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21
Jan

I’m not even mad. That’s amazing! 7 brilliant, unorthodox hacks


Most of the time you hear about large scale hacks, it’s based on brute force attacks, or user naivety — such as a person clicking a link they shouldn’t or accidentally downloading malware. But there are also plenty of ingenious high-tech hacking methods which wouldn’t look out of place in a spy movie. Whether it’s false fingerprints or hacking drones, here are six of the most unusual and clever hacking methods we’ve heard about.

Getting past the sensors

Simon Hill / Digital Trends

Your smartphone sensors could rat you out by revealing your PIN code and password to hackers, claim researchers at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University. Utilizing machine learning and information gathered from six different smartphone sensors, they were able to unlock Android handsets with 99.5 percent accuracy within three attempts — provided that the PIN was among the 50 most common numbers. Even when this was expanded to 10,000 PIN numbers, the success rate stood at around 83 percent.

The idea of hacking different smartphone sensors is that they can reveal information which may not be immediately apparent to users — such as utilizing the ambient light sensor to discern which button is being pressed, based on how much light is being blocked.

When TVs go from smart to scheming

We don’t necessarily think of televisions as being computers, but in the age of smart TVs, maybe we should.

Recently, security consultant Rafael Scheel of Oneconsult AG demonstrated how it’s possible for hackers to gain control of smart TV sets without having to have physical access to them to do so. Using a cheap transmitter to embed malicious commands into a rogue TV signal, Scheel was able to gain access to televisions in the vicinity of the signal.

Once the TV is compromised, it could be used to attack further devices in the home network, or simply to spy on a home’s inhabitants using the TV’s camera and microphone.

Hacking in the age of 3D printers

At first glance, it might be harder to understand why someone would want to hack a 3D printer rather than, say, a smartphone. However, when you consider the applications of 3D printing for areas like prototyping it’s quite obvious.

In one 3D printer hack demonstration showing how secret designs could be stolen, a team of computer scientists was able to use a smartphone’s built-in sensors to measure the electromagnetic energy and acoustic waves that emanate from a 3D printer. This allowed them to gather enough data to replicate 3D printed objects with accuracy levels of up to 94 percent.

More worryingly, another team of researchers was able to use a phishing attack to gain access to the PC attached to a 3D printer, and alter its 3D model file. The result was a 3D printed drone propellor that was made to malfunction, and caused the drone to crash.

A flying hacker’s laptop

A lot of the high profile large scale hacks have taken place from thousands of miles away — from places like North Korea. However, there is also a rise in proximity-based “over the air” attacks, in which hackers are able to gain access to other people’s devices, which are physically located nearby.

In order to carry out proximity-based attacks on local devices like set-top boxes, smartwatches, smart refrigerators and more, researchers from renowned security firm Bishop Fox have developed a flying drone-based hacking station called Danger Drone.

By using its abilities to hover and fly to get around the problem of physical access, Danger Drone could be used to carry out an attack on multiple smart devices in a victim’s home.

Your fingerprints aren’t safe

Biometric passcode systems like Touch ID are on their way out for smartphones, but fingerprint sensors will likely stick around for years before they die out completely — and that’s exactly what this next James Bond-style hack could be used to exploit.

Demonstrated at the 31st annual Chaos Computer Club convention in Hamburg, Germany, hacker Jan Krissler showed how it was possible to replicate the fingerprint of German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen using nothing more than a photo of her hands software called VeriFinger.

With photos taken from several different angle using a standard camera, Krissler created a full fingerprint for Von der Leyen, and then developed a mold good enough to fool a fingerprint sensor.

Using soundwaves to control a phone

Whether it’s your smartphone or your connected car, hackers may be able to access it using soundwaves. Researchers at the University of Michigan have shown that it’s possible to hack into a variety of different gadgets by using soundwaves to trigger micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a.k.a. the chip used to say whether a device is in motion.

Using just a cheap $5 speaker to blast sound at different frequencies was able to cause devices to perform a range of actions, such as showing a video, starting an app, or even potentially start up a vehicle. While this would only have limited application from short range, it’s pretty disconcerting to imagine a device being hacked using an off-the-shelf speaker.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Hacker suspected of extorting HBO over ‘Game of Thrones’ script is charged
  • TWB Podcast: iPhone price cut rumor; smart home hack; delivery robot
  • Researchers already found a way to fool Amazon Key and shut off your camera
  • Vietnamese hacker breaks into airport system, finds his way to prison
  • Add the Teksta Toucan to the list of toys that can spy on your kids


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21
Jan

I’m not even mad. That’s amazing! 7 brilliant, unorthodox hacks


Most of the time you hear about large scale hacks, it’s based on brute force attacks, or user naivety — such as a person clicking a link they shouldn’t or accidentally downloading malware. But there are also plenty of ingenious high-tech hacking methods which wouldn’t look out of place in a spy movie. Whether it’s false fingerprints or hacking drones, here are six of the most unusual and clever hacking methods we’ve heard about.

Getting past the sensors

Simon Hill / Digital Trends

Your smartphone sensors could rat you out by revealing your PIN code and password to hackers, claim researchers at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University. Utilizing machine learning and information gathered from six different smartphone sensors, they were able to unlock Android handsets with 99.5 percent accuracy within three attempts — provided that the PIN was among the 50 most common numbers. Even when this was expanded to 10,000 PIN numbers, the success rate stood at around 83 percent.

The idea of hacking different smartphone sensors is that they can reveal information which may not be immediately apparent to users — such as utilizing the ambient light sensor to discern which button is being pressed, based on how much light is being blocked.

When TVs go from smart to scheming

We don’t necessarily think of televisions as being computers, but in the age of smart TVs, maybe we should.

Recently, security consultant Rafael Scheel of Oneconsult AG demonstrated how it’s possible for hackers to gain control of smart TV sets without having to have physical access to them to do so. Using a cheap transmitter to embed malicious commands into a rogue TV signal, Scheel was able to gain access to televisions in the vicinity of the signal.

Once the TV is compromised, it could be used to attack further devices in the home network, or simply to spy on a home’s inhabitants using the TV’s camera and microphone.

Hacking in the age of 3D printers

At first glance, it might be harder to understand why someone would want to hack a 3D printer rather than, say, a smartphone. However, when you consider the applications of 3D printing for areas like prototyping it’s quite obvious.

In one 3D printer hack demonstration showing how secret designs could be stolen, a team of computer scientists was able to use a smartphone’s built-in sensors to measure the electromagnetic energy and acoustic waves that emanate from a 3D printer. This allowed them to gather enough data to replicate 3D printed objects with accuracy levels of up to 94 percent.

More worryingly, another team of researchers was able to use a phishing attack to gain access to the PC attached to a 3D printer, and alter its 3D model file. The result was a 3D printed drone propellor that was made to malfunction, and caused the drone to crash.

A flying hacker’s laptop

A lot of the high profile large scale hacks have taken place from thousands of miles away — from places like North Korea. However, there is also a rise in proximity-based “over the air” attacks, in which hackers are able to gain access to other people’s devices, which are physically located nearby.

In order to carry out proximity-based attacks on local devices like set-top boxes, smartwatches, smart refrigerators and more, researchers from renowned security firm Bishop Fox have developed a flying drone-based hacking station called Danger Drone.

By using its abilities to hover and fly to get around the problem of physical access, Danger Drone could be used to carry out an attack on multiple smart devices in a victim’s home.

Your fingerprints aren’t safe

Biometric passcode systems like Touch ID are on their way out for smartphones, but fingerprint sensors will likely stick around for years before they die out completely — and that’s exactly what this next James Bond-style hack could be used to exploit.

Demonstrated at the 31st annual Chaos Computer Club convention in Hamburg, Germany, hacker Jan Krissler showed how it was possible to replicate the fingerprint of German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen using nothing more than a photo of her hands software called VeriFinger.

With photos taken from several different angle using a standard camera, Krissler created a full fingerprint for Von der Leyen, and then developed a mold good enough to fool a fingerprint sensor.

Using soundwaves to control a phone

Whether it’s your smartphone or your connected car, hackers may be able to access it using soundwaves. Researchers at the University of Michigan have shown that it’s possible to hack into a variety of different gadgets by using soundwaves to trigger micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a.k.a. the chip used to say whether a device is in motion.

Using just a cheap $5 speaker to blast sound at different frequencies was able to cause devices to perform a range of actions, such as showing a video, starting an app, or even potentially start up a vehicle. While this would only have limited application from short range, it’s pretty disconcerting to imagine a device being hacked using an off-the-shelf speaker.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Hacker suspected of extorting HBO over ‘Game of Thrones’ script is charged
  • TWB Podcast: iPhone price cut rumor; smart home hack; delivery robot
  • Researchers already found a way to fool Amazon Key and shut off your camera
  • Vietnamese hacker breaks into airport system, finds his way to prison
  • Add the Teksta Toucan to the list of toys that can spy on your kids


21
Jan

From the Editor’s Desk: Why do we want ‘foldable’ phones like the Galaxy X?


andrew-editors-desk-3.jpg?itok=3NRXQzM-

So … foldable phones, huh?

The Galaxy S9 and S9+ haven’t even been announced yet, and we know so much about them. So that means it’s time to start looking at the next thing, right? If that’s your thought process, you’ve no doubt been keeping up with the Galaxy X rumors — the “foldable” phone supposedly coming from Samsung this year. Samsung isn’t the only company working on this sort of thing, but if any company is setup to take advantage of branding and marketing to sell an altogether new form factor and technology, it’s the one.

If the rumorsphere is to be believed, the Galaxy X will effectively have a “standard” phone form factor, with the same width (or so) as a Galaxy S9, but with extra screen height to it. That extra height gives you more phone to look at without making the phone super wide, but makes it awkward to use. The solution? Let the thing bend in half on itself — at least, that’s what the current thinking is.

galaxy-x-patent-render-letsgodigital-2.j

Not knowing much else about how Samsung would position the Galaxy X, it seems like more than just a novel idea and a technology demo. Sure it looks a little funny now, but so did all-screen phones in the early 2000’s. It looks like the premise is simple: you get a big screen when you’re actively using it, but then it can be folded over into a more compact package when you’re not. This obviously involves some pretty large technological hurdles to have a screen that can be reliably folded back and forth thousands of times without quality degradation, but let’s assume Samsung has that figured out.

note-edge-versus-note-4-hardware-18.jpg?

Yes this form factor will only actually appeal to a small piece of Samsung’s typical audience, the core technology enthusiasts, but that’s kind of the point. The Galaxy S9 and S9+ will still be out and available. We may even have the Galaxy Note 9 by the time the Galaxy X is unveiled. This foldable phone will be an extra piece for Samsung to show what it can do and try to push the industry forward. To get people to expand their thoughts about what a phone can be. And, of course, it lets Samsung experiment a little bit.

In 2014 everyone thought the Galaxy Note Edge was ridiculous with its asymmetrical curved display … but that development was merely a stepping stone for Samsung to make it to what we see today in the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note 8: phones with smaller bezels, narrower profiles and bigger screens in smaller packages. The Note Edge wasn’t practical in any way, but today’s phones using the same general technology most certainly are.

We’ve seen this strategy play out before, and last time it worked out really well for Samsung. I’m not inclined to bet against it this time around, even if the Galaxy X seems way more “out there” than the Note Edge. I am absolutely excited for it.

Let’s close this thing out with a few other random thoughts form the week:

  • I switched from my Pixel 2 to a 2 XL prior to CES because I needed the extra screen and battery for the show. Now that I’ve been back for over a week … I’m still using it. Somehow I’ve normalized the size, even though I don’t “need” the extra battery anymore.
  • There are still plenty of times that it’s just awkward to hold and annoying to reach the top of the screen, but they apparently haven’t been annoying enough to get me back on my Pixel 2.
  • You may have noticed this week’s editorial about Google Now and Google Assistant. Apparently I’m not alone — most people think Google has handled this transition from Now to Assistant poorly, and there’s work to be done.
  • In further editorializing, great piece from Daniel Bader this week on where LG’s headed in the U.S. It has an outsized brand awareness as a company overall, but it just can’t get a foothold in the U.S. market. The future isn’t looking great.
  • I leave for Barcelona to cover MWC 2018 in exactly one month. Dang that came up quickly. But I’m excited to see how the show shapes up with Samsung’s announcement that it’ll unveil the Galaxy S9 there rather than a separate event.

Have a great week, everyone!

-Andrew

21
Jan

After Math: First!


It was a week of firsts for the tech industry. Facebook finally got around to adding its first African American board member (because it’s not like it’s already 2018 or anything), a lifeguard drone made its first Hasselhoffian beach rescue, Ferrari announced that it is indeed working on its first electric supercar, and Kodak took a break from slapping its brand on cryptocurrency mining rigs to release the first footage from its upcoming hybrid Super 8 camera. Numbers, because how else will you put entrants in order?

$70: That’s how much Nintendo’s first cardboard-based Switch accessory, the Labo, will set your parents back once you finally wear them down and convince them to buy it for you.

18: That’s how many patients will participate in the first human CRISPR trials held in the US. The trial, put on by the University of Pennsylvania, seeks to replace two faulty genes as a means of combating multiple myeloma, melanoma and two types of sarcoma cancers.

People stand in front of a logo at Facebook's headquarters in London, Britain, December 4, 2017. REUTERS/Toby Melville

2018: That’s the year that Facebook finally bothered to appoint an African American person to its board. Kenneth I. Chenault is already the CEO and Chairman of American Express.

70: That’s how many seconds it took for the “Little Ripper” UAV to deploy, spot and rescue a pair of stranded swimmers off the coast of New South Wales.

50: That’s how many votes the Democrats have in their fight to reverse the FCC’s disastrous decision to repeal Net Neutrality protections. The D’s only need to find one more vote in the Senate order to move the resolution to the president’s desk for signing.

$3,000: That’s how much you’re going to need to shell out for Kodak’s upcoming hybrid Super 8 camera once you finally wear your spouse down and convince them to let you buy it.

21
Jan

Amazon’s checkout-free store opens to the public January 22nd


Amazon’s bid to automate the convenience store is finally ready for the public. The company has confirmed that the Amazon Go store attached to its new Seattle headquarters will be open to non-employees on January 22nd, or more than a year later than planned. The premise remains the same. You have to scan in with a smartphone app when you enter the store, but it’s largely friction-free beyond that. A computer vision AI system tracks the items you remove from the shelves, letting you walk out without talking to a cashier or using a self-checkout machine. The only staff you’ll likely see are for ID checking (when buying alcohol) and the kitchen.

Don’t expect to buy everything you’d normally find in a convenience store. Recode likens it to a more elaborate Pret A Manger with ready-to-eat meals as well as drinks, meat, produce, snacks and Amazon’s own meal kits. The main allure, of course, is the speed. You can walk in, grab a veggie wrap and walk out in a matter of seconds.

There aren’t any concrete plans for additional Go stores, and that will likely depend on how well the technology works. How will the AI cope with a busy store, or the inevitable moments when customers have second thoughts and put a product back on the wrong shelf? If it does work, though, it could justify the fears of Walmart and others that have been testing cashier-free stores as a counter to Amazon’s expected strategy. It’s hard enough for conventional retailers to draw you in when you can order many things straight from Amazon — they’ll face an even tougher battle if Amazon can bring that simplicity to the need-it-now world of retail.

Source: Recode

21
Jan

Best product key finders: How to find that missing software license for free


Product keys, software licenses, serial numbers — they all seem to disappear completely when you need them most. Perhaps you need to reinstall a program, or worse, an entire operating system, but can’t locate the original case, manual, or that ancient email you deleted more than a year ago. It’s not a far-fetched scenario by any means, and finding the missing info will definitely take up a chunk of your time, typically requiring you to be placed on hold with customer service for longer than you would like.

Fortunately, there are scores of product key finders that will scan your system and compile an extensive report of any keys they find. The best part? The bulk of them don’t cost a dime — just download and click. Below are our picks for the best product key finders so you can jot down, print, or take a screenshot of all your precious keys in one place. Oh, and try not to lose them this time around.

Belarc Advisor

Belarc Advisor is overkill when it comes to finding product keys, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. The comprehensive utility is an industrious system information tool that will quickly pull together a summary of your system’s hardware and software, providing you with a detailed report that includes your various information about your machine’s RAM, processor, and circuit board, among other things.

It also includes a list of software licenses for Microsoft Office, Windows, antivirus programs, and heaps of other applications and software installed on your system. Despite being more than just a key finder, the program leaves a relatively small footprint on your computer, which is always a plus.

Download now for:

Windows

The Magical Jelly Bean Keyfinder

The Magical Jelly Bean’s Keyfinder is another great piece of shareware, however, you’ll have to opt for the premium version ($30) if you want a more extensive list of product keys and serial numbers for programs like Adobe Photoshop and the rest of the Adobe CS suite. Here’s how to find your Adobe keys for free.

The free version of Magical Jelly Bean can retrieve your Windows product key from your computer’s registry and copy it to your clipboard, save it as text, or print a hard copy. The software also supports more than 300 diverse programs and features an editable configuration file, meaning you can manually add support for other keys that aren’t as easily recognizable. The program also includes several advanced tools for the more tech-savvy user — such as the ability to retrieve product keys from unbootable Windows systems — but the basic key finder will suffice for most users with little to no hassle.

Download now for:

Windows

Mac Product Key Finder

The Mac Product Key Finder functions in the same way as the Magical Jelly Bean’s KeyFinder for Windows, albeit on MacOS, whether you’re running the latest High Sierra build or no. The freeware will scan your Mac for any software and allow you to save any associated product keys as a text, CSV, or PDF file, among a host of other formats.

The biggest drawback to the software is it is severely out of date. It hasn’t had a substantial refresh in several years, but it remains one of the only key finders available exclusively for Apple products. It can also locate product keys for your iPad, iPhone, or any other iOS device you’ve previously connected with iTunes. The premium version of the program ($30) will allow you to scan your Time Machine backups and expands the limited number of available keys the freeware version supports to nearly 400. If the Windows-only options are out of reach, Mac Product Key Finder is the next best thing.

Download now for:

MacOS

License Crawler

NirSoft’s License Crawler isn’t the most compatible key finder on our roundup, but it is one of the most portable. The barebones application will scan your computer’s registry for Windows product keys as well as Nero, Microsoft Office, and a few other notable pieces of software. Although the product is quicker than Googling serial numbers yourself, the finder’s key registry is fairly limited and occasionally produces inaccurate product keys that it claims are correct. It’s also pretty useless if the software in question doesn’t store its product key in the Windows registry. However, the application is ideal for a USB drive, is compatible with almost all versions of Windows, and produces a complex report that can be saved as a text document for later viewing.

Download now for:

Windows

Win Keyfinder

Win Keyfinder is another great option for those looking to locate missing product keys. The software is similar to Belarc Advisor in that it benefits from a small footprint — the ZIP file should download in just a few seconds and will take up very little room on your computer. You don’t have to install an actual program, either, as it can run using this single file. Once it locates your specific product key, the information will be displayed for you to copy, save, print, and even encrypt if you choose to do so. You can also change the product key and owner ID information at this juncture as well, and the software will identify keys for operating systems going all the way back to Windows 98. Win Keyfinder will also find keys for a swath of Microsoft Office iterations, including 97, 2000 SP2, XP, 2003, 2007, and 2010.

Download now for:

Windows

Updated 01/12/2018 by Jon Martindale – Added relevant internal links.

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21
Jan

Try these Honor View 10 tips and tricks to get more from your phone


The Honor View 10 packs in an awesome six-inch screen, a great dual camera lens setup, and the very powerful Kirin 970 processor. Coming in at just under $500, the device will surely be a favorite among people looking for an excellent midrange phone. If you recently purchased one, then you’ll want to check out this list of our top Honor View 10 tips and tricks.

Our first tip is to protect your new phone with one of the best Honor View 10 cases.

Set up Face Unlock

One of our favorite features on the Honor View 10 is Face Unlock, which allows you to quickly unlock your phone without using an unlock screen password or pattern. Since Face Unlock is not as secure as Face ID on the iPhone X, you can only use it to unlock your phone; if you want to make purchases, you’ll need to authenticate either by fingerprint or password.

Setting up Face Unlock is simple. Go to Settings > Security & privacy > Face unlock. You’ll need to enter your lock screen password to continue.  Tap Continue on the Enroll Face screen, then select Allow from the following screen. Make sure your face is centered in the image bubble. Once the camera has captured an image of your face, you’ll see a message saying, “Face successfully enrolled.” Finally, you’ll be presented with the option to automatically unlock your phone or set up a slide to unlock feature.

Enable Navigation Dock

As smartphone screens grow larger, they become increasingly difficult to navigate with just one hand. While most phones have an option that minimizes the screen, the Honor View 10 has a pretty awesome feature called Navigation Dock that allows you to use gestures to move about the screen.

There are two ways to enable the Navigation Dock. The quickest way is to tap the Navigation Dock icon in the Quick Settings tray. You can also enable the feature by going to Settings > Smart assistance > Navigation Dock. Slide the Navigation Dock toggle to the right to enable the feature. Once the Navigation Dock is enabled, you’ll see a circular icon appear on the screen. To move the icon, just hold and drag it to your desired location.

The Navigation Dock requires a series of gestures to move about the screen. Any time you want to return to the Home screen, long tap on the icon. To move back, you just need to quickly tap the icon. If you want to see an overview of apps you currently have open, just tap and slide the icon.

Create a PrivateSpace

If you find yourself frequently sharing your phone, the Honor View 10 offers an excellent privacy feature called PrivateSpace. With PrivateSpace, you can easily set up a private account that can only be accessed with a unique password or fingerprint.  To set PrivateSpace up, go to Settings > Security and privacy > PrivateSpace. Tap the Enable button followed by OK. You’ll then be prompted to set up a numerical password for the feature; this password cannot be the same as your primary unlock password. Once you’ve entered and confirmed a unique password, you can then tap the Associate button to attach a unique fingerprint.

Once PrivateSpace is configured, you can continue using your existing account by using your primary unlock screen password or fingerprint. If you want to use your PrivateSpace account, simply unlock your phone with your unique password or fingerprint.

While PrivateSpace is a great feature, it does not work with Face Unlock. If you previously set up Face Unlock, it will be disabled when you enable PrivateSpace.

Lock specific apps

If you’re looking to lock down just a few apps on your phone instead of creating a PrivateSpace, the App Lock feature on the Honor View 10 may be your best bet. With App Lock, you can require a password or fingerprint to open any app on your phone. To set up the feature, go to Settings > Security & privacy > App Lock. Use your fingerprint or lock screen password to access a list of apps installed on your phone. You can then easily enable the feature for each individual app by sliding its respective toggle bar.

Use Dual SIM cards

Along with the more expensive Huawei Mate 10 Pro, the Honor View 10 is one of a growing number of U.S. phones that offers dual LTE SIM support. To manage your SIM cards, go to Settings > Wireless & networks > Dual SIM settings. In the settings, you’ll see options for SIM 1 and SIM 2; if you tap on either of these, you can easily change the name of your SIM card. There’s also a slider for each SIM card that will allow you to enable or disable either card.

Once you have your SIM cards labeled you can then use Dual SIM settings t. You’ll also have the option to prioritize whatever SIM is receiving 4G service.

Use different camera modes

The Honor View 10 packs a pretty impressive dual camera setup. In addition to the 16-megapixel RGB lens and 20-megapixel monochrome lens on the phone, the Kirin 970 chip uses artificial intelligence (A.I.) to identify common settings and makes adjustments to help you get the best photo

When you open the camera app, you’ll be met with a pretty standard viewfinder screen. If you swipe to the left, you’re presented with more than a dozen different camera modes. Swipe right and you’ll see the Settings menu. While most of these modes are pretty standard fare for a smartphone, the light painting mode definitely stands out as one of our favorites.

Light painting lets you make artistic alterations to images. When you select Light painting mode, you are presented with four different scenarios:

  • Tail light trails captures the lights of moving cars in the night.
  • Light graffiti lets you capture trails of light in static images.
  • Silky water captures the flow of moving water in a silky-smooth effect.
  • Star track captures the trails of stars and galaxies in the night sky.

Take the perfect selfie

With Perfect Selfie, you can create preselected different settings to retouch your photos. Perfect Selfie works with portraits on both the front and rear camera; it can also recognize you in group shots. To use Perfect selfie, tap the Camera app on the home screen and swipe left to access the Settings menu. Tap on Perfect Selfie and toggle on. Next click Edit personal info; the app will ask you to take several shots from different angles.

Once you’ve taken all of the images necessary for Perfect Selfie to identify you, a collection of different beauty sliders will appear. You can use these to brighten and smooth out your skin, enlarge your eyes, and even make your face thinner. When you’re happy with your selections, click the check icon in the top right menu bar. You can easily make changes at any time by tapping on Set beauty effects.

Add fun photo filters

If you’re a fan of the AR filters available on Instagram and Snapchat, you’ll love the camera on the Honor View 10. With more than a dozen fun filters, it’s easy to find one that best captures the moment.

To take advantage of filters, tap on the Camera app on the home screen. Swipe right to see a list of different modes. Select the AR Lens mode. In the viewfinder screen, tap on the AR icon on the right hand side of the screen. You’ll see a number of different facial filter options.

If you’re using the front-facing camera, you’ll also see a Backgrounds option. This option allows you to use AR filters to change the background in your selfies.

Create two instances of an app

If you have multiple social media accounts, App Twin is going to make your life a whole lot easier. With App Twin, you can easily create multiple instances of many popular social media apps.

Before you use App Twin, make sure you have the social media apps you want to clone downloaded on your phone. Once you have the apps downloaded, go to Settings > App Twin and enable the apps you wish to copy. Once enabled, you’ll see two icons for each app on your screen or in your app drawer.

Enable voice features

If you like going hands-free, the Honor View 10 offers a nice selection of voice control features. With voice controls on the Honor View 10, you can easily unlock your phone, make phone calls, and even find your phone.

To enable voice control, go to Settings > Smart assistance > Voice Control. Tap on Voice wake up. Press the microphone icon and repeat the wake phrase “Dear Honor” three times. You’ll need to be in a quiet room and say the phrase slowly to get the best results.  If the phone has difficulty recognizing your voice, tap Wake up phrase training to record additional voice samples.

If you want to use your voice to make calls, tap Quick Calling and enable the feature by using the toggle. If you want to use the feature to call your contact Jane, for example, you would simply say. “Dear Honor, call Jane.”

The Honor View 10 also allows you to use your voice to find your phone. If you have voice control enabled, all you’ll need to do is say, “Dear Honor, where are you?”  Your phone will immediately begin ringing and repeating the phrase, “I’m here,” so you can easily locate your phone.

Editors’ Recommendations

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  • Try out these Honor 7X tips and tricks to get the most out of your new phone
  • The best Honor View 10 cases to keep your midrange monster beautiful
  • Honor View 10 review
  • Honor View 10 vs. OnePlus 5T: Which midranger reigns supreme?


21
Jan

You realize how much you rely on your phone only when you have to shut it off


Android-figures.jpg?itok=JOwVsINE

That little screen is your window to the world.

You hear it all the time: a smartphone is the best way to keep in touch with friends and family, know what’s happening in the world, and have a little fun now and then. But I found out that you can come to depend on it being the only way to do these things, and when you can’t have it you might feel lost.

I’ve had a round of doctors probing and poking at my back this winter. That’s not something unusual for me, but this go ’round involved three minor surgeries. Ouch. I just had the third (and final, thank heavens) done and unintentionally spent some time cut off from everything because I was without my phone.

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I had just finished the thing and was trying to get comfy in an uncomfortable hospital bed. I reached into my little pack (Be prepared; my scoutmaster taught me that!) and grabbed my phone to send a few messages to my people. I had just finished hollering at Daniel and the rest of the crew to let them know I survived, and a nurse with a look on her face that said “don’t argue with me” told me to shut it off and give it to my wife to take out of the room. Apparently, my room was part of the intensive care ward and had oxygen lines (or something, I’m no medical technician guy) and electronics were not allowed. No big deal, I was only there for one night so they could watch me sleep or whatever creepy thing they like to do at hospitals. Or so I thought.

Being alone with my thoughts was not nearly as fun as I ever imagined it would be.

My wife made sure I was settled in, then she had to go to work. So it was just me and my thoughts. The book I had planned to read was a Kindle book on my phone. There was no TV, no radio, no anything besides me and the little voice in my head. Normally people slept in this room, I was just in it because scheduling around hospital renovations made it empty and convenient. I literally had nothing to do but twiddle my thumbs until the next morning when I could leave, and it was simply maddening. I could have brought a book or a stack of magazines or something to pass the time, but I didn’t because my phone does all that stuff.

I know I’m not alone here. Not in the stuck in a hospital bed way, but in the depending on my phone to be everything way. These little gadgets have worked their way into our lives and replaced so many things like books or music players or even televisions, and I have always taken that for granted — I always have my phone in my pocket. That means I have the news, some music, YouTube and Netflix, plus a way to talk to real people with me all the time and never thought twice about it. At least until it was too late to do anything.

I love having a phone that does it all, but I’m going to start packing a book, too.

It’s great that we have these wonderful contraptions and that they can do so many things. But I’m going to make sure I pack a book or two along the next time I’m planning to be away from home for a day or two because without my phone I felt isolated and alone once I got over the boredom. And this was just one day; I don’t want to think about being cut off for an extended period of time. Being alone with my thoughts was not nearly as fun as I ever imagined it would be.

21
Jan

Google’s Gboard debuts a quick way to create reaction GIFs


Google’s Gboard for iOS is lagging a bit behind its Android counterpart, but a new update for iPhone users comes with a game changer. As The Verge has noticed, its dedicated GIF-maker button is no longer hidden at the bottom and now has a more prominent position on the keyboard, right on top beside the word suggestion bar. So accessible, and so convenient. It’s made even better by the fact that it can now also record short video snippets using the front-facing camera, making it a veritable reaction GIF machine.

Simply fire up the Make-a-GIF button and record a Loop, which is a three-second Boomerang-like format. Or a Fast-Forward that lets you record up to a minute of footage and spits out a sped-up GIF. While we can confirm the button’s new placement on iOS, as you can see below, we don’t see it on Android yet. (Take note, however, that we only saw the button’s new placement when we re-installed the keyboard.) Gboard’s app store pages don’t have notes about the update either, so you’ll simply have to check it every now and then.

Source: The Verge

21
Jan

Ben Heck’s mini pinball game: Designing the case


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With the electronics, mechanisms and simulations done, the miniature pinball game is starting to come together. Now it needs a great case. Remember, not every design element needs to be done on the computer first; sometimes it’s better to get hands-on with foam board and start prototyping. Once the design is set, Ben can take the measurements and make the fine adjustments using computer-aided design tools and then begin laser cutting. Would you have designed this differently? What should the graphics look like? Let us know over on the element14 Community.

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