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Posts tagged ‘T-Mobile’

19
Sep

Teen claims you can get free T-Mobile data through a proxy


One teen may have just achieved the dream of every cost-conscious wireless user: free, no-strings-attached mobile data. High school student Jacob Ajit claims to have discovered a trick that gets you all the T-Mobile data you want by using a proxy server. Reportedly, T-Mobile doesn’t block sites with “/speedtest” in the address when you’ve run out of data on prepaid service. If you use the proxy to make it look like every site link has that text, you can surf to your heart’s content at no charge beyond what it cost to get the SIM. Before you ask: sorry, folks, Ajit’s proxy is down.

We’ve asked T-Mobile about the workaround, and we’ll let you know if it can verify its authenticity and say what it’s doing in response. With that said, Ajit is quick to acknowledge that his technique’s effectiveness is likely short-lived at best. It’d be trivially easy for the Uncarrier to restrict access, and it won’t be surprising if the hole is completely closed by the time you read this (assuming it was truly open to begin with). You’d also need the wherewithal to set up and use a proxy in the first place. Look at it this way, though: if nothing else, the stunt shows that even big telecoms make simple mistakes.

Via: Ars Technica

Source: Jacob Ajit (Medium)

16
Sep

T-Mobile tells iPhone owners not to install iOS 10 just yet


T-Mobile issued a stern warning to its customers against downloading and installing the new iOS 10 update to their existing 6, 6 Plus and SE iPhone models. According to the T-Mobile website, doing so will, cause the handset to “lose connectivity [to the T-Mobile network] in certain circumstances.” Once that happens, the user can only re-establish their network connection by fully powering down the phone and restarting it. That said, the company does expect Apple to push a corrective patch live within the next 48 hours.

Via: Verge

Source: T-Mobile

16
Sep

T-Mobile Tells Customers Not to Install iOS 10 on iPhone 6, 6 Plus, and SE


T-Mobile CEO John Legere says T-Mobile customers who own an iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, or iPhone SE should not install Apple’s iOS 10 update, released on Tuesday. According to Legere, iOS 10 is causing those three iPhone models to lose connection to the T-Mobile network.

Legere’s comments come following customer complaints that started circulating following T-Mobile’s latest carrier update, 25.1. It was initially believed the problem was the carrier update on T-Mobile’s end, but Legere says that’s not the case.

Apple is working to resolve the issue with iOS10 for @TMobile customers. Don’t download iOS10 if you currently use an iPhone 5SE, 6 or 6+

— John Legere (@JohnLegere) September 15, 2016

Apple is working to resolve the problem, but in the meantime, customers should avoid the update. T-Mobile has offered a fix for those who have already updated to iOS 10 and are experiencing connectivity issues – restart. According to the company, the only way to resume connectivity is to restart the iPhone each time that it loses connection.

Apple is expected to have a fix ready in the next 24 to 48 hours.

Tag: T-Mobile
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15
Sep

iOS 10 Carrier Updates Causing Issues for T-Mobile Users in U.S., Telstra Users in Australia


The combination of upgrading to iOS 10 and installing the latest carrier updates appears to be causing issues for some T-Mobile and Telstra customers in the United States and Australia respectively, crowdsourced information suggests.

A number of T-Mobile and MetroPCS customers claim that once their iPhone loses service temporarily, the device is unable to reestablish a cellular connection unless it is fully restarted or network settings are reset. The issue appears to have started after the latest 25.1 carrier update on iPhones running iOS 10.

MacRumors reader GCHASE1995:

Anyone on T-Mobile that has done the carrier update to 25.1, have you been getting no service? I can’t get service at all. I can get it, if I reset network settings. Then if I lose service I can’t get it back.

Reddit user Hitokill:

I am in the same boat as many others. If I can stay connected to the LTE network the 25.1 update is fine. However, I work in a building with certain areas that have no coverage. Once I walk in those areas and lose signal, then walk to an area where I normally have full bars I can’t get it back on no matter what I do (hard reset, Airplane Mode, etc…) The only fix I found was going into settings and Reset Network Settings. Totally sucks but that is basically what I have to do. T-Mobile rep said he did something on his end too, but didn’t fix the issue when it came back.

Meanwhile, several Telstra customers in Australia report that Visual Voicemail no longer works after updating to iOS 10 and installing the latest carrier update. “I have no indication that a voicemail has been left and nothing shows up in the voicemail section,” wrote one user. “Voicemails are definitely being left though.”

It is unclear if Apple is aware of these issues, but they will likely be resolved in a future software or carrier update.

Tags: T-Mobile, Telstra
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13
Sep

iPhone 7 Broke T-Mobile’s All-Time Sales Record on Pre-Order Day


Apple opened pre-orders for iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus last Friday at 12:01 a.m. Pacific Time, and T-Mobile has now revealed that the smartphones shattered all of the carrier’s previous iPhone pre-order records. T-Mobile said pre-orders from Friday through Monday were up nearly 4x compared to the iPhone 6 series two years ago.

T-Mobile also announced the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus set a single day sales record for any smartphones ever in the carrier’s history, although it stopped short of sharing any specific numbers. iPhone 7 was already T-Mobile’s top pre-registered smartphone ever, topping pre-registrations for both iPhone 6s and iPhone 6.

iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will be available beginning September 16 at T-Mobile stores in the U.S. and on its website. Its prepaid brand MetroPCS customers will carry the smartphones beginning September 23. iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus models from AT&T and T-Mobile do not support CDMA networks such as Verizon and Sprint.

T-Mobile is offering a free 32GB iPhone 7 to new or existing customers who trade in their fully functional iPhone 6 or later sans water damage or a shattered screen. A two-year financing agreement is required.

Tag: T-Mobile
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11
Sep

The best places to buy and sell a used iPhone


By Jackie Dove

With a new iPhone arriving soon, many people will look to sell their old iPhone for some quick cash. But which places offer the best return and the smoothest process? To find out, Tom’s Guide tested seven services that buy and sell used iPhones.

To find out where you can expect the best return on your dollar, we bought an iPhone from each reseller service and then turned around and re-sold that phone to same service where it came from. We also rated each service on their convenience, ease of use and responsiveness to come up with our rankings.

The key takeaways from our testing:

  • Glyde and Swappa top our rankings of the best places to buy and sell a used phone.
  • Walmart and Best Buy finished at the bottom.
  • We resold our iPhones for an average of 52 percent of what we had paid for them.
  • We got the highest rate of return from marketplace services that connect smartphone buyers with sellers; the worst return came from big-box retailers.

How we tested

To best measure how much return you can expect from iPhone resellers, we selected services that both buy and sell used iPhones, evaluating seven. In addition to Glyde and Swappa, we also looked at Amazon, Best Buy, GameStop, Gazelle and Walmart. We bought a used iPhone from each service, and then — without activating or using our newly purchased phone — sold the same model back to the seller where we purchased it.

From most resellers, we bought a 16GB iPhone 6. We purchased a 16GB iPhone 6 Plus from Amazon and GameStop due to availability issues, though we stuck with iPhones released in 2014 to get comparable quotes from resellers. Also, due to availability, some of the iPhones we purchased were tied to specific carriers, which we’ve noted below. In our experience, unlocked phones not tied to any one carrier generally fetch higher prices (though AT&T and Verizon phones have a high resale value, too).

MORE: The Best iOS Apps You’re Not Using

As you might expect, there’s a gap between what resellers will charge you for an iPhone and what they’re willing to pay out when you try selling that same phone back. Just like with cars that depreciate the moment you drive them off the lot, that iPhone you’re hoping to unload will never recoup its value. In our testing, resellers make their money by buying low and selling high.

When ranking these seven services, in addition to measuring how much we got back when reselling an iPhone, we also took the entire process into account. Were the instructions easy to follow? How quickly did it take to get a quote on our iPhone? Did the reseller offer cash or store credit? And how promptly did we receive that cash or credit after completing the sale?

Glyde: Our top pick

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 (AT&T)
What we paid: $359.50
What we got back: $265.60
Rate of return: 74 percent
Cash or credit: Cash and bitcoin
Pros: Best rate of return; Clear explanation of policies with explicit breakdown of fees; Option to wait for a better price; Can verify your identity via PayPal; Flexible payment options
Cons: You’re not required to post a verification photo, a step that can help weed out scammers.

Glyde offers a straightforward, colorful and easy-to-navigate website where you can find an assortment of second-hand iPhones as well as Android models from Samsung, HTC, LG and others. To sell my iPhone 6, all I needed to do was select the website’s Sell tab and type in the phone’s model number, carrier, color and condition. Several questions from Glyde covered details about physical appearance and scratches, personalization, and whether I had included accessories like a power adapter and cable.

Note that prices can change, often from day to day. After trying a dry run, I went back to Glyde to re-enter information about the phone I was trying to sell, and the market price had dropped to $316 from $326.

The market price is what the buyer is going to pay, not the amount I would pocket. Glyde charges a 15-percent transaction fee, while a kit with packaging to ship off your phone will cost you $3. Glyde was the most transparent service when it came to spelling out fees. I wound up collecting $265.60. (That amount would have been $274.10 if I had stuck with the quote from my dry run.) That’s still the highest percentage of return from any vendor we tested, as we got back 74 percent of what we paid for the iPhone.

MORE: Upgrading to the iPhone 7? Read This Before You Do

While I was disappointed with the price drop over two days, I decided to take my profit immediately and hit the List for Sale button. From there, you type in information about the phone, enter your email and Glyde account password, and verify your identity with your credit card or PayPal account. Click the button, and your item is listed. You can post your listing on Facebook, Twitter and Google + right from Glyde’s page.

Two days after I listed my phone for sale, a buyer bit and then reneged within an hour; Glyde notified me via email about both events. The next day, another person offered to buy, which I quickly confirmed. A packing box arrived in the mail, with a prepaid label; all I had to do was drop the package into the nearest mailbox. Three days after the buyer receives and accepts the phone, Glyde posts the money into your account. From there, you can transfer the cash to your bank account, opt for Bitcoin payment or have a check mailed to you for a $2 fee.

Swappa: Runner-Up

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 (Verizon)
What we paid: $465
What we got back: $325
Rate of return: 70 percent
Cash or credit: Cash
Pros: Posted items are approved quickly by Swappa; Ability to adjust listing; Solid rate of return; Added protection via PayPal purchases
Cons: Time-consuming process required for shooting photos of your phone; Agreeing to an immediate trade will lower your rate of return; Mandatory $10 PayPal transaction fee.

Swappa — as in “you wanna swappa?” — is an electronics website that features a fun interface for selling several dozen brands of phones, including Android devices as well as the iPhone. Just type in the specific search term to find the model you want to sell, and if it appears, you get an immediate idea of how much cash you’ll get.

My Verizon-tied iPhone cost $465, and from the site’s initial offer, I would have pocketed up to $307 in cash, which came to 66 percent of the total I paid for the device. Swappa also gave me the choice of selling my phone for from $340 to $559 if I wanted to wait for a better deal. I opted for a better return — and to take the deal, I had to register, either through Facebook or Google+ or via email and password.

It took longer to get my listing up on Swappa than it did with other sites. The process requires you to shoot a verification photo of the phone and its accessories using a specific, rather low-tech approach. You have to set up your shots with the site’s verification number handwritten on a piece of paper next to the phone, and then powerup the phone you’re reselling, so the screen is lit when you take your picture. You repeat the process with any included accessories. The idea is to prevent scams, and Swappa at least offers ample instruction on how to take your picture.

MORE: The Best iPhone 7 Carrier Deals

After I took the photos, Swappa took 15 minutes to verify and approve my entry. From there, it’s a matter of waiting for someone to buy your phone. If you’ve tried to get a higher price, you can revise your listing to Swappa’s lower price, which I did after waiting three days. The phone sold only after I settled on a new price: $335, which netted me $325 once I took into account a mandatory PayPal transaction fee.

That PayPal fee is the only cost — there’s no fee to sell on Swappa — and using PayPal to handle transactions felt safer than having to punch in credit card information. Swappa reviews and approves all listings before buyers can see them. Swappy promptly answered my questions about my listing when I sent queries via email and posted them to Swappa’s Facebook page. When my phone sold, I was notified that money had been deposited in my PayPal account, after which I had two days to mail out the phone.

As an extra added layer of protection, anyone who sells a stolen phone, or one with a damaged screen or water damage violates Swappa’s terms of use, giving buyers recourse through PayPal.

Gazelle

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 (Verizon)
What we paid: $406
What we got back: $210
Rate of return: 52 percent
Cash or credit: Both
Pros: Quick and easy resale process; Multiple options for getting paid for your device; Inspection processensures quality selection of phones on sale.
Cons: Middle-of-the-road payment for trade-ins, compared to other resellers.

Gazelle has an attractive site that makes it easy to get started with your sale: The company trades in iPhones and Samsung Galaxy models as well as Android devices from HTC, Nokia, LG and others that cover the four major carriers.

If you take Gazelle’s offer on your phone, you have a choice of payment via Amazon gift card (which adds an extra 5 percent to your total), PayPal, charitable donation or standard check delivered within 10 days of Gazelle verifying the phone’s condition. Customers buy your phone from Gazelle, not you directly, and the company inspects the device before selling it as certified pre-owned to guarantee the condition. To ensure buyers are satisfied, there is a 30-day return policy.

After you enter your email address and a minimum amount of information about the phone’s brand, capacity and physical condition, you do not have to wait for a buyer — just accept the Gazelle offer, box up the phone and choose how you want to be paid.

As a reseller, Gazelle will appeal most if you want to unload your phone quickly and would like some options for how you’ll be reimbursed. We got back only half of the value of the iPhone we had bought, though.

Amazon

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 Plus (unlocked)
What we paid: $549.99
What we got back: $265
Rate of return: 48 percent
Cash or credit: Amazon gift card
Pros: Process is clearly explained; Trade-in offer is immediate; Amazon offers free mailing label for sending in your phone.
Cons: Prices paid are fairly low; You’re restricted to store credit; Trade-in links can be hard to find.

To sell your old smartphone on Amazon’s massive website — which appears to sell a huge variety of almost every brand imaginable — requires an eagle eye and some clicking around to find the right path. In the end, typing the exact item into Amazon’s search box, clicking on a result and finding the trade-in link on the page was the quickest way to get an estimate.

For an iPhone 6 Plus that we bought for $549.99 from the e-commerce giant, Amazon offered $265 in trade — less than half of what we paid. While your phone’s appearance and condition may be acceptable to you, Amazon reserves the right to inspect the device and asks straightaway if you will accept a lower price or if you want the phone sent back if your price and Amazon’s don’t match. After my phone passed inspection, Amazon deposited the proceeds of my gift card directly into my account.

The company’s trade-in program offers an Amazon gift card in exchange for your used phone. If you don’t mind registering as an Amazon seller — which involves entering credit card and tax info — you can sell your phone on Amazon’s individual seller marketplace. But that’s a lot of hoops to jump through for a one-time sale, especially when the gift card can be used to buy any of the hundreds of thousands of things Amazon sells on its site.

GameStop

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 Plus (AT&T)
What we paid: $459.99
What we got back: $240
Rate of return: 52 percent
Cash or credit: Both
Pros: Choice between cash or store credit; Simple process; In-store staff were helpful and professional during our testing.
Cons: Middling return on the value of our phone; Requires a visit to a brick-and-mortar store to complete your sale.

GameStop takes a different approach than other resellers because of its focus on games. While some resellers offer a mix of cash and credit, GameStop customers may be more inclined to trade in their phones for store credit in games, VR headsets and gaming systems, in addition to the refurbished iPhones and Samsung Galaxy models available on the GameStop site. The transaction is straightforward except for one thing: The final turnover of your phone for cash or gift cards must be done in person.

The website offers a list of the phone types GameStop accepts for trade. A working iPhone 6 Plus that has no missing parts, cracks or dents will trade or get cash totaling $240. That’s a little more than 52 percent of the $459.99 we had paid GameStop for the same phone the previous month. A damaged phone will trade for $95, while a dead phone gets $25.

My trade-in experience took just 15 minutes, as the pleasant and efficient clerk behind the counter tested the phone and looked up records. I walked out with a $240 gift card.
GameStop lets you search for stores within a 15-mile radius of your zip code. If there’s no retail outlet near you, you’ll want to turn to a different reseller.

Walmart

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 (Straight Talk)
What we paid: $369
What we got back: $125
Rate of return: 34 percent
Cash or credit: Credit
Pros: Simple transaction requiring little information; Free shipping label supplied.
Cons: Very low return on resales; Limited to in-store credit.

You’ll find plenty of phones available for sale at Walmart, including contract, unlocked and refurbished phones available for the major carriers as well as the retailer’s in-house Straight Talk network. What you won’t find is the option to get cash back for your phone. It’s store credit and no negotiating.

It’s easy enough to go through the process, using the Gadgets for Gift Cards link. The used iPhone 6 we bought from Walmart netted a $125 offer, 34 percent of what we paid, which was the lowest return from any reseller. Interestingly, the phone was tied to Straight Talk. Had we tried selling back an unlocked phone or one tied to AT&T or Verizon, Walmart would have given us $160 in credit.

Once you approve Walmart’s appraisal, just log in to your account or create a new account with your email and mailing address. Walmart offers a printed label that you can use to pack up your phone and send it in. After that, just wait for your gift card to arrive via email, which it did within three days of receiving my phone.

Best Buy

What we bought: Space Gray iPhone 6 (AT&T)
What we paid: $599.99
What we got back: $208
Rate of return: 35 percent
Cash or credit: Gift Card
Pros: Trade-in process is simple, if you have no questions; Trade-ins at the store are handled efficiently by friendly staff.
Cons: Long wait times for answering questions on Best Buy’s 800-number; Low rate of return.

Best Buy has a busy website that features a vast variety of iPhones and flavors of Android phones for sale. But it’s still fairly easy to find the place to trade in your older iPhone. If you do, be prepared to accept payment in credit. Like Walmart and Amazon, Best Buy doesn’t deal in cash for phone trade-ins.

We paid $599.99 for an iPhone 6 that arrived in a sealed box (for an iPhone 6s oddly) but with no earbuds included, the only used phone we bought that was missing an item. That didn’t affect my trade-in price; when I turned in my iPhone for resale, the Best Buy clerk said I didn’t need to include accessories. But Best Buy’s offer was the second-lowest return from any reseller: just a $208 gift card, or 35 percent of what we paid for the iPhone.

MORE: Best Cellphone Plans for Your Money

Getting a quote from Best Buy’s website is simple enough. All I had to do was list the phone’s color, carrier and condition to get a trade-in value that I could redeem in person or by mail. Getting answers to questions proved more difficult. I called Best Buy’s toll-free number to ask about the missing earbuds and an issue with the phone’s IMEI number, and waited 20 minutes and through three transfers before I was told it would be a better idea to do my trade-in at a store. That took a much more efficient 15 minutes.

Other options

You don’t necessarily need to go through a reseller or e-commerce marketplace to unload your aging iPhone. Certainly, Craigslist offers the opportunity to find a willing buyer, and depending on your negotiating skills, you may be able to get a bigger return than you would from a reseller who’s going to offer you a set price.

That said, handling a sale on your own can be a hassle, and there’s always the risk of running into scammers. A reseller or reputable marketplace removes a lot of the headaches and potential risks.

If you’re planning on using the money you get from trading in your phone to finance the purchase of a new phone and you’re committed to a specific wireless carrier, you may want to see what that carrier will offer you for your old phone. Verizon offered us the best quote on an iPhone 6, with a $265 trade-in value. AT&T quoted us a price of $200 for a 16GB iPhone 6, while T-Mobile and Sprint offered $191 and $159, respectively. Those quotes assume a phone is in excellent condition, and the amounts can vary based on which carrier your old phone is tied to. You receive the trade-in value in the form of credit or a gift card.

Where to buy a used phone

Our testing of reseller services focused primarily on selling a used iPhone, because that’s where you’re likely to experience the greatest amount of variance, from the money you get back for your phone to the simplicity of the resale process. In contrast, shopping for a used iPhone from these sites is a pretty similar experience, though there are a few differences worth noting.

In terms of selection, you’ll generally find each service offers a wide degree of smartphone models and capacities. In our search for a used iPhone 6, we found that models tied to AT&T and Verizon were plentiful while T-Mobile and Sprint devices were in shorter supply. Amazon, Glyde and Swappa offered the widest range of phones in terms of carriers and capacities.

Used iPhone shoppers will find the best range of prices at Swappa, though lower-priced phones are likely to have been well-used. Glyde, Gazelle, GameStop and Amazon also offer attractive pricing on used phones depending on what model you’re looking for.

We found it easiest to shop for a used iPhone at Glyde and Swappa, which conveniently group iPhone models together, allowing you to drill down to the version you want. Despite its wide selection, Amazon offers very cluttered search results; type in iPhone 6, and you’re just as likely to get entries for the 6s, 6s Plus and 6 Plus as you are for the model you want. Walmart and Best Buy feature helpful filters for removing superfluous search results.

We should note that we ran into one quirk when buying our phones from Glyde and GameStop, though that’s likely a result of how we ordered our iPhones. Because we bought our phones through our corporate office and shipped them to an editor at another location, both Glyde and GameStop flagged our initial purchases, requiring us to set up a PayPal account to complete the deals. Most shoppers won’t run into that problem, though it could flare up if you’re buying a used phone as a gift for someone who has a different address than yours.

More from Tom’s Guide:

  • Walmart, Best Buy Offer Worst iPhone Trade-in Deals
  • The Best and Worst iPhone Trade-In Deals
  • iPhone 7 vs iPhone 7 Plus: What Should You Buy?
  • Why You Shouldn’t Get the iPhone 7
  • iPhone 7 Camera Tech: Can Apple Be the Best Again?
10
Sep

iPhone 7 trade-in programs require two-year contracts


If you’re looking to get your hands on an iPhone 7 in the coming weeks but wasn’t fast enough to secure one when preorders open, there’s still hope. All four major phone carriers have implemented their own iPhone 7 promotions, but despite their seemingly generous offers, there are quite a few caveats that might keep you from cashing in.

All the carriers (Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint and AT&T) are offering special trade-in programs that read nearly exactly the same in print, with differing names the only real thing that separates them. The deal is such that if you trade in your qualifying iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus, you’ll receive credit across 24 months toward your purchase of an iPhone 7.

There aren’t too many stipulations when it comes to the device you can trade in, except for the fact that it must be in “good working and cosmetic condition,” and you’ll only receive a credit of $650 toward the phone of your choice.

It may take a few cycles for the credit to show up, which is normal, but the iffy part is this: You have to keep your line active for a full two years.

While companies like Verizon touted the abolition of contracts, they still seem to be in vogue, just under a different name, “savings” in this situation. The deal may technically make your new iPhone 7 free, but you’re paying with it with your time as a customer at the carrier of your choice.

It doesn’t render the promotion useless by any means, but it does demonstrate the fact that carriers are still pushing many of the same ideas they were when they were still running with contracts. They’re just framing it differently. It’s still a good deal if you want to trade in your existing phone and have no qualms with staying with your current provider, but make no bones about it: it’s still a contract, even if it’s not in name.

Via: 9to5Mac

9
Sep

iPhone 7 Models From AT&T and T-Mobile Do Not Support CDMA Networks


Choosing which iPhone model to purchase this year should be more carefully considered, as both AT&T and T-Mobile models of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus do not support CDMA networks such as Verizon and Sprint in the United States. Apple confirmed the matter in fine print in the iPhone 7 tech specs and on its LTE page.

A customer that purchases an iPhone 7 from Apple’s website and selects AT&T as their carrier, for example, would be unable to later use the smartphone on Verizon, Sprint, or any other CDMA network, even if the device is unlocked. By comparison, all iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus models worked on both GSM and CDMA networks.

A customer that purchases an iPhone 7 from Apple’s website and selects Verizon as their carrier, on the other hand, would also be able to use the smartphone on AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, or any other GSM or CDMA network. This essentially means iPhone 7 models from Verizon or Sprint are closer to being a true “world-phone.”

It was previously reported that Apple would switch to Intel modems for select iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus models, including AT&T models, and Intel modems do not support the CDMA standard in the United States. That is likely the reason why AT&T and T-Mobile models are limited to GSM networks.

iphone-7-wirelessOnly Verizon and Sprint models support both GSM and CDMA networks
The same report said Qualcomm would supply modems for the remaining iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus units, including Verizon and Chinese models, and this appears to be the case. Qualcomm modems support both the GSM and CDMA standard, which explains why the iPhone 7 from Verizon and Sprint will work on all carriers.

Qualcomm, which holds patents for WCDMA and CDMA2000 standards, is the main CDMA modem supplier in the United States. The company developed the first CDMA-based cellular base station in 1990, and since then it has licensed its technology to companies like Apple in return for royalty payments.

Until this year, Qualcomm was Apple’s exclusive supplier of modems for LTE and Wi-Fi connectivity, which explains why the iPhone 6s and previous generations supported both GSM and CDMA networks regardless of carrier. But with Intel entering the mix, choosing which iPhone to purchase is now more meaningful.

iphone-6s-wirelessAll iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus models supported both GSM and CDMA networks
The lack of CDMA support in iPhones with Intel modems may be short lived, fortunately, as Intel acquired CDMA assets from VIA Telecom in 2015. It is believed that this acquisition could pave the way for Intel to release its first LTE modem with both GSM and CDMA support as early as 2017 or 2018.

Ultimately, the most obvious choice should be to purchase a Verizon or Sprint model, even if you are an AT&T or T-Mobile customer, especially when considering resale value. However, some customers may have difficulty purchasing from another carrier, depending on their current status with their existing carrier.

Apple should also release an unlocked SIM-free model in the U.S., likely based on the Verizon/Sprint model, in a few weeks based on past launches.

Related Roundup: iPhone 7
Tags: Intel, Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T, Verizon, Qualcomm
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8
Sep

T-Mobile Offering Free 32GB iPhone 7 During Pre-Order With Trade-In


T-Mobile has announced that it will offer a free 32GB iPhone 7 during pre-order to new or existing customers when they trade in their iPhone 6, 6s, 6 Plus or 6s Plus. The offer is for a limited time and will be available at T-Mobile.com when pre-orders are live and T-Mobile retail stores.

The offer partially extends to other iPhone 7 models. For example, the 32GB iPhone 7 Plus is available for $120 with a trade-in, while the 128GB and 256GB iPhone 7 are available for $100 and $200, respectively.

To qualify for the offer, the trade-in iPhone has to be a 6, 6s, 6 Plus or 6s Plus and be able to turn on, have no water damage, and not have a shattered screen. Customers will also need a 24-month no-cost finance agreement. T-Mobile says that customers will see a credit on their bill every month for 24 months. After 24 months, T-Mobile says customers will have paid nothing and received a free iPhone 7.

Customers can walk away at any time by either paying their outstanding phone balance or turning in their iPhone 7.

AT&T has also announced a promo for the iPhone 7. New and existing DirecTV and AT&T U-verse customers can get a 32GB iPhone 7 on either AT&T Next or AT&T Next Every Year when they add a new line to their account from another wireless provider. Customers will receive up to $650 in monthly bill credits whey they activate their new iPhone. Similar to the T-Mobile offer, customers can choose another iPhone 7 model and pay the difference.

Related Roundup: iPhone 7
Tag: T-Mobile
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6
Sep

T-Mobile to increase its max LTE speeds to 400 Mbps


In the last few weeks, T-Mobile introduced its One plan for unlimited data and then tweaked it after customer complaints. For power users, T-Mobile’s claiming several tech advances that combine for a max download speed of 400 Mbps. But you’ll only get those blindingly fast rates using a Samsung Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge within one of 319 cities, and only after a pair of software updates by the end of October.

The first announced speed boost, 4×4 MIMO (multiple in, multiple out), alleges to double upload and download rates by increasing data paths between device and cell tower by twofold. According to T-Mobile’s post, that’s already active in 319 cities and will go live on the aforementioned Samsung phones after a software update later in September. This alone will double data speeds up and down.

But you’ll only get to that magic 400 Mbps max when using both new speed-augmenting technologies. The other one, 256 quadruple amplitude modulation (QAM) for downloads and 64 QAM for uploads, will be available nationwide with an end-of-October software update to supported phones. Like MIMO, it’s only available for Galaxy S7 and Edge, though more supported devices will be named later on.

Source: T-Mobile blog

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