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3
Feb

Build of Android 5.0.1 Lollipop for Samsung Galaxy Note Edge leaks


samsung_galaxy_note_edge_lollipop_xda

Even newer devices that have been on the market for just a few months are without any form of Android 5.0 Lollipop. While we know why the Galaxy Note 4 has been slow to receiving the update, nothing has been said regarding the Galaxy Note Edge. The likely reason would be that it is taking Samsung a lot of time to tailor the software for the curved portion of the display. Fortunately for those tired of waiting, a build of Android 5.0.1 for the Galaxy Note Edge has leaked.

Everything is pretty much how you would expect it to be. TouchWiz is here to stay and elements of Lollipop are present. On XDA, it is noted that the build is a beta and that means issues can be found. Right now, the frequency of the Snapdragon 805 processor is not correct and requires users to manually set it to 3000MHz upon flashing the build.

It is an official build (XXU1BOA2); therefore, following directions will not cause your warranty to be rendered useless. It is available for both SM-N915FY and SM-915F variants of the Galaxy Note Edge.

Source: XDA
Via: Phone Arena

Come comment on this article: Build of Android 5.0.1 Lollipop for Samsung Galaxy Note Edge leaks

3
Feb

You can now get the Alcatel OneTouch Idol Mini for just $99.99


onetouchidolmini

Alcatel OneTouch recently launched its own online store in the U.S. to cater to a new audience. And today, you can get one of its popular budget offerings for just $99.99 unlocked and off contract. This is a sweet deal even for a budget device and will be valid until the 9th of February.

For the price, you’re getting a 4.3 inch display sporting a resolution of 480 x 854, a 5-megapixel camera on the back, 8GB of internal storage, 512MB of RAM, 4G compatibility, a dual core 1.3 GHz MediaTek MT6572 chipset, Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and a 1,700 mAh battery.

Compatible 4G networks include AT&T, T-Mobile, Straight Talk, MetroPCS and several others, so you have a multitude of providers to choose from.

Since Alcatel OneTouch has teamed up with Amazon in the U.S., Prime customers can get free two-day shipping on the handset. Head over to the link below for more details on the OneTouch Idol Mini.

Source: Alcatel OneTouch USA
Via: Android Central

Come comment on this article: You can now get the Alcatel OneTouch Idol Mini for just $99.99

3
Feb

11 best Android media center apps


XBMC Kodi best Android media center apps
Turning an Android device into a media center is a somewhat difficult task. There isn’t a lot available and Android as a whole doesn’t always play nice with what’s available. However, there are some apps that can help you along the way. Let’s take a look at the best Android media center apps.


AllCast best Android media center appsAllCast

[Price: Free / $4.99]
First on our list is AllCast and it isn’t a media center on the face of it but it can act like one. You can keep your media on your Android device and with AllCast, stream it to practically anything including Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox 360 and One, and others. This essentially turns your phone into a media center that you can control and send content to your home TV screen at will. It’s a clean solution that requires little set up and you can pick up the AllCast Receiver app to turn any Android device into a device that AllCast can stream to.
Get it on Google Play


BubbleUPnP best android media center appsBubbleUPnP

[Price: Free / $4.69]
BubbleUPnP is a DLNA app that lets you stream your media to a variety of devices similar to AllCast. It works with Chromecast, DLNA TVs, most modern gaming consoles, and it also supports local playback. Much like AllCast, it’s not a media center on the face of it, but you can use it to manage and stream your media to practically anywhere straight from your Android device. A bonus is that you can also access media from other DLNA-enabled devices (e.g. your PC) and play media from them.
Get it on Google Play
bubbleupnp best android media center apps


localcast best Android media center appsLocalCast

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
LocalCast is another competitor in the DLNA-streaming space and, as such, also works well as a media center app. It supports the usual array of devices including gaming consoles, DLNA-enabled TVs, Chromecast, and others. You can also stream from some unusual places like Google Drive, Dropbox, and more so you can manage and stream your media without keeping it on your Android device. It’s a nifty app with some good features.
Get it on Google Play


matricom mediacenter best Android media center appsMatricom MediaCenter

[Price: Free]
Matricom MediaCenter is a fork off of XBMC and one of the few ways to get XBMC straight from the Google Play Store. It’s based on the latest build (Kodi) so you can expect to see all of the features (and issues) found in XBMC’s Kodi. It’s a good alternative media center, especially for fans of XBMC. It says that it only officially supports the Matricom G-Box Q, but I was able to install it on all of my current devices. That said, it may not be available for all devices. There is also a matching launcher you can install for a full experience.
Get it on Google Play
matricom mediacenter best Android media center apps


media browser for Android best Android media center appsMedia Browser for Android

[Price: Free]
Media Browser for Android is a basic media center-style application. With it you can browse your media and the app will pull information about it in order to make more in depth. It requires a media server set up that’s very similar to Plex which means it can be installed and will work across multiple devices. The interface is basic, but effective, and it’s a good alternative to Plex when it comes to a media center and media streaming setup.
Get it on Google Play
media browser for android best Android media center apps


Mizuu best Android media center appsMizuu

[Price: Free]
Mizuu is a more classic media center app that manages your on-device media and also some places where you can stream content such as YouTube and TED Talks. It features a Material Design inspired interface that made headlines not long ago. It used to be a paid app but it recently went completely free so you can try it out without spending a dime. It has one of the best interfaces of any app on this list and if all you need is local media management, this is a great option.
Get it on Google Play
Mizuu best Android media center apps


my media center best Android media center appsMy Media Center

[Price: Free]
My Media Center is an interesting application because it integrates so many various functions. It manages your local media but you can also connect your TV services (using compatible devices) and use the app as a DVR. It cannot stream live TV or recorded TV but it does allow you to manage your TV from your Android device. This includes a universal search so you can find the stuff you want, the aforementioned DVR scheduling, and then, of course, your local media is integrated in. It’s a fun app with a lot of potential to be an all-in-one sort of solution.
Get it on Google Play


Plex best Android media center appsPlex for Android

[Price: Free / $4.99 for the app. $4.99/month, $39.99/year, $149.99 lifetime for Plex Pass subscription]
Plex is known as one of the premiere media browsers available. You have to set up a media center on your PC which is surprisingly easy but after that you can stream media from your PC to your Android devices, TV, gaming consoles, and a lot more. The paid version of the app is fairly useful but the best features are in the Plex Pass subscription which actually allows you to use gaming consoles and lets you stream from literally anywhere with an Internet connection. The interface is quite lovely and functional as well.
Get it on Google Play


remote media center hd best Android media center appsRemote Media Center HD

[Price: Free with in app purchases]
Remote Media Center HD is a bit different because its point is to communicate strictly with your PC. That lowers the potential points of failure and simplifies things for people who only need to engage with media on their computer. It also has some features similar to My Media Center where you can search the EPG grid (TV) and schedule DVR recordings. You can even use it as a remote. It does take a little bit of set up and know-how to get it to work flawlessly but it is still a solid option.
Get it on Google Play


VLC best android media center appsVLC for Android

[Price: Free]
VLC for Android is a long time favorite media player for desktop and laptop users and the Android variant became stable at the end of 2014 so mobile users can enjoy it as well. It plays music and videos from a vast number of codecs and even allows you to stream video content if you have the URL for it. It has a media center style interface which makes it a light and solid option for people looking to manage their local content with a few extra features tossed in for good measure. It’s also totally free and easy to use.
Get it on Google Play


xbmc kodi best Android media center appsXBMC (official)

[Price: Free]
XBMC has been a popular media center option on a ton of devices for many, many years and it’s getting better on Android all the time. You can get the latest Kodi stable builds for your Android device with the only hiccup being that it’s not actually available in the Google Play Store. You’ll have to download and sideload this application on your own. XBMC is a full featured media center that manages your DLNA media, your local media, and there are a host of plugins that let you access all sorts of other content. It’s trusted by many but it does require a little bit of know-how to set up so prepare for that.
You can find the installation instructions and download links for XBMC by clicking here
XBMC Kodi best Android media center apps


Wrap up

If we missed any awesome Android media center apps, let us know in the comments!

To see our complete list of Android apps and games lists, click here!



3
Feb

Great, another ‘solution’ to your smartphone’s terrible battery life


If you want your smartphone to last longer without carrying flammable gas in your pocket, there may possibly, conceivably be new battery tech coming soon (maybe). Yep, we’re skeptical after many a disappointingbreakthrough,” but an MIT spinoff company called SolidEnergy claims it has developed a new type of lithium-ion battery that can store more energy and still survive hundreds of charging cycles. It resorted to a method that’s been tried before: replacing the usual graphite electrodes with lithium metal. Previous attempts failed, however, because such electrodes react with the battery’s electrolyte, forming “dendrites” that cause tiny problems like explosions.

To counter that, the researchers developed a thin lithium electrode and an electrolyte that has both solid and liquid parts. Unlike regular liquid electrolytes, it’s non-flammable, and has additives to prevent dendrite formation. The company claims that prototype batteries using the tech can store double the power by weight while still retaining 80 percent of their storage capacity after 300 charges. That’s pretty close to current lithium ion cells for portable electronics, but still considerably less than the durability required for EVs. The company said its tech could easily be adapted to current battery manufacturing techniques.

We’re still unconvinced, but SolidEnergy may unthaw our cynical hearts if it can pull off its ambitious schedule. It plans to release its first batteries for portable electronics by 2016 and roll out models for electric cars the following year. But as MIT Technology Review points out, the road from “nice prototype” to “actual battery you can buy” is littered with a lot of corpses.

Filed under: Science

Comments

Source: MIT Technology Review

3
Feb

ARM unveils Cortex A72 processor architecture, coming in 2016


ARM, the company responsible for practically every mobile processor base design in Android devices, just took the wraps off of a new chip design today. Called the ARM Cortex A72, the new reference chip is claimed to sport twice the performance of its Cortex A57 chip, as well as 3.5 times the performance of 2014’s Cortex A15. Additionally, ARM says the new design also reduces energy consumption by 75 percent over last year’s devices.

3
Feb

ARM unveils Cortex A72 processor architecture, coming in 2016


ARM, the company responsible for practically every mobile processor base design out there, just took the wraps off of a new chip design today. Called the ARM Cortex A72, the new reference chip is claimed to sport twice the performance of its Cortex A57 chip, as well as 3.5 times the performance of 2014’s Cortex A15. Additionally, ARM says the new design also reduces energy consumption by 75 percent over last year’s devices.

3
Feb

ARM unveils Cortex A72 processor architecture, coming in 2016


ARM, the company responsible for practically every mobile processor base design out there, just took the wraps off of a new chip design today. Called the ARM Cortex A72, the new reference chip is claimed to sport twice the performance of its Cortex A57 chip, as well as 3.5 times the performance of 2014’s Cortex A15. Additionally, ARM says the new design also reduces energy consumption by 75 percent over last year’s devices.

3
Feb

Soccer Player Manager Android app Review



Being from the UK, I’m a big fan of soccer (or football as we call it), which means I have a particular liking for soccer manager simulation games and I was recently given the opportunity to review Soccer Player Manager by MobTwo.

Soccer Player Manager is your typical soccer management simulation type game, with the developer comparing akin to the popular Championship Manager type of games you’re probably familiar with. What sets this app apart is that you can play as the manager or as a player manager (of which the mode is coming soon).

With that said, Soccer Player Manager is in Beta, so certain features (like the player manager mode) is not yet active, but it does give a good indication of where the app is heading.

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All the features you’d expect to find in a soccer management app are there – you can arrange your squad, transfer players in and out, manage finances, sign up sponsors, and assign team training. The game is fast-paced as well, with 3 league matches per day to give 19 matches total; 1 week is equal to 1 league season.

The graphics of Soccer Player Manager are very basic, but the underlying mechanics of the game are there. With some refinement to the graphics and presentation of some of the features, Soccer Player Manager stands a real chance of becoming a go-to app for soccer management simulation.

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The app is supported by in-app purchases which can be used to refill your energy that gets depleted when playing games, but otherwise the app is easily free to play.

With that said, the game is still in development and is clearly in Beta; I was constantly reminded of this in the app with timeout errors and, as mentioned, features being unavailable. Soccer Player Manager is a good start, but definitely needs some work.


The post Soccer Player Manager Android app Review appeared first on AndroidGuys.

3
Feb

Motorola ships record 10M units over last quarter



Things are definitely looking up for Motorola as the company today announces a new record in shipments. Over the three month period ending on December 31, 2014, Motorola moved 10 million units. That’s up 118 percent year over year and the first time ever eclipsing the mark.

Now, to be fair, this can include the mobile phone business, Android tablets and TVs. What’s more, this is shipments and not sales. However, getting beyond that, it is a record for Motorola and they’ve just now broken into the Chinese market. Thanks to a device lineup that includes variations of the Moto X, Moto G, and Moto E, the next few quarters could be quite fun for the crew at Lenovo/Motorola.

Lenovo (PDF)


The post Motorola ships record 10M units over last quarter appeared first on AndroidGuys.

3
Feb

iOS 8 Adoption Rate Hits 72% As Android Lollipop Distribution Reaches 1.6%


Apple’s newest operating system, iOS 8, is installed on 72 percent of iOS devices almost five months after it first launched in September of 2014, according to new numbers Apple shared on its App Store support page for developers.

Installation numbers are up 9 percent since mid-December and have jumped 3 percent since January 20, following the launch of iOS 8.1.3 at the end of the month. As iOS 8 adoption grows, the number of users running iOS 7 has dropped to 25 percent. 3 percent of users continue to use an earlier operating system.

ios8adoption
iOS 8 adoption has been somewhat slower than iOS 7 adoption, as iOS 7 was running on 80 percent of devices in January of 2014, compared to iOS 8’s 69 percent adoption rate at that same time. Possible explanations for the slower adoption rate include the large amount of storage space required to update to iOS 8 and the major bugs the operating system has experienced. Excitement over iOS 7’s complete visual redesign may have also driven a larger number of upgrades.

Apple has resolved many of the initial bugs that were found in iOS 8 with several operating system updates, including iOS 8.1, iOS 8.1.1, iOS 8.1.2, and iOS 8.1.3, which has led to an uptick in adoption, and the company has also made an effort to inform customers that it’s possible to install iOS 8 via iTunes to alleviate storage space issues.

Though adoption of iOS 8 has been slower than iOS 7 adoption rates, Apple is still way ahead of Android. The latest version of Android (5.0, aka Lollipop), released in November, is currently only installed on 1.6 percent of Android devices. The vast majority of Android users are still running KitKat, which was released in October 2013, or even Jelly Bean, which first debuted in June 2012.

androidadoption
Android updates often take a long time to propagate to customers because of the large number of different Android-based devices on the market. Android updates must go through carriers and cell phone manufacturers, who like to build their own apps and interfaces into the operating system.



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