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19
Jul

Google reportedly confronted Samsung over its approach to smartwatches


Samsung Gear Fit

The strained relationship between Google and Samsung over Android customization has been apparent for a while, and it now looks like this discontent has spread to the wearable world. The Information claims that Google CEO Larry Page confronted Samsung last week over its decision to invest more in its Tizen-based Gear 2 and Gear Fit smartwatches than the Android Wear-packing Gear Live. While the details of Page’s discussions aren’t available, it’s clear that Google wants its biggest hardware partner to devote more attention to its Android-based platform. Reportedly, Google had even wanted Samsung to avoid dipping into wrist-worn technology until Android Wear was ready. As we know now, the Korean company didn’t exactly honor that request — instead, it released the Galaxy Gear (initially using a heavily customized Android) and quickly threw most of its energy into Tizen peripherals.

Neither firm has commented on the disagreement. However, a scrap over wearables isn’t completely shocking. Google is trying to rein manufacturers in by requiring that they use its stock interface on Android Wear equipment; that’s not going to please Samsung, which has spent a lot of time customizing Android in an attempt to stand out. The Gear Live’s very existence suggests that Samsung is being somewhat accommodating. If the leak is accurate, though, Google may not be truly happy unless that device takes center stage in Samsung’s lineup.

Filed under: Cellphones, Wearables, Mobile, Samsung, Google

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Via: 9to5Google

Source: The Information

19
Jul

McMoon’s and the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project


If you’ve ever used Street View on Google Maps to preview an unfamiliar travel destination, then you’ll understand the reasoning behind NASA’s Lunar Orbiter missions during the late ’60s. The space probes were doing reconnaissance and beamed back 160 pairs of images covering a total of 12,000 square miles of lunar landscape. Unfortunately, the technology at the time resulted in less-than-ideal photographic quality. In 2008, however, a group called the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) was able to track down the original tapes and restore them to their full resolution. The LOIRP set up shop in an abandoned McDonald’s — which they dubbed McMoon’s — near the NASA Ames Research Park in California and began wrangling archived tape reels and defunct machinery to help them achieve their goal. The story was documented for the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) and released this week as Extraterrestrial: The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project. It’s the third installment of CMOA’s The Invisible Photograph series, which deals with imagery that’s been lost, degraded or almost destroyed.

In preparation for the Apollo 11 moon landing, NASA launched five successive probes between 1966 and 1967 to explore the Moon’s surface scouting for viable landing sites and scientific research locations. The probes were able to snap photographs of the moon’s surface using traditional film cameras from an orbit as low as 28 miles. The film was developed on board the craft, scanned and then beamed to Earth where the data was recorded onto 70mm magnetic tapes. NASA converted that information to photographs using 35mm film at a 250:1 dynamic range (essentially 8-bit quality). Data on the original tapes, however, had been captured at 1000:1, four times the resolution of what NASA had been able to output at the time. The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project tracked down the originals and managed to acquire vintage machines like Ampex FR-900 tape drives to reclaim the images at their full resolution. The project was a success, and this is their story:

Filed under: Science

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Source: CMOA

19
Jul

Get a new look on the cheap with these customizable phones


Deep-pocketed power users may buy new smartphones once a year or even every few months to take advantage of improved displays, better cameras and faster processors, but the majority of owners are more likely to tire of their device’s appearance long before its outdated specs. A few manufacturers have taken a new approach when designing their handsets, opting to include not only replaceable batteries, but also swappable backs, that let you change the look of your phone for only a few bucks. Samsung’s Galaxy S5 and LG’s G3 are two recent flagships that you can change up after purchase, but there are a few other options to consider, too. If you’re feeling extra ambitious, you could even replace the backplate on, say, an iPhone 5s, but such an undertaking requires precise work, pricier parts and a voided warranty. Click through for our customizable picks that keep things simple (and cheap).

Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile, Samsung, Microsoft, Nokia, ASUS, LG

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19
Jul

Recommended Reading: Gauging the smartwatch craze and skin listening


Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you’ll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read.

Does Anyone Outside Silicon Valley Even Want a Smartwatch?
by Kevin Roose,
New York Magazine

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The first wave of smartwatches has its popular entries (ahem, Pebble), but widespread adoption has yet to take hold. With Google’s Android Wear initiative, new options bring closer ties with the operating system and improved aesthetics. But is that enough to attract the masses? Do people really want an extension of their phone as a wrist-worn device?

Music for your Skin
by Sujata Gupta, Nova Next

The current gadget landscape features a number of devices that provide tactile feedback through vibrations. Devices from smartphones to game controllers serve up said alerts for new activity or enhanced experiences. But what if that sort of dermal interaction could be used to hear music? Well, researchers are working on ways to experience music and sound with our epidermis, and not our ears.

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Meet ‘Project Zero,’ Google’s Secret Team of Bug-Hunting Hackers
by
Andy Greenberg, Wired

This week, Google revealed a group of hackers it’s calling Project Zero, tasked with sniffing out security flaws in software. It sounds very covert ops, and the team is looking to nix the so-called zero-day issues before they’re exploited by those seeking to do harm. Wired has a detailed look at the cleanup initiative.

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The Rise of the Wedding Drone
by Daniel A. Medina, The Atlantic

It’s no secret that drones have become a popular choice for filmmakers to capture amazing footage without chartering a chopper. That said, shooting a wedding with the remote-controlled vehicles has become an increasingly popular, albeit expensive, option. Of course, given the FAA’s stance on commercial drones, this could lead to further issues if you’re looking for a bird’s-eye view of your nuptials.

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How Google’s New Font Tries to Anticipate the Future
by Cliff Kuang, Wired

Google first outed its Android-mined font Roboto alongside Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) a couple years back. The folks in Mountain View have spent over a year redesigning the typeface for use not only on mobile devices, but also on the screens of wearables and smart TVs. Android’s head of design Mathias Duarte tells Wired that “the idea of having a typeface that’s thought out as a UI typeface — that’s not been done before.”

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Filed under: Misc

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19
Jul

Future pacemakers might be completely biological


intensive care unit lcd monitor for several patients

It’s pretty amazing that humanity has invented a small electrical device that can be used to ensure a heart keeps a steady beat, but pacemakers have to be maintained, replaced — sometimes they can even become infected. Researchers say they’re working on a less invasive solution: a “biological pacemaker.” It’s a form of gene therapy that implants the heart with a gene-carrying virus that creates a “sino-atrail node,” a collection of neurons that acts as a natural metronome for the body’s most important muscle.

In a recent study, Researchers were able to improve the heart rate of 12 pigs with heart conditions by injecting the gene into a specific area of their hearts. Within two days of injection, the animal’s hearts started keeping a regular pace, and were reporting stronger heartbeats than those of the pigs in the pacemaker-equipped control group. After two weeks, however, the pig hearts started to regress to their irregular repetitions — the gene is delivered via virus, and the animal’s natural immune system eventually tries to fight off the therapy.

Eugenio Cingolani, the study’s author, says that the team is working on long-term experiments to assess the viability of the technology, and hopes to start human trials in the next few years. If successful, the therapy could be used to treat unborn infants with heart defects while still in the womb. Eventually, it may even replace pacemaker technology altogether — virtually eliminating the possibility of infection. Just think: you’ll never have to replace your heart’s batteries ever again.

[Image credit: Shutterstock / beerkoff]

Filed under: Science

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Source: Washington Post, Science

19
Jul

Perform a Nandroid backup online with this App


Capture

A Nandroid backup is a process which is performed in recovery mode to take a snapshot of the current state of your Android Operating System, along with data, settings, and a whole bunch of other information to create a backup file. This backup can then be used to restore to if you flash a bad ROM, or install a bad App, restoring with it not only a known-working Android Operating System, but all your data and Apps with it.

With this new tool you’re able to perform a Nandroid backup without having to turn off your device to enter recovery mode – perfect for backing up on the fly before installing a questionable App or changing a developer setting. That means no more missed calls or messages whilst you’re booting into recovery and performing the backup.

Do not get confused with the naming of the App however, since an online backup here is referenced not in the uploading or downloading of a backup connected to the internet, but instead in the ability to perform a backup with your phone live.

Features
* Creates backups in the CMW 5 and 6 style or TWRP!
* Full support of the onandroid script.
* Create custom names for your backups.
* Choose what partitions get backed up.
* Scheduled backups.
* Tasker support.
* Upload backup to FTP after creating backup.

Requirements
1. Rooted android phone
2. Latest version of Busybox

Online Nandroid is a free App in the Google Play Store based off a script originally developed over at XDA.

The post Perform a Nandroid backup online with this App appeared first on AndroidGuys.

19
Jul

HTC One M8 getting 4G LTE support in India on August 15



When HTC launched the One M8 in India in April, the company promised that the One M8 will be compatible with TDD-LTE networks. During the launch of HTC Desire 616 and HTC One E8 in India, the company has once again announced that they are planning to roll out 4G LTE support for One M8 starting August 15.


Android 4.4.4 update for the HTC One M8 and M7 Google Play editions

It was quite puzzling to see smartphone brands launching non 4G LTE devices in India even though phased roll out of fast connections have started over 2300MHz band. Nevertheless, the list of 4G compatible smartphones in India is growing, thanks to LG G2 4G, LG F70 4G, Oppo Find 7, Oppo Find 7a, Samsung Galaxy S5 4G, Xolo LT900 and now the HTC One M8.


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The post HTC One M8 getting 4G LTE support in India on August 15 appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

19
Jul

Galaxy Note 4 TouchWiz APKs leak in form of a list


samsung_galaxy_note_3_trio

Samsung Galaxy Note 4 is one of the most anticipated devices this year. There are many people out there who just can’t wait to get their hands on Samsung’s new phablet, I know a bunch of them who belong in this category. We’ve seen some leaks when it comes to this device, but that is nowhere near over it seems.

This time we have Note 4′s leaked APK list, courtesy of @evleaks. Alongside the list in form of an image, the leaker wrote the following: “Some interesting Samsung Galaxy Note 4 APKs”. If we take a closer look we can find some interesting stuff here. SStudio_WQHD_K suggests the device will have a 2K screen, this was to be expected though. SHealth3_5 confirms S Health will be once again a part of TouchWiz, with some new features probably. The list also mentions a fingerprint service and a few APKs which suggest all kinds apps/features to make your inner photographer happy.

galaxy note 4 apks leak__

Check out the list for yourself and see if anything appeals to you. Unfortunately this list also suggest another heavy version of TouchWiz, we’re still hoping that won’t be the case, but… Anyhow, are you one of those people who’re waiting for this device to launch? That will probably happen at this year’s IFA in Berlin this September.

Source: @evleaks

The post Galaxy Note 4 TouchWiz APKs leak in form of a list appeared first on AndroidGuys.

19
Jul

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review: Cheap, but definitely not Nasty



Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewIf you have read any of my audio product reviews, you will know that I am not a huge fan of in-ear headphones. More than just the tight fit most earphones need to stay in your ears, I find that having the speaker so close to your ear is a recipe for trouble, often leaving my ears sore and sometimes giving me a headache. However, the Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones have changed my perspective on in-ear headphones, from their comfy ear buds to the very balanced sound to the very affordable $59.95 AUD/$49.99 USD, I think I’ve found the first pair of earphones that I actually like. Let’s check them out.

What’s in the box

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewIn the box of the Denon Music Maniacs, you will get the earphones themselves and an assortment of accessories. You’ll get 3 additional sets of earbuds in different sizes, extra-small, small and large (medium is included on the earphones). You’ll also get an additional cable add-on which is required for some devices; if you need this, you’ll likely know by now. I’m a little disappointed that there is no method for transporting the Maniacs with you or to even keep them neat, whether it be a bag or winding tool.

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewDespite being named “Music Maniac”, the Maniac’s have a very un-maniacal look. Almost all black with small silver highlights on the back of the earbuds, the Maniacs are extremely reserved and simple, which is perfectly fine, because the main event of these earphones is their performance where it really matters; more on that soon.

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewThe Maniacs have one other notable feature, which is the inline microphone and answer button. The design of the inline unit has a very small footprint which is perfect for travelling. While it’s a bit disappointing there aren’t more controls on the inline unit, I do applaud Denon on keeping it extremely small and still functional.

How does it perform

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewFor those who aren’t aware, Denon is a brand who has been involved in premium audio products for many years, though most recently have been making inroads with their consumer audio offerings. So the Music Maniac earphones have the pedigree, but do they have actual audio performance to back it up? Absolutely.

I mentioned in the introduction that the Music Maniacs are very possibly the first earphones I’ve liked, and partly thanks to its balance. The highs and mids are very clear and the bass is not at all overbearing, though some would say nonexistent. I really liked the audio balance that the Maniacs offer; it was right for almost every genre of music I listened to, and while rock and dance listeners may want a little more bass, that’s nothing a little equalizer tweaking can’t fix.

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewThe other part that I really like about the Maniacs are the fact that the earbuds are superbly comfortable. I’m not exactly how these earphones are so different to other offerings, but I have happily used the Maniacs for hours on end without getting sore ears. The fit is just right, and doesn’t put any unnecessary pressure on your ear cavity, which for me is a huge plus


Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear HeadphonesThere is one more part of the Denon ecosystem which I haven’t mentioned yet. Denon has released an app that was supposedly designed to enhance the performance of the Music Maniac earphones. From my brief exploring of the app, it doesn’t do anything ground breaking; it’s useful for playlists and adjusting EQ, but that’s nothing you can’t already manage with other apps, and not that useful if you listen to music using a streaming app.

What I like about the Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphone

As I mentioned earlier, there’s a lot I like about the Music Maniac earphones. The top two things are obviously the comfort and the audio quality, which should really sell it for anybody just looking for a simple set of earphones that get the job done. That’s exactly what Denon would want for their cheapest entry in the Music Maniac category: cheap and effective. And for $59.95 AUD, that’s a small price to pay for that kind of performance.

This point is a little less tangible, but I really appreciate how simplistic and reserved the Maniacs are. While they look at crazy as their name suggests, that all creates a nice contrast with the abilities that it hides beneath.

What I don’t like about the Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewDespite liking the Maniacs a lot, I do have some concerns about the package you get. Chief among these concerns is the fact that you don’t get a means of transporting your earphones nicely. Obviously it’s not a dealbreaker, but transporting earphones is an absolute pain without a bag or something to wrap them around to keep them untangled.

Final Thoughts

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones ReviewThe Denon Music Maniac earphones are by far my favourite earphones ever. They’re comfortable, cheap and the audio quality is extremely good given its price. They aren’t going to blow your mind, but if you’re in the market for something simple that does the job and does it well, without breaking the bank, the Music Maniacs are for you.

If you’re interested in picking up the Denon Music Maniac earphones, make sure to check out the product page here.

Gallery of Photos

Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review
Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review
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Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones
Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones
Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review
Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review
Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review
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The post Denon Music Maniac AH-C50MA In-Ear Headphones Review: Cheap, but definitely not Nasty appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

19
Jul

NASA says lunar caves could provide living spaces for future astronauts


Shoot The Moon

It turns out that the Moon could be habitable. Sort of. NASA writes that some of the holes in our moon’s surface might actually be caves where future astronauts could hole up and guard themselves from radiation, micrometeorites and massive temperature changes when day turns to night, aiding future exploration. The aeronautics outfit says that these caves could be the result of a few different actions, including sub-surface lava draining away from an area and vibrations causing the roofs of resultant voids to collapse. The only way to know for sure, though, is to physically check them out — there’s only so much that photos from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter can tell us. Who knows, maybe once astronauts start delving below the lunar surface they’ll find a wizard or two.

[Image credit: Associated Press]

Filed under: Alt

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Via: The Verge

Source: NASA

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