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31
Jan

In a battle of machine against man, the machine won … in Texas Hold’em poker


Why it matters to you

The algorithms used in Libratus help the AI “reason” in scenarios where information is incomplete or incorrect, which would be handy in non-gaming situations.

It was a battle pitting man against machine, and eventually, the machine won.

No, we’re not talking about the backdrop to a science-fiction movie, but an actual duel that took place between four professional Texas Hold’em poker players and an artificial intelligence called Libratus. The competition, called Brains vs. Artificial Intelligence: Upping the Ante, took place at the Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh from January 11 to Monday. Libratus defeated its four human opponents with an average daily win of $206,061 and a grand total win on a hefty $1,766,250 in virtual funds.

But don’t let Libratus scare you — it was only created to play Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold’em poker. It’s the brainchild of Professor Tuomas Sandholm and Ph.D. student Noam Brown from Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science and uses the Bridges computer at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center for its computation needs. It doesn’t rely on the experience of expert human players but instead, consists of algorithms that create a strategy based on an analysis of the rules and the opponents.

More: Artificial intelligence can now predict heart failure, and that may save lives

However, those algorithms weren’t developed specifically for poker, enabling the Libratus to thoroughly analyze any situation where information is misleading or incomplete. Thus, the algorithms could be used at auctions, during business transactions, and while playing poker where the players aren’t always honest about their cards.

To some degree, the human opponents were at a disadvantage. The Bridges computer provided Libratus with around 25 million core hours of computations. While the players slept at night, the Bridges computer performed computations based on the previous day’s gameplay results, sharpening Libratus’ strategy. The Bridges computer also supplied live computations to Libratus during the games as well.

The four human players underestimated Libratus in the beginning, and by the ninth day, Libratus had already gained the lead with $459,154 in virtual chips. At the time, Jimmy “ForTheSwaRMm” Chou acknowledged that Libratus was getting better at the game every day. “It’s like a tougher version of us,” he admitted.

Over the course of 20 days, machine and man played 120,000 hands of Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold’em poker. The other three human players included Dong “Donger Kim” Kim, Jason “PremiumWhey” Les, and Daniel “Dougiedan678” McAulay. All four are considered as some of the world’s top players of Texas Hold’em.

“This is the first time that AI has been able to beat the best humans at Heads-Up No-Limit Texas Hold’em,” said Sandholm. “More generally, this shows that the best AI’s ability to do strategic reasoning under imperfect information has surpassed that of the best humans.”

Les said that while Libratus kept changing its overall strategy throughout the competition, the AI seemed capable of adjusting its strategy against the individual players too. That led the humans to gather together each night to create strategies for thwarting Libratus the next day, but nothing helped. There was no stopping the Libratus/Bridges duo.

“I really felt this bot was exploiting me [in certain poker situations],” Chou said.

31
Jan

In a battle of machine against man, the machine won … in Texas Hold’em poker


Why it matters to you

The algorithms used in Libratus help the AI “reason” in scenarios where information is incomplete or incorrect, which would be handy in non-gaming situations.

It was a battle pitting man against machine, and eventually, the machine won.

No, we’re not talking about the backdrop to a science-fiction movie, but an actual duel that took place between four professional Texas Hold’em poker players and an artificial intelligence called Libratus. The competition, called Brains vs. Artificial Intelligence: Upping the Ante, took place at the Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh from January 11 to Monday. Libratus defeated its four human opponents with an average daily win of $206,061 and a grand total win on a hefty $1,766,250 in virtual funds.

But don’t let Libratus scare you — it was only created to play Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold’em poker. It’s the brainchild of Professor Tuomas Sandholm and Ph.D. student Noam Brown from Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science and uses the Bridges computer at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center for its computation needs. It doesn’t rely on the experience of expert human players but instead, consists of algorithms that create a strategy based on an analysis of the rules and the opponents.

More: Artificial intelligence can now predict heart failure, and that may save lives

However, those algorithms weren’t developed specifically for poker, enabling the Libratus to thoroughly analyze any situation where information is misleading or incomplete. Thus, the algorithms could be used at auctions, during business transactions, and while playing poker where the players aren’t always honest about their cards.

To some degree, the human opponents were at a disadvantage. The Bridges computer provided Libratus with around 25 million core hours of computations. While the players slept at night, the Bridges computer performed computations based on the previous day’s gameplay results, sharpening Libratus’ strategy. The Bridges computer also supplied live computations to Libratus during the games as well.

The four human players underestimated Libratus in the beginning, and by the ninth day, Libratus had already gained the lead with $459,154 in virtual chips. At the time, Jimmy “ForTheSwaRMm” Chou acknowledged that Libratus was getting better at the game every day. “It’s like a tougher version of us,” he admitted.

Over the course of 20 days, machine and man played 120,000 hands of Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold’em poker. The other three human players included Dong “Donger Kim” Kim, Jason “PremiumWhey” Les, and Daniel “Dougiedan678” McAulay. All four are considered as some of the world’s top players of Texas Hold’em.

“This is the first time that AI has been able to beat the best humans at Heads-Up No-Limit Texas Hold’em,” said Sandholm. “More generally, this shows that the best AI’s ability to do strategic reasoning under imperfect information has surpassed that of the best humans.”

Les said that while Libratus kept changing its overall strategy throughout the competition, the AI seemed capable of adjusting its strategy against the individual players too. That led the humans to gather together each night to create strategies for thwarting Libratus the next day, but nothing helped. There was no stopping the Libratus/Bridges duo.

“I really felt this bot was exploiting me [in certain poker situations],” Chou said.

31
Jan

AT&T is looking to new technologies to improve internet connectivity


Why it matters to you

Some AT&T customers might be frustrated by the lack of high-speed internet, but they can take heart in the knowledge that the company is looking for answers.

AT&T is in an interesting position. As the oldest telecommunications company in the U.S., it has the largest installed base of legacy infrastructure — which is another way of saying that a great deal of its physical plant is made up of old copper wiring.

While they work fine for providing landline voice services, a good deal of those copper lines aren’t capable of providing high-speed internet connectivity. AT&T is therefore on the lookout for other technologies to provide high-speed internet to augment its investments in fiber, and its Project AirGig is one that will be getting some attention going forward.

More: AT&T Project AirGig to provide multi-gigabit wireless internet using power lines

Project AirGig, which the company announced in September 2016, uses power lines to send signals that are then transmitted to customers via antennas mounted on utility poles. According to the company, the technology can offer multi-gigabit connectivity for both internet and smartphone data.

The broadband-over-power lines (BPL) technology at the heart of Project AirGig was developed by AT&T Labs, along with other innovations including the Radio Distributed Antenna System (RDAS). Now, AT&T is close to being ready to begin trials.

The need for improved internet speeds is growing exponentially, with video streaming leading the way as the principle consumer of internet bandwidth. According to AT&T’s research, data use has increased by 250,000 percent since 2007, and 4K mobile video streaming, augmented and virtual reality, autonomous vehicles, and smart homes will do nothing but increase the demand for data.

Andre Fuetsch, AT&T Labs president and CTO, has provided this related statement:

“We are looking forward to begin testing the possibilities of AT&T Labs’ invention for customers and utility companies. AT&T is focused on delivering a gigabit-per-second speed everywhere we can with our wired and wireless technologies. Project AirGig represents a key invention in our 5G Evolution approach. AT&T Labs is ‘writing the textbook’ for a new technology approach that has the potential to deliver benefits to utility companies and bring this multi-gigabit, low-cost internet connectivity anywhere there are power lines — big urban market, small rural town, globally.”

Next up are field trials to demonstrate how well Project AirGig works with power company smart-grid technologies, as well as to test against inclement weather and other issues that could impact the technology’s performance. AT&T isn’t giving up on fiber and its G.fast advanced DSL, either, and so Project AirGig is just one of a number of methods AT&T plans to use to roll out faster internet to its customers.

If you’re an AT&T customer and you’re unhappy with your internet connection, take heart. While it might not happen tomorrow, the company is working on some technologies that should help to improve your situation in time.

31
Jan

HTC loses another high-level executive as it continues to struggle


HTC is losing execs, and gaining a reputation.

HTC has lost another big-name executive in Jason Mackenzie, the face of the company’s U.S. division where he served as president for over two years before moving onto an executive vice president role of the Taiwanese outfit’s global arm in early 2016.

After 12 amazing years, today is my last day @htc. It was a great run & I feel blessed. Thank you Peter Chou, @cherwang, & TeamHTC.

— Jason Mackenzie (@JasonBMac24) January 31, 2017

The Seattle-based exec had been with HTC for 12 years, moving over from Siemens in late 2005 to take on the then-powerhouse’s growing smartphone sales division. He moved through the ranks, switching over from U.S. sales to global and back, finally settling on a more expansive role early last year.

The loss comes just five days after Claude Zellweger, HTC’s VP of Design, left for Google’s Daydream VR division. Both departures leave gaps in the company’s executive team at a time when it is struggling to transition from a smartphone OEM to a global player in the VR market with the HTC Vive.

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Its recent smartphones, the HTC U Ultra and U Play, were announced shortly after CES, and will go on sale in early March.

31
Jan

Everything we hope to see in the Android Wear 2.0 update


Google is rebooting Android Wear, and that’s exciting!

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Despite repeated reports that smartwatches are dead, we know for a fact that Android Wear is about to get a massive refresh. Rolling out alongside Google’s Wear 2.0 update are two new watches meant to act almost like the Nexus program of old, and we know several manufacturers will be following up quickly with new hardware of their own. With new hardware and new software, Android Wear as we know it is being rebooted.

The big questions now lie in our expectations. What do we as Wear users want from this new generation of watches? Here’s a lap around the Editor’s table with all of our thoughts!

Andrew

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Android Wear has a bit of an identity crisis, and I hope that the launch of Android Wear 2.0 helps spur manufacturers to lock in and put out some compelling hardware that can meet a variety of needs. Though external case designs of Android Wear watches have differed, they’re all basically the same: a too-big watch with clunky bands and very little feature differentiation.

Going forward I hope companies can bring in some variety with smaller, thinner watches, as well as mid-sized watches that skip out on trying to do everything to focus in on the core features people use these watches for. This new era will hopefully introduce a better variety of offerings to fit more needs and styles, though I know the business models of these companies may not be compatible with hitting niches inside of an already small market.

Jen

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While I’m really excited to have longer battery life and Assistant on my watch, what I really want to see are smaller watches. I am a teensy human, and having a watch that actually properly fits me without looking like a child playing dress up would be amazing.

I’m also pretty stoked about the activity trackers. I’m terrible at remembering to open up my activity apps before I start working out, [and if what we saw at Google I/O is true](http://www.androidcentral.com/android-wear-20-brings-new-features-fitness, this won’t be a problem for me anymore.

Jerry

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I want to see watches that look better and feel better while I’m wearing them.

I have been in situations where being able to discreetly check notifications was a plus. I think we all probably have. But in general, I’ve found that there isn’t much reason for me to wear a smartwatch. I have my phone in my pocket no matter where I am, and when I wear a watch it’s because I like the way it looks on my wrist. And I don’t mean it looks better than other options like my Huawei Watch does. I mean I like the way it looks. Everyone wants things that look good, right?

I know it’s hard to pack everything into a watch to make it smart, then put a big enough battery in it to keep it running. I’m hoping new processors and smarter software that is easier on battery life means someone can make a smartwatch that doesn’t look like a smart watch. Samsung got very close with the Gear S3 Classic (it’s not necessarily a size thing), so I have hope.

Flo

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Someone give me a reason to wear Android Wear. It’s been a few years since they’ve come into existence, but I’m still struggling to find a reason to take my Asus ZenWatch 2 out of its drawer.

Here’s the problem with Android Wear: Google and its partners have failed to convince me, the consumer, that it’s worth buying one for any reason other than it’s a way of showing allegiance to the Android brand. I want seamless interconnectivity between my phone and my watch, but I also want a watch that doesn’t try too hard to cram everything my smartphone does into a 1.5-inch display. Features like Google Assistant and Android Pay are certainly worth looking forward to, but they fail to solve the problem of why I’d wear a computerized wristwatch in the first place.

Alex

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My first wish is for the watchmakers themselves, not Google. Just as Android Wear has adopted some of Samsung’s Gear features in the 2.0 release, manufacturers should steal Samsung’s rotating bezel idea for rotating through notifications and menus. It’s more convenient than blocking the screen as you swipe and would allow for some neat design flourishes.

From a purely software perspective, I’ve already written at length about how I think smartwatches, including Android Wear, need to do fewer things and then do them better. Focus on the essentials, make notifications awesome, and everything else can just be gravy.

Russell

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Bring on the watches that last me more than a single day! With the new Snapdragon Wear 2100 processor and denser batteries, we should see thinner watches with one day of life and thicker watches offering two full days. I want to leave the charger at home, especially if the charger is one of those ridiculous pin things.

I’m also looking forward to Assistant on my wrist, but only if it’s available without needing to press a button. I’d even be happy with a gesture to activate Assistant if an always-on mic isn’t good for power consumption.

Ara

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I’m more than ready for Assistant on my wrist, but more than anything, I want Android Pay on my wrist. I’ve had an OG Moto 360 that’s been bootlooping intermittently for the last six months, and the only reason I refuse to upgrade yet is the lack of tap-and-pay. We’ve seen NFC in a number of watches, including in leaks of 2.0 devices, and Apple and Samsung already have tap and pay on their wearable platforms. It’s time for Android Wear to catch up.

Beyond that, I’m hoping that with full-fledged watch apps comes more finessed controls for media apps. Even before Android Wear, even before I was an Android nerd, I had a singular vision for wearables: controlling my music. I could fast-forward and rewind my iPod Video’s click wheel inside a folio case in my pocket with frankly disquieting consistency and accuracy. When I came to Android and Google Play Music, I had to give that up. Now, to fast-forward through 90 seconds of a 25-minute show or rewind 30 seconds to replay the sweet bridge that my coworker interrupted, I have to wake my phone, unlock my phone, open the music app, and seek as desired. I want a click wheel on my wrist. Or at the very least, I want a button in Android Wear that can let me rewind and fast forward in 30-second intervals.

Daniel

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More than anything, Android Wear 2.0 has to show me things I didn’t know I needed. I think it’s a given that the platform will integrate Google Assistant, but what I really enjoyed about Android Wear’s early forms was its occasional perfectly timed Google Now card. Give me that experience more consistently, and use the new watch’s GPS and/or cellular connection to show me more accurate location data — and the contextual information around it — without having to rely on the slow Bluetooth connection from my phone.

I typically find that, aside from the push notifications mirrored from my phone, smartwatches are no better than phones at doing most things, and even as a companion to my phone, don’t excel at anything particularly well. So start to use AI and machine learning to adapt what’s shown at any particular time in a way that, because your smartphone is turned off in your pocket for most of the day, only a smartwatch can do. Google is well-positioned to offer a solution like this, but it really has to bring all of its separate pieces together.

Your turn!

Got some thoughts on what you want from the next wave of Android Wear? Share it with us in the comments!

31
Jan

Android 7.1.1 was the end of the line for Nexus 6 and Nexus 9


This could be the end of the line for two of 2014’s Nexus devices.

With the release of a small maintenance release, Android 7.1.2, in beta yesterday, speculation kicked up around the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9 missing from the list after being included on previous beta releases. At the same time, the Nexus 6P was missing but explicitly mentioned as having an update coming soon. With no mention of either the Nexus 6 or 9, it seems as though these phones have received their final platform update — and it shouldn’t be surprising.

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The Nexus 6 and Nexus 9 launched together in October 2014, meaning we’re comfortably beyond two years of software support for the phone and tablet. With the launch of the new Pixel and Pixel XL, the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9 were the next two to drop off of the update pile, and we’re simply getting a bit of an earlier glimpse now that the Android Beta Program exists.

We still have nearly a year of security patches to look forward to.

Though the major platform updates have stopped for the phone and tablet, Google’s official commitment to Nexus devices includes a total of three years of security patches, meaning we should see monthly security updates arrive for the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9 until at least October 2017. That gives owners a bit of extra time knowing their devices are secure while they consider their options for a new phone or tablet.

The massive Nexus 6 was hardly the mainstream device that Google had hoped it would be launching in 2014, and the Nexus 9 had its own slate of problems that meant it never really took off. Still, they were both solid devices for their time and the Nexus 6 in particular aged quite well through the transition into Android 7.0 Nougat. There will no doubt still be a good number of people using both throughout 2017, even as Google moves on.

Android Nougat

  • Android 7.0 Nougat: Everything you need to know
  • Will my phone get Android Nougat?
  • Google Pixel + Pixel XL review
  • All Android Nougat news
  • How to manually update your Nexus or Pixel
  • Join the Discussion

31
Jan

How to set up GameStream on your NVIDIA Shield TV


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Play your favorite PC games on your Shield TV with GameStream.

The PC vs. console debate has raged on amongst gamers on forums and chatrooms for decades. But it’s 2017, and there’s more parity between console and PC gaming than ever before. Furthermore, thanks to GameStream for the [NVIDIA Shield Android TV], you can stream your favorite PC games straight from your computer to your living room TV and play from the comfort of your couch with your Shield controller in hand.

There are over 200 titles compatible with GameStream, so you’re bound to find some of your favorite PC games to play on your Shield. Do note that your PC will be inaccessible while streaming games to the Shield, an important thing to note if you share your PC with your family or roommates.

See the NVIDIA Shield TV at Amazon

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But before we go any further, here’s what you’ll need to get things set up:

  • NVIDIA Shield Android TV box
  • PC with a GeForce GTX 650 or higher graphics card. View full system requirements here.
  • A strong Wi-Fi signal in your home

To maximize your Wi-Fi strength, you’ll want to ensure that your PC is connected to the internet via a wired ethernet connection so that your Wi-Fi can maintain a strong connection between your Shield and your PC no matter where they are in your home.

Once you’ve confirmed your PC is compatible, you’re ready to get things set up.

On your PC, download and install GeForce Experience.
Log into your NVIDIA account in GeForce Experience. If you have yet to set up an account with NVIDIA, you can create one from scratch, or use your Google or Facebook account.
Check for the latest updates to the GeForce Game Ready driver in GeForce Experience.
Download and install latest updates.
Once the updates have installed, go to the GeForce Experience Settings — the icon looks like a gear.
Select Shield from the side menu.
Ensure that GameStream is turned on.
Switch over to your NVIDIA Shield TV.
Go to GameStream from the main menu.
Log into the same NVIDIA account logged into GeForce Experience.

Now you’re PC and NVIDIA Shield are connected and you’re good to stream any of the GameStream-supported games that are installed on your PC to the Shield. GeForce Experience will automatically scan your computer for any compatible games installed. When you go to the GameStream menu on your Shield, you should also see Steam as an option, which allows you to stream any games you’ve got installed on your PC from your Steam library.

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Some games may require a keyboard and mouse setup. The NVIDIA Shield TV offers support for both Bluetooth and wired USB keyboards and mice, so you should hopefully be able find something that works around the house. If not, we’d recommend getting the Logitech K400r, which includes a keyboard and trackpad for a great wireless experience in your living room.

Once you’ve got everything set up, your favorite PC games will load and play just as fast and smoothly as any Android games or apps downloaded onto your Shield TV.

Android Gaming

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  • Best Android games
  • Best free Android games
  • Best games with no in-app purchases
  • Best action games for Android
  • Best RPGs for Android
  • All the Android gaming news!

31
Jan

Google launching new security features for G Suite admins


It isn’t fun, but data security is of the utmost importance in big companies.

Google’s enterprise-focused application offering, G Suite, is getting new tools that certainly won’t be considered sexy from the end-user perspective but will have network admins and CTOs jumping for joy. The new features are all centered around security, and more importantly keeping sensitive company data locked up tight inside the company while still visible and usable to employees who need it.

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Though G Suite customers have had the ability to use a physical security key as part of a two-step systems, but now admins have the ability to force the use of something like a YubiKey for all company sign-in activity. In turn, admins will be able to manage the deployment of those security keys and see reports on their usage.

Accidents can happen, but with this system they won’t turn into disasters.

Once employees are logged in and have access to sensitive corporate data, it’s imperative that it stays inside the system. Google is now implementing DLP (Data Loss Prevention) in Google Drive in the same way it originally implemented it in Gmail. With these new tools, admins can identify sensitive data using OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and secure it before it is accidentally shared outside the company.

At a higher level, G Suite is expanding its logging to include preconfigured BigQuery integration for Gmail so admins can troubleshoot issues and see where email is headed throughout the company. Google is also announcing third-party email archiving, making it easy to back up email that was previously managed outside of the Gmail system and have it stored in Google Vault right alongside your other internal email.

31
Jan

Walter brings foreign prestige TV dramas to the US


The internet has democratized almost everything to the point where almost anyone can now start their own streaming service. Channel 4, a British public service broadcaster, is joining the fray by launching its own internet TV platform in the US. Walter Presents will launch in March with the stated aim of showcasing the best foreign-language dramas from across the world. Unfortunately, the victim in all of this peak TV madness is your wallet, which will be asked to shell out $6.99 a month for the privilege.

The name Walter Presents is in reference to Walter Iuzzolino, an Italian TV producer who serves as chief curator for the service. Iuzzolino, the story goes, is responsible for scouring Europe for prestige dramas that will play well in the English-speaking world. In the UK, Walter was responsible for showing Deutschland ’83, Thicker Than Water and Merciless.

When the service launches, a library of 34 series, sourced from 12 different countries, will be available for you to binge watch. Two additional series will be added to the platform each month, with the company promising it’ll deliver high-quality subtitles with each one. Initial shows in the library include acclaimed French drama Spin and Norwegian thriller Valkyrien.

It’s not the first time that an ostensibly British broadcaster has opted to launch an on-demand platform in the US. The BBC and ITV teamed up late last year to birth BritBox, a similarly Netflix-esque service that’ll showcase the best of the two channel’s output.

Which is, in no way, giving us streaming service fatigue. After all, there’s only a handful of other companies offering a similar product right now. Like Netflix… Amazon… Hulu… Showtime, HBO Now, CBS All Access, Crackle, Crunchyroll, Starz, Vdio, Seeso, Filmstruck, YouTube Red…

Source: Walter Presents

31
Jan

Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 “confirmed” for MWC reveal, Samsung’s iPad rival less than a month away


We haven’t long heard about the specs that Samsung’s latest iPad rival is expected to come with, and now there’s strong evidence to suggest all will be revealed at Mobile World Congress in February.

  • Galaxy Tab S3 leaks reveal Samsung’s next iPad rival

Japanese news site Naver has quoted an official Samsung spokesman as saying: “This week we will the distribute an Invitation Letter to MWC 2017 to Global Media”. We know the invite doesn’t refer to the Galaxy S8 smartphone, as that isn’t expected until at least March…or April, depending on which rumour you believe. The news site also states the incoming tablet will be unveiled on 26 February, the day before the show officially begins and the same day LG is expected to reveal the G6 flagship smartphone.

Considering we haven’t heard much in the way of any other devices from the South Korean tech giant, it’s logical to assume the invite refers to the Galaxy Tab S3.

The site goes on to say there will indeed be two models of the Tab S3, the LTE version – model number SM-T820 – and a Wi-Fi only version – model number SM-T825. Both will come with 9.6-inch 2048 x 1536 displays and Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 processors, a spec that marries up with a recent GFXBench posting.

The rear camera will be 12-megapixels while the front will be limited to 5, and RAM is expected to come in at 4GB. The price is also reported to be 700,000 Won when it’s released in March, which at the time of writing converts to £484 or $608, so it won’t exactly be cheap.

  • Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus: What’s the story so far?

With slightly more concrete evidence as to the Galaxy Tab S3’s existence and release date, we have just under a month to see the final product in Barcelona.

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