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Posts tagged ‘Android 5.0’

14
Dec

The Asus Zenfone 2 is the perfect example of why unlocked phones will rule the market in 2016 (Review)


Being a writer definitely has its perks. The last two phones I reviewed were the Google Nexus 6P and the Samsung Galaxy Note 5. Both define  “flagship”, and impress in just about every way. You can argue that both phones would please almost any Android fan, but the major downside to both devices is the hefty price tag that is associated with them. The Nexus 6P starts at $499 while the Galaxy Note 5 starts at $749 excluding any deals. Unfortunately for our readers, when we only review flagship devices, we are missing out on saving you money by reviewing budget and mid-range devices.

In the U.S. we basically have access to high-end devices like the Galaxy lineup, the Nexus lineup and iPhones, or we have over the counter type pre-paid phones which run anywhere from $20 to $100 dollars and offer bare minimum features. So basically, you either have to shell out a ton of money for a full-featured smartphone, or you can give up all features for a basic phone that can text, make phone calls and send emails.

Why aren’t there many mid-range phones in the U.S.? I really don’t have the answer to this question, but overseas you can find dozens of smartphones in the $150-300 price range that may not feature the super powerful internal hardware specs of flagships, but they do feature hardware that performs quite well.

The review today is the first of many I will be doing, of low to mid range devices, in the coming months to provide you with a full and unbiased alternative to phones that cost over $500.

IMG_20151213_170443

The Asus Zenfone 2

Asus should be a name you’re familiar with, since they make a wide range of consumer electronics for the U.S. market. They may not have a strong hold on the smartphone market locally, but they have made the Nexus 7 which has a 4.5/5 star rating from over 6,000 reviewers on Amazon.com. Asus also makes Chromebooks, home PCs, and laptops. You just may not have used a smartphone from Asus, but that’s the purpose of this review.

The Zenfone 2 has been my daily driver for the last full three weeks and let me tell you all about it.

Design and Hardware

201505141852313079

The Asus Zenfone 2 is a full featured Android Lollipop device at a price less than $250. I have been using the international unlocked, dual SIM 5.5″ 1080p IPS display version. Powering the Zenfone 2 is an Intel Atom processor, with a hefty 4GB of RAM and 32GB of internal memory(expandable via microSD up to 128GB).

With a 5.5″ display, curved back, brushed plastic back, the Zenfone 2 reminds me of the LG G3, which was a favorite phone of mine from a year ago. The volume rocker on the Zenfone 2 is even on the back of the device, directly under the camera and LED flash. Holding the Zenfone 2 is extremely nice as it feels light and balanced, while the brushed back gives it a texture that makes it rather grippable.

Many people complain about having plastic phones but the Zenfone 2 does not at all feel or look cheaply made. The back is curved making this device extremely comfortable to hold, much more so than the Samsung Galaxy Note 5.

IMG_20151213_170426

  • Color –Black/Red/Gray/Gold
  • Dimensions –77.2 x 152.5 x 3.9 mm (WxDxH) ~ 10.9 mm
  • Weight –170 g
  • CPU
    Intel® Atom™ Quad Core Z3580 (2.3GHz), PowerVR G6430, with OpenGL 3.0 support
    Intel® Atom™ Quad Core Z3560 (1.8GHz), PowerVR G6430, with OpenGL 3.0 support
  • Memory
    2GB/4GB LPDDR3 RAM
  • Storage
    16GB/32GB/64GB eMMC Flash
  • Memory Slot –MicroSD card (up to 128 GB)
  • Modem
    Intel 7262 + Intel 2230
  • Connectivity Technology
    WLAN 802.11 ac
    USB
    Bluetooth V4.0, NFC
    Dual Micro SIM card
  • Network Standard
    Data Rate:
    HSPA+: UL 5.76 / DL 42 Mbps
    DC-HSPA+: UL 5.76 / DL 42 Mbps
    LTE Cat4:UL 50 / DL 150 Mbps Network type: GSM+WCDMA+LTE-FDD
    2G: GSM 850/900/1800/1900MHz
    3G: WCDMA 850/900/1900/2100MHz
    4G: FDD-LTE 1800/2100MHz
  • GPS/GLONASS/QZSS/SBAS/BDS
  • Display
    5.5inches, Full HD 1920×1080,IPS
    Corning® Gorilla® Glass 3
  • Battery
    3000 mAh Li-Polymer (non-removable)
  • Camera
    Front 5 Mega-Pixel, Fix Focus, Wide View, PixelMaster
    Rear 13 Mega-Pixel, Auto Focus, PixelMaster
  • Sensor
    G-Sensor/E-Compass/Gyroscope/Proximity/Ambient Light Sensor

Daily Usage

I am definitely one of the least technical writers here at AndroidGuys and my reviews reflect that as such. I don’t root, customize, or do other things that require an advanced knowledge of software. I have a full time job outside of writing, and don’t have the time nor willpower to learn those types of things. As long as my phone works well is all that really matters to me.

AT&T is my mobile service provider and happens to be compatible with my Asus Zenfone 2. In order to activate my Asus Zenfone 2, all I had to do was throw in my SIM card from my Nexus 6P. The Nexus 6P does use a Nano SIM card, whereas the Zenfone 2 uses a larger Micro SIM card, so my options were to go and get a free Micro SIM from AT&T or use a SIM adapter. I used the SIM adapter, inserted the card into the Zenfone 2 and within a minute I was up and running on the AT&T network.

The Asus Zenfone 2 is a 4g LTE capable phone, but in my area all I could connect to was the HSPA network. HSPA is theoretically slower than the latest LTE speeds, but in practice proved to be no slower or faster than the full LTE network in North County San Diego. Using the Speedtest app, I averaged 7-10mb/s download on the Zenfone 2, which is quite comparable to the 9-12mb/s I averaged on my Nexus 6P. Without getting too deep into technical details on network speed, the overall speed of my cellular connection felt identical to the Nexus 6P.

Phone calls came in as clear as any other phone I have used, which is a must have for me, because I do use my smartphone as my primary work device. I have two to four conference calls per week, so voice clarity and loudness is something I simply cannot live without. The Zenfone 2 has been a pleasant surprise and has completely impressed me for a device that can be purchased for less than $250.

201505141852326042

Camera

201505141852314433

The Asus Zenfone 2 comes with a 13MP rear camera that takes great pictures, even in less that ideal lighting conditions. No this camera isn’t as good as what you’re going to get on the Note 5, but very few cameras are. The Nexus 6P camera doesn’t even live up to the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 camera, but that doesn’t mean the Zenfone 2 camera is at all unacceptable. In some low-light conditions the camera did produce some grainy results, but in full day light and with the flash, the pictures came out quite nicely. I am more than happy with the results.

Software

Zen UI

If there is one downside about this phone it really comes to the customization of Android. LG and Samsung definitely are guilty of over-customization too, but the Asus Zenfone 2 does come with many features built atop Android 5.0. Although, bear in mind, I just came from a stock Android device in the Nexus 6P, and customization of software is a subjective point of view. Some people like it and some people hate it.

Although being an unlocked device, I am VERY happy that AT&T could not get its paws on the software, and install loads of useless apps it pre-installs on devices it sell directly. In order to keep things simplified, I just installed the Google Now launcher and immediately my Zenfone 2 felt like I was using a stock Android device.

The most important factor about the software is that it felt fast. In no way did any of the customization slow the phone down. I really pushed hard on the Zenfone 2 as I do with any of my daily drivers. I make calls, send texts, use social media, take notes, play games, watch movies and capture plenty of memories with my camera. I was thoroughly impressed with the speed of the phone. It may not win benchmark tests, but neither does the Nexus 6P or Nexus 5X. What matters most is daily performance, and if a device is free of lags and memory leaks it is a winner in my book

The Samsung Galaxy Note 5 wins almost all benchmark tests, yet frequently runs into software issues. Just because a smartphone has the latest and greatest processor does not necessarily mean it will translate into the best performance. The Zenfone 2 shines in the software performance category. It just has a little too much customization that I find useless.

Although there are some nice features like “Tap to Wake Up” or Zenmotion which allows you to draw a “C’ on the screen to open up the camera. Software customization is purely subjective. What matters most is that the customization do not effect performance.

zen motion

Display

201505141852312022

One major area where budget and mid-range phones save money is the display, because the display is one of the major areas of build cost. The Asus Zenfone 2 does come with a 1080p IPS display, and if you have ever read my reviews, you would know I much prefer AMOLED technology to LCD or LED. AMOLED offers superior contrast levels when it comes to blacks, and it also offers fantastic color saturation.

One reason for my preference of AMOLED display is that there is never any back light bleed. Back light bleed, where you can sometimes see an abundance of light around the perimeter of the display is a pet peeve of mine. I hate it. Also IPS displays sometimes look a little washed out when it comes to color.

To my surprise, the Asus Zenfone 2 has absolutely no back light bleed, and the colors on the display look accurate and rich. Not as rich as on the Nexus 6P, but rich enough to make me happy. Display performance is something that I care about second to overall performance. If a display looks bad, I simply will not like the phone. The Zenfone 2 display is very clear and is easy on my aging eyes. The 5.5″ display falls into the sweet spot of sizes that I prefer.

IMG_20151213_170609

Summary

Overall I could not be more happy than to start my journey into the budget to mid-range devices with the Asus Zenfone 2. I picked this phone to start with, because I know Asus has a great track record for creating great products at affordable prices like the Nexus 7. Intel has also proven to be quite impressive, with its relatively unknown mobile Atom chip, as it performed incredible smoothly paired with 4GB of RAM. 32GB of internal memory should be the minimum all devices come with these days, and having expandable memory is a bonus too.

Should I travel overseas I will definitely be taking advantage of the second SIM card slot. The absolute best feature of the Asus Zenfone 2 is that it can be purchased brand new for less than $250. That’s half the price of the Nexus 6P and $500 cheaper than the Samsung Galaxy Note 5. It truly makes me question why you need to spend the extra money on a flagship device. There will always be a market for flagships phones, but unlocked budget and mid-range devices are definitely worth taking a gander at. The Asus Zenfone 2 is a rock star when it comes to performance versus price.

Look for more reviews of budget and mid-range devices in the near future.

I will be giving this phone away to a lucky reader. All you have to do is make a comment below, and/or follow us on

” rel=”external nofollow” title=”” class=”ext-link ext-icon-20″ data-wpel-target=”_blank”>Instagram and tell us you read the Asus Zenfone 2 review. If you happen to be the winner of the Zenfone 2, please let us know how you like it.

If you would like to make a purchase, head on over to gearbest.com and check out the Asus Zenfone 2. It is currently on sale for $233 with free shipping, and a 100% 45-day satisfaction guarantee. Unlocked international smartphones are designed to work on GSM networks such as T-Mobile and AT&T.

Gearbest.com LINK

 

201510261247308250

 

The post The Asus Zenfone 2 is the perfect example of why unlocked phones will rule the market in 2016 (Review) appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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17
Sep

Android vulnerability allowing attackers to easily bypass passwords in lock screens


android-malware

We like to think our password-protected lock screens will keep our data secure. At the very least it should force thieves to perform a factory reset and keep our private information away from strange hands, right? The truth is this is not always the case. As with any other operating system, Android has its faults, and the guys over at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered a pretty nasty bug that can grant anyone access to certain phones.

The attacker needs no software or coding, nor does he really have to be an experienced tech geek. This is really pretty simple to do, which is why we can’t call it a hack. The good news is that it only affects devices running Android 5.0 to 5.1.1 Lollipop.They also have to be using a password-protected lock screen. In addition, the attacker has to have the phone in his/her possession for some minutes.

hackers-hacking-hacks

How to access Android 5.x devices

This is no rocket science. The idea is pretty much to input so many characters into the password field that it will force the device buffer too much, choke and give in. But the phone can handle a lot of text, which is why the intruder will need to open up the camera app at the same time (which is also accessible without a password input).

In the video, we see the tester launching the phone app (Emergency Call) and creating a long string of characters by copying and pasting. Once it’s long enough, he switches over to the camera app, pulls down the notification bar and presses on the Settings button. This, of course, will request a password. From there, just keep pasting the same string of characters over and over within the text field. Eventually, the device will not be able to handle the lockscreen process and let the user right in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=489&v=J-pFCXEqB7A

Where’s the fix?!

Pretty scary, right? I mean, it was reported only last month that about 18.1% of active Android devices are on Lollipop. That’s a whole lot of us, but we do have good news for you. This vulnerability has already been fixed for devices like the Nexus 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10.

Other large phone makers should be jumping on board relatively soon… or at least we hope so. You know how manufacturers and carriers can drag their feet when taking care of these software updates.

SecurityCheckup_Blog_1200x646_2x

How to protect yourself

Thankfully, we don’t necessarily have to rely on software updates to keep our Android smartphones protected. Just switch over to PIN or pattern unlock methods and you will be fine. These other lock screen protection techniques are not susceptible to this vulnerability.

smartphone privacy security 3 Shutterstock

8
Sep

Android distribution numbers for September show more growth for Lollipop


sony_lollipop_red_header

Each month, Google organizes the distribution of Android into a very simple pie chart. The data shows which the versions of Android that are still active on device’s today. On Monday, Google finished collecting data for September 2015. Things are how you’d expect them to be: Lollipop is still growing while KitKat is the most popular version of Android.

android_platform_distribution_september_2015

Despite being released in 2012 and 2013, respectively, Jelly Bean (31.8%) and KitKat (39.2%) remain at the forefront of Android distribution (71% combined). Lollipop, which debuted in late 2014, has grown a few percentage points to 21%. Companies are getting on top of updating their devices at a better pace, but it seems that the many low-end and mid-range devices with KitKat are weighing down better growth for Lollipop.

And it wouldn’t be a proper reporting of Android distribution numbers without mentioning that Froyo, Gingerbread, and Ice Cream Sandwich are still clinging on to a minor 8% combined.

Next month could be the first time we see Android 6.0 Marshmallow appear on the pie chart.

Source: Android Developers

Come comment on this article: Android distribution numbers for September show more growth for Lollipop

Visit TalkAndroid for Android news, Android guides, and much more!

7
Sep

Lenovo starts rolling out Android 5.0 update for the A6000 in India


Lenovo A6000

Lenovo has finally started pushing out the long-awaited Android 5.0 update to all unlocked models of the A6000 located in the India. In terms of added functionality, this upgrade brings the the latest build of the open-source operating system to the handset, as well as a multitude of bug fixes and stability improvements.

Hit the break for the full changelog.

  • Material Design: You will quickly notice a whole new colorful look and feel to your device – from fluid animations to new application and system themes, colors and widgets.
  • Notifications UI & Priorities: In order to alert you to the mosttimely and relevant information, the format and behavior of notifications have evolved:
    • notifications will appear on the lock screen and are intelligently ranked by type and who sent them.
    • you double-tap to open one, swipe left or right to clear one, or clear all notifications from the bottom of the list.
    • you can set the priority and privacy of notifications for each application.
    • very high priority notifications will pop up briefly over other applications so that you can take action.
    • when you dismiss a notification on one device it will be dismissed on your other Android devices, if they are connected to the Internet.
    • you can further tailor how notifications behave with the new Downtime and Ambient Display settings (see below).
  • New Interruptions & Downtime Settings: You can tailor how interruptions behave, choosing to allow all, none, or only priority interruptions.  You can personalize what counts as a priority interruption (reminders, events, calls, messages) and even tailor them to be from only contacts you specify.  The Downtime setting will allow only priority interruptions during the times and days that you specify.  e.g. allow only priority interruptions on the weekend.
  • Recent Apps (Multi-tasking): The redesigned Overview space (formerly called Recents) will include both applications and separate activities within those applications.  For instance, each open tab in Chrome will also appear here along with recent applications; both your Gmail Inbox and a draft email message will appear as separate cards.  This provides a consistent way to switch amongst tasks.
  • Flashlight: Lollipop includes a new flashlight option as part of Quick settings (swipe down with two fingers from the status bar to see it).
  • Pin a view/app: Screen pinning allows you to keep a specific app or screen in view. For example, you can ‘pin’ a game and your child will not be able to navigate anywhere else on your phone.
  • Battery: The Battery settings panel now shows an estimated projection for how much time you have left while discharging or charging.  You can also enable a new battery saver mode that will save power by reducing performance and most background data operations to extend your battery life.
  • Smarter Internet Connections: With Android Lollipop, your phone will not connect to a Wi-Fi access point unless there is a verified Internet connection. This feature improves hand-offs between Wi-Fi and cellular connections, helping to maintain your video chat or voice-over-IP (VoIP) call as you switch.
  • Performance: Your phone now uses the new Android Runtime to help optimize application performance.  After upgrading to Lollipop, your applications will undergo a one-time optimization process.  Note that the optimization for ART requires more space.
  • Security: Encryption can now use a stronger 256-bit key to help protect your data.  Note that the stronger key willonly be used after you perform a factory reset on Android Lollipop.  Otherwise encryption will continue to use 128-bit key.  You can turn on encryption in the Security settings menu.

If you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that the update is ready for your device, you could always search for the upgrade manually. To do so simply follow the four steps below:

  1. Open the Settings app
  2. Scroll to the bottom and tap on “About Device”
  3. Hit “System Updates”
  4. Tap on “Check for update”

Come comment on this article: Lenovo starts rolling out Android 5.0 update for the A6000 in India

Visit TalkAndroid for Android news, Android guides, and much more!

2
Aug

Samsung Galaxy Note 3 Neo confirmed to get Lollipop in the UK


Galaxy Note 3 Neo White

On Twitter, Samsung confirmed that the Galaxy Note 3 Neo will be getting the Lollipop software update in the United Kingdom shortly. Samsung stated that it hasn’t forgotten about it and is currently working on it.

The new build, based on Android 5.0, will include the Material Design overhaul and 64-bit ART compiler that makes apps open faster. It will also come with updated features such as a redesigned recent apps menu, new lock-screen card notifications, easier accessible quick settings, and improved battery life.

This will only be the second update the handset has ever received since it launched with Android 4.3 out of the box, the current build is Android 4.4.3. Thus will be a pretty sweet update.

Source: Samsung UK (Twitter)
Via: YouMobile

Come comment on this article: Samsung Galaxy Note 3 Neo confirmed to get Lollipop in the UK

Visit TalkAndroid for Android news, Android guides, and much more!

19
Jul

Google finally acknowledges the Lollipop battery drain associated with mobile radios


Over on the Android Developer Preview portal, Google has acknowledged an issue with battery life on Lollipop.

The problem occurs when a device running either 5.0 or 5.1 uses data. Internet apps will continue to drain the battery by keeping mobile data active unless they are forced to stop. On KitKat, apps stop doing so once they have completed their tasks. According to the user who reported it, this happens on Android M, as well. He or she also adds that the issue has been in the Android Issue Tracker since April, but Google has given it low priority.

A project member responded to the post with this:

Hi,
Thank you for reporting this issue. We have passed this on to the development team and will update this issue with more information as it becomes available.

Status: Acknowledged

Owner: dnaga…@google.com

Labels: Defect-22287469

Personally, I’ve experienced this since my LG G3 updated to Lollipop some time ago. Battery life indeed was worse, as the personal anecdotes I had read had mentioned.

Still, Google realizes this complication, and hopefully, this means that Google will raise its priority and work to fix it, especially as Lollipop (and later, Android M) becomes the most used flavor of Android.

The post Google finally acknowledges the Lollipop battery drain associated with mobile radios appeared first on AndroidGuys.

17
Jul

Google finally acknowledges the Lollipop battery drain associated with mobile radios


Over on the Android Developer Preview portal, Google has acknowledged an issue with battery life on Lollipop.

The problem occurs when a device running either 5.0 or 5.1 uses data. Internet apps will continue to drain the battery by keeping mobile data active unless they are forced to stop. On KitKat, apps stop doing so once they have completed their tasks. According to the user who reported it, this happens on Android M, as well. He or she also adds that the issue has been in the Android Issue Tracker since April, but Google has given it low priority.

A project member responded to the post with this:

Hi,
Thank you for reporting this issue. We have passed this on to the development team and will update this issue with more information as it becomes available.

Status: Acknowledged

Owner: dnaga…@google.com

Labels: Defect-22287469

Personally, I’ve experienced this since my LG G3 updated to Lollipop some time ago. Battery life indeed was worse, as the personal anecdotes I had read had mentioned.

Still, Google realizes this complication, and hopefully, this means that Google will raise its priority and work to fix it, especially as Lollipop (and later, Android M) becomes the most used flavor of Android.

The post Google finally acknowledges the Lollipop battery drain associated with mobile radios appeared first on AndroidGuys.

2
Jul

Verizon’s finally pushing out the Lollipop OTA for the Galaxy Note Edge


Samsung_Galaxy_Note_Edge_Back_Note_Edge_Name_TA

Verizon is now rolling out the long-awaited Lollipop update to all carrier-branded variants of the Galaxy Note Edge located in the United States. In terms of functionality, this upgrade transports the latest build of the Android operating system to the handset, in addition to a truckload of bug fixes and stability improvements.

Hit the break for the full changelog.

  • Material Design: You will quickly notice a whole new colorful look and feel to your device – from fluid animations to new application and system themes, colors and widgets.
  • Notifications UI & Priorities: In order to alert you to the most timely and relevant information, the format and behavior of notifications have evolved:
    • notifications will appear on the lock screen and are intelligently ranked by type and who sent them.
    • you double-tap to open one, swipe left or right to clear one, or clear all notifications from the bottom of the list.
    • you can set the priority and privacy of notifications for each application.
    • very high priority notifications will pop up briefly over other applications so that you can take action.
    • when you dismiss a notification on one device it will be dismissed on your other Android devices, if they are connected to the Internet.
    • you can further tailor how notifications behave with the new Downtime and Ambient Display settings (see below).
  • New Interruptions & Downtime Settings: You can tailor how interruptions behave, choosing to allow all, none, or only priority interruptions.  You can personalize what counts as a priority interruption (reminders, events, calls, messages) and even tailor them to be from only contacts you specify.  The Downtime setting will allow only priority interruptions during the times and days that you specify.  e.g. allow only priority interruptions on the weekend.
  • Recent Apps (Multi-tasking): The redesigned Overview space (formerly called Recents) will include both applications and separate activities within those applications.  For instance, each open tab in Chrome will also appear here along with recent applications; both your Gmail Inbox and a draft email message will appear as separate cards.  This provides a consistent way to switch amongst tasks.
  • Flashlight: Lollipop includes a new flashlight option as part of Quick settings (swipe down with two fingers from the status bar to see it).
  • Pin a view/app: Screen pinning allows you to keep a specific app or screen in view. For example, you can ‘pin’ a game and your child will not be able to navigate anywhere else on your phone.
  • Battery: The Battery settings panel now shows an estimated projection for how much time you have left while discharging or charging.  You can also enable a new battery saver mode that will save power by reducing performance and most background data operations to extend your battery life.
  • Smarter Internet Connections: With Android Lollipop, your phone will not connect to a Wi-Fi access point unless there is a verified Internet connection. This feature improves hand-offs between Wi-Fi and cellular connections, helping to maintain your video chat or voice-over-IP (VoIP) call as you switch.
  • Performance: Your phone now uses the new Android Runtime to help optimize application performance.  After upgrading to Lollipop, your applications will undergo a one-time optimization process.  Note that the optimization for ART requires more space.
  • Security: Encryption can now use a stronger 256-bit key to help protect your data.  Note that the stronger key willonly be used after you perform a factory reset on Android Lollipop.  Otherwise encryption will continue to use 128-bit key.  You can turn on encryption in the Security settings menu.

As is customary with all manufacturer updates, the upgrade is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device to hit your unit, you could always search for the update manually. To do so simply follow the four steps below:

  1. Open the Settings app
  2. Scroll to the bottom and tap on “About Device”
  3. Hit “System Updates”
  4. Tap on “Check for update”

If you own a Verizon-branded Galaxy Note Edge, why not drop us a line in the comments section below to let us know when you receive/received the update?

 

Come comment on this article: Verizon’s finally pushing out the Lollipop OTA for the Galaxy Note Edge

Visit TalkAndroid for Android news, Android guides, and much more!

30
Jun

HTC Desire EYE receiving its Lollipop update


It is a great day for AT&T customers using the HTC Desire EYE. After months of waiting, their phone will be updated to the latest iteration of Android! Yesterday, HTC product manager Mo Versi took to Twitter letting the world know that Lollipop was finally headed to the Desire EYE.

While is was at first unclear whether the device would receive Android 5.0 or 5.1, HTC has since then confirmed that the update will be to Android 5.0. While this means that the Desire EYE will not be running the most recent version of Lollipop, it will likely be hard to tell with HTC’s Sense skin running on top.

The update will be available to all compatible devices on AT&T. If you are rocking the HTC Desire EYE on AT&T, you should start receiving a notification about your Lollipop update sometime today. To check for the update manually, you can go into your Settings menu, tap on “AT&T Software Update,” and then tap “Check for updates.”

Have you recieved the Lollipop update for your Desire EYE, yet? Tell us in the comments!

Source: Mo Versi (Twitter) VIA: PocketNow

The post HTC Desire EYE receiving its Lollipop update appeared first on AndroidGuys.

30
Jun

HTC Desire Eye scheduled for Lollipop update with AT&T June 30th






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The HTC Desire Eye was nothing short of an interesting device. Personally, I would have rather had that then an M8. It just seemed… cooler. I don’t know. All of you who did choose to pick one up are in for a special little treat tomorrow. According to HTC’s VP of Product Management, the HTC Desire Eye has received technical approval for Lollipop and it is set to roll out June 30th.


He doesn’t mention which version of Lollipop will be coming though. I would love to assume that it is Android 5.1. However, it is safer to bet that it is Android 5.0 since that is what went out to international versions back in April. If you have the HTC Desire with AT&T be on the look out for an update to grace your device anytime around midnight and beyond. You will, as usual, want well over 50% battery life, a solid Wi-Fi connection and some time to kill for it to download and install.

If any users see it, be sure to share any details as to what version it is and additional features that get listed. I’ll check in with AT&T in the morning to see what they have to say on the subject.

Via Mo Versi Twitter

The post HTC Desire Eye scheduled for Lollipop update with AT&T June 30th appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

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