Skip to content

Archive for

30
Jun

HDHomerun Quatro is down to one of the lowest prices we’ve seen!


hdhomerun-8.jpg?itok=tbGHgqv0 HDHomerun Quatro has — wait for it — four tuners, so you can watch up to four shows at one time on multiple devices. ($119 at Best Buy)

Our favorite OTA streaming box at its best price ever!

If you’re in the market for a good over-the-air tuner that also shares that sweet free television with almost any device on your network, today is a good day to buy. Best Buy has the HDHomerun Quatro on sale for just $119, which is one of the lowest prices we’ve seen.

Why HDHomerun? It’s got the easiest setup of any of the OTA streaming boxes we’e used. (So long as you don’t need DVR or want to use it with Roku.) Just plug it in, fire up the app, and you’re good to go. And the quatro has four tuners, so you can watch different channels on multiple devices — up to four, because quatro — at the same time. It’s perfect if you have multiple televisions in your house, or know that you’ll be watching on multiple mobile devices at the same time.

It works with web browsers. It works with Android. It works with iOS (via the Channels app). It works with Linux. And Windows 10. And Plex and network-attached storage.

And that $119 sale price is spot-on.

More: The best over-the-air streaming box for cord-cutters

See at Best Buy

Introducing CordCutters.com

  • The hardware you need
  • All about streaming services
  • What channels are on which service
  • FREE over-the-air TV
  • How to watch sports
  • Join the discussion

Get the latest deals

30
Jun

Fourth of July sale: Take $300 off the HP Envy x360 2-in-1 convertible laptop


Although tablet computers have yet to completely replace laptops, these handy mobile devices have nonetheless become very popular for both play and work. Accessories, such as Bluetooth keyboards, have made it much easier for people to use their tablets for things like writing and presenting. Now, however, a lot of companies like HP are closing the gap between “tablet” and “laptop” altogether with convertible computers like the excellent HP Envy x360.

It’s not hard to see the appeal of 2-in-1 laptops like the Envy. With the touchscreen capability of a tablet, more powerful hardware, and the ergonomic backlit keyboard of a laptop, a 2-in-1 definitely provides the best of both worlds. A growing number of “normal” laptops come with touchscreen displays today, but the HP Envy x360 takes this one step further by allowing you to actually rotate and flatten the screen on its base for tablet use with the included stylus.

Tablets typically run on dedicated mobile chips like those from Qualcomm or Nvidia, but under the hood, the HP Envy x360 is all PC. It runs on an 8th-generation Intel Core i7-8550U CPU, an Intel integrated graphics processor, and 8GB of RAM – more than enough for snappy performance when you’re working, browsing the web, streaming videos, or even doing some light gaming. The 15.6-inch display comes with a crisp 1080p resolution on the standard model, too, so you can enjoy it all in Full HD.

Instead of flash memory, you also get a standard hard drive with 1TB of storage, which offers plenty of space for all of your programs, work files, and entertainment. It comes with 64-bit Windows 10 operating system pre-installed as well.

As part of its ongoing Fourth of July sale, HP is slashing prices on its inventory of desktop and laptop computers. The HP Envy x360 retails for $1,000 in its basic configuration, but through Wednesday, July 4, this 2-in-1 convertible laptop is available at a discount of $300, letting you pick it up for just $700.

See it

Looking for more great stuff? Find laptop deals and more on our curated deals page, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for regular updates.

We strive to help our readers find the best deals on quality products and services, and choose what we cover carefully and independently. If you find a better price for a product listed here, or want to suggest one of your own, email us at dealsteam@digitaltrends.com.Digital Trends may earn commission on products purchased through our links, which supports the work we do for our readers.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • HP slashes prices up to 52 percent for its Fourth of July sale
  • Take 20 percent off HP Omen gaming PCs and laptops for a limited time
  • Here are the 5 best Fourth of July sales you won’t want to miss
  • The best HP laptops
  • Giveaway: Win an HP Omen, the gaming PC powering the Fortnite Pro-AM tournament



30
Jun

Thousands of Android and iOS apps are leaking your data through their Firebase backend


Apps are inadvertently leaking data through 2,271 misconfigured databases.

Firebase is a great service for any small developer who needs to have an online service at their disposal. It’s powered by Google and the company goes out of its way to help developers use it in their mobile apps. You can see by simply watching any Google I/O session video about Firebase that developer actually cheer when the service is mentioned.

Apparently, some of those developers have hit a snag when it comes to configuring the database they may be using to store your data. After scanning 2.7 million apps, security researchers at Appthority say more than 113GB of data is available through over 2,200 Firebase databases to anyone who knows the right URL. In total, there are over 100 million personal records exposed.

firebase-server-leak-2018.jpg?itok=HAMYd

Researchers found 28,500 apps that used Firebase to connect and store user details, of which 3,046 stored their data inside a misconfigured Firebase database that was readable through the use of a JSON URL scheme. The majority of the apps that use Firebase are for Android, but 600 apps that exposed data are for iOS. The problem is platform-agnostic, and the apps in question aren’t the culprit here. It’s simply the database configuration on the backend.

The information leaked contains:

  • 2.6 million plaintext passwords and user IDs.
  • 4 million+ PHI (Protected Health Information) records.
  • 25 million GPS records.
  • 50 thousand financial including Bitcoin transactions.
  • 4.5 million Facebook, LinkedIn, corporate data-store user tokens.

Appthority informed Google about the database configuration and provided the list of affected apps before this report was published. We’ve reached out to see if Google has anything they would like to add and will update once it’s received.

Appthority is no stranger to finding poorly configured online databases. Previously the company has found “critical” user data exposed through services like MongoDB, CouchDB, Redis, MySQL, and Twilio.

30
Jun

It sounds ridiculous, but these beaver bots are designed for disaster zones


Engineers, scientists and other researchers will often look to the natural world to find solutions to problems. That is what a team at the University at Buffalo, New York recently did when it created a beaver-inspired robot which, believe it or not, could turn out to be a lifesaver in a disaster zone.

The robot built by graduate students Maira Saboia Da Silva, Vivek Thangavelu, and others doesn’t physically resemble a beaver. Instead, it’s a mini-rover vehicle which uses a camera, custom software, and a robotic arm to lift and deposit nearby objects — modeled after the way the beaver builds dams from whatever it can find in its location. In this case, however, it uses the nearby objects it finds to build ramps which allow it to overcome obstacles to reach its destination. In the real world, the robot could be used for rescue missions in disaster zones — for instance, utilizing whatever rubble and other objects it can find to help it reach trapped people.

“Animals don’t make a complete plan before they start,” Nils Napp, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, told Digital Trends. “Instead, they keep evaluating cues as they build and respond to them. For many animals, we don’t exactly know which cues they respond to, and how those cues map to the final function of the emerging structure. In the case of beavers, we know they respond to the sound of moving water, and that stopping water from rushing results in a working dam. In our robots, we were able to map geometric cues to a final function, which is to enable mobility. That’s where the inspiration came from. In the future, we would also like to expand the types of functional structures our robots can build including dams and levees.”

At present, the autonomous robot has only worked with beanbags of different sizes to simulate various objects. In 10 tests, it moved anywhere from 33 to 170 bags, each time creating a ramp to reach its target location.

“It’s really difficult for robots to work in messy, real-world, outside environments,” Napp continued. “In factories and inside homes the world is structured, and that allows robots to reason about what they should do next. We were looking at how animals solve problems in the wild, and one common approach seems to be that they continuously analyze and modify partially built structures until they fulfill some specific function. We applied this idea to robots, enabling them to assess structures and add material where necessary until their task is complete.”

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Think inside the box with these tricked-out shipping container homes
  • ‘Fortnite: Battle Royale’ tips and tricks
  • Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Stick-on helmet speakers, bikes kids can build
  • Here’s how to clean a Keurig in just a few simple steps
  • The best PlayStation 4 games you can buy right now



30
Jun

How facial recognition software helped identify the Capital Gazette shooter


The day after the deadly shooting left five people dead in the newsroom at Capital Gazette, a seemingly unusual fact has emerged about how police identified their suspect.

According to The New York Times, ABC News, and others, after capturing the suspect, Jarrod Ramos, authorities used facial recognition technology to identify him.

After he was in police custody, Ramos refused to cooperate with authorities. He at first evaded identification when the fingerprint scanning machine malfunctioned, causing police to speculate that he’d filed off his fingerprints prior to the attack. With an uncooperative suspect and malfunctioning fingerprint machine, investigators were left to use other methods to ID him.

Local police sent an image of Ramos to the Maryland Combined Analysis Center, Anne Arundel County Police Chief Timothy Altomare told reporters, which then compared the image to photos of known offenders contained in the Maryland Image Repository System (MIRS) database. MIRS contains more than ten million photos, including those of known offenders and every driver’s license photo in Maryland. It can also access the mug shot database maintained by the FBI, which contains some 25 million faces.

Ramos had previously been convicted of harassment and was likely present in the database.

MIRS photos have helped Maryland authorities identify criminals in the past. A robbery suspect was caught after police compared an Instagram photo to the state DMV database, which linked them to the suspect. Facial recognition is also used at DMVs around the country, reports The Verge, to minimize ID fraud and duplicates.

Catching and identifying criminals is obviously essential but if you’re worried about the connection between facial recognition technology and the steady creep of surveillance into every aspect of our society, you’re not alone. Privacy advocates have challenged this use of facial recognition, calling it a threat to civil liberties. One concern is that, although authorities are instructed to remove the photos of people who’ve been arrested but found innocent, systems like MIRS aren’t often inspected to ensure that’s the case.

Facial recognition technology has been in the news lately after the American Civil Liberties Union revealed that police departments were testing Amazon’s facial recognition software in the field.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • LG G7 ThinQ review
  • Honor 10 review
  • Facial recognition tech picks a suspect out of a crowd of 50,000 in China
  • Panera Bread’s data leak might affect more than 37 million customers
  • This twisted metal bridge in Amsterdam was 3D printed by welding robots



30
Jun

Microsoft calls its foldable Andromeda device “disruptive”


Ryan Smalley | Behance

There have been numerous leaks surrounding Microsoft’s dual-screen Andromeda computing device in recent months, which is widely believed to usher in a new pocketable PC form factor to bridge the gap between what a smartphone and a laptop can do. Now, according to recently leaked internal emails, we are learning that Microsoft is positioning Andromeda as a “new and disruptive” device that will be part of the company’s Surface hardware family.

“It’s a new pocketable Surface device form factor that brings together innovative new hardware and software experiences to create a truly personal and versatile computing experience,” Microsoft’s internal document described Andromeda, according to The Verge.

Recently discovered Windows 10 code revealed that Andromeda could become the ultimate convertible computing device with the capability to transform into any one of five form factors depending on usage. While today’s convertible notebooks with 360-degree hinges can only be used in up to three usage modes, Andromeda can transform between closed, flat, convex, concave, and full modes.

Essentially, Andromeda can be opened like a book and is compatible with a digital stylus, similar to Microsoft’s Courier concept from nearly a decade ago. With expanded inking capabilities planned for Windows 10, Andromeda could be positioned as a paper notebook or paper planner replacement. This wouldn’t be too far of a stretch given that Surface Chief Product Officer Panos Panay had described the Surface Mini, a tablet that was canceled before it was launched by Microsoft, as a capable Moleskine notebook replacement.

Though Andromeda’s transformative capabilities are generating a lot of buzz, it’s still unclear what processor will power the device. Microsoft has traditionally relied on its partnerships with Intel and AMD to run Windows on x86 processor architectures, but the company has also worked with Qualcomm to bring Windows to ARM-based CPUs. It’s rumored that Qualcomm’s upcoming Snapdragon 850 and the powerful Snapdragon 1000 processors are designed for new form factors, like PCs with foldable or dual displays such as the one rumored to debut on Andromeda. A Snapdragon processor may make sense given Andromeda’s positioning as a potential phone replacement and Microsoft’s push for Always Connected PCs using Qualcomm’s chipset. “It will blur the lines between mobile and stationary computing,” another Microsoft document stated, according to The Verge’s report.

Even if Microsoft decides to leverage Snapdragon processors for its new computing form factor, Intel is also readying challengers in the dual-screen space. Intel’s dual-screen Tiger Rapids PC concepts will be adopted by partners Asus and Lenovo. Dell is also rumored to be working on its own device codenamed Project Januss.

Earlier reports suggest that Microsoft’s exciting Andromeda convertible could debut as early as late this year. The device is anticipated to launch as the Surface Phone.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Microsoft leak hints dual-screen Andromeda device targets launch later this year
  • Microsoft’s foldable Andromeda PC could transform into five distinct modes
  • Microsoft’s ‘Andromeda’ device may be a phone after all
  • Everything we know about Microsoft’s ‘Andromeda’ Surface phone device
  • Dell is reportedly working on its dual-screen version of the Surface Phone



30
Jun

Microsoft calls its foldable Andromeda device “disruptive”


Ryan Smalley | Behance

There have been numerous leaks surrounding Microsoft’s dual-screen Andromeda computing device in recent months, which is widely believed to usher in a new pocketable PC form factor to bridge the gap between what a smartphone and a laptop can do. Now, according to recently leaked internal emails, we are learning that Microsoft is positioning Andromeda as a “new and disruptive” device that will be part of the company’s Surface hardware family.

“It’s a new pocketable Surface device form factor that brings together innovative new hardware and software experiences to create a truly personal and versatile computing experience,” Microsoft’s internal document described Andromeda, according to The Verge.

Recently discovered Windows 10 code revealed that Andromeda could become the ultimate convertible computing device with the capability to transform into any one of five form factors depending on usage. While today’s convertible notebooks with 360-degree hinges can only be used in up to three usage modes, Andromeda can transform between closed, flat, convex, concave, and full modes.

Essentially, Andromeda can be opened like a book and is compatible with a digital stylus, similar to Microsoft’s Courier concept from nearly a decade ago. With expanded inking capabilities planned for Windows 10, Andromeda could be positioned as a paper notebook or paper planner replacement. This wouldn’t be too far of a stretch given that Surface Chief Product Officer Panos Panay had described the Surface Mini, a tablet that was canceled before it was launched by Microsoft, as a capable Moleskine notebook replacement.

Though Andromeda’s transformative capabilities are generating a lot of buzz, it’s still unclear what processor will power the device. Microsoft has traditionally relied on its partnerships with Intel and AMD to run Windows on x86 processor architectures, but the company has also worked with Qualcomm to bring Windows to ARM-based CPUs. It’s rumored that Qualcomm’s upcoming Snapdragon 850 and the powerful Snapdragon 1000 processors are designed for new form factors, like PCs with foldable or dual displays such as the one rumored to debut on Andromeda. A Snapdragon processor may make sense given Andromeda’s positioning as a potential phone replacement and Microsoft’s push for Always Connected PCs using Qualcomm’s chipset. “It will blur the lines between mobile and stationary computing,” another Microsoft document stated, according to The Verge’s report.

Even if Microsoft decides to leverage Snapdragon processors for its new computing form factor, Intel is also readying challengers in the dual-screen space. Intel’s dual-screen Tiger Rapids PC concepts will be adopted by partners Asus and Lenovo. Dell is also rumored to be working on its own device codenamed Project Januss.

Earlier reports suggest that Microsoft’s exciting Andromeda convertible could debut as early as late this year. The device is anticipated to launch as the Surface Phone.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Microsoft leak hints dual-screen Andromeda device targets launch later this year
  • Microsoft’s foldable Andromeda PC could transform into five distinct modes
  • Microsoft’s ‘Andromeda’ device may be a phone after all
  • Everything we know about Microsoft’s ‘Andromeda’ Surface phone device
  • Dell is reportedly working on its dual-screen version of the Surface Phone



30
Jun

5 things Apple fixed with iOS 12


Brenda Stolyar/Digital Trends

Read more about iOS 12


iOS 12 Review


Five reasons to install iOS 12


How to download iOS 12


All the new features in iOS 12

Every year, Apple’s mobile platform grows and evolves to become more useful. The latest iteration of iOS introduces a slew of newly-minted features, but instead of focusing on these here, we’re going to take a look at some things Apple has fixed with the most recent iteration of its mobile operating system. Some of these are unexpected while others have been on the horizon for far too long, but all make for a better user experience.

Before we dive in, however, we must point out that there are still some problems that iOS 12 doesn’t even try to fix, but hey, there’s always next year, right?

Notifications

Apple has added quite a few options for managing your notifications in iOS 12, but you’ll need to head into Settings > Notifications to finetune them. Here, you can decide whether apps should be allowed to send notifications at all, and if so, whether they should appear on the Lock Screen, in the Notification Center, or as Banners. You can also turn Sounds and Badges on or off.

There’s also a handy new option called Notification Grouping, which is set to Automatic by default and mercifully groups together multiple notifications from the same app, meaning you’ll no longer receive blocks of Twitter notifications when your latest tweet blows up.

Brenda Stolyar/Digital Trends

To round off the list of improvements, Siri will now take note of which notifications seem to be important to you over time, and will make suggestions and offer shortcuts to quickly get rid of the alerts you don’t need.

Do Not Disturb

Do Not Disturb mode allows for better sleep, but Apple has enhanced the feature in iOS 12 with a new feature called Bedtime Mode. Not only does the tool automatically silence notifications at night, it also prevents your lock screen from showing anything until the morning.

You can still turn Do Not Disturb on and off whenever you want, but now you can also choose to turn it on for an hour, until evening or morning, until you leave a specific location, or until a calendar event, such as a meeting, ends. This is helpful if you often find yourself turning Do Not Disturb on and then later wondering why your phone has been so quiet, only to realize you forgot to turn it off again.

Photos

Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

We prefer Google’s Photos app to Apple’s, but iOS 12 does introduce a handful of improvements to Apple’s proprietary software. For starters, the app can now combine keywords and offers suggestions when entering text in the search field. There’s also a new For You tab that suggests photos you might want to share and the contacts you might want to share them with based on who is in the photos. This makes it easier to share photos with friends and family after a get-together or big event.

Face ID

For now, this one is exclusive to the iPhone X. Apple has added the option to add a second face to Face ID via Settings > Face ID & Passcode > Set Up an Alternate Appearance. If you have an alter ego, or you want your partner or a family member to have access to your phone, this allows you to do so.

There’s another fix to Face ID worth noting. When a facial scan fails, you can now try again more easily by swiping up, which will quickly trigger a rescan and prevent you from having to put your iPhone to sleep and wake it up again.

Passwords

You can already use Face ID to authenticate logins, passwords, and credit card details, but with iOS 12, you can also use Touch ID, which is great news for anyone who doesn’t have an iPhone X. Apple has also made it easier to automatically create strong passwords, which are stored in your iCloud Keychain and autofill across your devices.

You’ll also find that SMS passcodes now pop up as autofill suggestions — no more having to memorize them or flicking back and forth. And if you prefer to use a third-party password manager, Apple now allows you to access passwords stored elsewhere when typing in apps or Safari, though, this will require the password manager developer to update their app.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • iOS 12’s best new features
  • Apple iOS 12 hands-on review
  • The best Apple Watch faces
  • Common iOS 11 problems and advice on how to handle them
  • iPhone notifications are no longer a nuisance with iOS 12



30
Jun

What’s the difference between 4G and LTE?




When you’re looking at buying a new phone, you might find that there are way too many acronyms to choose from, between CDMA, GSM, LTE, and WiMax; the list goes on. What does any of it mean? It can be easier to focus simply on the differences in these networks as they apply to you directly. The simplest explanation is that the “G” in 4G stands for generation, because 4G is the fourth generation of mobile data technology, as defined by the radio sector of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU-R). LTE stands for “Long Term Evolution” and applies more generally to the idea of improving wireless broadband speeds to meet increasing demand.

What is 3G?

When 3G networks started rolling out, they replaced the 2G system, a network protocol that only allowed the most basic of what we would now call smartphone functionality. Most 2G networks handled phone calls, basic text messaging, and small amounts of data over a protocol called MMS. With the introduction of 3G connectivity, a number of larger data formats became much more accessible, including standard HTML pages, videos, and music. The speeds were still pretty slow, and mostly required pages and data specially formatted for these slower wireless connections. By 2G standards, the new protocol was speedy, but still didn’t come anywhere close to replacing a home broadband connection.

What is 4G?

The ITU-R set standards for 4G connectivity in March of 2008, requiring all services described as 4G to adhere to a set of speed and connection standards. For mobile use, including smartphones and tablets, connection speeds need to have a peak of at least 100 megabits per second, and for more stationary uses such as mobile hotspots, at least 1 gigabit per second.

When these standards were announced, these speeds were unheard of in the practical world, because they were intended as a target for technology developers, a point in the future that marked a significant jump over the current technology. Over time, the systems that power these networks have caught up, not just in the sense that new broadcasting methods have found their way into products, but the previously-established 3G networks have been improved to the point that they can be classified as 4G.

What is LTE?

LTE stands for Long Term Evolution, and isn’t as much a technology as it is the path followed to achieve 4G speeds. As it stands, most of the time when your phone displays the “4G” symbol in the upper right corner, it doesn’t really mean it. When the ITU-R set the minimum speeds for 4G, they were a bit unreachable, despite the amount of money tech manufacturers put into achieving them. In response, the regulating body decided that LTE, the name given to the technology used in pursuit of those standards, could be labeled as 4G if it provided a substantial improvement over the 3G technology.

Immediately networks began advertising their connections as 4G LTE, a marketing technique that allowed them to claim next-gen connectivity without having to reach the actual required number first; it would be like the U.S. claiming they had landed on the moon because they got pretty close and the spaceship that got them there was a lot better than the previous ship. It’s not entirely trickery though, despite inconsistent speeds depending on location and network, the difference between 3G and 4G is immediately noticeable.

To make matters more confusing, you’ll also likely come across LTE-A at some point. This stands for Long Term Evolution Advanced, and it takes us a step closer to proper 4G. It offers faster speeds and greater stability than normal LTE. It’s also backward compatible and works by aggregating channels, so instead of connecting to the strongest signal in your vicinity, you can download data from multiple sources at the same time.

30
Jun

Apple is completely rebuilding Apple Maps — and it will start in iOS 12


A new version of Apple Maps is on the way in iOS 12, and it’s going to make the mapping service much more helpful and accurate, according to TechCrunch.

Apple Maps didn’t skyrocket to popularity the way Apple hoped. After a bumpy launch in 2012, the company tried to quickly patch the service and make it usable. While it has dramatically improved since, it can’t compete with the wealth of data available in Google Maps. The solution? An overhaul of the app that will show improved and more detailed visuals, better context awareness, responsiveness to changes like roadwork, and even details like pedestrian paths, making it useful even when you’re not driving.

Specifically, Apple is focusing on a few key aspects for the new Maps. For starters, Apple wants to improve accuracy, ensuring that the app doesn’t only stay up to date, but that it’s also updated far more regularly than it already is. Apple notes that in its current iteration of Maps, updated road infrastructure takes some time — but in the new version, it will be very quick and easy, which should help ensure that the app remains up to date.

TechCrunch

“Since we introduced this six years ago — we won’t rehash all the issues we’ve had when we introduced it — we’ve done a huge investment in getting the map up to par,” Apple Senior Vice President Eddy Cue told TechCrunch. “We’ve done a huge investment of making millions of changes, adding millions of locations, updating the map and changing the map more frequently.”

Building a new mapping app from the ground up isn’t easy. To do so, Apple has been collecting its own data and data from users — though the company is quick to point out that it’s doing so with privacy in mind. For example, instead of collecting data on trips from one point to another, it collects segments of those trips, so it couldn’t tell where a user was coming from or going. Those segments of data are collected anonymously too — so Apple employees themselves simply can’t know which users were taking which trips.

TechCrunch

That will continue as Apple continues to build Maps, and it will help inform a range of things. It’ll help Apple determine traffic, weather conditions, new construction, and so on — all with the help of the millions of iPhone devices in the world, and all privately and anonymously. Apple also combines that data with information collected from high-resolution cameras on satellites, and information collected from the Apple Maps-branded cars you may have seen driving around some areas of the U.S. That data helps Apple locate things like swimming pools, sporting areas, and more.

The new app will be available in the San Francisco Bay Area at launch, with the rest of Northern California to come this fall. Apple says it will be rolling the news Maps out section by section to different parts of the U.S. over the next year. This new Maps will be stitched into the current Apple Maps, but you should be able to tell the difference pretty easily. Eventually, you’ll see design changes in the Apple Maps app. Safe to say, Google has some serious competition on its hands.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Bye to Apple Maps, hello to Waze: CarPlay to support third-party navigation apps
  • Apple HomePod review
  • Apple iPhone 8 review
  • The best Apple Watch apps
  • The best Apple Watch faces



%d bloggers like this: