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18
Jan

How to trade bitcoin for other cryptocurrencies


As successful a year as bitcoin has had in 2017, there’s no denying that other cryptocurrencies have seen a boon in their value too. Some have even more seen more growth than what many consider to be the poster child of a new economic model. With that in mind (and the ever-present concern of bitcoin’s volatility), it might not be a bad idea to at least know how to trade bitcoin for one of the popular alt-coins.

If you’ve never purchased bitcoin before or don’t know what this whole cryptocurrency lark is all about, we’d recommend you do a bit more reading before diving in to trading some of the less well-known alt-coins. But for those of you who have already purchased nice stack of bitcoin and would rather diversify than invest more, here’s how to trade bitcoin for something else.

What currencies should you trade for?

At the close of 2017, there are hundreds upon hundreds of cryptocurrencies vying to become as popular and as valuable as bitcoin, which can make it a little difficult to know what’s what and what you should be trading your bitcoin for. We wouldn’t presume to know the future of which cryptocurrencies will become super valuable and which will fall, especially since they all could go either way and many are dependent on bitcoin in that respect. However, these are some that are perhaps worth considering more than others.

Litecoin – One of the older bitcoin alternatives, created back in 2011, Litecoin has seen enormous growth in 2017 off the back of bitcoin’s own explosive value spike. It’s increased in value close to 100 times throughout the year, making it one of the top 10 most valuable cryptocurrencies and top five in terms of market cap.

Ethereum – With a market cap second only to bitcoin itself, Ethereum is an exciting, modern cryptocurrency which bundles in features like smart contracts, giving it real potential as a future transactional medium. It’s also seen huge growth as of late, making it a very viable alternative to bitcoin.

Bitcoin cash – Although some of the experts we’ve spoken to don’t speak too highly of this bitcoin fork, bitcoin cash is, at the time of writing, the second most valuable cryptocurrency in the world. It has proven extremely volatile, however, jumping tens of percent in days. Be wary of putting too much into this one. Consider it a more high-risk investment than even its brethren currencies.

Dash – Another older cryptocurrency formerly known as Darkcoin, Dash is built on the same framework as bitcoin, but fixes some its glaring issues. It’s a top five cryptocurrency in terms of value, but lacks some of the name recognition of the above contemporaries.

Other currencies potentially worth considering are Monero, ZCash, and Ripple, but as with all cryptocurrency investments, do your research first and be aware that very few represent a stable investment.

For a look at how all of these currencies are trading at any one time, live trackers like LiveCoinWatch and CryptoCompare can keep you abreast of the situation.

Using an exchange

The most automated and hands-off method for trading bitcoin for another cryptocurrency is through an established exchange. There are many exchanges out there and not all of them will tick all of the boxes you’re looking for. Some may not offer trades for the cryptocurrency you are interested in, or provide wallets for that particular currency. For a look at all of the many options available to you, Bitcoin.com has a regularly updated list of the best ones available.

That said, here are a couple of popular options and the steps you need to take to trade currencies on them.

Coinbase/GDAX

One of the longest-running and most respected exchange platforms, Coinbase (its trading platform, GDAX), lets you conduct trades between bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum, so you have some choice in what you trade.

Since you’ll want an attached wallet, signing up with Coinbase first is a good place to start. Don’t forget to verify your identity and complete the account setup process so that you have full access to all of Coinbase’s features.

Once complete, head to GDAX and login using your Coinbase information. You may be asked to verify again, but once that’s complete, you’re in. Transfer the bitcoin you wish to trade to your GDAX account and once confirmed, you’re ready to trade.

The main trading page features live trackers for the major currencies traded on the site. It’s a little confusing, but never fear, the actual trading itself is easy enough to get your head around. To choose what you’re trading and what for, click the slashed “Select Product” button in the top left. Select either ETH/BTC or LTC/BTC to make the trade for Ether or Litecoin, for bitcoin, respectively.

Next, you need to choose whether you make a standard “market” order at best market price; a “limit” order, which only makes a trade at a specific value or better, or a “stop” order, which will initiate a market order once a certain value has been reached.

When you are happy with your choice, click the green “Place Buy Order” button and await the trade. It is unlikely to be instantaneous, but it should be complete within a 24 hour period, especially if you are buying at market value.

There are a few more advanced features that you can play with if you want, but they go beyond the scope of this introductory guide.

ShapeShift

ShapeShift technically operates as an exchange, though it fits more of a middle ground between something like Coinbase and the more direct trade platforms. That makes it somewhat the best of both worlds, as it’s fast and convenient, but not quite as hands-on as peer to peer trading. It’s also much more private than both, as it needs no accounts or verification and supports far more currencies than Coinbase.

The important point to note with ShapeShift though, is that it does not deal in fiat currencies like USD. That means you will need to go somewhere else to buy or sell cryptocurrencies, but it makes it perfect for trading one cryptocurrency for another.

Note: ShapeShift does not currently operate in New York or North Korea.

To get started with ShapeShift, all you have to do is head to the home page and select the currencies you’re trading to and from — in this instance, pick bitcoin and whatever you want to trade it for. Choose “Quick” for your first time out, though you can play with the “Precise” trades when you’re more accustomed to the service.

On the next page, input your “destination address” for your new currency’s wallet (make sure it’s compatible with what you want to receive) and a refund address, should the trade fail for whatever reason. Check the “Miner fee” in the bottom right, to make sure you are happy with the transaction cost, then agree to terms and hit the big “Start transaction” button.

The next screen will give you a wallet address to deposit your bitcoin into. Do that and once it’s confirmed, you will receive your new cryptocurrency in its respective account.

Although transactions are typically fast on ShapeShift, it, like other exchanges methods, is susceptible to market traffic, so may take longer to make the trade at busier times.

Direct trades

Much like when it comes to selling your bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, if you would rather take a more direct role in the sale process, direct trades or peer to peer transfers are preferable. They do require you to be on-hand to make the transaction yourself, but you have a much firmer grasp of the price being negotiated and the eventual time and point of sale.

Since direct trades have a set price and you deal directly with your fellow trader, the process is slower and arguably more susceptible to fluctuations in value. That can mean you get a better deal, but it might not. It will be on you to check prices and cryptocurrency values at the point of trade to make sure you’re getting the best deal for you.

Paxful

Although Paxful can be used to trade bitcoins for cash, gift cards, and bank transferred funds, it can also trade one cryptocurrency for another. It supports Litecoin, Dash, Ethereum, and more — check the full list to see if the coins you want are supported. To make the trade, you can look for existing buy/sell orders by selecting your currency of choice and chosen payment method and selecting an appropriate trade, or make your own.

You’ll need an account to continue from there, but once setup and logged in, you can enter into a direct chat with your respective buyer/seller to complete the transaction. All cryptocurrencies are held in escrow so everyone walks away happy from a trade and it can be completed safely.

For those a little uncertain about the process, Paxful offers its own support system to help you if you run into any problems.

LocalBitcoins

LocalBitcoins is primarily aimed at buying and selling bitcoin, but it does also support Ethereum at the time of writing. It is even more hands-off than Paxful, so be aware that you will be responsible for the whole process, from providing a valid wallet address and completing your end of the deal in a timely manner.

To conduct a trade on there, you’ll need to select “Quick Sell” at the top of the page, input the amount you’re looking to trade and where you’re located and then select “Ethereum Altcoin” from the dropdown of available offers.

You may not find any listings at the time of searching, in which case using an alternative platform or waiting will be your best bet. However, in the case that you do find someone willing to make the trade, pick the one that offers you the best return on your bitcoin and hit the “Sell” button on the right-hand side.

Sign up for an account if you haven’t already and input your trade offer to the buyer. You can then enter a discussion to hash out a deal. Once you’ve made it, await the transfer of Ethereum from your trade partner and when received, send them the bitcoin in return.

Editors’ Recommendations

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18
Jan

Apple is paying the $16 billion in back taxes it owes in Ireland


Apple may be forking over $38 billion in repatriation tax payments to the U.S. government as part of an enormous investment in the American economy, but that’s not the only sizable dent that a government will make in the company After a lengthy and contentious debate that has raged on since the summer of 2016, Apple is finally settling its debt in Ireland. The Public Accounts Committee in Ireland will expect to see the collection of $16 billion in taxes from Apple beginning in March, and lasting through September.In 2016, the European Commission ruled that Apple was the beneficiary of illegal state aid in Ireland by way of so-called sweetheart tax deals with the Irish government. In essence, Apple was paying far less than the 12.5 percent corporate tax rate thanks to a deal it struck with the government back in the 1990s. This allowed Apple to record sales in Ireland other than other countries with higher tax rates, saving the company billions in tax dollars. Until now, that is.Although Apple may have hoped that its enormous tax payment in the U.S. to account for overseas cash might reduce the amount it would have to pay in Europe, this has not been the case.

“The Commission’s 2016 state aid decision found that, over many years, tax rulings issued by Ireland had allowed Apple to pay less tax on profits recorded in Ireland than other companies subject to (the) same national taxation laws,” a spokesman for the European Commission said. “This gave Apple an illegal advantage in breach of EU state aid rules, which must now be recovered by Ireland — nothing has changed in that regard.”

Apple’s sizable tax payment will apparently be held in an escrow account — which is to say, one held by a third party. This account ought to be set up by end of March. In a letter to the Public Accounts Committee, Department of Finance Secretary General Derek Moran noted, “Given the scale and the bespoke nature of the establishment of the recovery process at this stage it is not possible to provide a definite date for the completion of the collection of the alleged aid. However, identification of the escrow agent/custodian by the end of March 2018 will then allow for a payment into the escrow fund account, with payments continuing through the course of April, May, and June and up to the end of September 2018.”

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18
Jan

Apple is paying the $16 billion in back taxes it owes in Ireland


Apple may be forking over $38 billion in repatriation tax payments to the U.S. government as part of an enormous investment in the American economy, but that’s not the only sizable dent that a government will make in the company After a lengthy and contentious debate that has raged on since the summer of 2016, Apple is finally settling its debt in Ireland. The Public Accounts Committee in Ireland will expect to see the collection of $16 billion in taxes from Apple beginning in March, and lasting through September.In 2016, the European Commission ruled that Apple was the beneficiary of illegal state aid in Ireland by way of so-called sweetheart tax deals with the Irish government. In essence, Apple was paying far less than the 12.5 percent corporate tax rate thanks to a deal it struck with the government back in the 1990s. This allowed Apple to record sales in Ireland other than other countries with higher tax rates, saving the company billions in tax dollars. Until now, that is.Although Apple may have hoped that its enormous tax payment in the U.S. to account for overseas cash might reduce the amount it would have to pay in Europe, this has not been the case.

“The Commission’s 2016 state aid decision found that, over many years, tax rulings issued by Ireland had allowed Apple to pay less tax on profits recorded in Ireland than other companies subject to (the) same national taxation laws,” a spokesman for the European Commission said. “This gave Apple an illegal advantage in breach of EU state aid rules, which must now be recovered by Ireland — nothing has changed in that regard.”

Apple’s sizable tax payment will apparently be held in an escrow account — which is to say, one held by a third party. This account ought to be set up by end of March. In a letter to the Public Accounts Committee, Department of Finance Secretary General Derek Moran noted, “Given the scale and the bespoke nature of the establishment of the recovery process at this stage it is not possible to provide a definite date for the completion of the collection of the alleged aid. However, identification of the escrow agent/custodian by the end of March 2018 will then allow for a payment into the escrow fund account, with payments continuing through the course of April, May, and June and up to the end of September 2018.”

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18
Jan

Stem cell breakthrough may give people with paralysis their sense of touch back


For someone without a severe spinal cord injury (SCI), trying to wrap your head around what it would be like to experience is next to impossible. While most of us might focus on the mobility difficulties such a condition may cause, it’s easy to forget that many who experience paralysis also lose sensation in parts of their body — robbing them of their sense of touch.

In a new piece of research, investigators from University of California, Los Angeles look to have taken a big step in helping with this by coaxing stem cells to become sensory interneurons for the first time. The protocol could be a crucial advance in stem cell-based therapies able to restore sensation in paralyzed individuals who have lost feeling in parts of their body.

“Our work is exciting because we are the first to apply the right signals that tell stem cells how to become a type of spinal sensory neurons, the neurons that normally reside in the spinal cord that let you experience and react to the environment,” Samantha Butler, a UCLA associate professor of neurobiology and part of the Broad Stem Cell Research Center, told Digital Trends.

“Specifically,” butler continued, “these are the neurons that let you feel touch, and — something more mysterious — [establish] the position of your body in space. ‘Proprioception’ is a super power you didn’t know you had. Your spinal cord knows where your body is at all times, so that your legs don’t knock into each other as you walk, for example, or you hold yourself upright without thinking about it. If you lose proprioception you can still do these things, but it is extremely difficult: you need to be consciously willing yourself to perform the right movement task at all times.”

In previous work, Butler and her colleagues discovered how signals from a family of proteins called bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) influence the development of sensory interneurons in chicken embryos. In their new project, they added a specific bone morphogenetic protein called BMP4, along with another signaling molecule called retinoic acid, to human embryonic stem cells. The results were a mixture of two types of sensory neurons, providing proprioception and also enabling people to feel a sense of pressure.

The group is currently implanting these new sensory interneurons into the spinal cords of mice to discover whether they will integrate into the nervous system and become fully functional. Their research was recently published in the journal Stem Cell Reports.

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18
Jan

Elby could be the ebike that solves your commuting conundrums


It’s not that you hate your job — it’s that you hate getting there. When telecommuting is oh so much easier than your actual morning (and evening) commute, it’s no wonder that you’d rather stay at home than brave an overcrowded subway, a gridlocked highway, or one of the other urban mobility nightmares we’re facing these days. But before you grumble about how miserable your way to the office will be, you may want to take a look at Elby. Heralded as the world’s first one-size-fits-most pedal-assist hybrid bicycle, this is one ebike that will make getting to work (or just about anywhere else) so much fun that you may actually enjoy the journey more than the destination.

At its core a commuter bike, Elby wants to get you from Point A to Point B without requiring too much exertion on your part. The low step-through frame makes it an accessible bike for folks of a wide range of builds — whether you’re five feet tall or well over six feet tall, you should be able to ride the Elby. The frame is made of lightweight 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and as such, weighs in at under 50 pounds. That weight includes the high-torque BionX D-Series rear hub motor that helps get you up that pesky hill or through that challenging traffic without breaking a sweat. And better yet, it’s pretty quiet, so you can still get lost in your thoughts.

The motor is powered by a high capacity, super high output lithium-ion battery with a fully sealed 52-cell structure that promises to take riders up to 80 miles on a single charge. Recharging can either be done by plugging the bike into an outlet, or taking the battery out and charging it separately.

 To control the whole bike, there’s an intuitive BionX handlebar control ring that includes an on and off switch, as well as a thumb-activated Assist Level button and throttle. In order to actually get the throttle to work, you do need to have a bit of inertia. This is, after all, a pedal assist bike, and not a motorbike. That said, you should be able to simply push off from a stationary position and then hit the throttle to get the motor to kick in. Top speeds stand around 20 mph if you’re only using the motor, though if you add some pedal power you can actually get faster. Thanks to the bike’s low center of gravity, though, you shouldn’t feel as though you’re hitting dangerous speeds.

If you’re choosing not to bike with the motor, the Elby features a 9-speed drivetrain that should still make for trouble-free pedaling, and to keep you safe, there’s a high intensity Super Nova lighting system on both the front and rear of the bike.

Of course, no 21st-century ebike would be complete without some smartphone integration. With Elby, your mobile device actually turns into a mounted Elby interface. You can check out information about your bike, plan routes, track statistics and speed, or check the status of the entire ebike system.

While the Elby certainly could be the answer to your commuting woes, it’ll come at a price. The 9-speed variant will set you back $3,699 (though it’s currently on sale for $2,999), while the single-speed version is $3,499. But if you’re looking for a way to solve your transportation conundrums, the Elby may be your answer.

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18
Jan

Updates addressing Meltdown security issue are causing a number of PC reboots


If you haven’t updated your Intel-based PC with the latest patch to address the “Meltdown” security issue, then you need to wait a little longer. Intel said on Wednesday, January 17, that the firmware update released in early December to device manufacturers causes a higher number of system reboots on all PCs based on second- to seventh-generation Intel processors, which covers mostly all Intel-based PCs released since 2011. 

“While the firmware updates are effective at mitigating exposure to the security issues, customers have reported more frequent reboots on firmware updated systems,” Intel’s Navin Shenoy said in a statement. “We have reproduced these issues internally and are making progress toward identifying the root cause. In parallel, we will be providing beta microcode to vendors for validation by next week.” 

“Meltdown” is one of two security flaws recently discovered in all processor designs. The problem resides in how a processor will “think ahead” or predict when it’s executing multiple tasks. It stores data derived from multiple programs, services, and the operating system in the PC’s memory to help plot its next move. Think of a bank vault with lots of little storage boxes, and Google discovered a way to secretly sneak into that vault. 

The good news is that CPU manufacturers can patch the Meltdown issue. The bad news is that the fix can possibly slow down your PC because the processor must jump through extra hoops to keep the data it uses safe and sound. But as Intel clearly shows, the patching process doesn’t mean the company is slapping on a Band-Aid and moving on with life. Intel says it’s working to “understand, diagnose, and address” the issue causing reboots. 

Even though the Meltdown issue affects processors released over the last five or so years, you can determine the “generation” of your PC’s CPU by viewing its name. The indicating number resides just after the dash, such as the Core i7-6820HK serving as a sixth-generation chip as indicated by the “6.” You may also see many codenames thrown around regarding the Meltdown issue and Intel processors, so here’s a guide for those as well: 

Codename 

Generation 

Year 

Coffee Lake 

8 

2017 

Kaby Lake 

7 

2016 / 2017 

Skylake 

6 

2015 

Broadwell 

5 

2014 / 2015 

Haswell 

4 

2013 

Ivy Bridge 

3 

2012 

Sandy Bridge 

2 

2011 

Intel’s updates aren’t distributed outright to customers and businesses. Instead, they are provided to desktop and laptop makers, motherboard manufacturers including Asus, Gigabyte, and MSI, and through operating system updates. But given the reboot issues stemming from these updates, waiting until a better fix is your best bet. After all, the Meltdown problem was only made public at the beginning of January, thus there is currently no known exploit of Meltdown out in the wild … at least, not yet. 

Meltdown isn’t just an Intel-based problem. It also resides in AMD’s processors, and chips based on ARM’s CPU architecture manufactured by Qualcomm, Samsung, and many others. Qualcomm said it’s working on fixes for its Snapdragon chips while AMD is working with vendors to address the issue. Nvidia even updated its drivers to help protect systems with GeForce-branded add-in cards and discrete GPUs. 

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18
Jan

Honor View 10 vs. Honor 7X: Which phone is best for you?


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Honor is starting off the New Year strong with two new devices that tackle the low- and mid-range markets. The Honor 7X is one of our strongest recommendations for budget shoppers, packing a 18:9 display and dual cameras for just $200. Similarly, the View 10 gives the OnePlus 5T some much needed competition in the affordable flagship territory, with incredibly powerful specs and Android Oreo out of the box.

Despite the difference in price, however, both phones look pretty similar. Each has a large display with a high screen-to-body ratio, capable dual cameras, and an all-metal design — so why shell out more than twice the money for the View 10?

Why you should save your money and get the Honor 7X

These days, you don’t have to spend $500 or more to get a good phone. The Honor 7X may not pack the powerful internals of its more expensive companion, but it’s still a very solid performer.

The aluminum unibody design feels far more premium than that of similarly priced options like the Moto G5 Plus, and the 18:9 display gives the 7X a more modern look. The 2160×1080 LCD panel is a great touch, too — that’s the same resolution as the higher-end View 10.

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Inside, it packs an octa-core Kirin 659 chipset, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage. That’s quite a bit more than $200 usually affords, and you can further expand that storage with a microSD card if you don’t need the second SIM slot.

The 7X also impresses with its dual cameras. The secondary sensor is only 2MP, but it helps the primary 16MP ƒ/2.2 lens measure depth for nice wide-aperture photography. In addition, there’s a wide selection of shooting modes for different photo moments.

Why you should spend more for the View 10

For all the Honor 7X’s merit, the View 10 is simply more powerful. It features the same Kirin 970 chipset as the Mate 10 Pro from Honor’s parent company, Huawei, which is one of the highest-end processors on the market. With it comes to Huawei’s Neural Processing Unit, which allows for powerful AI enhancements that improve camera performance, instant text translation, and more.

Anything you can do, View can do better.

It also fills in the gaps on some important features the 7X lacks — namely the newer USB-C standard and NFC communication. Unfortunately, it’s still missing IP certification for water and dust resistance, and the aluminum design prevents wireless charging compatibility, but there’s still plenty to love about this phone.

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The View 10 also features more modern software. Where the 7X is still stuck on Android 7.0 Nougat and EMUI 5.1, the View 10 goes all out with Oreo and EMUI 8 to offer the same software experience as on the premium Mate 10 Pro. This introduces a cleaner UI, as well as handy new Android features like picture-in-picture video and notification dots.

Which one’s right for you?

There’s no one-size-fits-all answer here. Both phones are fantastic offerings for their respective price ranges, beating out the competition in a number of ways. The View 10 is clearly the more premium option, but not everybody will benefit enough from its advantages to justify spending the extra money.

It mostly comes down to whether you prioritize features like Android Oreo, EMUI 8, or the View 10’s AI capabilities. If modern software is a must-have, then the decision is easy — you simply won’t get that from the 7X. If, however, you don’t mind being on a slightly older build of Android, the 7X still has a lot to offer, and in day-to-day operation, you likely won’t notice the difference in performance.

Which would you choose?

Which phone would you pick up, and do you have any solid plans of doing so? Let us know in the comments below!

18
Jan

Huawei joins RCS movement by using Android Messages as default texting app


Google’s convinced Huawei to adopt RCS; now it just needs to do the same with carriers.

Although we may never get iMessage on Android, that’s okay. Google’s been leading the charge for RCS for a while now, and in an attempt to help expand its adoption to more carriers and other partners, Huawei is joining Google in this trek.

huawei-mate-10-pro-second-3.jpg?itok=bEO

RCS is essentially the next step up from traditional SMS/MMS texting, and it allows for things like texting over Wi-Fi networks, non-sucky group chats, indicators when someone’s read your message, etc.

One of the ways Huawei will be helping Google increase RCS’s adoption is by shipping all of its future phones with Android Messages out of the box. Android Messages is Google’s main showcase for RCS, and by using Android Messages as its default texting app, Huawei will be following in the footsteps of Motorola, Sony, LG, HTC, and others.

It’s really encouraging to see so many OEMs work with Google is expanding RCS, but the real challenge lies with getting carriers to adopt Google’s hub model.

Bell Mobility takes a first step in replacing SMS in Canada

18
Jan

Essential Phone giveaway! Enter now at Android Central!


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We’ve put together a little contest that will give one of you the opportunity to win an Essential Phone, because who doesn’t like winning free phones? All the details are below, so get yourself entered now!

THE PRIZE: One Android Central reader will be taking home a new Essential Phone in black!

THE GIVEAWAY: Head down to the widget at the bottom of this page. There are multiple ways to enter, each with varying point values. Complete all of the tasks for maximum entries and your best shot at winning! Keep in mind that all winning entries are verified and if the task was not completed or cannot be verified, a new winner will be chosen. The prize does not include service, and we cannot guarantee that the device will work on all carriers. International winners will be responsible for any customs fees incurred during shipping.

The giveaway is open until February 9, 2018, and the winner will be announced right here shortly after the closing date. Good luck!

Enter to win a free Essential Phone from Android Central!

18
Jan

This is what Fuchsia OS looks like on the Pixelbook


Fuchsia OS technically runs on the Pixelbook, but there’s still a lot that’s broken.

At the very beginning of the year, it was discovered that Google had added the Pixelbook as an official test device for its mysterious Fuchsia OS. Just about a couple weeks later, the team at Ars Technica managed to get Fuchsia running on the machine with some (expectedly) mixed results.

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Unlike an early version of Fuchsia that came out in May of 2017, this is running directly on the Pixelbook rather than just showing a UI on top of Android. You can read Ars Technica’s article to learn about all the nitty-gritty details, but what I find most interesting is how the UI works.

Starting first with the lock screen, you’ll see the time in the middle with a plus icon near the bottom right. Tapping this brings up shortcuts for Wi-Fi, Login, and Guest, but for the time being, all of these are quite broken.

fuchsia-os-pixelbook-lockscreen.jpg?itokfuchsia-os-pixelbook-home-screen.jpg?ito

Fuchsia’s lock screen (left) and home screen (right)

Once you move past this and get to the home screen, the time/date, Wi-Fi indicator, and battery information is present in the middle of the screen. Below this is a Google Search bar and notification cards to show contacts’ birthdays, how long it takes to get to a restaurant, etc. When you tap on the Fuchsia logo at the top, you’ll get volume and brightness sliders, airplane mode toggle, do not disturb mode, and auto-rotate lock.

Any apps or web pages that are open appear at the very top, and you can move these around and open them up in split-screen mode as you like.

fuchsia-os-pixelbook-recent-apps.jpg?itofuchsia-os-pixelbook-split-screen-mode.j

Recent apps and split-screen mode in Fuchsia

Fuchsia OS is still in very early stages, and there’s a good chance a lot of what we’re seeing here could change by the time it’s ready for the limelight. Even so, it is interesting to get a glimpse of what Google’s working on.

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