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13
Jul

Lunar UI Icon Pack Review: Something a little different from Vishal Kashi



Lunar UI Icon Pack ReviewIt’s the weekend so news is always going to be slow, so let’s take a look at a new icon pack from Vishal Kashi (Destructo570) of GFXDevs. The Lunar UI icon pack incorporates many visual features that are popular among icon enthusiasts these days; they’re flat with rounded corners, they’re minimal and the colours are extremely vibrant. What’s more, Lunar UI tries to branch out with a few icons, changing up the traditional colours that we’re used, like blue for Facebook is now red. Check out our video review of them below:

As I mentioned in the video, the icon pack already has 730 icons and 9 wallpapers, and is regularly update by Vishal weekly; make sure to circle him on Google+ if you want to follow his updates or see what new projects he is working on. Personally, I’m a big fan of Lunar UI, and I really like that some of the icons looks substantially different to what we’re used to, like the aforementioned Facebook icon. I also really like how they all look when they’re congregated closely; although many of them look quite different, the overall effect of them is great. If you’re interested in picking up Lunar UI, they’re available for $1.45 USD on the Google Play Store now; links are below.


What do you think of the Lunar UI icon pack? Let us know your opinion.


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The post Lunar UI Icon Pack Review: Something a little different from Vishal Kashi appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

13
Jul

Watch these smart bullets home in on targets like tiny missiles


DARPA shows its EXACTO smart bullets in action

Soldiers have long dreamed of smart bullets that always hit their targets, and it looks like they’re now much closer to getting their wish. DARPA has posted the first footage of EXACTO (Extreme Accuracy Tasked Ordnance), a .50-caliber bullet that uses optical guidance and sensors to home in on its prey. As you see in the fuzzy-looking video below, the projectile compensates for movement, weather and wind with all the agility of a missile — even if you try to miss, it easily swerves back on track. The project is still young, but it could prove a tremendous help to long-distance snipers for whom even the tiniest slip-up could ruin a shot.

Filed under: Misc

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Via: DARPA (Twitter)

Source: DARPA (1), (2)

13
Jul

Chromebooks could get even cheaper soon thanks to support for MediaTek Processors



Chromebooks could get even cheaperChromebooks are fantastic value for the type of people who just need a larger form factor device for surfing the internet at home, or in well-connected places. While some Chromebooks are a little expensive, most Chromebooks are extremely well priced around $200-300 USD. Well, that average may be set to drop after what has been spotted on the Chromium OS code review site. It appears that MediaTek, manufacturer of generally cheaper smartphone processors, has added code to Chromium OS, suggesting Chromebooks could get even cheaper than they are now if they were running MediaTek processors.

Having said that, the code contributed comes from a test device running an ARM Cortex-A7 processor, something which when compared to existing Chromebooks, could get a little slow. This would obviously cut down costs, though, and we could even see Chromebooks with MediaTek processors drop below the $200 mark. This marks the second time that MediaTek has been mentioned in relation to Google products; the first being their involvement in the development of Android One, Android’s new budget line of devices.


What do you think about cheaper Chromebooks running MediaTek processors? Let us know your thoughts below in the comments.

Source: Chromium OS via engadget


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The post Chromebooks could get even cheaper soon thanks to support for MediaTek Processors appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

13
Jul

Weekends with Engadget: DARPA’s mad science projects, Google’s 3D-mapping tablet and more!


This week, we dove into the history of DARPA, explored the hand-drawn world of Cuphead, took an in-depth look at Google’s 3D-mapping tablet and interviewed two people who managed to cut ties with technology. Read on for Engadget’s news highlights from the last seven days. Oh, and be sure to subscribe to our Flipboard magazine!

What you need to know about DARPA, the Pentagon’s mad science division

You probably know DARPA for its fleet of super-powered machines, but this agency’s reach extends far beyond military robotics. Read on as Mariella Moon breaks down everything you need to know about one of the Department of Defense’s most interesting operations.

Two years to Tango: the race to finish Google’s 3D-mapping tablet

Two years. That’s exactly how much time Google’s ATAP division was given to develop Tango, a first-of-its-kind 3D-mapping tablet. Read on as Brad Molen digs into the project’s ambitious start and race toward the finish line.

Cuphead: Bringing 1930s style to 21st century games

Cuphead, you say? At first glance, this upcoming, hand-drawn 2D shooter might appear to be a long-lost game from the 1930s, but it’s only meant to look that way.

How to Disappear (almost) Completely: living off the grid

Ditching social media is hard enough, but how about technology itself? In the final installment of How to Disappear, Dan Cooper interviews two people who cut their ties with the modern world and took up meager existences off the grid.

The world’s first video game arcade machine is a glittery fiberglass wonder

They may look like Teletubbies, but these colorful contraptions are actually a few of the world’s first video arcade machines. Produced in 1971 by the minds behind the Atari, these devices had plenty of glitter and diodes, but weirdly no RAM, processor or ROM.

Music Vault brings 12,000 classic concert clips to YouTube

Music lovers listen up: YouTube is now to home to nearly 2,000 hours of classic concert footage, all thanks to Music Vault. This incredible archive includes 12,000 clips of performances by The Who, Bob Dylan and more.

Hicon Social Bangle is a wearable fashion bungle

It’s gaudy. It’s awkward. It’s the Hicon Social Bangle. Paired with a selection of vibrating charms, this bracelet notifies its wearer of text messages, calls and social network activity — as long as its Kickstarter campaign is funded, of course.

Samsung NX mini review: a $450 mirrorless cam that fits in your pocket

Samsung’s latest mirrorless shooter, the NX mini, is cheap ($450), lightweight and has a flip-up LCD that’s perfect for selfies. This camera’s compact size makes it extremely pocketable, but those with larger hands be warned — it has very petite controls.

Sony RX100 III review: a fantastic point-and-shoot, but it’ll cost you

Sony’s RX100 line of point-and-shoot cameras have always been fantastic. Zach Honig takes a look at the latest camera from Sony, the RX100 III. Does it live up to the reputation of its predecessors? Read his review and find out!

What you need to know about Kickstarter, Indiegogo and the concept of crowdfunding

From potato salads to virtual reality headsets, crowdfunding websites offer something for everyone. But how exactly do they work? Read our explainer and find out.

Filed under: Misc, Internet

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13
Jul

Luna Icon Pack Review: Brighten up your homescreen with these illuminating Icons



Luna Icon Pack ReviewFinally coming back to icon reviews after an extended hiatus. Our first icon pack off the press is the Luna icon pack, which is the creation of Anaïs Limpalaër. The icon pack makes use of round icons, and has a very interesting illuminating effect to it thanks to the colour gradient that looks like it gets brighter towards the white icon in the middle. I think they look fantastic, and if you want to take a closer look at them, check out our icon review video below:

As I mentioned in the video, while I did only have an older version of the icon pack on hand, Anaïs has updated the pack now to be 865 icons strong, and includes 5 wallpapers. Of course, Anaïs continues to update the icon pack, so make sure to keep track of her Google+ page for updates. The Luna icon pack is currently $1.99 USD on the Google Play Store now, so if you’re interested in picking up these very pretty icons, be sure to hit the Play Store links that are below.


What do you think of the Luna Icon Pack? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.


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The post Luna Icon Pack Review: Brighten up your homescreen with these illuminating Icons appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

13
Jul

Hulu gets exclusive rights to stream South Park’s full show catalog


South Park characters as of season 14

If you’re determined to catch up on South Park episodes without downloading them, you’d better get used to Hulu — you’ll be using it a lot. The service has just unveiled a deal that gives it exclusive US rights to stream the series’ complete catalog for the next three years, including new episodes as soon as they’ve finished airing on TV. The official South Park website will still host both 30 older segments as well as new releases, but you won’t be (officially) streaming the classics anywhere else. It’s a definite coup for Hulu, which has frequently had to watch as Amazon and Netflix score big exclusives of their own. It’s not grand news for Americans, though, as you’ll only have one streaming source for the full escapades of Cartman, Kenny, Kyle and Stan.

Filed under: Home Entertainment, Internet, HD

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Via: Hulu (Twitter)

Source: South Park Studios, New York Times, BusinessWire

13
Jul

Chromebooks can get cheaper thanks to new support for a low-end chip


Chromebook

You can pick up a Chromebook for a dirt-cheap $200, if you know where to shop. However, there are now signs that these Google-powered portables could get even cheaper. MediaTek has contributed code to Chromium OS (the base for Chrome OS) for a test device with an entry-level ARM Cortex-A7 processor — a big step down from the relatively inexpensive Cortex-A15/A7 hybrid that Samsung uses, not to mention the Intel Celeron chips in other Chrome devices. Theoretically, this leads to Chromebooks and Chromeboxes that cost significantly less than $200, albeit after a big speed hit. Just as with phones and tablets, a Cortex-A7 system is likely to be pretty sluggish.

MediaTek hasn’t discussed what it’s doing with the code, and it could be a while (if ever) before there’s hardware you can buy. However, it’s not hard to see why the semiconductor firm would want to support Chrome gear. The company’s chips are seemingly omnipresent in the basic smartphones seen across developing markets like China and India. Support for a starter Cortex-A7 processor could have a similar effect in the PC world, bringing Chrome OS systems to people who might not otherwise get a computer at all.

Filed under: Laptops, Internet, Google

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Via: Francois Beaufort (Google+)

Source: Google Source

13
Jul

Apple Responds to Chinese State-Run Media Warning Against iOS Location Tracking [iOS Blog]


maps.jpg Earlier this week, China’s state-run media broadcast labeled the iPhone a “national security concern” over Apple’s Location Services feature found in iOS 7, with the country’s researchers stating that the data could lead to accessing highly-sensitive data in China.

Today, Apple officially responded to the controversy on its Chinese website. The statement, which was posted in both Chinese and English, starts off by reiterating the company’s commitment to privacy and stating that its Location Services exist solely to help users for activities that require navigation:

Our customers want and expect their mobile devices to be able to quickly and reliably determine their current locations for specific activities such as shopping, travel, finding the nearest restaurant or calculating the amount of time it takes them to get to work. We do this at the device level. Apple does not track users’ locations – Apple has never done so and has no plans to ever do so.

Apple also states that it does not have access to the Frequent Locations data on any iPhone, noting that access to the information can be turned off and is only used to provide commuting information and automatic routing as requested by the user:

Frequent Locations are only stored on a customer’s iOS device, they are not backed up on iTunes or iCloud, and are encrypted. Apple does not obtain or know a user’s Frequent Locations and this feature can always be turned “Off” via our privacy settings.

Apple does not have access to Frequent Locations or the location cache on any user’s iPhone at any time. We encrypt the cache by the user’s passcode and it is protected from access by any app.

Apple concludes the statement by saying that it has “never worked with any government agency from any country” to create backdoor access in any of its products, and vows to never allow access to its servers. Last year, the company shared a sentiment in its “Commitment to Customer Privacy” letter which was issued after the discovery of the NSA’s secret intelligence program, PRISM.

China has become an increasingly important market for Apple, as the company has made moves over the past few years to improve its presence in the country. Last year, the company partnered with the region’s biggest carrier China Mobile and opened more retail stores throughout populated areas. CEO Tim Cook has also made a number of visits to China, meeting with Beijing’s mayor and the Chinese Vice Premier to discuss market growth.

Note: Due to the controversial nature of this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.



13
Jul

Google filtered World Cup search trend news to spare Brazil from further agony


A Brazil fan cries as his team loses to Germany in the World Cup semi-final

If you love Brazilian futebol, this has been an especially tough week; that devastating loss to Germany in the World Cup semi-finals was a shock to fans used to victory. Thankfully for you, Google feels your pain. The internet giant has revealed to NPR that its experimental social newsroom for the Cup avoided covering some of the bigger Brazilian search trends during the lopsided match, such as “shame,” because they were simply too negative. As producer Sam Clohesy explains, the decision was motivated both by a desire to go viral as well as pure sympathy. People tend not to respond well to bad news on social networks, and Google would rather not “rub salt into the wounds” — unlike a regular news outlet, it has more incentive to write about cheerful happenings than calamities. The filtering isn’t going to restore Brazil’s lost chance at football glory, but it might make the next four years a little more bearable.

[Image credit: AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo]

Filed under: Internet, Google

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Via: Slashdot

Source: NPR, Google

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