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19
Jun

‘Keepsafe Browser’ Launches on iOS With Tracker Blockers, Secret Tabs, Touch ID/Face ID Log-Ins, and More


Keepsafe is a company behind privacy-focused iOS apps like Photo Vault, Blur for iMessages, Unlisted, and Secure VPN Proxy. Today the company expanded its suite of secure apps with the launch of “Keepsafe Browser,” an app that enables users to browse the web privately [Direct Link].

The company says Keepsafe Browser ensures that all internet browsing history is kept private, and the app prevents third-party trackers from being able to target users. This means that users will be protected from ads, social networks, analytics, and content services built for targeting users online.

“Since its founding, Keepsafe has been on a mission to restore privacy to people’s daily lives,” says Zouhair Belkoura, co-founder and CEO of Keepsafe. ”Understanding the range of current privacy issues people today face, Keepsafe’s Browser leads industry competitors with its discreet web browsing privacy controls.”

Like other Keepsafe apps, users can lock access to the app using a unique entry code, which can also be tied into the iPhone’s biometric security (Touch ID or Face ID) or Android Fingerprint. As long as you have the code set up and toggle on Touch ID/Face ID in settings, the request for Apple’s security features will appear after you open the app in place of the code keypad entry field.

Privacy controls include secret tabs that forget session data after they are closed, meaning that all cookies, caching, and URLs will be deleted. There are also normal tabs that store cookies and URLs locally so that users can quickly return to their favorite websites and remain logged in to their accounts on those sites. In the tab switcher screen, private tabs have a slightly blurred purple hue over them as well.

Many developers have updated or tested out private browsing modes in iOS apps recently, including YouTube’s test of an “incognito mode” for its mobile app. Prior to that, Firefox updated its iOS app with default tracking protection in both regular and private browsing sessions, and last November Mozilla launched spin-off iOS app “Firefox Focus” built around secure web browsing.

Apple has its own incognito mode alternative called Private Browsing in Safari, which prevents a user’s browsing history from being saved, while also asking websites not to track users. At WWDC, the company detailed how privacy and security protections will be improved for users in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave, including support for automatic strong passwords. With this feature, Safari automatically creates, autofills, and stores passwords, and flags if they’ve been reused to make it easier for users to create unique passwords for each login.

For Keepsafe, the company’s new Keepsafe Browser app is available for free on iPhone and iPad [Direct Link].

Tag: Keepsafe
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19
Jun

Apple Seeds Second Beta of iOS 12 to Developers


Apple this morning seeded the second beta of the upcoming iOS 12 update to developers for testing purposes, two weeks after seeding the first beta following the Worldwide Developers Conference.

Registered developers can download the first iOS 12 beta from Apple’s Developer Center or over-the-air after installing the proper certificate.

The iOS 12 update brings major changes to the iOS operating system, with Apple working from top to bottom to make iPhones and iPads, especially older models, faster and more responsive.

On the iPhone X, there are new Animoji characters along with “Memoji” customizable, personalized Animoji that can be used both in Messages and in FaceTime. Messages and FaceTime have also gained fun new camera effects, and Group FaceTime support allows for calls with up to 32 people.

Siri is smarter in iOS 12 with a new Shortcuts feature that lets you create custom automations using first and third-party apps that can be activated with Siri, and Apple built a comprehensive set of time management and monitoring tools into iOS 12 with Screen Time.


New Do Not Disturb options make turning off notifications and distractions easier than ever, with a new Do Not Disturb at Bedtime feature cutting down on nighttime interruptions.


Group Notifications make notifications easier to view and manage, while a new Instant Tuning feature lets you tweak your notification settings on a notification-by-notification basis.


Apple News has a new Browse feature, the Stocks app has been redesigned, iBooks has been overhauled with a new look and a new name — Apple Books — and Voice Memos has been revamped with iCloud support and an iPad app. There’s also a new Measure app.

ARKit 2.0 introduces new capabilities like shared experiences that let two people see the same AR environment on separate devices, and persistence, which allows AR experiences to be saved across multiple sessions.

Tons of other small tweaks and features have been added to iOS 12, so make sure to check out our roundup and our tidbits post for additional detail on what’s new in iOS 12.

Early betas of new operating system updates always introduce tweaked features and new functionality, so we’ll be updating this post with everything that we find in iOS 12 beta 2.

iOS 12 is limited to developers at the current time, but Apple will provide a public beta later in June. iOS 12 will see an official release this fall alongside new iPhones.

Related Roundup: iOS 12
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19
Jun

Second Beta of tvOS 12 Now Available for Registered Developers


Apple today seeded the second beta of a new tvOS 12 operating system to developers for testing purposes, two weeks after releasing the first beta following the 2018 Worldwide Developers Conference keynote.

Designed for the fourth and fifth-generation Apple TV, the new tvOS 12 developer beta can be downloaded onto the Apple TV via a profile that’s installed using Xcode. Subsequent betas can be downloaded via the software update mechanism on the Apple TV.

tvOS 12 brings support for Dolby Atmos sound. Apple says that iTunes will be home to the largest collection of Dolby Atmos-supported movies anywhere, with Apple upgrading titles customers have purchased for free.

Building on single sign-on, a new zero sign-on feature will further simplify the cable authentication process. With zero sign-on, the Apple TV can detect a user’s broadband network and automatically sign them into supported apps they receive through their cable subscription.

Aerial screensavers include location information and there are new screensavers captured in collaboration with the International Space Station.

Other improvements to Apple TV in tvOS 12 include AutoFill passwords from iPhone, an Apple TV Remote automatically added to Control Center on the iPhone or iPad, and Apple TV support on Home control systems like Control4, Crestron, and Savant.

tvOS 12 is available for developers for testing purposes and will be available as a public beta later this month ahead of a fall public release.

Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 12Buyer’s Guide: Apple TV (Neutral)
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19
Jun

Apple Seeds Second Beta of macOS 10.14 Mojave to Developers


Apple today seeded the second beta of an upcoming macOS Mojave update to developers for testing purposes, two weeks after releasing the first beta following the new software’s debut at the Worldwide Developers Conference.

macOS Mojave introduces a new method of installing software updates, so after you’ve installed the first beta from the Apple Developer Center, additional betas can be downloaded clicking on the Apple in the menu bar, choosing “About This Mac” and clicking “Software Update.” Alternatively, open System Preferences and choose the “Software Update” icon.

The macOS Mojave update introduces a long-awaited and much-desired systemwide Dark Mode, with Mojave users able to choose between a light theme or the new dark theme. Dark Mode is accompanied by Dynamic Desktops, aka wallpapers that subtly change throughout the day.

Stacks, a new Desktop organization system, keeps all of your desktop files nice and neat, while Finder has been enhanced with a Gallery View, a Sidebar, a revamped Quick Look option and Quick Actions, so you can do more in the Finder window than ever before.

Screenshots can now be edited using Markup tools, while Continuity camera, a new feature, lets you import photos and document scans directly from the iPhone to the Mac.


Apple News, Socks, Home, and Voice Memos apps have been ported from iOS to macOS as part of a multiyear project Apple is working on to make it easier to port iOS apps to Macs, and Apple has introduced several privacy protections to keep your data safer.

Apple is also making it harder for websites to track you with a range of new tools, plus there’s an entirely revamped Mac App Store that makes it easier to discover apps.

macOS Mojave will be beta tested by developers and eventually public beta testers for several months so Apple can work out bugs and other issues before releasing the software to the public in the fall.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave
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19
Jun

Make it so! 8 ‘Star Trek’ technologies that actually exist now (sort of)


For the past half-century, across hundreds of TV episodes, multiple spinoffs, and more than a dozen movies, Star Trek has offered us a tantalizing glimpse of the future. Along the way, that’s included plenty of amazing technologies that have the potential to reshape life as we know it.

While much of it remains science fiction, a sizable number of the gadgets and tech toys that have appeared in Star Trek now exist, to some degree, in today’s world. Here are eight great examples.

Tractor beams

Star Trek’s tractor beam is an attenuated linear graviton beam which can be used by space stations or starships to control the movement of external objects — such as towing disabled ships to safety.

Researchers from the U.K.’s University of Bristol have developed and successfully demonstrated an acoustic tractor beam capable of trapping small objects in midair. In the near future, they hope tractor beams will be useful for moving things like kidney stones or eye floaters in the human body. Okay, so that’s not quite the same as trapping a Klingon starship, but it’s a good start!

Universal translators

We’re way ahead of the curve on this one! Star Trek claims that the universal translator, a device able to instantaneously translate between different languages, only comes into being late in the 22nd century.

Here in the 21st century, there are devices like Baidu’s pocket universal translator that’s able to easily translate spoken sentences from English into Mandarin and back again. Google has also developed in-ear translation earbuds for translating between numerous languages, and there are even apps capable of translating a baby’s cries into English.

Right now, the big difference between Star Trek’s technology and ours is the amount of time it takes to train these devices to understand new languages.

Phasers

Phased array pulsed energy projectiles, Star Trek’s phasers come in various different sizes, ranging from personal small arms to giant energy weapons capable of being mounted onto starships. They can also be used in a variety of ways, such as slicing through materials, heating objects, triggering explosions, or simply stunning an adversary.

In the current world, we’re still stuck using the phaser’s antecedent, the humble laser. On the plus side, laser projectiles are becoming more commonplace — including handheld laser cannons and Lockheed Martin’s modular ATHENA laser weapon, designed to shoot swarms of drones out of the sky.

Computers we can speak to

Allowing the crew in Star Trek to interact with computers by speaking to them solves one of the big screenwriting problems: making computer interactions both clear to the audience and interesting in a way that having everyone typing on keyboards simply wouldn’t be. Plus, nothing says “far future” quite like having your computer understand verbal commands, right?

Here in 2018, this is now so commonplace that we considered not even including it on this list. Almost all of our smartphones have A.I. assistants such as Apple’s Siri, while one of the fastest growing product categories is smart speakers like the Amazon Echo.

Hypospray

If you really, really hate needles then the existence of the “hypospray” would be enough to make Star Trek’s vision of the future sound like a utopia. Known colloquially as a “hypo,” this injection-free drug delivery system can inject liquids into the body at high speed without having to puncture the skin.

Today, an MIT spinoff called Portal is working on a next-generation needle-free jet injector, capable of injecting an ultra-fine stream of liquid — thinner than a strand of hair — through the skin at Mach 0.7. For those keeping track at home, that’s the cruising speed of an average commercial airliner. While it still involves piercing the skin, it’s a world away from the syringes in wide use today.

Tablet computer

Like computers which recognize your voice, this is one that always seems too obvious to mention nowadays. Nonetheless, within many of our lifetimes (certainly if you’re in your late twenties or older), we’ve watched computers slim down from bulky machines into flat, all-in-one devices no thicker than a pencil.

A person watching Star Trek: The Next Generation today may not realize how futuristic something like the crew’s Personal Access Data Devices (PADD) once appeared. But, trust us, it really was!

Food replicator

Unless you’re someone who simply loves the act of cooking, the idea of a Star Trek-style replicator, capable of materializing food and beverages sounds like a dream come true. Thanks to the wonders of modern science, it may not remain a dream for too much longer.

Food-based 3D printing is starting to hit its stride, while the National University of Singapore has developed a programmable cocktail glass, capable of tricking your senses into thinking that you’re drinking … well, just about anything you can imagine, really.

Warp drive

Aside from teleportation (which sadly isn’t a real thing just yet), warp speed is the most iconic Star Trek technology out there. It’s also the furthest away of any on this list — although it’s not impossible that we’ll get there.

In recent years, excitement has been building about NASA’s EmDrive technology, which could lead to ultrafast interplanetary travel. It’s not a “warp drive” per se, but should a real world demonstration actually happen, it’ll likely change our understanding of physics as we currently know it. But it’s also no longer a total fantasy, either.

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19
Jun

Uber is testing a low-fare option that’s great if you’re not in a rush


Uber rides could be about to get even cheaper, though you’ll have to wait around a bit to secure the lower fares.

A new feature currently being tested by the ridesharing company offers a lower fare if you’re prepared to wait a little longer for your car to arrive.

Spotted by Quartz, it seems that an Uber employee accidentally jumped the gun in revealing the feature. The employee in question posted a tweet showing a screenshot of the cheaper fare option when he requested a ride in Berkeley, California recently.

The image suggests the request was made at 4.56 p.m. or shortly before, with the Uber fare for a ride “now” calculated at $10.18. However, wait until just 5 p.m. and the fare drops to $8.15, representing a decent enough saving for a slight delay in your pick-up time.

Uber confirmed the feature to Quartz, saying: “The option to wait longer in exchange for a cheaper ride is being tested among all Uber employees in San Francisco and Los Angeles.”

It added: “Affordability is a top reason riders choose shared rides, and we’re internally experimenting with a way to save money in exchange for a later pickup.”

An Uber fare for a particular route can change throughout the day depending on the estimated journey time, traffic conditions, and the number of riders and drivers using the app at any given moment. The feature currently being tested gives Uber more control over managing demand, taking pressure off the service during busy periods or other times of the day when there are fewer Uber drivers on the road.

Keep in mind, however, the feature is currently being tested, so it’s not certain it will ever make it to the Uber app for all riders to use. We’ll keep you posted.

Another way Uber riders can score cheaper fares is through its Express Pool service, though it’s currently only available in a limited number of locations. When you select the option, Uber’s app works fast to gather several other people taking roughly the same route, before directing you to a nearby pick-up point where your fellow riders will also be waiting. The Uber vehicle will then drop you all off at the same location, which should be a short walk from your respective destinations.

Of course, many cities have other ridesharing services besides Uber. Lyft, which remains Uber’s biggest ridesharing rival in the U.S., also offers a number of different ride options depending on cost and convenience. If you’ve yet to use Uber of Lyft but you’re thinking about hopping aboard, do take a moment to check out Digital Trends’ recent comparison of the two services to find out which one is best for you.

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19
Jun

Australia punishes Apple for refusing to replace iPhones stricken by ‘Error 53’


Simon Hill / Digital Trends

Australia’s federal court has ordered Apple to pay 9 million Australian dollars (roughly $6.6 million) for refusing to fix iPhones that had been bricked by the controversial “Error 53”.

A result of an update to iOS 9, Error 53 was widely feared by the iPhone community as it locked users out of their phones, turning the expensive device into little more than a stylish paperweight. The error only affected those who took their iPhones to a third-party repair store to fix a broken home button, and Apple has long claimed that the error was intended as a security measure, to stop Touch ID being bypassed or exploited by third parties.

Unfortunately, since third-party repair stores are not always privy to Apple’s specific repair instructions, any tampering with the Home button — even to repair it — would lead to Error 53 being triggered, and the iPhone getting locked. When a number of consumers took their locked iPhones to Apple for repair, they were told that their devices were no longer eligible for a refund or replace, as the device had been repaired by a third party. Unfortunately for Apple, that flies in the face of Australian consumer laws.

“If a product is faulty, customers are legally entitled to a repair or a replacement under the Australian Consumer Law, and sometimes even a refund,” said Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) Commissioner Sarah Court. “The Court declared the mere fact that an iPhone or iPad had been repaired by someone other than Apple did not, and could not, result in the consumer guarantees ceasing to apply, or the consumer’s right to a remedy being extinguished.”

The fine came about as a result of a legal battle and investigation by the ACCC that began in April 2017. As part of the investigation, the ACCC contacted multiple Apple retailers within Australia, and were allegedly told that iPhones with the error would not be replaced. Apple eventually admitted that it had misled Australian consumers on the matter.

Apple has always resisted the use of third-party repair shops to fix its products, preferring that consumers come back to its certified repair shops for (expensive) fixes. However, as the smartphone industry matures, it has faced increasing pressure to open the books to its marvelous wonders, and many U.S. states are experimenting with right-to-repair bills similar to Australia’s, that would force technology giants to permit third-party repairs through easy access of instructions and parts.

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  • 6 self-driving car crashes that tapped the brakes on the autonomous revolution



19
Jun

Go viral faster with Project Rush, Adobe’s upcoming social-first video editor


Adobe

Adobe’s edit anywhere philosophy powering apps that work seamlessly across mobile and desktop is coming to video. Introduced during VidCon on Tuesday, June 19, Project Rush is a streamlined video editing program with identical features across the smartphone and desktop apps.

Project Rush contains touches of Lightroom CC’s cloud-based, cross-device compatibility and bits and pieces of Adobe Premiere Pro, its professional video editing software. It arranges all of this into an entirely new video editing platform, but Premiere Pro users shouldn’t feel threatened — Adobe says the app has Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Audition inspiration under the hood, but with a simplified user interface designed for YouTubers, vloggers, social sharers, and other online video users without the time or patience to learn those more advanced tools.

While Project Rush focuses on a largely different user base, Adobe says the interface is designed to be approachable to Premiere Pro users, while a 3-minute tutorial serves as a crash course for newbie editors. And while the upcoming video editor isn’t as full-featured as Premiere Pro, Adobe Head of Product Management Steve Forde stresses that Project Rush is not a toy.

A streamlined, newbie-friendly interface

Adobe

The app, whether on a mobile device or a desktop, opens directly to the project browser, which, thanks to the Creative Cloud, contains all the user projects no matter what device initiated the video. From there, users can choose an existing project or start a new video edit. From the start, Rush prompts users to select multiple video clips. Unlike Premiere Pro, Project Rush launches the video timeline by automatically arranging those clips in the order selected. Users can then rearrange and trim clips and add transitions. One-tap filters also give footage a new look without any complex color grading.

Many features are designed with automation in mind, including automatically recognizing audio clips and graphics and adding them as layers on the timeline. Auto ducking, a feature only recently introduced in Premiere Pro, is also included, which automatically adjusts the volume of music during portions of the video with speech.

While the audio controls pay homage to Adobe Audition, traces of the company’s motion graphics app After Effects are also scattered inside Project Rush. Pre-made templates for credits, for example, are built into the app or available through Adobe Stock. Users can also design their own templates inside After Effects and import them into Project Rush.

The user interface is designed to maintain simplicity across desktop and mobile. While a touch device will offer different gesture-based controls, the user interface and features are identical across devices.

Like Lightroom’s smart previews, Project Rush creates proxies of the actual video files, allowing editors to work faster than they could with the full resolution footage. Publishing the video in the full native resolution requires access to the full file on the device, so sharing a 4K video is best left to the desktop version of the app. 

Social-first video editing

Adobe

Project Rush’s focus on serving as a tool for online video creators is most apparent at export — the app gives a list of several online destinations and automatically adjusts the parameters to meet that particular network’s standards. Along with old favorites like YouTube, Vimeo, and Facebook, Project Rush can also work with vertical video for Instagram Stories and Snapchat.

“Social video creation is the reason we created this product,” Forde said, “and [creators] aren’t creating just for YouTube or Facebook. They are creating for multiple platforms.”

However, Project Rush is currently just a sneak peek — Adobe hasn’t yet shared pricing or a release date, although it says the program will be out before the end of the year. It also clarified that Project Rush will be available both as a stand-alone app and as part of the Creative Cloud suite.

Editors’ Recommendations

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  • The best video-editing software
  • Lightroom CC gets synced presets on mobile and batch editing on desktop



19
Jun

Go viral faster with Project Rush, Adobe’s upcoming social-first video editor


Adobe

Adobe’s edit anywhere philosophy powering apps that work seamlessly across mobile and desktop is coming to video. Introduced during VidCon on Tuesday, June 19, Project Rush is a streamlined video editing program with identical features across the smartphone and desktop apps.

Project Rush contains touches of Lightroom CC’s cloud-based, cross-device compatibility and bits and pieces of Adobe Premiere Pro, its professional video editing software. It arranges all of this into an entirely new video editing platform, but Premiere Pro users shouldn’t feel threatened — Adobe says the app has Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Audition inspiration under the hood, but with a simplified user interface designed for YouTubers, vloggers, social sharers, and other online video users without the time or patience to learn those more advanced tools.

While Project Rush focuses on a largely different user base, Adobe says the interface is designed to be approachable to Premiere Pro users, while a 3-minute tutorial serves as a crash course for newbie editors. And while the upcoming video editor isn’t as full-featured as Premiere Pro, Adobe Head of Product Management Steve Forde stresses that Project Rush is not a toy.

A streamlined, newbie-friendly interface

Adobe

The app, whether on a mobile device or a desktop, opens directly to the project browser, which, thanks to the Creative Cloud, contains all the user projects no matter what device initiated the video. From there, users can choose an existing project or start a new video edit. From the start, Rush prompts users to select multiple video clips. Unlike Premiere Pro, Project Rush launches the video timeline by automatically arranging those clips in the order selected. Users can then rearrange and trim clips and add transitions. One-tap filters also give footage a new look without any complex color grading.

Many features are designed with automation in mind, including automatically recognizing audio clips and graphics and adding them as layers on the timeline. Auto ducking, a feature only recently introduced in Premiere Pro, is also included, which automatically adjusts the volume of music during portions of the video with speech.

While the audio controls pay homage to Adobe Audition, traces of the company’s motion graphics app After Effects are also scattered inside Project Rush. Pre-made templates for credits, for example, are built into the app or available through Adobe Stock. Users can also design their own templates inside After Effects and import them into Project Rush.

The user interface is designed to maintain simplicity across desktop and mobile. While a touch device will offer different gesture-based controls, the user interface and features are identical across devices.

Like Lightroom’s smart previews, Project Rush creates proxies of the actual video files, allowing editors to work faster than they could with the full resolution footage. Publishing the video in the full native resolution requires access to the full file on the device, so sharing a 4K video is best left to the desktop version of the app. 

Social-first video editing

Adobe

Project Rush’s focus on serving as a tool for online video creators is most apparent at export — the app gives a list of several online destinations and automatically adjusts the parameters to meet that particular network’s standards. Along with old favorites like YouTube, Vimeo, and Facebook, Project Rush can also work with vertical video for Instagram Stories and Snapchat.

“Social video creation is the reason we created this product,” Forde said, “and [creators] aren’t creating just for YouTube or Facebook. They are creating for multiple platforms.”

However, Project Rush is currently just a sneak peek — Adobe hasn’t yet shared pricing or a release date, although it says the program will be out before the end of the year. It also clarified that Project Rush will be available both as a stand-alone app and as part of the Creative Cloud suite.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • The best free video-editing software
  • This plug-in uses A.I. to create closed captions inside Premiere Pro
  • Premiere Pro can now automatically match color using artificial intelligence
  • The best video-editing software
  • Lightroom CC gets synced presets on mobile and batch editing on desktop



19
Jun

Yahoo Mail revamps its mobile web experience, releases Android Go app


Yahoo has launched two new initiatives to help provide an enjoyable and efficient experience regardless of storage capacity, network speeds, or location. Users will now have access to a newly revamped Yahoo Mail mobile web experience, along with an optimized app for Android Go phones.

With the new mobile browser, users will have a variety of the same features as the Yahoo Mail app without having to take up storage by downloading another app. Upon logging in through your browser, you’re able to organize your inbox by swiping right to mark emails as read and left to delete. Other actions include deleting, forwarding, replying, and more, with the access toolbar made available once a message is open.

For further organization, there’s a sidebar menu where you can access all your folders and store important emails. When it comes to searching through emails, the addition of infinite scrolling allows you to scroll all the way to the bottom of your inbox rather than tapping “next” each time you want to see more.

As for composing emails, the autosuggest feature makes it easy to find emails rather than having to manually type them in or search for them. By typing in the first few letters, it will generate a list of email addresses you send emails to frequently.

There are options for customization as well. The new mobile web browser offers a variety of new colors and themes — with light and dark backgrounds — to personalize your inbox. By adding the Yahoo Mail mobile browser to your home screen as an icon, it essentially begins to behave as an app without having to install anything. You can also opt in to receive notifications whenever you receive emails.

Its Android Go app was released for Android Go phones Google launched in May of last year. Google designed it specifically for devices with low memory for use in areas where spotty networks make it difficult to access the web. For Yahoo, releasing a Go app didn’t require straying too far away from its original Yahoo Mail app for Android since it was already lightweight.

“Our main Android app was really close to what the requirements for Go were … We really optimized it for the download footprint. You’re basically getting all of our core Android mail features, so you’re really not missing anything,” Joshua Jacobson, senior director of product management for Yahoo Mail, told Digital Trends.

When it comes to the RAM usage on devices, the Yahoo Mail Go app uses 50 megabytes with an install size below 10 megabytes. Jacobson said the team was able to optimize the graphics for lower-resolution screens, as well the language packs — since Go phones are more prominent in developing markets like India and Brazil.

The Go app supports multiple accounts, allowing users to set and save different themes for each. As with the main Yahoo Mail app, you’ll also see photos of each of the senders whenever they email you. Other features include autosuggest for contacts you email often, as well as tools like adding GIFs, stationary, and more. Users are also able to archive and delete emails straight from the notification.

For those with a smartphone running the Android Oreo (Go Edition) operating system, Yahoo Mail Go is currently available for download via the Google Play Store.

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  • Yahoo Mail is about to make RSVPing to an event a whole lot easier



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