Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Samsung Galaxy S6’

13
Feb

Here are the videos you don’t want to miss this week – February 13, 2016


lg g4 now aa (3 of 23)

2015 was a really great year for Android smartphones. The Nexus 6P, Samsung Galaxy S6, LG G4, Moto X Pure Edition are among a long list of great handsets that make little to no compromises. So with the Galaxy S7 and LG G5 on the horizon, it was only natural for us to take a look back at two of the best devices of last year – the Galaxy S6 and G4.

While Josh and Lanh were covering the flashback videos this week, Krystal went ahead and published her review of the Samsung Galaxy A9 (seriously, you need to watch it). Gary also brought us a great video explaining the ins and outs of CPU frequency scaling, and Jayce made a detailed video about the upcoming flagships of 2016.

Here are the Android-related videos you don’t want to miss this week.

Looking back at the flagships of 2015

LG G4… now

The LG G4 was one of the best Android handsets of 2015, and possibly of all time. It has an amazing camera, unique design and some powerful under-the-hood specs. How has it held up overtime? Don’t miss Josh’s LG G4 flashback video to learn more.

Samsung Galaxy S6… now

Like the G4, the Samsung Galaxy S6 was one of the best smartphones of this past year. And with the Galaxy S7 coming right around the corner, it’s definitely worth taking another look at the S6, and how it’s held up overtime. Check out Lanh’s Galaxy S6 flashback video attached above and full post below.

Samsung Galaxy A9 review

Samsung’s Galaxy A9 might not be available in all parts of the world, but it’s certainly a device worth talking about. It’s big, powerful, and sports a great fingerprint sensor – what more could you want? Be sure to check out Krystal’s wonderful review to learn all about the Galaxy A9.

A look at what’s to come in 2016

2015 was a great year for Android. The Samsung Galaxy S6, LG G4, Moto X Pure Edition and Nexus 6P are among the best Android handsets ever produced, which makes us excited to think about what’s to come in 2016. In this post, we’ve rounded up 6 of the smartphones we’re most looking forward to seeing in the year to come.

Android Apps Weekly

Microsoft buys SwiftKey, more Apple apps to come, Adventures of Mana! – you don’t want to miss the latest episode of Joe’s Android Apps Weekly show.

What is CPU frequency scaling?

There is a feature in Android (via the Linux kernel) which allows the clock frequency of the CPU to be varied. What is it and how does it work? Gary explains in this informative video and post.

Advertisements
11
Feb

Deal: Get a free Galaxy S6 with any other Galaxy flagship purchase at AT&T


samsung galaxy s6 active vs galaxy s6 and edge (18 of 20)

Dayum, this is a pretty sweet deal. AT&T is offering a free 32 GB Galaxy S6 to anyone that purchases a Galaxy S6, S6 Edge, S6 Edge+, S6 Active or Note 5 on an AT&T Next instalment plan. Both devices will need to be on a Next plan, but considering one of them is for free, it’s a pretty awesome offer.

If you’re not particularly keen on the Galaxy S6, AT&T is also offering the S6 Active as the free device, or up to $595 in monthly bill credits so you can choose any other eligible Galaxy device you like. The free S6 will need to be a new activation and you’ll have to pay the taxes on both devices upfront.

AT&T free Galaxy S6 offer AT&T

The offer isn’t available in Connecticut, Rhode Island or Miami-Dade and you need to keep both devices “in good standing” (that means pay your bill) for the first month before the monthly bill credits kick in after three bill cycles. The offer is available until March 31 (at least in Puerto Rico) and both handsets must be on Next plans of at least $70 per month. With the Galaxy S7 being unveiled in less than two weeks at MWC 2016, you know more deals like this are coming soon.

Buy one, get one free Galaxy S6 with AT&T

10
Feb

Marshmallow update arrives for Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge in Europe


galaxy-s6-marshmallow-thumb

The European Marshmallow update has finally begun for the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge. T-Mobile Poland tweeted to say the update was coming a couple of days ago and the first OTA updates are arriving as we speak. South Korean Galaxy owners only got the update two weeks ago, so things are moving quickly.


Android 6.0 marshmallow logo DSC_0126See also: Android 6.0 Marshmallow updates roundup – February 2, 2016106

As always in Europe, new Samsung firmware is typically soak-tested in either Poland or the Baltic states before rolling out to the larger Western European countries. Fortunately if you’re in Europe, you can simply grab the relevant unlocked firmware and flash it on your international S6 or S6 Edge rather than wait for the update to arrive in your country.

<!–http://www.androidauthority.com/marshmallow-update-galaxy-s6-galaxy-s6-edge-672522/–>

jQuery.ajax(
url: “//player.ooyala.com/v3/7f2b2d0412e84a188ede8d648751dc42?namespace=OoyalaPlayer4825&platform=html5-fallback”,
dataType: “script”,
success: function() [];
function aarunplayer() ooyalaplayers.push(OoyalaPlayer4825.Player.create.apply(this, [“ooyalaplayer-4825″,”JqYWJnMDE6SVOK0flM5oGZDoSMfu_5IK”,”auto”:true,”showadmarquee”:false]) ); ; aarunplayer();
);

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

Here’s the Galaxy S6 Android 6.0 Marshmallow update changelog which also holds for the S6 Edge:

  • Exercise greater control over app permissions
  • Purchase easily and securely with Fingerprint support
  • Experience enhanced battery-life through Doze
  • Redesigned App Drawer

To check for the update, go to Settings > About phone > System updates > Check for updates. If you think it might be a little while before you see Marshmallow touch down on your Galaxy device, take a look at Nirave’s video above of the update to see what’s coming.

When do you think you’ll see Marshmallow? What do you think of the changes?

9
Feb

Looking back at the Samsung Galaxy S6


The official launch of the Samsung Galaxy S7 is less than two weeks away, and with the rumor train chugging along at full steam, we’re slowly but surely getting a clear idea of what to expect on February 21. However, before we move on to what is soon to be Samsung’s latest and greatest, we thought it would be a good idea to take a look back at its predecessor.

Samsung Galaxy S6 videos

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed’;
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

The Samsung Galaxy S6 featured one of the most radical changes that Samsung has ever made to their flagship Galaxy S line, and with a quite a lot being new, there is some curiosity with regards to how the device has aged since its release last year. That’s what we find out, in this quick look at the Samsung Galaxy S6 – now!

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-2

The drastic changes Samsung introduced with the Galaxy S6 were seen right off the bat, with the company finally giving users what they wanted with a more premium metal and glass build. The use of these new build materials not only makes for a device that is still one of the best looking in the market, but also helps the smartphone hold up much better over time when compared to its plastic-clad predecessors. Of course, an additional $100 will get you the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge with its unique curved edges to the display that spill over on the sides, and is personally the one I prefer.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-3

Granted, accusations of the design being “inspired” by one of its biggest competitors were flung around, and while there are admittedly some similarities, the Galaxy S6 is still a Samsung smartphone through and through, while also being a far better designed smartphone that year’s past. While many appreciated the updates to the design and build quality, it wasn’t without its detractors.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-4

The new design language did result in previously staple elements like expandable storage and removable batteries going by the wayside, which understandably caused quite the uproar among users who took advantage of these features. Obviously, the story is pretty much the same to this day, with users having to opt for for the highest 128 GB built-in option to alleviate any storage concerns, but that, did of course, require paying the resulting hike in the price point.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-9

With replaceable batteries no longer an option, users had to resort to fast charging or wireless charging to stay topped up. Both are fantastic features, the Galaxy S6 did lose some of its luster when you had to charge it multiple times a day. The Samsung Galaxy S6 didn’t offer a particularly impressive battery life when it was initially released, and that unfortunately holds true even today. However, this situation could potentially improve with the upcoming update to Android 6.0 Marshmallow. For now, if you are looking for a Galaxy S6 with good battery life, the Active iteration, with its much larger battery, is the way to go, but even its availability is limited by its AT&T exclusivity.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-8

Speaking of updates, the Galaxy S6 has received quite a few over the course of the year, including the official update to Android 5.1.1 Lollipop. The Apps Edge feature that was initially exclusive to the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ also made its over to its smaller sibling, which was great news, given that this is the most useful Edge feature on offer. The update to Android 6.0 Marshmallow is also slowly starting to make its way to users, A beta version of the software is also floating around for those who are interested, and Nirave has already given us a look at what this updated software package brings to the table.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-1

Samsung also made a lot of its improvements to the software experience available with the Galaxy S6, but despite that, it’s still not one of my favorites in terms of aesthetics. However, what was a welcome addition and one of the best parts of TouchWiz now is the robust Theme Store, and being able to cater the look of the user interface to how you want it does make the whole experience feel a lot more bearable.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-10

The 5.1-inch Super AMOLED display with a Quad HD resolution remains just as gorgeous as it has ever been, and is another great example of how well this phone has held up, despite being one of the earlier flagship releases of 2015. This is still one of the best smartphone displays currently available in the market, and everything from reading text and watching videos to playing games continues to be as enjoyable as it did when the phone first came out.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-7

As far as performance is concerned, the Exynos 7420 has proven to be a beast of a processor, and in my experience, everything seems to be as snappy and responsive as it was initially. Applications and games continue to load smoothly, but the aggressive RAM management that has become a well known issue is still unfortunately still there. The fingerprint scanner also doesn’t feel as fast as before. That’s not to say that the fingerprint scanner isn’t as accurate or reliable as before, but when compared to the implementations found with the more recent smartphone releases, the Galaxy S6 does now feel a step behind.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-6

Of course, one of the best features of the Samsung Galaxy S6 is the camera. The 16 MP rear shooter is capable of taking amazing photos, and the Galaxy S6 camera can still be considered one of the best smartphone cameras currently available, which is certainly saying something, given how a lot of OEM flagships in 2015 featured camera experiences that were much improved in their own right.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-5

The camera is a pleasure to use, with its clean and intuitive software that certainly does not lack in features. Samsung also makes launching the camera a breeze, requiring only a double tap of the home button. I began to once again appreciate how convenient this shortcut was when I started to use the Galaxy S6 again, and a quick method to launch the camera like this is something that I’m hoping a lot more OEMs wills adopt this year.

So there you have it for this look back at the Samsung Galaxy S6! It may not have always been the case with Samsung’s flagship offerings, but the Galaxy S6 has certainly managed to stand tall against the test of time. The design and build quality are fantastic, the display is beautiful, the processing package continues to deliver, and what you have here is still one of the best smartphone cameras around. These statements are not usually easily made when considering a device that is a year old, and even more so in the case of previous Samsung devices. If nothing else, the Galaxy S6 is a testament to the fact that Samsung began to right the ship in 2015, and that is something we are hoping to see continue in just a few days from now.

9
Feb

Samsung Galaxy S6 now only $457 on Amazon


samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-1

A new Samsung Galaxy flagship is to launch soon, and you can bet we will be at MWC getting you all the goods. But today we are not focusing on the “next big thing”. The good thing about being so close to a phone launch is that prices of the current iteration are bound to start dropping.

While the Samsung Galaxy S6 has been hovering around the $500 price point, today we are finding it just a bit lower on Amazon. Samsung’s flagship device is now going for $457, a reasonable price for anyone looking to get a high-end phone and doesn’t need to wait around for the upcoming version.


samsung galaxy s6 editor's choice (1 of 1)See also: Samsung Galaxy S6 review: the change we’ve been waiting for290

The Galaxy S6 is still a great handset. Samsung went back to the drawing board and rehashed its design from the ground up. The Galaxy S6 was the first of better built handsets to come, featuring a metal frame and glass body.

samsung-galaxy-s6-now-resized-2

In addition, you have great specs on board here. The Samsung Galaxy S6 features an Exynos 7420 processor, 3 GB of RAM and 32 GB of internal storage. It also sports a 5.1-inch 2560×1440 display, stunning cameras and a 2550 mAh battery.

Is it worth it? Well, if you have the extra cash and don’t mind spending a little over $450 on a good phone, I say it should be worth it. We do continue to have the phone listed on our ‘Best Android phones‘ list, so that should say something, right?

Buy the Samsung Galaxy S6 for $457

30
Jan

Here are the videos you don’t want to miss this week – January 30, 2016


honor5X_4

While it hasn’t been all too busy in the Android world as of late, our video team has still been working hard to bring you some great Android-related coverage.

This week Krystal brought you her full review of the honor 5X, Huawei’s new budget smartphone that’s just made its way to the United States. Josh has some thoughts about switching to an iPhone for about a month, and Nirave gives us a detailed walkthrough of Android 6.0 Marshmallow (beta) on the Samsung Galaxy S6. Joe has also brought us two great new videos regarding the best new Android apps and games of January 2016.

There’s certainly a lot to cover here, so without any further delay, here are the videos you don’t want to miss this week.

honor 5X review

The honor 5X is just now making its way to the United States, and it’s one heck of a value. At only $200, this might actually be one of the best cheap Android phones available on the market. Is there anything you should know before you run out any buy one for yourself? Don’t miss Krystal’s full review of the honor 5X.

Why I switched to iPhone (…and back again)

Josh recently took a little vacation, where he actually switched to the iPhone 6s for a full month. Now that he’s back on Android, he’s willing to share his thoughts.

This is Marshmallow (beta) on the Galaxy S6

While there’s still no official build of Android 6.0 Marshmallow for the Galaxy S6, Samsung has released a beta to the public. Wondering what changes it will bring to the handset? Nirave goes hands-on with Marshmallow (beta) on the S6.

Apps, apps, and more apps

10 best new Android apps of January 2016

Following a major lull in December, it seems as though every developer decided to release their new applications in the same month. Check out Joe’s latest roundup of the best new Android apps of January 2016!

10 best new Android games of January 2016

Not only have there been a ton of app releases in the past month, there are also a good amount of games you should check out. Here are the 10 best new Android games of January 2016.

Android Apps Weekly

The future of Link Bubble and the return of the mobile Humble Bundle – you don’t want to miss the latest episode of Joe’s Android Apps Weekly show.

30
Jan

Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge receiving Marshmallow 6.0.1 update in South Korea


galaxy-s6-marshmallow-thumb

The Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge are very different products for Samsung, from their build quality to their features – or lack thereof – and even the manner in which a major Android OS update has been handled. Unlike in past years, the South Korean OEM ushered in the release of Android Marshmallow 6.0 by offering customers in select markets the ability to participate in a beta testing program.

According to a new report however, as of today both variants are officially updating to Android 6.0.1 for customers in Samsung’s home market of South Korea. As of the time of writing, this story is still development and thus details are limited. Models on SK Telecom are detailed. It is currently unknown as to if either KT or LG U+ hves also begun rolling out the firmware. The build date for both the S6 and the S6 Edge is Fri, 22 Jan 2016 however the time stamps are different.

With South Korea users now formally receiving Marshmallow, it is probably just a matter of days or weeks before the international roll-out begins for unlocked models. In particular the UK was also involved in the beta test program and thus it can be expected that said territory will be among the first to receive the update. Those interested in screen captures obtained from the early preview offering will note the significant visual differences below:

#gallery-1
margin: auto;

#gallery-1 .gallery-item
float: left;
margin-top: 10px;
text-align: center;
width: 16%;

#gallery-1 img
border: 2px solid #cfcfcf;

#gallery-1 .gallery-caption
margin-left: 0;

/* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */

Sour Grapes

Some users may be upset that Marshmallow has not hit the Galaxy S6 Edge+ or the Galaxy Note 5, Samsung’s pair of flagships released in the second half of last year. Neither of these models were eligible for the Android 6.0 Beta Test program either, which further irritated customers, some of whom felt they were being given the short end of the stick. It is expected that the firmware update for these devices will happen within the next few weeks, however apart from leaks claiming to be internal release targets from Samsung, there is nothing truly concrete at the moment.

Another common complaint raised about the update issue is the speed at which Samsung has approached it. With Android 5.0 Lollipop at the end of 2014, Samsung impressed many when it began rolling out the updates for some Galaxy S5 models before the year even ended. Poland in particular, received Lollipop just weeks after Google released it. This cycle however, it seems that a considerable amount of time has been required in rolling out the new firmware. It is an issue made all the more noticeable and almost paradoxical, given the more streamlined version of TouchWiz that shipped with the 2015 flagships.

note 5 leaked marshmallow (4)

Marshmallow has mysteriously been melted with a lucky T-Mobile user’s mobile, the Galaxy Note 5.

Given the existence of public beta testing, it is possible that Samsung felt a stable build was not yet ready to be released to the general public. This might be due to some of Android 6.0’s more significant overhauls, such as the inclusion of granular permissions for Apps, or even the way in which Google’s mobile OS handles native fingerprint sensors. It might also have had to do with priority being placed more prominently on Android Security Patch updates which need to be issued for dozens upon dozens of devices in Samsung’s hardware catalog.

Even so, Samsung’s handling of Marshmallow has definitely been an unusual one to say the least. Frequent reports of random Galaxy Note 5 and Galaxy Note 4 users suddenly finding themselves eligible for the update have been cropping up around the internet for weeks now, despite no public beta test having been made available. At one point even a Galaxy S5 user was provided the update.

Wrap Up

With Marshmallow now officially out for the Korean Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge, it is only a matter of time before the world at large will be eligible for access, too. This could not come at a more pressing time given the fact that the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge are expected to be announced in just 22 days, with a possible release in less than a month and a half.

We want to hear your thoughts! How would you evaluate Samsung’s handling of the Marshmallow update? Has it been relatively timely, or has the company gone back to its old ways? For that matter, are any of you in possession of a Korean variant and have already received the update? Let us know how it is!

(function ()
document.getElementsByTagName(‘body’)[0]).appendChild(opst);
());

 

29
Jan

The best-selling unlocked Android phones from B&H (January 28)


Unlocked smartphones are definitely gaining popularity and for good reason – they free you up from financing plans and two year contracts. If you’re looking for a new smartphone B&H has you covered.

nexus_5x

Why unlocked?

Whereas a lot of today’s flagship models tend to run in the $500-$600 range, or higher, there’s an awful lot of smartphone to be had for less money. In fact, you can sometimes spend $200-300 for a phone and get a substantial upgrade over your previous one.

We’ve gathered up the 10 best-selling unlocked Android devices from B&H so you can get a sense for what’s available. Indeed, you’ll see a nice mix of big-name vendors and devices from other, scrappy players. Note that we’ve omitted color variations; you might find other colors available.

Why B&H Photo Video?

As the largest non-chain photo and video equipment store in the United States, B&H also offers consumers a wide selection of smartphones. Indeed, you’ll find just about every major manufacturer from around the globe, plus some from other, growing names, too. It’s also here where you’ll be able to get your hands on the unlocked BlackBerry Priv. There’s something here for everybody.

So, the next time you need to replace your existing phone, consider scooping up one of these. It’s often a heck of a lot cheaper than going through your carrier in the end. Depending on which model you purchase, you could save big on an unlocked Android device from B&H.

 

  1. Google Nexus 5X 32GB – $349.00
  2. Motorola Moto G 2nd Gen 8GB – $99.99
  3. Google Nexus 5X 16GB – $299.00
  4. ASUS ZenFone 2 Laser ZE551KL 32GB Smartphone – $229.00
  5. Motorola Moto G 3rd Gen 16GB – $219.99
  6. BlackBerry Priv 32GB – $699.99
  7. Sony Xperia M4 Aqua  16GB – $199.99
  8. Samsung Galaxy S6 32GB Smartphone -$479.99
  9. Samsung Galaxy S5 16GB – $349.99
  10. Panasonic Lumix 16GB 4K Photo Camera and Smartphone – $449.99

 

The post The best-selling unlocked Android phones from B&H (January 28) appeared first on AndroidGuys.

27
Jan

Marshmallow on the Galaxy S6 is a welcome improvement


A key issue with Android is how long it takes older devices to get the latest update, but with Marshmallow, we’ve seen companies take a different approach. Like Sony and honor before it, Samsung isn’t known for being forthcoming with its software updates, but has opened a public beta for customers to test the update before it’s rolled out. After a few days with the update, what’s new and how does it impact on the Galaxy S6 experience?

For more info on Samsung updates, read our Marshmallow update roundup

Like most phones, I found the Galaxy S6 to be great at launch before it began to slow and show signs of struggling after a few months. The biggest difference with the Marshmallow update has to be the performance, with the handset appearing to be much smoother than it was running Lollipop. Naturally though, the performance will drop after a a period of usage but the initial experience is definitely positive and, from memory, better than my experience with the Galaxy S6 Edge when it first came out.

Throughout the update, Samsung seems to have made an attempt to adopt Material Design with varying degrees of success. While the flatter icons and a consistent UI language between third parties, Google and Samsung apps are definitely impressive, there are some changes that are garish and unnecessary. As a long-time Galaxy user accustomed to TouchWiz, these two changes are my biggest pet-hates about the update, but some of you may find them acceptable.

Galaxy-S6-Marshmallow-Beta-AA-(12-of-12) Galaxy-S6-Marshmallow-Beta-AA-(9-of-12)

The first is that the UI changes are now overly white, even things like the notification menu that were absolutely fine on Lollipop. The second is that Samsung has bought back the dreaded “squircles” and the white background on the home screen icons reminds me of early versions of Huawei’s EMUI. It’s completely unnecessary and to be honest, it looks downright ugly. It’s a classic example of a company trying to make something better, but actually reinventing the wheel and making it much worse.

The notification menu has had some welcome improvements, not least with Samsung allowing you to swipe down to access all the quick settings. You can also scroll the initial quick settings bar like you could in Lollipop so this should appease most users. At the bottom of the notification drop down is a shortcut to Notification settings, where you can now turn off or turn on notifications for individual apps. It’s not all great though as you can’t remove Quick Connect and the wasted space does get quite annoying.

Gaiaxy S6 vs in video:

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed’;
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

The Marshmallow update also signals a closer partnership between Google and Samsung and this has likely been one of the factors behind the new user experience. One of the biggest new features in the update is Now on Tap, which brings contextual information to your fingertips that is related to whatever’s displayed on your screen. From first use, Now on Tap certainly works well enough, and it’s refreshing to see that Samsung hasn’t tried to replace Now on Tap with a feature of its own making.

The camera has also been updated in Marshmallow and finally, you can now shoot in RAW format using a Galaxy S6. In the latest Android 5.1.1 update, the RAW option was grayed out so it’s good to see that Samsung has finally enabled a feature that many people have asked for. The updated camera also loads much faster and the delay between taking consecutive pictures has been reduced as well.

Galaxy S6 family in reviews:

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed’;
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

Alongside the changes in the camera, the Marshmallow updates also brings with it Doze mode which is meant to offer significant standby time improvements. Over the past few weeks, the battery has been somewhat impressive with average battery life with minimal usage around 2-4 days. While this isn’t on par with other flagships that have bigger batteries, the performance gain is almost 40% and no doubt, Marshmallow plays a large part in it.

Overall, the Marshmallow update brings several big changes and features to the Galaxy S6 and not least, the performance gains certainly make it a worthwhile update. However, like all user experiences on mobile, the changes aren’t all for the better and there’s no doubt going to be a few elements that some users won’t be pleased with.

#gallery-1
margin: auto;

#gallery-1 .gallery-item
float: left;
margin-top: 10px;
text-align: center;
width: 25%;

#gallery-1 img
border: 2px solid #cfcfcf;

#gallery-1 .gallery-caption
margin-left: 0;

/* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */

All things considered, the Marshmallow update is certainly a welcome one and the Galaxy S6 is a much better smartphone for it. What do you think of the Marshmallow update for the Galaxy S6 and are you running the beta? Check out all the screenshots and the video above and let us know your views in the comments below!

22
Jan

10 Android phones you should consider for Sprint (January 2016)


Are you in the market for a new smartphone? Is Sprint the service provider you’re considering? You’re in luck!  We’re here to help you pick out that next handset. If you’re an existing smartphone owner, picking out an upgrade won’t be too much of a challenge. But, for others, particularly first-time buyers, the idea of buying an Android might make them nervous.

Which is the newest phone? What is the best phone? Which is the one that’s going to give me exactly what I need? We’re here to help you dig mine through the muck and pull out a few gems.

We’ve put together a list of the top 10 Android smartphones you should consider for Sprint this January. Here, in no particular order, are ten Android handsets that you should consider for Sprint if you’re currently contemplating a new device.

LG G Flex 2

Introduced early in 2015, this phone was among the first to boast a Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor. It’s powerful enough to contend with most Androids and features a 13-megapixel rear camera with laser focus and optical image stabilization. What it also offers, is a self-healing protective coating, which means your keys and general wear won’t ruin the finish. Also, the phone is curved in multiple ways and allows for one of the most comfortable experiences around.

LG G Flex 2 at Sprint

LG G Flex 2 at Amazon

LG G Stylo

LG Stylo

LG Stylo

A low-cost alternative to the Samsung Galaxy Note line, the LG G Stylo gives users plenty of screen space and a stylus for which to write. Running a still-recent version of Android (5.1 Lollipop), this one comes with 8GB internal storage and 1GB RAM. The quad-core processor isn’t gonna set any benchmarks but the total package is affordable and worth the money. First-time buyers looking for a big screen should consider the 5.7-incher.

LG Stylo at Sprint

HTC One E8

Although the HTC One E8 is powered by an older version of Android (5.0 Lollipop), it’s a powerful experience that’s enough for most average users. Don’t let the plastic body fool you; there’s a fair amount of hardware under the hood. Specs include a 2.3GHz quad-core processor, 2GB RAM, and 16GB storage. Toss in a microSD card for up to 128GB extra storage and satisfy your media needs.

HTC One E8 at Sprint

HTC One E8 at Amazon

LG Tribute 2

You might ask why we have a phone with these specs listed as a recommended buy. The answer is simple: the price is more than fair considering the package. We like what LG has been doing these last few years and this is a great starting point for smartphone newbies. The 4.5-inch screen, is among the smallest you’ll find in today’s smartphones but it feels really good in most hands.

LG Tribute 2 at Sprint

Samsung Galaxy Note 5

Galaxy-Note5_right-with-spen_Silver-TitaniumThe fifth generation of Samsung’s plus-sized smartphone experience boasts a gorgeous metal and glass design. The S Pen digital stylus is smarter than ever and works without even powering on the display. Up from previous models, storage options are now 32GB and 64GB. The battery, which comes in at a commendable 3000mAh capacity, allows for fast charging, wireless charging, and even fast wireless charging.

Samsung Galaxy Note 5 at Sprint

Samsung Galaxy Note 5 at Amazon

Google Nexus 6

Running an untouched version of Android Lollipop, the Nexus 6 is among the first to receive an update to the 6.0 Marshmallow build. The 6-inch screen might be a little bigger than you’re familiar with but the reviews and feedback have been solid. Internal storage is tapped at 32GB with no microSD expansion card slot but it should be enough for those who live in the cloud.

Google Nexus 6 at Sprint

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+

An almost identical sibling to the aforementioned Galaxy Note 5, this one trades out the stylus for the dual curved display. If you don’t need to jot down notes or mark up documents, consider grabbing the more sexy counterpart.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ at Sprint

Samsung Galaxy S6

Announced in the spring, it’s hard to beat the annual Samsung flagship smartphone. The 5.1-inch Quad HD screen is a stunner and feels oh-so-right in our hands and the premium design includes glass and metal. It’s the first Galaxy S model we’ve wanted to coddle and protect in a long time. It doesn’t hurt that it runs Android 5.0 Lollipop (with an expected 6.0 update), comes with at least 32GB storage, and has 3GB RAM to boost performance.

Samsung Galaxy S6 at Sprint

Samsung Galaxy S6 at Amazon

LG G4

lg_g4_black_leatherLG continues to impress with a steady stream of flagship models that demand attention. We long ago fell in love with the rear button layout and this year’s version has one of the best camera experiences we’ve ever seen on a smartphone. The specs are top-notch and the screen is a real looker.

LG G4 at Sprint

LG G4 at Amazon

HTC One A9

As the only HTC model on this list, we’re big fans of the new design cues and direction. It’s not necessarily a powerful smartphone, but it’s more than enough for first time buyers with plenty left over. It’s the first non-Nexus handset to run Android 6.0 Marshmallow and enjoys features such as Doze, Android Pay, and Android on Tap. For the first time in a few years we are excited about HTC again and can’t recommend this phone enough for its target demographic. The 5-inch screen feels terrific in hand and the fingerprint scanner is highly responsive. Check out our review of the HTC One A9.

HTC One A9 at Sprint

The post 10 Android phones you should consider for Sprint (January 2016) appeared first on AndroidGuys.

%d bloggers like this: