Skip to content

Archive for

27
Oct

‘Final Fantasy XV’ dev claims Nvidia’s new card greatly improves performance


“Highest” Preset | Wide

The lead programmer on Square Enix’s Final Fantasy XV claimed in an interview with Wccftech that Nvidia’s deep learning supersampling (DLSS) technology made possible through its RTX-series graphics cards, can have a dramatic effect on the game’s performance. Although the game doesn’t yet support it, it is one of the major titles that will be adding the anti-aliasing-like technology soon.

Alongside ray tracing, DLSS was one of the major technologies that Nvidia touted its new Turing-generation of graphics cards with. Used in place of traditional anti-aliasing techniques like temporal-anti-aliasing (TAA), DLSS leverages AI and deep learning to reproduce certain elements of a scene at a much higher resolution than the game is rendered at. It’s designed to improve the visual fidelity of scenes and be much less resource-intensive than techniques like TAA.

According to the technical director and lead programmer on Final Fantasy XV, Takeshi Aramaki, the effects of DLSS are impressive. In his chat with Wccftech, he stated that “The resolution of the texture reduces partially at times, but polygon edges are much cleaner and we’ve been able to realize blur reductions. The performance significantly increases with the 4K resolution and the framerate also shows a substantial improvement.”

Another important improvement with this feature, we’re told, is that it was much easier to implement DLSS than TAA in the game, making for an easier developmental process.

It should be noted, however, that there have been a number of user reports of poor anti-aliasing in Final Fantasy XV, both in terms of its performance impact and its overall aesthetics. While that may make the use of DLSS more dramatic an improvement for those who can take advantage of it, it suggests that the game is not the best benchmark of how DLSS truly compares to TAA or similar anti-aliasing technologies.

Despite his praise of DLSS and the speed with which it’s been implemented, Aramaki wouldn’t be drawn on when we can expect it to become available for owners of both the game and Nvidia’s RTX cards to enjoy. He did, however, suggest that Square Enix may implement ray tracing in the game at some point in the future, giving gamers another reason to adopt the new graphics cards from Nvidia.

For a more in-depth look at Final Fantasy XV performance, check out our guide.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • A.I. makes Nvidia’s RTX 2080 twice as powerful as the GTX 1080
  • Nvidia’s RTX 2000 GPUs look like A.I. hardware dressed up for gamers
  • Nvidia’s Turing chip reinvents computer graphics (but not for gaming)
  • Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 2060 might launch next year without ray tracing
  • Nvidia’s new GPUs look amazing, but that doesn’t mean you should buy one



27
Oct

Samsung Galaxy Book 2 vs. Pixel Slate


Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

Once was a time when Microsoft had fallen behind when it came to portable computing. Today though, modern manufactures release products specifically designed to compete with the excellent range of Microsoft Surface 2-in-1s. That’s exactly what Google and Samsung have done with their new respective Pixel Slate and Galaxy Book 2 convertible tablets.

They’re distinctly different devices though, sporting different internal hardware configurations and very different operating systems. So, which is best? To find out, we pitted the Samsung Galaxy Book 2 versus the Pixel Slate and made them face off in a number of important use cases.

Design

Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

Google is well known for its minimalist aesthetic choices, and the Pixel Slate fully embodies that ideal, but in a fashion that we found a bit drab. It’s flat, dull color scheme and heavily rounded corners make it look less exciting compared to its contemporaries. The Galaxy Book 2, on the other hand, really stands out. It has a subtle, soft aluminum finish that is truly striking, even when compared to fresh-faced devices like the Surface Pro 6.

Both suffer from overly thick bezels, which is becoming a hallmark of 2-in-1 devices. Perhaps we’ve been spoiled by the ultra-thin bezels of modern laptops like the XPS 13, but we can’t help with wish these 2-in-1s adopted at least some kind of middle ground for a more up-to-date look.

Style aside, both devices are light and well balanced. During our time with the Pixel Slate, we even saw someone balance it on a single fingertip, showing how easy and comfortable it is to hold in just one hand.

Port selection on the Pixel Slate is as minimal as its aesthetic, offering just two USB-C connectors and an accessory connector for the keyboard (and no headphone jack). The Galaxy Book 2 has a slightly broader array of connection options, offering the same USB-C ports, a microSD card reader, and a 3.5mm headphone jack. It also has built-in LTE for easy internet connectivity on the go — something that is becoming more common in laptops too.

Although there is a stark disparity between the starting price of both devices, the bundled accessories (or lack thereof) close that gap significantly. The Galaxy Book 2 starts at $1,000 but comes complete with a detachable keyboard and a new S Pen, the latter of which magnetically attaches to the lid. The Pixel Slate might start at just $600, but both the keyboard and Pen are additional accessories, priced at $200 and $100 a piece. The keyboard takes some getting used to as well, with our early testing leaving us far from enamored with the rounded keycaps.

Arguably the biggest difference between the two devices’ designs though, is the software they run. The Pixel Slate runs Google’s Chrome OS which is lightweight and increasingly offers better touch support. It has its own suite of compatible applications and a broader selection of Android apps. The Galaxy Book 2 runs Windows 10 S in its default configuration, which means it is limited to Microsoft Store apps. You can opt for a full Windows 10 installation instead, however, if you so wish.

Performance

Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

The Galaxy Book 2 is built around Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 850 octa-core processor and comes with 4GB of RAM and 128GB of onboard storage, all for $1,000. In our review, it performed well with no real slow-downs during light multitasking or multi-tab browser usage. It shows noticeable improvements over the older Snapdragon 835 processor but it still performs poorly when compared with Intel hardware like the Core i5 CPU found in the Surface Pro 6. The onboard Adreno 630 graphics core was lacking in gaming scenarios, proving to be only really capable of rendering low-demand titles like Minecraft at comfortable frame rates.

They should look pretty though, thanks to the bright and rich AMOLED display the Galaxy Book 2 sports. It has a resolution of 2,160 x 1,440, offering a pixel density of 216 pixels per inch (PPI).

The Pixel Slate comes in a few different configurations and uses more typical laptop hardware. The $600 model comes with an Intel Celeron processor, 4GB of RAM, and 32GB of onboard storage, with options to double both.

In our hands-on test, we used the $800 Intel Core m3 model with 8GB of RAM, which we found to be a little underpowered, feeling quite clunky during certain tasks like using the device’s new split-screen mode for multi-tab browsing at the same time.  The $1,000 model should be far more capable though. It offers an Intel Core i5 CPU, 8GB of RAM and 128GB of storage. The $1,600 high-end variant sports an Intel Core i7 CPU from Intel’s Amber Lake generation, 16GB of RAM, and 256GB of storage space.

None of the Pixel Slate’s chips will have super-powered graphics cores, but they should be more than capable of handling the multitude of low-demand games and mobile titles that make up the bulk of the Chrome OS catalog. They’ll look crisp too, thanks to the Pixel Slate’s 3,000 x 2,000 (293 PPI) display, though odd scaling on Android apps might mean black bars are a requirement to fit the screen.

Portability

Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

The dimensions of both devices are much the same. The Galaxy Book 2 measures 11.32 x 7.89 x 0.30-inches, while the Pixel Slate measures 11.45 x 7.95 x 0.27-inches. The weight difference between the two is also negligible — 1.75 pounds and 1.6 pounds respectively. While both are small and light enough to throw in a bag for travel, the Pixel Slate has arguably better weight balancing, making it the more comfortable device to hold one-handed.

There is a starker difference in battery life, however. The Galaxy Book 2 is rated by Samsung at lasting as long as 20 hours on a single charge, while the Pixel Slate is rated for up to 10-hours of mixed usage. In our testing of the Samsung 2-in-1 managed seven and a half hours of web-browsing which isn’t bad, but it’s a little underwhelming considering the Qualcomm processor was supposed to enable far greater battery life than the Intel competition.

We have yet to run detailed battery tests on the Pixel Slate.

Pixel Slate pulls ahead by a pixel

Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

Neither the Pixel Slate or Galaxy Book 2 have really blown us away. We’d recommend a Surface Pro 6 over either of them, but in this head-to-head there are only two combatants and we have to raise the flag of the Pixel Slate in victory. It might be dull to look at, have expensive accessories, and wonky performance at the low-end, but its overall package is more pleasing, especially at its lower price point.

The Galaxy Book 2 does have better battery life and a much nicer aesthetic, but it’s hardly affordable. The Snapdragon 850 feels underwhelming at times and the Windows 10 S operating system left us frustrated more than liberated, as was the intention with the leaner version of Microsoft’s flagship operating system.

There are certainly better 2-in-1s out there, but if you’re picking one of these, the Pixel Slate offers enough of a display upgrade and a more affordable array of hardware that it wins the day. This may change once we complete a full review of the Pixel Slate, but so far, it offers the better overall 2-in-1 experience.

Overall winner: Pixel Slate

Don’t forget to check out our laptop reviews for some other great 2-in-1 options.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Samsung Galaxy Book 2 review
  • Samsung Galaxy Book 2 packs Snapdragon 850 into Always Connected Windows 2-in-1
  • Samsung Galaxy Book 2 vs. Surface Pro 6
  • Google Pixel Slate vs. HP Chromebook x2
  • Surface Pro 6 vs. Surface Book 2



27
Oct

It’s no longer illegal to ‘hack’ your electronics to repair them


Battles over the “right-to-repair” movement continue to intensify, but those in favor of it have just scored what appears to be a huge win. That’s because the Librarian of Congress and U.S. Copyright Office just proposed the introduction of new laws which will give both customers and independent repair shops the ability to carry out legal hacks on the software on devices in order to carry out repairs or maintenance.

What it means is that people are free to break digital rights management (DRM) and embedded software locks for the express purpose of maintaining a device or system “in order to make it work in accordance with its original specifications” or to return it to a “state of working in accordance with its original specifications.”

There is a whole lot to unpack in the massive 85-page document, which lays out all the new exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). It seems fairly broad and comprehensive, however. Heck, it even includes a section dedicated to video games, in which it is noted that some these exemptions cover legally owned video games, “when the copyright owner or its authorized representative has ceased to provide access to an external computer server necessary to facilitate an authentication process to enable gameplay.”

In such situations, copying and modification of the program is permitted “to restore access to the game for personal, local gameplay on a personal computer or video game console.”

While these laws are a definite win, though, the battle is far from over. Tech giants with some seriously deep pockets aren’t all in favor of handing over the keys to the repair kingdom, and these exemptions don’t necessarily mean this is going to be easy. For example, Apple has reportedly started introducing software which could brick MacBook Pros if they are repaired by someone not authorized to do so by Apple.

Not being legal experts, we don’t know how scenarios like this will play out. Still, this is a definite step in the right direction for anyone who thinks consumers should have the ability to continue using the products they have bought for as long as possible.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • iFixit meddles with a Mac, tests Apple’s block on third-party repairs
  • IrisVision uses VR to help people with fading eyesight to see again
  • How to run a free background check
  • The best free first-person shooters
  • How to fix a scratched DVD or CD



27
Oct

It’s no longer illegal to ‘hack’ your electronics to repair them


Battles over the “right-to-repair” movement continue to intensify, but those in favor of it have just scored what appears to be a huge win. That’s because the Librarian of Congress and U.S. Copyright Office just proposed the introduction of new laws which will give both customers and independent repair shops the ability to carry out legal hacks on the software on devices in order to carry out repairs or maintenance.

What it means is that people are free to break digital rights management (DRM) and embedded software locks for the express purpose of maintaining a device or system “in order to make it work in accordance with its original specifications” or to return it to a “state of working in accordance with its original specifications.”

There is a whole lot to unpack in the massive 85-page document, which lays out all the new exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). It seems fairly broad and comprehensive, however. Heck, it even includes a section dedicated to video games, in which it is noted that some these exemptions cover legally owned video games, “when the copyright owner or its authorized representative has ceased to provide access to an external computer server necessary to facilitate an authentication process to enable gameplay.”

In such situations, copying and modification of the program is permitted “to restore access to the game for personal, local gameplay on a personal computer or video game console.”

While these laws are a definite win, though, the battle is far from over. Tech giants with some seriously deep pockets aren’t all in favor of handing over the keys to the repair kingdom, and these exemptions don’t necessarily mean this is going to be easy. For example, Apple has reportedly started introducing software which could brick MacBook Pros if they are repaired by someone not authorized to do so by Apple.

Not being legal experts, we don’t know how scenarios like this will play out. Still, this is a definite step in the right direction for anyone who thinks consumers should have the ability to continue using the products they have bought for as long as possible.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • iFixit meddles with a Mac, tests Apple’s block on third-party repairs
  • IrisVision uses VR to help people with fading eyesight to see again
  • How to run a free background check
  • The best free first-person shooters
  • How to fix a scratched DVD or CD



27
Oct

It’s no longer illegal to ‘hack’ your electronics to repair them


Battles over the “right-to-repair” movement continue to intensify, but those in favor of it have just scored what appears to be a huge win. That’s because the Librarian of Congress and U.S. Copyright Office just proposed the introduction of new laws which will give both customers and independent repair shops the ability to carry out legal hacks on the software on devices in order to carry out repairs or maintenance.

What it means is that people are free to break digital rights management (DRM) and embedded software locks for the express purpose of maintaining a device or system “in order to make it work in accordance with its original specifications” or to return it to a “state of working in accordance with its original specifications.”

There is a whole lot to unpack in the massive 85-page document, which lays out all the new exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). It seems fairly broad and comprehensive, however. Heck, it even includes a section dedicated to video games, in which it is noted that some these exemptions cover legally owned video games, “when the copyright owner or its authorized representative has ceased to provide access to an external computer server necessary to facilitate an authentication process to enable gameplay.”

In such situations, copying and modification of the program is permitted “to restore access to the game for personal, local gameplay on a personal computer or video game console.”

While these laws are a definite win, though, the battle is far from over. Tech giants with some seriously deep pockets aren’t all in favor of handing over the keys to the repair kingdom, and these exemptions don’t necessarily mean this is going to be easy. For example, Apple has reportedly started introducing software which could brick MacBook Pros if they are repaired by someone not authorized to do so by Apple.

Not being legal experts, we don’t know how scenarios like this will play out. Still, this is a definite step in the right direction for anyone who thinks consumers should have the ability to continue using the products they have bought for as long as possible.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • iFixit meddles with a Mac, tests Apple’s block on third-party repairs
  • IrisVision uses VR to help people with fading eyesight to see again
  • How to run a free background check
  • The best free first-person shooters
  • How to fix a scratched DVD or CD



27
Oct

Do we even need 5G at all?


Faster phones, easier access to on-demand video, simpler networking — on the surface, 5G sounds like a dream. So why is it more of a nightmare?

Hear me out.

5G: The promise of faster bandwidth

At least on paper, everything about 5G makes sense. The technology, short for fifth generation and the latest cellular technology you’ll need to know about, is a smart evolution from the current 4G LTE network you’re most likely using. Current 4G networks power the latest iPhone and Android smartphones, they’re increasingly baked into cars, and we use them for video downloads and to watch the Red Sox win the World Series on our mobiles. And some people worry that they’re running out of room.

5G promises much faster speeds: 1 gigabit per second downloads, compared with the national average of about 20 Mbps on today’s networks. Yeah, that’s just a promise, but it’s a good thing. It means you’ll be able to download that first episode of Game of Thrones in a few seconds, rather than a few minutes. Sure, 4G networks are faster than they were in 2016, but are they fast enough?

Beyond mere speed, 5G promises incredibly low latency, a measure of the time it takes data to travel from point A to point B and back again. With today’s 4G networks, it’s just 10 or 20 milliseconds – the blink of an eye or the pop of a camera flash, really. 5G may drop it to just a single millisecond, potentially 10× less latency. Why does that matter? If you’ve ever tried VR and noted that the scenery doesn’t move as fast as you do, or were irritated when the audio and video on a stream you’re watching are out of sync, you’ve experienced the pains of latency.

Networking companies believes the incredibly low latency of 5G paired with its fast speeds will enable all sorts of uses, from controlling manufacturing machines in real time to facilitating car to car communication to the dream of IoT, where everything talks to everything else at the speed of thought.

“Low-latency services and massive IoT scale will thrive … [meaning] more connected services and devices, and higher broadband capacity that can benefit our entire society,” says Nicki Palmer, chief network engineering officer and head of wireless networks for Verizon Wireless. Mo Katibeh, Chief Marketing Officer for AT&T Business, is equally ebullient, describing a recent experience gaming over 5G “…using mmWave spectrum and edge compute technology. The demo was a two-player hardware-intensive video game where the entire experience was being powered by 5G. No on-premise equipment—the game itself (for both players) was housed in the cloud. It was a truly remarkable experience.”

So yeah, that all sounds good. But hear me out.

The messy downside of 5G

To achieve all that low-latency goodness and deliver those delicious download speeds, network companies have been looking at millimeter wave bandwidths, meaning high frequency spectrums: 30 GHz to 300 GHz. Verizon uses 28 and 39GHz, for example. The challenge is, those waves don’t travel far at all. Remember when cordless phones went from 2.4GHz to 4.8GHz? You couldn’t walk in the next room and keep a call going. These frequencies present technical hurdles that researchers are still struggling with.

Remember when cordless phones went from 2.4GHz to 4.8GHz? You couldn’t walk in the next room and keep a call going.

To address this issue, carriers anticipate using “small cells” instead of enormous antennas that blanket city blocks or whole neighborhoods. Small cells are bricks or maybe toolbox-sized pieces of gear that can fit outside your house, on buses, high on telephone poles, wherever. And to guarantee the type of coverage consumers will expect, they’ll need to. In order to build a 5G network (which will sit alongside of the 4G net for the foreseeable future), carriers will need small cells on every flag and telephone pole, street sign, building, whatever. Finding places to put all those antennas will be a preposterous challenge in itself.

Oh, and here’s a fun fact: Since every carrier is using different spectrum for their 5G experiments, you probably won’t be able to use a 5G phone on different networks. “It’s not because there isn’t a desire and we don’t want to have cross-compatibility,” said Gordon Mansfield, AT&T’s vice president of radio networks and device design, recently. ” It’s just that nobody has figured out how to cram the 28GHz 5G that Verizon and T-Mobile are using, and AT&T’s 39GHz 5G, into one box yet. And while T-Mobile and Verizon are using similar 28GHz bands, T-Mobile is also putting 5G on the 600MHz band, which Verizon is not.”

Oh, and here’s another fun fact: Did I mention that the signals are easy to block? Steven J. Vaughn Nicols put it well in Computerworld: “That stop sign in front of your car? Bleck! There went your signal.”

Sprint stands alone with a unique plan: run 5G on the same 2.5GHz spectrum it currently uses for 4G. Sure, that sounds smarter, but the company will still have to upgrade every cellular tower with new radios to support that plan.

Oh yeah, one more thing: In order to get 5G, you’ll need to upgrade. Your current phone can’t just be “turned on” to the new tech, nor can all of the IoT devices you currently own that networking companies want to interconnect with it. It may be simpler some day to use, but to capitalize you’ll have to replace everything. Every smart doorbell, every connected cooker, every thermostat. That’s not smart. That just sounds wasteful.

What about Gigabit LTE?

Then there’s the speed thing. That 1Gbps speed is theoretical, just something in the labs. It’ll take a while to hone 5G to make it that fast. Meanwhile, network operators have been doing exactly that with 4G. Remember the LTE part of 4G? That stands for Long Term Evolution, and in the long term, it keeps getting better. According to Fierce Wireless, upgrades to AT&T’s 4G network that will be in place by the end of the year should bring a 400 Mbps theoretical max speed.

“That stop sign in front of your car? Bleck! There goes your signal.”

Meanwhile, there are plans to boost current networks even faster, thanks to technologies like carrier aggregation and MIMO and more. They call it Gigabit LTE, and network operators are working on it right now. So remind me: why do we need 5G?

Research and development are crucial to advancing our networks, and there’s reason to keep iterating around the ideas and concepts of 5G. Faster? Lower latency? Yes please! But for now, why not keep improving 4G, and ensure more widespread adoption of broadband technologies across the rural areas of our country? Because winter is coming – and my network damn well better be prepared for the download demands.

The views expressed here are solely those of the author and do not reflect the beliefs of Digital Trends.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Verizon 5G Home promises gigabit internet speeds for as low as $50
  • AT&T’s new 5G network could adopt tiered billing, including a gaming plan
  • Moto Z3 review
  • 4G vs. LTE: The differences explained
  • Trust us, you need to pay attention to Samsung’s new mobile modem



27
Oct

MacRumors Giveaway: Win a ‘Side Winder’ Cable Organizer for MacBook Pro or MacBook Air


For this week’s giveaway, we’ve once again teamed up with Fuse to offer MacRumors readers a chance to win a Side Winder cable wrangler, designed to let you quickly and easily wind up your MacBook Air or MacBook Pro’s charger cord.

The reel-style construction of the Side Winder keeps your power adapter, cord, and attached extension cable in a neat, compact package with zero tangles and no hassle. It’s perfect for use at home or work and it’s great for when you need to travel because it makes it so quick to pack up.


When traveling with a traditional Power Adapter and cable setup in a bag or backpack, winding the cord and the extension cable is an exercise in futility because it constantly comes unwrapped, leading to a messy, knotted tangle of cable. That cable tangle is the problem the Side Winder solves.


Side Winder works by enclosing the Power Adapter of your MacBook with a reel that holds the cable. When you need to wind extra cable, a simple twist of the top piece pulls it in. When more cable is needed while the MacBook is in use, you can pull out as much cable as you need to reach a power outlet.


Fuse says that it takes less than six seconds to fully wind a cable using the Side Winder, and the design of the device provides protection against cable damage and fraying by preventing stress at weak points.


Side Winder is compatible with all 45W, 60W, 61W, 85W, and 87W MacBook Pro and Air chargers, with both MagSafe 1 and 2 and USB-C versions available. The MagSafe versions are available for $29.99, while the USB-C version is $33.99. The USB-C model includes a USB-C cord, but neither model includes a power adapter or extension cable.


In addition to offering Side Winders to MacRumors readers in our giveaway, Fuse is also providing a 20 percent discount on all Side Winder purchases. To buy one at a discount, just use this link.

We have 20 Side Winders to give away to MacRumors readers. To enter to win our giveaway, use the Rafflecopter widget below and enter an email address. Email addresses will be used solely for contact purposes to reach the winners and send the prizes. You can earn additional entries by subscribing to our weekly newsletter, subscribing to our YouTube channel, following us on Twitter, following us on Instagram, or visiting the MacRumors Facebook page.

Due to the complexities of international laws regarding giveaways, only U.S. residents who are 18 years or older and Canadian residents (excluding Quebec) who have reached the age of majority in their province or territory are eligible to enter. To offer feedback or get more information on the giveaway restrictions, please refer to our Site Feedback section, as that is where discussion of the rules will be redirected.

a Rafflecopter giveawayThe contest will run from today (October 26) at 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time through 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time on November 2. The winners will be chosen randomly on November 2 and will be contacted by email. The winners will have 48 hours to respond and provide a shipping address before new winners are chosen.
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

27
Oct

First Impressions From New iPhone XR Owners


We’ve seen plenty of iPhone XR reviews from media sites that Apple invited to test the new device ahead of its release, but now that the iPhone XR has officially launched in all countries around the world, iPhone XR first impressions from regular Apple customers are now available.

New iPhone XR owners on Reddit, Twitter, and the MacRumors forums have been sharing their opinions on the new device, and for those considering a purchase, thoughts from average consumers provide useful insight.

iPhone XR image via Reddit

On iPhone XR Size, Color, and Design

MacRumors reader Kendo warned that the iPhone XR isn’t a middle ground between the XS and the XS Max due to the size of the device’s bezels. If you wanted the iPhone XR because the iPhone XS Max was too big, you may still be unhappy with the size.

Because the bezels are one mm thicker (two if you include both sides) and with the 6.1″ screen, the width is pretty much identical to the XS Max. It is only a little shorter but also significantly thicker. I was originally in the market for a slightly bigger phone than the XS and a slightly smaller phone than the Max (the cheaper price was just icing on the cake). However because the width is essentially the same, you are better off just getting a Max if money wasn’t a concern and you only wanted an “in between” size between the XS and the Max. If you’re going to handle a bulky phone anyway, you might as well get the bigger screen on the Max since the width and weight are really similar to the XR.

MacRumors reader tks900 said that he’s having second thoughts about his iPhone XR due to its size compared to the iPhone 6s even though the display is gorgeous.

However: It’s quite big. And heavy. Coming from the 6S, this is a really different animal. I have large hands and am used to handle my phone with one hand. Impossible with the XR. This bulkiness of this thing becomes even more obvious when I use it with a case. I know many people won’t, but to me, the phone is just too slippery without a case and actually even harder to handle.

Redditor Meerkatch said the iPhone XR feels like a toy version of the iPhone XS due to the bezel size.

The bezels on the sides are noticeably big in real life, the bezels are like how a glass screen protector is on an iPhone 6, but the screen protector is the actual screen of the phone excluding the home button and the camera and including a notch (if that makes sense). I wouldn’t say it’s enough justification to get the Xs. I felt like it’s a toy version of the Xs for some reason, it feels like an Apple Watch Sport compared to the Apple Watch Edition (Xs).

Redditor downwardCorgi said that the red color is brighter than blood red and that the bezels aren’t noticeable. Using it one handed in some situations is difficult, he says.

It is a slightly darker shade than a typical rainbow flag red. It’s maybe slightly brighter than actual blood red. And yeah now that everything is rounded, it’s kinda cute. If the display was small the same bezels would look larger, but the phone itself is already big, you just look at the content on the screen, not the bezels.

Reaching top is fine if you use reachability. It’s another step but I think it’s a fine compromise. Reaching the left edge with the right hand thumb to go back to the previous page is kinda hard but it’s possible. So in short, vertically it’s fine if you use reachability, it’s quick and easy, horizontally, reaching all the way to the other side with a thumb is a bit hard when one-handed. When using with just left hand, probably not as much an issue cause I don’t think there’s gestures to swipe from the right edge. But typing with one hand still is hard due to the horizontal length.

MacRumors reader c.s. pointed out that the iPhone XR is much easier to grip than older aluminum iPhones, for customers who are coming from an iPhone 7 or earlier.

Just picked up an iPhone XR at the Apple store to replace my iPhone 7. No line at noon, it was an easy buying experience. I’ve always used the Apple leather case on my 7, and I was pleasantly surprised when handling the XR. My 7 always felt slippery when out of the case, but the XR is much more grippy to me. In fact, I’m opting to go caseless and just got AppleCare in case I regret that decision.

I’ve got my iPhone xr setting up right now. First thing I liked, even though it’s heavier it doesn’t feel as heavy as the 7 plus. First thing I don’t like, the bevel around the screen is pretty thick.

— Probably not a Hero (HSH) 💛 (@HalfSh3ll3dH3r0) October 26, 2018

On the iPhone XR’s Display

Redditor 3mbersea shared images of the iPhone XR and iPhone XS Max screens side by side in portrait and landscape mode. 3mbersea says there’s a “big difference” in screen quality when watching high quality videos, but not in regular use.


MacRumors reader Nitefly shared some details on the display of the iPhone XR, pointing out that there’s some color shifting, but it’s slight.

I am posting this from an XR. Phhwooooar what a phone!

There is some colour shift. However, the point at which it makes a material difference is the point at which you would never choose to use the screen at that angle.

In other words, the colour shift is slight in a generous viewing field. At extreme angles, ones you couldn’t even watch TV shows from, it is more pronounced. I’d say the screen dimming is more obvious than the colour shifting. Likewise, it’s really quite immaterial.

My god, the camera is ace. Also, I viewed this screen right next to an XS and could not see a difference in sharpness at a sensible, ‘phone using’ distance.

Redditor MonstersUGrad98 confirms that the XR uses the same iOS layout as Plus-sized iPhones, showing a two-column split view in apps like Messages and Mail.

MacRumors reader gig090 said that the iPhone XR’s display resolution is “fine” and nothing that you need to worry about, even compared to the XS. The bezels, though, are “a little bit too fat” in comparison to the iPhone XS.

Got my iPhone XR a few hours ago. Very happy with it so far. A big upgrade. The display comments were highly exaggerated – it looks beautiful. Great job @Apple

— aphel (@itsaphel) October 26, 2018

MacRumors reader sjperformance said the LCD display is great, but he prefers the smaller bezels of the XS and XS Max.

Overall good LCD display. Probably best LCD display on an iPhone. The Max a little bit taller. Width is about the same. Weight is good on this XR too. Now the bezels…I don’t like them but it’s ok. Prefer the smaller thinner bezels of the OLED displays.

On the A12 Bionic Processor

Redditor imagineJack, who came to the iPhone XR from Android, says it’s super fast and responsive.

The phone is extremely snappy, fast and responsive. Every app I’m opening stays in memory for ages. (Not sure if this is just a general iOS 12 thing but it’s great.) The speakers are great, the camera is great.

iPhone XR first impressions: It’s a bit too big, but I think I’ll get used to it. FaceID is amazing, speed is amazing, screen is amazing, camera is amazing. It’s all amazing. Battery life is excellent too. Now I just have to not drop it!

— Orion Edwards (@borland) October 26, 2018

Have a new iPhone XR? Feel free to share your first impressions and your photos in the comments below.

We’ll be sharing a more in-depth look at the iPhone XR and comparing the iPhone XR’s camera to the iPhone XS camera, so make sure to stay tuned to MacRumors for more iPhone XR coverage.

Related Roundup: iPhone XRBuyer’s Guide: iPhone XR (Buy Now)
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

27
Oct

Snap Launches Snap Camera App for Mac With Twitch, Skype, and YouTube Integration


Snap today announced the launch of Snap Camera for Mac, which brings Snapchat’s well-known collection of lenses and filters to Macs and PCs.

The Snap Camera app, which can be downloaded from Snapchat’s website, offers up a simple interface with a camera field and access to hundreds of Snapchat lenses that add fun effects to your face using the Mac’s camera.

The different lenses available in new Snap Camera app for Mac can be used with Twitch when streaming video content, and it is compatible with YouTube, Skype, Google Hangouts, and Zoom as well. Using the lenses does not require a Snapchat account.

Snap’s new Snap Camera app features lenses created by Snap, lenses from third-party companies, and lenses created using the Lens Studio tool for Snapchat.


Lenses are available in a list in the app that you can scroll through, but there are also options to search for lenses by keyword, mark favorites, or assign lenses to shortcuts.

Snap Camera is a free download from the Snap website.

Tags: Snapchat, Snap
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

27
Oct

iFixit Gives Us a Peek Inside iPhone XR With New Teardown


Apple’s new lower-cost flagship smartphone, the iPhone XR, launched today, and iFixit picked up one of the new devices to take it apart for one of the site’s traditional teardowns that are designed to give us a peek inside Apple hardware.

An x-ray provided by Creative Electron offers a look inside the fully assembled iPhone, showing where each component is located.

Opening up the iPhone XR is similar to opening up the iPhone X, with Apple using its standard pentalobe screws that can be bypassed with iFixit tools. iFixit says that surprisingly, the screws don’t match the color of the iPhone XR, and compared to the iPhone XS, the SIM slot is lower.

In fact, the SIM tray in the iPhone XR is modular, which is a first for an iPhone. iFixit says that this will allow for faster swapping of a dead SIM reader and a reduction in cost when replacing the logic board.

iFixit says that it’s not entirely clear where the iPhone XS got its extra IP-68 water resistance from, given the fact that opening the XR and the XS is similar.


The internals of the iPhone XR look like a cross between an iPhone 8 and an iPhone X, according to iFixit, with a rectangular battery and a rectangular logic board.

iFixit is doing its iPhone XR teardown live, and it’s still in progress. We’ll add additional information to this post as iFixit proceeds through the iPhone XR’s disassembly.

Related Roundup: iPhone XRTag: iFixitBuyer’s Guide: iPhone XR (Buy Now)
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

%d bloggers like this: