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Posts tagged ‘LG’

26
Sep

The US’ TV energy ratings don’t reflect the real world


If you were hoping that your new, energy-efficient TV might help save the planet (and your power bill), you’re in for bad news. Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental advocacy group, has published research showing that the US’ energy ratings for TVs (such as EnergyGuide and Energy Star) don’t line up with consumption in the real world. Tests on 2015 and 2016 sets from LG, Samsung and Vizio show that they use “up to twice” as much energy as claimed, often by turning off power-saving features with “little to no” warning. Some switch off the eco-friendly mode if you so much as change the picture settings, for example, while high dynamic range video will jack up the energy draw by 30 to 50 percent. Even the test footage used for government tests doesn’t reflect the electricity you’d use in real-life viewing, the Council adds.

The NRDC goes so far as to accuse TV makers of “exploiting weaknesses” in US energy tests, designing TVs that feign compliance in test conditions but flout the rules when they’re in your living room.

None of the TV makers dispute the basic data, although the Consumer Technology Association unsurprisingly takes issue with the claims of sinister intentions. It insists that the NRDC is pushing “sensational-but-meaningless headlines” and showing an “inexplicable hostility” toward an industry that, in the long run, has saved a tremendous amount of power through TVs that honor EnergyGuide and Energy Star.

The CTA has a vested interest in defending TVs. They’re still the Association’s bread and butter, as any CES attendee can tell you. However, it’s true that TVs have become more efficient over the years, and there’s no concrete evidence that TV brands are cheating. Rather, the major concern is simply that TV energy ratings are behind the times. The Department of Energy’s testing method is 8 years old, the NRDC notes — it came about well before the advent of HDR and 4K screens. Officials may need to not only update their guidelines, but take a new approach that constantly adapts to evolving technology.

Via: BBC

Source: NRDC, CTA

18
Sep

LG is ready to sell its stunning 77-inch 4K OLED for $20,000


Just in case LG’s line of 2016 OLED TVs wasn’t impressive enough already, next month it will ship a massive 77-inch version, complete with 4K resolution and HDR compatibility. Jumping up in size from the $8,000~ 65-inch version won’t be cheap, however, as the company announced a $19,999 MSRP. That buys more than just the OLED tech loved for its deep black levels and impressive contrast, as LG is also rolling out its new Signature Concierge service with the premium-priced display.

By laying down the $20k (pre-orders are open this weekend at select retailers, in case you were wondering), you are also signing up for “24/7 VIP-level service providing one-on-one customer support.” Register your display (why not, you can probably get assistance doing that too), and you can expect a $200 AmEx gift card and LG G Pad tablet to go with it. Combined with a display that won our Best of CES award, one might even wonder how you could afford not buy one. So go ahead, put that order in, and then invite us over for movie night, we’ll bring the Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Source: LG

16
Sep

LG’s new $150 midrange phone packs a huge battery


If your main concern with a phone is battery life, and basically nothing else, this new LG device could be up your alley. The LG X Power is available on Boost Mobile for $150, and comes with an impressive 4,100mAh battery. Everything else about the new handset is pretty meh. The 5.3-inch machine only has a HD resolution, runs the somewhat outdated Android 6.0 Marshmallow, and has relatively poorer 8-megapixel and 5 MP rear and front cameras. I’d say the price justified the specs, but there are better phones out there for the money.

Despite the underwhelming specs, the X Power still has the biggest battery in that price range. It uses an octa-core MediaTek processor that the chip maker said has power-saving enhancements to extend battery life. So the stamina alone could be reason to consider the X Power.

This is also the first time a phone powered by Qualcomm rival MediaTek has been released by a CDMA carrier (the X Power will be available on Sprint in a few weeks). T-Mobile already sells some MediaTek-equipped devices. The X Power’s low price is likely a result of the less costly MediaTek chip (compared to Qualcomm’s options), and we’ll have to get our hands on one to see how it holds up for daily multitasking. In the meantime, Boost customers who really want a long-lasting smartphone may want to consider the Power.

16
Sep

LG V20, G5, Note 7, S7 Edge: Display Showdown


If you haven’t realized it, of late, we’ve been detailing the display section of our reviews a bit more than we’ve done in the past. Since we’re always trying to evolve our reviews process, we’re diving deeper into how we look at the displays in smartphones, by taking a deliberate path of uncovering their qualities using our new benchmark process. And with that in mind, we’re focusing our attention on the latest smartphone from LG – the multimedia powerhouse in the V20.

On paper, the LG V20’s display reads very much similar to its predecessor, but we all know that it’s unlikely that the same panel has been recycled. Yes, the V20’s 5.7-inch Quad HD IPS-LCD display with Gorilla Glass 4 is identical to specs found with the V10 last year, as well as the inclusion of its Second Screen, but the company was sure to mention that the Second Screen was brighter than before, going up to 68 nits from the former’s 35 nit reach. All of that is fine and dandy, but most of the attention will be place on the main display – so with that, we’re here to uncover what LG has crafted here with the V20.

This wouldn’t be a fair analysis, after all, if we have nothing else to compare its results against. And that’s why we’re also including the Samsung Galaxy S7, S7 edge, Note 7, and LG G5 into the mix, to see exactly how LG’s latest phone fairs against the competition.

It’s really bright, brighter than most

Right from the get-go, the V20’s display is notable for the sheer amount of luminance it’s able to muster up. Reaching a peak output of 714 nits, the display ensures that visibility isn’t compromised at all when viewing it outdoors – with the sun glaring down on it. In my experience, displays that produce 500+ nits tend to be usable under these conditions, so it’s swell to know that the V20 retains substantial visibility. That, of course, is something worth praising, just because not every phone is able to remain visible when it’s used in direct sunlight. Using them in the dark is one thing, but it’s totally another outside on a sunny day.

In that respect, the V20 earns some respect for being quite usable outdoors. Comparatively speaking, it’s definitely up there when compared to its esteemed rivals – namely the stuff from Samsung’s camp. Relying on a totally different display technology, Super AMOLED to be exact, the Galaxy S7, S7 edge, and Note 7 all produce some respectable levels at a little over 500 nits, well above other high-end phones, but none of them can achieve the same level of potency.

However, the LG G5 is just a smidgen better, but not by much at all. In fact, it tops out at 755 nits, besting the V20 in the process, but we wouldn’t say that it’s enough to make it significantly noticeable day-to-day.

Unbelievably cold color temperature

Right away, something becomes apparent the moment we start surfing the web on the V20. A keen eye is definitely needed to make it out, but as we stare at some of the white dead space while surfing through some sites, it’s quite telling that there’s a colder color temperature with the display here. The color white has a tinge of blue in it, indicating the obvious: that it’s an extremely cold panel.

In our testing, the IPS-LCD display reaches a color temperature of ~9100K, which is nowhere close to the “ideal” temperature of 6500K – indicating that it’s neither too warm or too cold. Unfortunately for the V20, it steers towards the colder side of the spectrum, making it one of the coldest displays I’ve come across dealing with high-end and flagship phones.

Ironically, AMOLEDs have been known to be exceptionally cold with their color temperatures, but in recent years, Samsung has perfected its own homemade Super AMOLED displays to be on par to those using LCD technology. In this scenario, all of Samsung’s recent smartphones exhibit color temperatures that are very close to the ideal level of 6500K.

All told, the V20’s display is just obnoxiously colder toned than most other things on the market right now.

LG V20 hands on 18

Ouch, it’s poorly color calibrated

Things don’t get better for the V20’s ability to accurately reproduce colors in the sRGB color spectrum chart, where it just fails to hit the reference points within the boundary. Sad to say, it manages to hit only one single target, but fails miserably with everything else. Bringing your attention to its color gamut chart in the sRGB spectrum, you can see how all the colors are inaccurately produced.

Yellows seems to be influenced by greens, while magentas have a hint of blue in them. Even worse, the V20 can’t even properly recreate the color teal, which is arguably the easiest color to reproduce out of the bunch. Honestly, it’s pretty rare for a display to botch the color teal, but the V20 does exactly that – wherein teals creep into blue territory.

Now, it’s one thing to be overblown and saturated, but there’s no consistency to the V20’s color path. For those who are particular about color accuracy, the V20 is an unlikely candidate, due to how it just can’t produce realistic, true-to-life colors. Well, it definitely shows that the V20 follows after the G5, seeing that the two results are nearly identical.

Over on the AMOLED side, Samsung’s offerings are close to perfect as they come when it comes to color accuracy – albeit, you’ll need to set the display to basic mode. Under its adaptive mode, the phones tends to produce more saturation with colors, which is not a bad thing for some folks.

Samsung Galaxy S7
Samsung Galaxy Note 7
LG V20
LG G5

Conclusion

Going back to its specs, we have zero complaints about what we see on paper with the V20’s screen. Quad-HD resolution, check. Sizable screen, check. Second screen, that’s a nice addition. But even though it’s able to push out some serious luminance, the overall tone of the display is subdued. Some displays just have that iridescence and charm when we first peek at them, drawing us closer to inspect them even more. With the V20’s display, however, I didn’t find myself ogling or drooling over the screen – it just looked decent, almost blah in a way.

That, of course, could all be attributed to its poor color temperature and its inability to accurately produce colors realistically. While its luminance isn’t called into question at all, since it’s actually one of the more potent ones out there, the other two qualities I mentioned just limits its ability to be compelling – from a display standpoint, naturally. You might not feel the same way, but if you were to place it besides any of Samsung’s flagships, you’ll see exactly how its superior qualities makes for a mesmerizing display that gets more attention.

What are your thoughts? Shout them out in the comments.

13
Sep

It takes two: A visual history of dual-camera mobile phones


With the recent launches of the iPhone 7 Plus and the LG V20, the dual-lens smartphone camera is once again a hot topic. Of course, many other companies will want to remind you that they were there first, except some have long since given up on the technology. So what happened? And why isn’t this yet a standard feature on all flagship smartphones? For those intrigued, it’s worth taking a trip seven years back in time.

8
Sep

The iPhone 7 vs. the competition: Win some, lose some


The new 4.7-inch iPhone is here and, just like the rumors predicted, the headphone jack is no more. If you’re not thrilled with having to shop for a new pair of earbuds, it might be worth looking to see how the new water-resistant handset stacks up against its Android competition. We’ve taken a few recent flagships and laid out their specs for your perusal, including Sony’s new Xperia XZ. With most top-tier Android devices running Snapdragon 820, these phones end up having a lot in common. However, there’s a few key differences to keep things interesting.

iPhone 7
Galaxy S7
LG G5
HTC 10
Sony Xperia XZ
Pricing
$649, $749, $849 (off-contract)
$200 (on-contract)
varies by carrier on contract; $650 off-contract
$699 (off-contract)
Not available
Known dimensions
138.3 x 67.1 x 7.1mm (5.44 x 2.64 x 0.28 inches)
142.4 x 69.6 x 7.9mm (5.61 x 2.74 x 0.31 inches)
149.4 x 73.9 x 7.3mm (5.88 x 2.91 x 0.29 inches)
145.9 x 71.9 x 3.0-9.0mm (5.74 x 2.83 x 0.12-0.35 inches)
146 x 72 x 8.1 mm (5.75 x 2.83 x 0.32 inches)
Weight
138g (4.87 ounces)
152g (5.36 ounces)
159g (5.61 ounces)
161g (5.68 ounces)
161g (5.68 ounces)
Screen size
4.7 inches (119.38mm)
5.1 inches (129.2mm)
5.3 inches (134.62mm)
5.2 inches (132.08mm)
5.2 inches (132.08mm)
Screen resolution
1,334 x 750 (326 ppi)
2,560 x 1,440 (577 ppi)
2,560 x 1,440 (554 ppi)
2,560 x 1,440 (564 ppi)
1,920 x 1,080 (424 ppi)
Screen type
Retina HD
Quad HD Super AMOLED
Quad HD IPS LCD Quantum
Quad HD Super LCD 5
Full HD TRILUMINOS LCD
Battery
Size not available, but up to 14 hours usage on WiFi
3,000mAh
2,800mAh
3,000mAh
2,900mAh
Internal storage
32/128/256GB
32GB
32GB
32GB
32GB
External storage
None
microSD
microSD
microSD
microSD
Rear camera
12MP, f/1.8
12MP, f/1.7, 1.4µm pixel size
16MP, f/1.8, 1.12µm pixel size
12MP, f/1.8, 1.55µm pixel size
23MP
Front-facing cam
7MP, f/2.2
5MP
8MP
5MP, f/1.8, 1.34µm pixel size
13MP, f/2.0
Video capture
4K at 30fps
4K at 30fps
4K
4K
4K
NFC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Bluetooth
v4.2
v4.2
v4.2
v4.2
v4.2
SoC
Apple A10 Fusion
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
CPU
Not available
2.15GHz quad-core
2.15GHz quad-core
2.2GHz quad-core
2.15 or 2.2GHz quad-core
GPU
Not available
Adreno 530
Adreno 530
Adreno 530
Adreno 530
RAM
Not available
4GB
4GB
4GB
3GB
WiFi
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Operating system
iOS 10
Android 6.0
Android 6.0
Android 6.0
Android 6.0
Standout features
Touch ID, IP67 certified, Lightning connector
Fingerprint sensor, IP68 certified
Fingerprint sensor, USB Type-C
Fingerprint sensor, USB Type-C
Fingerprint sensor, IP68 certified, USB Type-C
Accessories
Not applicable
Not applicable
LG Friends: Cam, Cam Plus, Hi-Fi Plus (not available in US), VR
Not applicable
Not applicable

* Specs in italics are unconfirmed, but we will update as more details become available.

Keep an eye out today for hands-on impressions of the new iPhones, and stay tuned to Engadget for our full review later this fall!

Click here to catch all the latest news from Apple’s “See You” event.

8
Sep

The iPhone 7 Plus vs. the competition: How even is the field?


The iPhone 7 Plus finally brings a dual camera to the iPhone line. But there are plenty of other big handsets out there with their own stellar features, including the LG’s newly unveiled V20 and its Hi-Fi Quad DAC. Check out the table below to see how these two compare to phones like the Moto Z which, just like Apple’s new lineup, ditched the headphone jack in favor of USB-C. We’ve even thrown in the Galaxy Note 7 — sure, it’s been recalled, but when it’s not randomly exploding the Note is still one of our favorite devices this year.

iPhone 7 Plus
Galaxy Note 7
OnePlus 3
Moto Z
LG V20
Pricing
$769, $869, $969 (off-contract)
varies by carrier, starts at $850 (off-contract)
$399 (off-contract)
$624, $674 (off-contract)
Not available
Known dimensions
158.2 x 77.9 x 7.3mm (6.23 x 3.07 x 0.29 inches)
153.5 x 73.9 x 7.9 mm (6.04 x 2.91 x 0.31 inches)
152.7 x 74.7 x 7.35 mm (6.01 x 2.94 x 0.29 inches)
155.3 x 75.3 x 5.19mm (6.11 x 2.96 x 0.20 inches)
159.7 x 78.1 x 7.6mm (6.29 x 3.07 x 0.30 inches)
Weight
188g (6.63 ounces)
169g (5.96 ounces)
158g (5.57 ounces)
136g (4.8 ounces)
Not available
Screen size
5.5 inches (139.7mm)
5.7 inches (144.78mm)
5.5 inches (139.7mm)
5.5 inches (139.7mm)
5.7 inches (144.78mm)
Screen resolution
1,920 x 1,080 (401 ppi)
2,560 x 1,440 (515 ppi)
1,920 x 1,080 (401 ppi)
2,560 x 1,440 (535 ppi)
Main: 2,560 x 1,440 (513 ppi)
Secondary: 160 x 1,040 (513 ppi)
Screen type
Retina HD
Quad HD Super AMOLED
Full HD Optic AMOLED
Quad HD AMOLED
Quad HD IPS LCD (main display)
Battery
Size not available, but up to 15 hours usage on WiFi
3,500mAh
3,000mAh
2,600mAh
3,200mAh
Internal storage
32/128/256GB
64GB
64GB
32 / 64GB
64GB
External storage
None
microSD
None
microSD
microSD
Rear camera
Dual cameras, 12MP, f/1.8 and f/2.8
12MP, f/1.7, 1.4µm pixel size
16MP, f/2.0, 1.12µm pixel size
13MP, f/1.8, 1.12µm pixel size
Dual cameras, 16MP f/1.8 and 8MP f/2.4
Front-facing cam
7MP, f/2.2
5MP, f/1.7
8MP, f/2.0, 1.4µm pixel size
5MP
5MP, f/1.9
Video capture
4K at 30fps
4K
4K at 30fps
4K at 30fps
4K
NFC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Bluetooth
v4.2
v4.2
v4.2
v4.2
v4.2
SoC
Apple A10 Fusion
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
CPU
Not available
2.15GHz quad-core
2.2GHz quad-core
2.2GHz quad-core
Not available
GPU
Not available
Adreno 530
Adreno 530
Adreno 530
Adreno 530
RAM
Not available
4GB
6GB
4GB
4GB
WiFi
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Dual band, 802.11ac
Operating system
iOS 10
Android 6.0
Android 6.0
Android 6.0
Android 7.0
Standout features
Touch ID, IP67 certified, Lightning connector
Iris scanner, fingerprint sensor, USB Type-C
Fingerprint sensor, USB Type-C
Fingerprint sensor, USB Type-C
Fingerprint sensor, 32-bit Hi-Fi Quad DAC
Accessories
Not applicable
S-Pen, Gear 360, Gear VR
Not applicable
Moto Mods: Insta-Share Projector, SoundBoost speaker, Power Pack
Not applicable

* Specs in italics are unconfirmed.

While we can’t take a deeper dive just yet, keep an eye out for our hands-on impressions of the iPhone 7 Plus later today.

Click here to catch all the latest news from Apple’s “See You” event.

7
Sep

LG Unveils V20 Android Nougat Phone With 3.5mm Jack, Audiophile Smarts


LG unveiled its new flagship V20 smartphone in New York on Tuesday evening, just 24 hours ahead of Apple’s iPhone 7 event in San Francisco.

A successor to last year’s LG V10, the new 5.7-inch phone is pitched as a “multimedia heavyweight” and boasts a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 processor, 4GB of RAM, 64GB storage, a 2560×1440 QHD IPS LCD display, and a fingerprint sensor home button.

The front of the handset boasts an always-on screen “ticker” strip along the top that can display mini apps and notifications, such as music controls and calendar events.

The V20 sacrifices a unibody aluminum design in favor of a miroSD slot (up to 2TB) and a removable 3200mAh battery via a metal backplate, while the top and bottom parts of the phone are made from silicon polycarbonate, earning the V20 a MIL-STD 810G drop and shock resistance rating. The device packs a USB-C port, water resistance is non-existent though.

While Apple is expected to drop the headphone jack with the iPhone 7 series, LG is very much relying on the analog port to appeal to audiophiles: the V20 boasts a 32-bit Hi-Fi Quad DAC (digital-to-analog converter) and a 72-stage volume control fine-tuned by Bang & Olufsen, with support for most lossless music formats including FLAC and Apple Lossless. It also includes a HD audio recorder able to capture “studio quality audio” from three ultra-sensitive built-in microphones.

lg-v20-steady-record-feature
The rear of the phone houses a 16-megapixel camera with a 75-degree field of view backed by optical image stabilization and laser, phase, and contrast autofocusing, with a second wide-angle 8-megapixel sensor boasting a larger 135-degree field of view. The front-facing 5-megapixel camera also packs a wide angle mode.

Software-wise, the V20 is the first phone to come pre-installed with Android 7.0 Nougat, which features vertical split screen view, picture in picture, VR mode, file-based encryption, and more.

With Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 suffering from a disastrous global recall due to reports of exploding batteries, LG’s feature-packed V20 phablet finds itself first in line to go up against the iPhone 7 Plus, at least for now. While LG is yet to announce pricing and availability, consumers can expect the V20 to hover around the same $800 price point as the iPhone 7 Plus and Note 7.

MacRumors will have full coverage of Apple’s iPhone 7 event today, with a live blog on our front page at MacRumors.com and updates in 140 characters or less through our @MacRumorsLive account on Twitter.

Tag: LG
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7
Sep

LG’s new V20 wants to be the all-in-one flagship the G5 wasn’t


When LG unveiled its hardy V10 last year, it was… well, it was a little weird. With a beefy body, a double-selfie camera and a tiny second screen, the V10 was the result of LG being a little weird. Lo and behold, the phone did surprisingly well around here. Then the G5 happened. Being the first modular smartphone to sell at massive scale, the G5 represented LG fully embracing that weirdness. It was also gutsy, ambitious and ultimately disappointing — the company even admitted the device “failed to generate sales” after replacing some high-level mobile execs. Ouch. Now, though, LG has revealed the V20, and it might succeed where the G5 failed because it isn’t nearly as imaginative.

Put another way, the V20 is not modular. The leaked renders that made the rounds before today were spot on, but people (including us) misinterpreted what that button on the phone’s right side was. It’s for popping V20’s metal back plate off so you can swap out its 3,200mAh. It’s a lot like opening a powder compact, an analogy LG couldn’t get enough of.

The V20’s foundation is mostly the same high-powered stuff we got with the G5 — there’s the usual Snapdragon 820 and 4GB of RAM, not to mention the same two-camera setup that pairs an 8-megapixel wide-angle sensor and a 16-megapixel standard sensor around back. LG also decided to release the V20 with a 5.7-inch Quad HD screen, 64GB of storage (up from the G5’s 32GB) and a shiny new build of Android 7.0 Nougat, all squeezed into a sturdy, aluminum alloy frame. Two potential issues right off the bat: the phone’s removable back means it can’t be waterproof, and its face is highly reminiscent of the BlackBerry Z10. Surely LG could have drawn inspiration from a more successful phone. Still, the V20 feels much, much more premium than the G5 did.

So, what else is new here? Well, the second, smaller display picked up a few new features along the way, the like the ability to display longer signatures. The screen itself is also brighter than the V10’s, and you can enlarge notifications that roll in, but there’s a good chance you won’t love it now if you didn’t before. On the software side, the V20 is the first Nougat phone with the ability to search deep in apps you’ve installed instead of just pre-loaded Google apps. It’s one of those things that should’ve been part of core Android for a while now — too bad LG announced the feature after we played with the phone.

Beyond that, there are a lot of audio and video improvements. LG updated its Steady Record feature to make on-the-go footage come out much crisper, thanks in large part to Qualcomm’s gyro-based electronic stabilization. The phone’s dual camera array is also helped by three forms of autofocus — laser, phase detection and contrast — to identify targets even faster in both photos and video. Video effects that ape traditional film and some impressive Hi-Fi audio recording chops make it clear the V20 is trying to be a real production powerhouse.

And while you had to buy extra hardware to coax the G5 into playing high-quality audio — hardware that wasn’t even available everywhere — the V20 does it just fine out of the box. LG representatives didn’t go into a ton of detail about how the V20’s “Quad” DAC works, short of mentioning how it cranks up volume, minimizes distortion and supports lossless music files. Still, the effect was clear: I tried running some tracks downloaded from the Google Play Store through the V20 and a pair of someone else’s expensive Audeze headphones and the difference in volume and punchiness was a pleasant surprise.

As first impressions go, the V20 leaves a pretty good one. It’s a solidly-built device that took parts of what made the G5 special and mashed it up with features that improve things people do every day. At the same time, it feels as though every decision LG made here was the safe choice. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. It’s true that Innovative products — even ones that, like the G5, weren’t properly polished — influence our expectations for the future. In the meantime, though, safe bets can still pay off big, and LG has done some good work here. Stay tuned for our full review soon.

6
Sep

The best of the rest at IFA 2016


Now that we’ve said goodbye to IFA 2016, it’s time to bring you highlights of the most interesting devices at the event. In this particular edition, you’ll find some that aren’t smartphones or wearables. We’re talking virtual reality massage chairs, fridges with built-in tablets, as well as adorable robots and drones. Acer’s ridiculous 21-inch gaming laptop is there too, along with its new convertible Chromebook. But that’s just part of it, so check out the slideshow and think about which items you want the most.

We’re live all week from Berlin, Germany, for IFA 2016. Click here to catch up on all the news from the show.

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