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15
Feb

Recommended Reading: Jawbone on the rise and the indie gaming bubble


Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology in print and on the web. Some weeks, you’ll also find short reviews of books dealing with the subject of technology that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read.

Jawbone Is Now the Startup Apple Should Fear Most
(978 words)
by Marcus Wohlson, Wired

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In case you hadn’t heard, there are reports that Jawbone is securing a massive round of funding that would fuel the company’s IPO. The Bluetooth gadget outfit has given us a range of wireless speakers and it’s line of Up fitness trackers, but more capital could mean new product categories — things like smart clothes and improved wrist gadgets. As Wired’s Marcus Wohlson notes, those new categories are “a move Apple has struggled to make in recent years.” And of course, there’s always the chance Google could nab Jawbone up before Cupertino has a chance to.

Behind the Scenes at Nerf HQ and the Making of the Slingfire Zombie Blaster
(919 words)
by John Brownlee, Fast Company

Ever wondered what the design process like behind the master blasters from Nerf? Sure you have! Here, Fast Company’s John Brownlee takes a behind the scenes look at the development of the Zombie Strike Slingfire: a sawed-off, pump-action foam dart weapon that’ll have you… er, kids… prepped to handle hoards of zombies this fall.

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The Floating, Fragile Indie Bubble
(2,273 words)
by Jessica Conditt, Joystiq

Joystiq’s Jessica Conditt takes an in-depth look at the current indie gaming landscape and the impending identity crisis that devs face. There are new tools and programs to lend a hand, but this means more devs are diving in. “Overpopulation and quality assurance are concerns echoed by nearly every developer I ask,” writes Conditt. However, the population boom has led to much better indie titles and more diverse voices, too.

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Pandora Suit May Upend Century-Old Royalty Plan
(1,292 words)
by Ben Sisario, New York Times

Nearly a century ago, ASCAP and BMI began serving as middlemen between publishers and songwriters with those looking to license their work. Now, with Pandora bogged down in legal proceedings over royalty payments, the aging system may be discarded. Of course, this is quite alarming for publishers who would then have to fend for themselves, and not even the largest outfits are equipped to do the work of the pair. “This is a horse-and-buggy consent decree in a digital environment,” said Rick Carnes, president of the Songwriters Guild of America. “There’s no way that works now.”

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Our Numbered Days: The Evolution of the Area Code
(3,149 words)
by Megan Garber, The Atlantic

Long distance calling isn’t the money maker that it once was in the US, but the area code has been ingrained into our culture for decades. The Atlantic’s Megan Garber takes a look at the history of those digits and what services like Skype and Google are doing to deplete the finite 10-digit numbering system — including adding one or two more digits. All of this begs the question: what will happen to those three-digit codes that have developed significant meaning for us?

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15
Feb

Windows Phone, Chromecast and YouTube get together thanks to Tube Cast


The past few weeks have seen a ton of activity on the Chromecast front, and now some of that excitement is extending to Windows Phone. With the Tube Cast app, you can link your Redmond handset to Google’s HDMI dongle and search, select and play YouTube clips to your flat-screen. As WMPoweruser notes, it’s pretty simple (much like Chromecast features on Android and iOS) but it can’t pause or stop playback. While the general idea is great, hopefully the next set of apps gives just a touch more functionality. After all, not being able to pause a goat screaming like a man can be awkward if the wrong person walks in the room.

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Via: WMPoweruser

Source: Windows Phone Store

15
Feb

The week’s best Android rumors: Galaxy Tab 4, HTC Nexus 10, Desire 8, Nokia Normandy, and more


Samsung Galaxy Tab 4

Samsung will possibly introduce the Galaxy Tab 4 line of tablets at Mobile World Congress, according to whispers. Details include a 7-inch, 8-inch, and 10.1-inch model are in order; common specs include 1280×800 resolution, microSD, and 1.2GHz processors. Storage will range from 8GB to 16GB and cameras jump around from 3.-megapixels to 8-megapixels.

Oppo Find 7

Chinese handset maker Oppo is expected to debut two versions of its Find 7 smartphone. Reportedly, one model will feature a 1080p HD display while the other offers users a 2K (2,560 x 1,440) resolution.

htc-new-desire-8

HTC Desire 8

HTC should soon introduce a 5.5-inch Desire 8, possibly at Mobile World Congress. Specs include a 13-megapixel rear camera, stereo front-facing speakers, on-screen navigation, and a plastic body (in multiple color options).

HTC M8 Mini

Specs leaked this week for the so-called Mini version of the HTC M8 figure to include a 4.5-inch 720p display, a quad-core 1.4GHz processor, 13-megapixel rea camera, 5-megapixel front-facing camera, Android 4.4.2 with Sense 6, on-screen buttons, 1GB RAM, and 16GB storage. Rounding things out are Wi-Fi (802.11 a/b/g/n/ac), microSD expansion, and Bluetooth 4.0.

HTC Nexus 10

Word on the street is that HTC has been working with Google to develop the next-generation of Nexus 10 tablet. No hard details to share yet; rumored arrival is scheduled for the second half of the year.

ZTE-Nubia-Z7

ZTE Nubia Z7

ZTE’s next big (translate: huge) release is expected to be the 6.44-inch Nubia Z7. Specs leaked thus far include Android 4.4 KitKat, a 2.3GHz quad-core processor, and a whopping 128GB internal storage. Launch is tentatively March or April, or so say the sources.

Sony Sirius

Details surfacing this week indicate that the Sony D6503 “Sirius” could feature a 15.5-megapixel camera at 16:9 aspect ratio in addition to the 20-megapixel setting. Recording at 1080p, users should have the option to toggle 30fps or 60fps.

Nokia Normandy

If a Vietnamese retailer’s price is any indicator, Nokia’s upcoming “Normandy” may come in around $110. We’ve been expecting a low sticker because of the leaked specs, but we’ll know more around Mobile World Congress.

The post The week’s best Android rumors: Galaxy Tab 4, HTC Nexus 10, Desire 8, Nokia Normandy, and more appeared first on AndroidGuys.

15
Feb

FCC filing hints at a couple of new Samsung Galaxy tablets


Samsung SM-T530 tablet at the FCC

Samsung may have more than the Galaxy S 5 to show at Mobile World Congress this year. It just passed a couple of unannounced tablets through the FCC. One is a 10-inch SM-T530 that is clearly isn’t one of the company’s pro models; the rear camera doesn’t have the telltale flash. As such, it’s most likely to be a fourth-generation entry in the lower-cost Galaxy Tab line. There isn’t any cellular data on this particular device, although we wouldn’t rule it out for additional variants that have popped up at the Bluetooth SIG and an Indian import tracker. We also spotted what looks to be an 8-inch SM-T330, which is rumored to be the Galaxy Tab 4 and was spotted on Bluetooth SIG a few weeks ago. It too doesn’t appear to sport any cellular bands, but as always, we wouldn’t rule out LTE versions later down the line. No matter what, it’s safe to presume that Samsung will have at least one more slate up its sleeve in the near future.

Nicole Lee contributed to this report

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Source: FCC (1), (2)

15
Feb

Roocase Dual-View Folio Review for Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 7.0: a folio with more to it than meets the Eye


Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewThe folio market is one that is brimming full of so many options these days, and it seems everyone and their dog has made a folio case for at least one device. Furthermore, most of these folios are very similar design, though they typically vary in the way that they fold into their respective viewing positions. This is an area that I think has a lot to be desired as many cases really struggle to hold tilted viewing positions and fewer still are able to do this effectively in both landscape and portrait positions. Which brings us the Dual-View Folio, a case from device protection specialist roocase (who ironically is not an Australian company). Today, we’ll be taking a look at a Dual-View Folio specifically for the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 7.0, but note that roocase also makes this particular Dual View Folio for these other cases too:

  • ASUS MeMOPad HD 7
  • Google Nexus 7 FHD (2013)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewThe Dual-View Folio (DVF) is a relatively simple affair; right out of the box, you’ll just the folio itself, no bells and whistles. What you do get a PU leather (or bicast leather) case which is able to hold one tablet inside as well as the accompanying stylus; more on that later. The case itself looks to be quite well made and comes in a host of groovy colours including black, pink, navy, red and the purple which we have here.

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewRoocase has opted for a slightly unorthodox method for securing your tablet inside the folio, using a simple velcro to hold your Tab 3 in the case and relying on the leather frame around it to hold the tablet from moving. For the most part it’s very effective, but I would say that the process of putting the velcro in behind the tablet to secure it is a bit fiddly. I found the leather strips holding the tablet in place to be a little flimsy, and while they do the job, they look like they might be slightly weak. Assuming that they hold, the DVF is actually a relatively protective case with ample spaces on all sides to avoid the tablet itself making contact with hard surfaces.

Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review

Once inside the case, it provides ample gaps and areas for you to access all the buttons and slots that you require from your tablet. Probably one of the neat things with using this leather enclosure rather than a plastic shell case to hold the tablet in place is that there can be so much space left open to manipulate the various buttons, which you can see in the gallery of images above.

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewAnd of course there’s also the stylus that we mentioned earlier; the stylus pictured above comes standard with each DVF and although you might not be able to see from this angle, also doubles as a pen, much like the moshi Stanza Duo we check out the other week (read the full review for the Stanza Duo here). Unlike the Stanza Duo, however, this stylus has a very simple pen and a very simple rubber capacitive tip. While it might not be made of the same premium materials, the included stylus in the DVF does the job. If I have one criticism of the stylus it is that the metal clip that holds it in the pen holder is a little too stiff which can make it a little fiddly to get back into the pen holder.

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewAs for the inside of the folio case cover, you get two grooves for two different viewing angles when using the folio in stand mode, as well as two slots for what look like SD cards. When the case is closed, it is held closed by a magnet, but only on the top edge of the case; this makes the case cover a little looser than what you might be hoping for.

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewAs the grooves suggest, the DVF is able to act as a stand as well with the grooves providing two viewing angles. The Tab 3.0 is a relatively light tablet so it didn’t appear to have too many issues staying in the grooves. The inside of the folio is made from a material that is almost like felt, which makes it quite good for stopping any sliding when in these viewing positions.

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewWhat is probably the best party trick of the DVF is the fact that the enclosure part of the folio which encases the tablet is actually only attached to the outside of the folio by velcro, as you can see in the photo above. What this means is that the tablet can be rotated to be used in portrait mode for viewing purposes, or if the front cover of the case is annoying you, you can just handle just the tablet without removing it from the enclosure. This makes for a much more versatile case as you can use just the bits that you need when you need it.

Roocase Dual-View Folio ReviewRating: 4/5

The roocase Dual-View Folio is a prime example of what a folio case should be: multifunctional. The Dual-View Folio would perform admirably in the home or office setting with its set of features. What the folio gains in functionality though, I feel it loses in polish; parts of the case aren’t that well designed and the stylus isn’t the best either. That said, for a MSRP of $39.95, there are plenty of worse cases around and none that offer the kind of versatility that the Dual-View Folio offers.

What makes that even sweeter is that Amazon is currently having a sale on the Dual-View Folio, halving the price to just $19.95. If you’re in the market to get a case for your Galaxy Tab 3 7.0, or any other device that roocase makes a case for, you can’t go wrong with a Dual-View Folio; Amazon links can be found below.

If you want to find out more about the Dual-View Folio, you can visit its product page here, or if you want to take a look at some of roocase’s other products, you can visit their website here.

 Gallery of photos

Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
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Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
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Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review
Roocase Dual-View Folio Review

 

15
Feb

Qualcomm cans its 4K smart TV chip while everyone’s busy watching House of Cards


Remember that awesome Smart TV processor Qualcomm trotted out for CES? It looks like it won’t be making its way to your living room after all. The company quietly announced the death of the Snapdragon 802 this week, stating that “the overall demand for processors uniquely designed for smart TVs has proven to be smaller than anticipated.” It’s a shame, too — that quad-core chip was specifically designed to push 4K content to your living room with a robust app experience, complete with multitasking support. Considering how many Android sets have hit the market in the last few years, we’re left to wonder: is there really a dearth of demand, or is Qualcomm struggling to find a way to market its new silicon?

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Via: Engadget Chinese

Source: Qualcomm

15
Feb

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review: not as freaky as you might Expect


Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewDenon is name that many audio savvy people will associate with high-grade amplifiers and cutting edge audio/video technology for the living room and television. They have, however, recently moved into producing headphones and earphones, targeting different lifestyle groups to try and put their stamp on audio consumers. We’re lucky enough to be looking at the Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones today which, you guessed it, are targeted at fitness junkies and others who might need a wireless pair of headphones. Let’s see if Denon’s pedigree comes through in their first foray into the fitness audio scene.

The earphones

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewRight out of the box, the Exercise Freak (EF) in-ear headphones come with a whole host of extras that will help you get set up and running. Naturally, you get the earphones and you also get a carry bag in the colour of your earphones. Inside this zip-sealed bag is a micro-USB cable for charging your EFs as well as three sets of different sized earbuds. You also get a carabiner, also matched in colour to your earphones, which can be hooked onto the rear of the carry bag for an easy way to attach your extras to yourself or your bag. Of course, the carry bag itself is large enough to carry all of this including the earphones if you’re just looking to pack them away.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewYou can purchase Denon Exercise Freak earphones in either blue, black, pink or the yellow which we’ve got here. They’re definitely a very distinctive pair of earphones, not only for the bright colours, but the design as well. To call them ugly would be doing them a disservice, but they are definitely not the most aesthetically pleasing earphones on the market; I’ve even heard the EFs described as ‘hearing-aid’-like referring to the general bulkiness of the earphones which do appear to carry a lot of size in the earpiece.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewAs you would have guessed from the name of the earphones, the EFs are a wireless Bluetooth set of earphones. Pairing is a simple matter of holding the play/pause button for a few seconds to enter Bluetooth pairing mode after which you can pair away with your device. The battery of the EFs lasts roughly 7 hours, which does seem a little short, but given the size of the earphones and the fact that you’ll never be exercising for longer than 7 hours at a time (hopefully), that should be more than enough battery life to suit your needs.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewTo fit better to your ear, the EFs employ the use of a moulded body that wraps around your ear with a rotatable earpiece at the end of it to try and get that perfect fit; more on the comfort later. The two earpieces are connected by quite a thick cable, thicker than the standard audio cable at least, which also has a reflective strip mounted to it; this is a nice touch, particularly for all those runners and riders who are fond of activities that either start very early or very late.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewAs you might expect, given that the Exercise Freak earphones are a full wireless set of headphones, there are quite a few controls mounted on the earpieces themselves. On right side, you will have the play/pause and volume up/down buttons, as well as housing the mic, micro-USB port for charging, and the indicator light. By comparison, the left earpiece appears to be lacking in notable features with only the answer call button situated on it. I can’t fault the placement of the buttons on the EFs as they all sit in logical positions that are easily accessible while wearing them.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewDenon also makes a point to advertise the fact that the Freaks are sweat resistant, which is always a nice feature considering they are targeted at the fitness crowd. While I didn’t test them to what might be the maximum of sweat saturation, they lasted through several workouts with sweat just needing to be wiped off at the end of it.

The comfort

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewAs I mentioned earlier, the Denon Exercise Freak earphones are quite a large set of earphones. They appear almost unwieldly, and to be frank, they are actually a bit unwieldy to manipulate. I’ve always been slightly opposed to headphones that have earpieces shaped to the ear for this reason: to actually place the EFs on your ears, you have to generally have to fiddle with your ears as you try and fit them into the right gap, and once they are correctly situated, then you’ll have to adjust the actual earbud part of the EFs to be correctly seated in your ear.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewThat would be all well and good if the EFs fit perfectly and stayed where they were; unfortunately, this isn’t the case. To make the EFs sweat proof, Denon has opted to use a slightly harder, slightly less grippy plastic for use for the earbud tips which results in them slipping out a lot, which as a fitness accessory can be quite a hinderance. Denon has said though that this is by design, seeing as runners and cyclists need to be aware of their surroundings when going about their exercise. While this is a partially valid consideration, I would have though that people in these situations would have already turned down their music to be more aware of their surroundings, or would choose not to use them at all.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewIn the periods of time that the EFs do stay on, however, they are decently comfortable. While you won’t ever forget that they are there, they are light enough to be relatively unnoticeable. Even with glasses and taking them on and off, I didn’t feel them impeding that freedom at all, though I would say if you were to wear a cap or other hat, you might have a bit of fiddling to do.

The sound

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewGiven Denon’s history with premium audio equipment, it’s no surprise to discover that the Exercise Freak earphones sound fantastic. As far as in-ear headphones go, the EFs are right up there with the best of the best for sound. The sound is full, with the treble and bass well represented, though I would say that they are slightly bass heavy, as I believe fitness folk are ought to prefer. As you would expect with in-ear headphones, they do lack the depth of their on-ear or over-ear headphone brethren, however the EFs sound fantastic regardless. That is, if you can keep them in long enough…

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewAs the existence of a microphone on the right earpiece also suggests, the Exercise Freak earphones are also usable to receive calls during your workout. Call quality is good, provided you have the earphones situated correctly, and mic audio performance is good also despite being located around your ear. I’m not sure how sensitive the mic actually is and whether you would end up getting a lot of background noise if you received a call while outside on a run, but I think it does the job well.

The practicality

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewI think the Denon Exercise Freak earphones are equipped will all the right ingredients to be a really good, functional pair of fitness earphones; they’re light, they have all the necessary buttons located in accessible positions, they’re sweat-proof and they have a reflective strip on the back for low-visibility conditions. To top it off, it also comes with a neat little bag for all its extras as well as storage of the earphones themselves during travel.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewI’ve already given you my opinions of how I think the EFs would perform out in the field, but if there’s a one little thing I would improve about them to make them a bit more functional, I would definitely add skip forward/backward track buttons seeing as that’s really the only missing playback function.

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewOne other thing that Denon offers which I didn’t mention earlier is fitness app, simply named Denon Sport. Like most other fitness tracking apps, it uses the GPS of your device to log your exercise progress and map your calorie consumption and route. You can also manually log indoor exercises as well as keep track of your nutrition habits within the app. The app is also able to give you feedback about your current exercise session. While it’s nice that Denon has provided this app, I found it a little too unpolished, and while it does provide you all the bells and whistles of most GPS tracking apps, I found it slightly ironic that Denon didn’t include any audio features into the app at all, not even a simple EQ settings app.

The verdict

Rating: 3/5

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones ReviewThere’s a lot to like about the Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones and I have to give kudos to Denon for their attempt at entering the highly lucrative and competitive fitness market with this set of earphones. Unfortunately, there’s also a lot to not like about the Exercise Freak earphones, and many of those issues undo the brilliance that it occasionally exhibits. Chief among this is the design of the earphones affecting the sound; the EFs sound fantastic, and if it weren’t a pair of fitness earphones, this would be great. But they are, and it isn’t great; the fact they keep slipping out during physical activity really does undo any advantages that were made by having Denon’s expertise in premium audio put into a pair of fitness earphones. Of course, they do the job as a pair of fitness earphones, however, ultimately when you’re paying a MSRP of $179.99 USD, you really want them to sound worth your money.

Luckily for you though, Amazon.com is currently having a sale on the Exercise Freak earphones with the blue, pink and yellow variants going for the lowered price of $99 USD and the black version going for slightly higher, but still reduced, price of $129 USD. At that price, I would still considering everything that I detailed above, but if it fits your bill, have at it; we have Amazon links below to help you out if you’re interested.

If you want to find out more about the Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones, you can visit the product page here, or if you would like to take a look at any of Denon’s other products, you can visit their website here.

 Gallery of photos

Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review
Denon Exercise Freak Wireless Fitness Earphones Review

15
Feb

HTC M8 Shows its Thin Bezels! Galaxy S5 Render Leaked? – The ManDroid Show


mandroidshow-htcm8-galaxys5

Happy Friday my nerd friends. TIme for that video portion of our website. Some more HTC M8 images arose from the interwebs. A strange little Galaxy S5 render has been circulating through the web that is most likely a nifty Photoshop job. Won’t be long now until we actually see these new flagship phones.

News Topics
HTC M8 images
HTC M8 render
Galaxy S5 render
LG G Pro official
Dennis Woodside leaves Motorola for Dropbox

15
Feb

Leak looks like the Xperia G, Sony’s newest midrange phone


Sony’s not really been his bag before, but ViziLeaks appears to have gotten hands on with one of the company’s phones before its official debut at Mobile World Congress. Two photos are claimed to show portions of the Xperia G, and were tweeted out along with some nebulous specs: LTE, 8GB of storage, an 8-megapixel camera and a gig of RAM, plus a 4.8-inch screen.

Those internals, if accurate (we’ve asked for screenshots to confirm them) would position the G as a mid-range handset with a slightly smaller size and similar design as the Xperia Z1S laying on top of it. Unfortunately, the pictures themselves are less than helpful in telling us much else about the device, though astute readers will note the different camera and power button placement between the sibling handsets. For those who aren’t familiar with ViziLeaks’ work, it was proven prophetic in the summer of 2013 on multiple occasions. Those leaks, of course, were all about Nokia’s Lumia 1020, but with MWC 2014 set to start in a week, we’ll know soon enough if Vizileaks is just as prescient about the Xperia G.

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Via: GSM Arena

Source: @ViziLeaks (1), (2)

15
Feb

HTC will support new flagships for two years, reconsidering update for HTC One X


HTC will support new flagships for two yearsIf you weren’t aware, HTC hosted an AMA (Ask Me Anything) on Reddit this morning, putting themselves out there to answer questions from all their fans and naysayers. But before these interested parties were able to say anything, HTC made an announcement that they will be trying to change their image, starting with a promise; a promise that HTC will support new flagships for two years after they have been released, a bold promise considering very few OEMs have even achieved this for one of their phones.

One other gem from this AMA, which will have HTC One X and One X+ owners very happy, is that HTC is now reconsidering updating these phones to Android KitKat. This is a pretty big backflip considering HTC came out and officially said that the phone would not be supported past Android 4.2.2, but I think we can all agree this change a good thing. What was slightly suspicious was that HTC claimed that the update was originally scrapped due to a lack of cooperation from NVIDIA with regards to the Tegra 3 processor in some of the global One X devices, however the US versions all have Qualcomm processors.

If you want to catch up and read what else went down in the HTC AMA, hit the Reddit link below which will take you to the feed. What do you make of HTC’s announcement today? Do you think they’ll be able to stick to their word on both these announcements? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Source: Reddit via Phandroid

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