Skip to content

Archive for

16
Jun

HoloLens 2 could pack Qualcomm’s new XR1 chip for extended reality


The next version of Microsoft’s HoloLens headset for augmented reality will supposedly feature Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon XR1 processor. The rumor arrives by way of an anonymous source who claims the second-generation headset packing the XR1 chip, currently dubbed as HoloLens 2, will make an appearance in January 2019. That means we could see the headset’s debut in six months during the CES 2019 show in Las Vegas. 

Qualcomm introduced the Snapdragon XR1 processor in late May, a mobile chip optimized for extended reality (XR), an umbrella term that covers augmented reality, virtual reality, and mixed reality. The chip targets mainstream devices, or rather affordable products, to provide high-quality XR experiences without having to invest in high-priced hardware. The chip is mostly optimized for augmented reality powered by artificial intelligence. 

That said, unlike Qualcomm’s other Snapdragon-branded chips, the XR1 isn’t meant for smartphones. Instead, Meta, HTC’s Vive division, Pico, and Vuzix have already jumped on the XR1 bandwagon to produce new products, such as the next-generation Vuzix Blade headset for augmented reality. Microsoft wasn’t mentioned during Qualcomm’s XR1 announcement, but speculation points to a possible hush-hush until the official HoloLens 2 reveal next year. 

Currently, Microsoft has two HoloLens bundles: the $5,000 Commercial Suite and the “cheaper” $3,000 Development Edition. Based on the prices alone, neither are meant for mainstream use. The Development Edition is designed for individual augmented reality application developers although the headset is used extensively in medical, retail, manufacturing, and other industries. The Commercial Suite adds enterprise-focused features like remote management to the developer-focused bundle. 

HoloLens made its debut in March 2016 packing an Intel “Cherry Trail” processor running at 1GHz, 2GB of system memory, 1GB of memory dedicated to an embedded Holographic Processing Unit, a 2.4MP camera, and 64GB of storage. More than two years later, we have yet to see a second-generation unit although previous rumors pointed to the next version, codenamed Sydney, launching in the first quarter of 2019. 

Previous rumors also expected the next-generation HoloLens to include Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chip, which is currently making its way into smartphones such as Samsung’s Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus. But now that Qualcomm officially revealed the Snapdragon XR1, this latter chip makes more sense for Microsoft. Either way, the company appears to be moving toward an ARM-based headset, ditching Intel’s x86-based platform.  

Qualcomm and Microsoft already have a newfound alliance with their “always connected” initiative. They created a Windows 10 platform based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon processors that promises notebooks with a high performance, long battery life beyond 20 hours, a constant internet connection thanks to 4G LTE connectivity and an affordable price. The HoloLens 2 could be part of that initiative. 

If Microsoft takes the Snapdragon XR1 route with its next HoloLens, the company is already set software-wise thanks to Windows on ARM. This is a version of Windows 10 that works on ARM-based processors, which “speak a different language” than CPUs produced by AMD and Intel. It’s Microsoft’s second attempt at supporting ARM-based hardware after Windows RT failed to win customers over during the Windows 8 era. 

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon chip will take VR, AR to the next level
  • Leaked docs show Google may be cooking up a stand-alone AR headset
  • Microsoft’s HoloLens could be gearing up to kick Intel to the curb
  • Apple’s wireless, mixed-reality glasses could launch in 2020
  • Magic Leap finally unveils ‘goggles’ with wireless processing, tracking



16
Jun

Ugh. I’m done with fitness trackers, and so is the world


Apple

I own a drawer full of fitness trackers and used to love tracking my workouts. It was fun, adding a geeky element to something entirely un-geeky. If I wanted to go for a run, I could grab my Garmin Forerunner 235, wait for it to grab a satellite lock, and do my usual route before uploading my stats to Garmin Connect. If that wasn’t charged, I could grab my trusty Polar.

Or if I wanted to hit the gym, I could don my Apple Watch and fire up Stronglifts for a strength session. If the weather was nice and I had the time, I could spandex up for a bike ride with my Garmin Edge 520. Hell, if I was really feeling into it, I could strap on a heart-rate monitor to see how out of shape I am or even a cadence sensor on my shoes.

But you know what? I’m not doing any of those things anymore. When it comes to fitness tracking, I’m done. I’m over it. I don’t want to know. I just want to get out there and feel healthy. Quantifying that data is no longer for me — no matter how much it lets me track my progress. So, I’m dumping the fitness tracker drawer.

A popularity problem

It appears I’m not alone. According to data I collected at Thinknum, interest in fitness training devices is on the wane.

In fact, usage of the Fitbit app has declined over the last 12 months after data showed a blip in popularity after the new year. It seems that even those who promised themselves they’d get in shape in 2018 are already giving up on the practice. But backing out of a New Year’s Resolution is hardly a new phenomenon.

Meanwhile, Fitbit’s latest flagship fitness tracker, the Versa, is experiencing slowing sales at Best Buy after what initially appeared to be a strong start.

It used to be that fitness geeks (and wannabe fitness geeks) would rush to pre-order the latest trackers to get that extra bit of accuracy on their Strava segments or calorie counts. Back in 2016, fitness trackers were all the rage. People tweeted their FitBit step progress whenever they could — and it seemed the gamification of amassing that data motivated them. When Apple told us fitness tracking was the future, we believed them. Companies like Pebble and Jawbone popped out of the electronics ether, promising a future of quantified health governed by devices strapped to our bodies.

What happened to the fun?

And then, just like that, they were gone. Pebble is on life support after refunding Kickstarter backers for a product it can’t deliver. Jawbone is undergoing liquidation. Apple is scrambling to re-invent the Apple Watch as a health companion while FitBit is dressing up its watches for lifestyle-focused nights on the town. And remember the word wearable? It was the hottest thing at tech conventions just two years ago. If your device hooked to a belt loop or slid onto your wrist, you were guaranteed interest.

I’d find myself looking at the watch—the entire experience reduced to a series of numbers and graphs.

I can’t explain why other people are losing interest, but I know that in my case, it’s because fitness tracking has become a bit too much. It’s taken the fun out of it. We went too far. Personally, I burnt out on the quantification (and I say this as someone who plays in data all day long at Thinknum Media). It became tedious.

What was once a fun, stress-free ride around Prospect Park became an effort to beat user Crank69 on that last quarter-mile Strava segment. I’d obsess over the latest Garmin firmware. I’d wait to begin my ride once I knew all satellite receptors were locked and loaded, just to make sure I got that extra tenth of a mile. I’d review segments ahead of time to save energy for a grind just to beat Crank69.

And then I realized I wasn’t having fun. Instead, my fitness life was the boring, frustrating, grinding, level-up portion of a videogame that you choose to forget.

Running a robotic race

Even running was similar, no matter how much it used to be a pastime of solitary meditation. I’d step out the door for runs looking more like a cyborg than a runner: Garmin on my wrist, heart-rate monitor on my chest, cadence pod on my shoe. I’d check my pace every quarter mile, down on myself for falling behind and getting little out of the watch’s accolades when I was hitting a new personal record. I’d find myself looking at the watch instead of enjoying the views of the park, missing the smiles from other runners, the entire experience reduced to a series of numbers and graphs.

And then there were the injuries in the gym. I’d follow the app’s algorithms to the ounce, even adding weight at the rate an app determined regardless of how I was actually feeling that day. Sure, my squats got massive, but so did my lower back pain. And if I had to lower the weight, I’d have to plod through the humiliating task of editing an app’s settings only to be greeted by a condescending message.

Gone were the days of chatting with my friends at the gym and the simple act of writing my latest lifts down in a notebook. I’d never read that notebook, nor would the numbers upload to the cloud but back then, I didn’t care — I knew when it felt right. But with the fitness tracker, I was pulling up charts at work, tracking my up- or down-slope. I was a machine. And I didn’t like it.

A tracker-free future

A Saturday morning ride I recently took was beautiful. It was just me, the bike, the park, and the other riders. I didn’t bring my Garmin or care how fast I was going, how far I went, or how Crank69 fared on the Prospect Park climb. And you know what? I think it was my fastest ride yet. But I’ll never know that for sure, and I’m OK with that.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Garmin Forerunner 645 Music review
  • Suunto 3 Fitness Review
  • The best fitness smartwatches you can buy
  • The best fitness trackers
  • Stay fit and save cash with our top 10 affordable Fitbit alternatives



16
Jun

Here’s who’s going to win the World Cup, according to A.I.


Robots aren’t playing professional soccer just yet, but they can certainly help predict it! With the FIFA World Cup kicking off, San Francisco-based tech firm Unanimous A.I. has used its considerable artificial intelligence expertise to predict the outcome of the 32-team men’s soccer tournament. Given that the startup has previously predicted the Super Bowl results successfully right down to the exact final score, we totally think this is worth taking seriously.

“These predictions were generated using swarm A.I. technology,” Louis Rosenberg, founder and CEO of Unanimous A.I., told Digital Trends. “This means it uses a unique combination of human insights and artificial intelligence algorithms, resulting in a system that is smarter than the humans or the machines could be on their own. It works by connecting a group of people over the internet using A.I. algorithms, enabling them to think together as a system, and converge upon predictions that are the optimized combination of their individual knowledge, wisdom, instincts, and intuitions.”

The technology is modeled on the remarkable abilities of swarms in nature, such as swarms of bees, schools of fish, or flocks of birds. These natural swarms combine the insights of large groups in optimized ways. Unanimous’ swarms utilize this same principle to answer complex questions — such as giving precise probability-based outcomes on each game in the World Cup.

“Unlike traditional A.I. systems, swarm A.I. technology can tackle diverse problems very quickly without training on subject-specific data sets,” Rosenberg continued. “That’s because we are using the knowledge, wisdom, insights, and intuitions of real people, in real-time, and our algorithms have already trained on human behaviors. This training happened over tens of thousands of data points, and it means now we just need to build a ‘human swarm’ that includes people with knowledge about the World Cup.”

In this case, Unanimous A.I. partnered with a company in the U.K. called Colossus, which provided a group of 30 experienced sports handicappers. These handicappers were then connected together online, and combined with A.I. algorithms to amplify their intelligence. “It took a little over an hour, but this artificial ‘hive mind’ predicted every match and created a full World Cup bracket,” Rosenberg said. “We then processed the data and were able to generate [a] probabilistic forecast.”

Long story short? You should expect Germany to beat Brazil in the final, while Spain and France round out the tournament’s final four teams. Well, depending on how much stock you put in A.I.’s predictive powers, that is!

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Machine learning? Neural networks? Here’s your guide to the many flavors of A.I.
  • Microsoft’s $25 million ‘A.I. for Accessibility’ seeks to amplify humanity
  • Forget cloning dogs, A.I. is the real way to let your pooch live forever
  • Fussy, hungry, or in pain? This app accurately translates your baby’s cries
  • Thanks to A.I., there is finally a way to spot ‘deepfake’ face swaps online



16
Jun

Here’s who’s going to win the World Cup, according to A.I.


Robots aren’t playing professional soccer just yet, but they can certainly help predict it! With the FIFA World Cup kicking off, San Francisco-based tech firm Unanimous A.I. has used its considerable artificial intelligence expertise to predict the outcome of the 32-team men’s soccer tournament. Given that the startup has previously predicted the Super Bowl results successfully right down to the exact final score, we totally think this is worth taking seriously.

“These predictions were generated using swarm A.I. technology,” Louis Rosenberg, founder and CEO of Unanimous A.I., told Digital Trends. “This means it uses a unique combination of human insights and artificial intelligence algorithms, resulting in a system that is smarter than the humans or the machines could be on their own. It works by connecting a group of people over the internet using A.I. algorithms, enabling them to think together as a system, and converge upon predictions that are the optimized combination of their individual knowledge, wisdom, instincts, and intuitions.”

The technology is modeled on the remarkable abilities of swarms in nature, such as swarms of bees, schools of fish, or flocks of birds. These natural swarms combine the insights of large groups in optimized ways. Unanimous’ swarms utilize this same principle to answer complex questions — such as giving precise probability-based outcomes on each game in the World Cup.

“Unlike traditional A.I. systems, swarm A.I. technology can tackle diverse problems very quickly without training on subject-specific data sets,” Rosenberg continued. “That’s because we are using the knowledge, wisdom, insights, and intuitions of real people, in real-time, and our algorithms have already trained on human behaviors. This training happened over tens of thousands of data points, and it means now we just need to build a ‘human swarm’ that includes people with knowledge about the World Cup.”

In this case, Unanimous A.I. partnered with a company in the U.K. called Colossus, which provided a group of 30 experienced sports handicappers. These handicappers were then connected together online, and combined with A.I. algorithms to amplify their intelligence. “It took a little over an hour, but this artificial ‘hive mind’ predicted every match and created a full World Cup bracket,” Rosenberg said. “We then processed the data and were able to generate [a] probabilistic forecast.”

Long story short? You should expect Germany to beat Brazil in the final, while Spain and France round out the tournament’s final four teams. Well, depending on how much stock you put in A.I.’s predictive powers, that is!

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Machine learning? Neural networks? Here’s your guide to the many flavors of A.I.
  • Microsoft’s $25 million ‘A.I. for Accessibility’ seeks to amplify humanity
  • Forget cloning dogs, A.I. is the real way to let your pooch live forever
  • Fussy, hungry, or in pain? This app accurately translates your baby’s cries
  • Thanks to A.I., there is finally a way to spot ‘deepfake’ face swaps online



16
Jun

Iowa man gets 20-year prison sentence for trying to steal a domain at gunpoint


Sherman Hopkins Jr. of Iowa found out that armed robbery doesn’t pay. Hopkins was sentenced Thursday, June 14, to 20 years in prison for using a gun in his attempt to hijack a domain during a 2017 home break-in. Although domain hijacking is described as the illegal change of a domain’s registration without the permission of the original registrant, Hopkins took it one step further by using a gun in his attempt to steal the “doitforstate.com” domain from 26-year-old Iowa resident Ethan Deyo.

The incident occurred last year when 43-year-old Hopkins broke into Deyo’s home. As part of the home invasion robbery, Hopkins had hoped to use his firearm to coerce Deyo to transfer the domain to him, but things went wrong quickly.

After Deyo spotted Hopkins, he locked himself in a room, but Hopkins kicked the door down. Deyo was subsequently shot in the leg when he attempted to wrestle the firearm away from Hopkins. Eventually, Deyo gained control of the gun, and Hopkins was shot in the chest multiple times, Motherboard reported.

The Linn County District Attorney’s Office had initially charged Hopkins with multiple crimes as a result of the incident, including possession of a firearm by a felon, the use of a firearm during a violent crime, and kidnapping. However, Hopkins pleaded to a lesser charge of one count of interference and attempted interference with commerce by threats and violence in December.

At the time of the incident, Cedar Rapids police only described the domain as being “valuable,” and it’s unclear why Hopkins had put forth all that effort in an attempt to gain control of doitforstate.com. “‘Do it for state’ is a recently minted turn of phrase that seems to have emerged out of frat culture at Iowa State University in 2017 and found a home on social media,” Motherboard reported. The similarly named @doitforstate_og Twitter account describes itself as “the authority on parting, college life, and fun.”

Although the doitforstate.com website doesn’t currently appear to be up right now, an old web snapshot of the site shows that the doitforstate.com dates back to January 2015. The snapshot revealed that at one point, the website had linked to the @doitforstate Twitter handle, which is owned by Iowa recording company Elite Sound and Design Studios. It’s unclear what connection Elite Sound and Design Studios has to Hopkins and the home invasion robbery.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • How the ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ VFX team made Thanos a movie star
  • Where to download free stock photos and public domain images
  • From 4 wheels to 2 wheels — Lyft looks to add CitiBike to its fleet
  • You’ll want to perk up when it comes to the new ‘Lazy State’ Intel CPU bug
  • Windows users are going to hate what Microsoft just confessed



16
Jun

Popular Mac Developer Slams Apple for ‘Sad State of Macintosh Hardware’


Rogue Amoeba developer Quentin Carnicelli, who works on Mac software like Airfoil, Audio Highjack, Loopback, and Fission, this week penned a critique of Apple’s Mac lineup and the company’s recent lack of Mac updates, and that missive has been gaining some attention from Mac fans.

Using MacRumors’ own Buyer’s Guide, Carnicelli points out that it’s been more than a year since any Mac, with the exception of the iMac Pro, has been updated.

It’s been 375 days, for example, since the iMac, MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air machines were last updated, and it’s been 437 days since the Mac Pro saw the price drop Apple implemented as it works on a Mac Pro replacement.

The Mac Pro has not seen a hardware update since December of 2013, more than 1600 days ago. Apple has promised its professional users that a high-end high-throughput modular Mac Pro system is in the works, but we thus far have no details on when it might see a release.

The Mac mini, Apple’s most affordable desktop Mac, has gone 1338 days without an update, with the last refresh introduced in October of 2014. While Apple has made promises about a refreshed Mac Pro, no similar statement has been provided about a future Mac mini, aside from a comment from Apple CEO Tim Cook stating that the Mac mini continues to be important to Apple.


According to Carnicelli, the state of the Mac lineup is “deeply worrisome” to him as a person who works for a Mac-based software company. Customers are, he says, forced to choose between “purchasing new computers that are actually years old” or “holding out in the faint hope that hardware updates are still to come.”

It’s very difficult to recommend much from the current crop of Macs to customers, and that’s deeply worrisome to us, as a Mac-based software company. For our own internal needs, we’ve wound up purchasing used hardware for testing, rather than opting to compromise heavily on a new machine. That isn’t good for Apple, nor is it what we want.

As Carnicelli points out, Apple could reassure its Mac users with updates and speed bumps to its Mac lineup on a “much more frequent basis,” calling the current lack of updates “baffling and frightening to anyone who depends on the platform for their livelihood.”

Apple in 2017 refreshed much of its Mac lineup (iMac, MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and MacBook) at its Worldwide Developers Conference, but this year, Apple opted to focus instead on software, with no new Mac hardware announced. With no new hardware in June, based on past release history, we could be looking at an 18-month upgrade cycle this time around, as pointed out by iMore’s Rene Ritchie, with new Macs making an appearance in September or October.

Some of the blame for Apple’s lack of updates can perhaps be placed on its reliance on Intel, and in the past, some Mac refreshes have been pushed back due to delays with Intel chips. This is likely one of the reasons why Apple is planning to transition from Intel chips to its own custom made Mac chips as early as 2020.

MacBook, MacBook Pro, iMac, and MacBook Air upgrades are not in the dire state that Mac Pro and Mac mini upgrades are in, but increased attention on issues with the MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards has left Apple customers eager to see those machine updated, especially as Apple has not acknowledged these keyboard issues despite their prevalence in the media.

“Apple needs to publicly show their commitment to the full Macintosh hardware line and they need to do it now,” writes Carnicelli.

Carnicelli’s comments on the state of the Mac lineup came just before Apple released a new Mac advertising campaign. Called “Behind the Mac,” the campaign highlights creators who use their Macs to “make something wonderful.”

The first ad spots in the series focus on photographer and disability advocate Bruce Hall, who uses his Mac for editing photographs, musician Grimes, who uses the Mac “from start to finish” to write all of her music, edit music videos, and more, and app developer Peter Kariuki who used his Mac to code the SafeMotos app, which is designed to connect passengers with safe motorcycle drivers in Rwanda.

These ads, while inspiring, may be seen as too little too late by those who have grown frustrated with Apple’s Mac lineup and have come to see the lack of updates as an indicator of a lack of commitment to the Mac.
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

16
Jun

Put your brain to the test! Seven of the best logic games for Android



5acb64bf14fb7.jpg?a=33173-4d9d2e&s=19491

Games that are based on riddles and puzzles have been around for centuries and are a way to keep the mind in shape. Whether it’s to focus at work, do better in school, or simply stay sharp, there are various reasons for wanting to boost your brainpower.

See Also:

  • Eight of the best word games you can play to boost your vocabulary
  • Seven best apps for meeting new people
  • Seven language apps for when you want to learn to speak a new tongue

These days there are hundreds of apps and games available that claim to put the “smart” in smartphone and give you a cognitive boost. Smartphones provide the perfect medium for this stuff.

Typically, game sessions are relatively short and can be done anywhere and whenever you have a few moments to spare. So, if you’re going to be staring at your screen, why not do something that could possibly make you smarter?

In order to help you find the best logic games, here is a list of some of the best apps you’ll find for download in the Google Play Store.

Blendoku 2

What it is:

Sudoku has been around for years and is no doubt one of the most famous math gamess around. Blendoku is sort of like Sudoku, but instead of numbers, you use colors to fill in the empty blocks.

Why we like it:

  • Become a color master by moving tiles of solid color into a hue- or shade-base spectrum, leading logically from one color to another.
  • Putting colors in order may seem like an easy task at first, but soon you’ll realize that getting from Magenta to Lime requires some serious mental gymnastics.
  • There’s a Painting Mode which shows the color schemes of famous paintings.
  • You get up to 500 levels you can play for free.

Install Blendoku 2

Unblock Me

What it is:

Unblock Me is a game in which you need to figure out how to get the different colored blocks through the hole.

Why we like it:

  • The game is quite challenging, even if it starts off easy. Blocks on the board are positioned in either horizontal or vertical position. A horizontal block can only move right or left, while the verticals can move up and down. You will need to shift them around in a way that frees a path for the red block and that proves extremely difficult to do in some levels.
  • There are over 14,5000 puzzles to solve. Stuck in one of them? There’s a hint system that helps player solve puzzles.
  • The game has a rating system designed to motivate players to find the best solution.

Install Unblock Me

Dreamcage

What it is:

Dreamcage is an escape game. These are games in which players try to solve a series of puzzles and riddles using their logic skills.

Why we like it:

  • The game has nice, immersive graphics.
  • Interesting story-line set inside a strange world filled with different cages, where the Giant Caretaker has gone missing.
  • Search all of the 15 beautiful room for clues and pick up a variety of tools and items. Use your logic to perform a variety of tasks and solve logic puzzles by employing the objects you’ve found.

Install Dreamcage

Brain It On!

What it is:

Brain It On! is a game with a minimalist appearance which challenges you to complete a given objective. Do you think you have the logic skills to do so?

Why we like it:

  • It’s a unique logic game. Each level starts off with an objective written across the screen. It can be a simple “draw a shape” prompt. As you advance request get increasingly difficult such as “place the ball in the orange box”.
  • The game dares you to think out of the box, as you construct shapes and solutions to solve the problem.
  • You can compete with friends, as well as easily share your solution and compare it with the ones your buddies came up with.

Install Brain It Out!

That Level Again 1-3

What it is:

A small but cute logic game(s) where all the levels are the same, but the ways to conquer them are not.

Why it’s fun:

  • The main character in the game has only one desire: to leave the house and you have to help him find the key, so he can escape.
  • Unique gameplay: once you get out of the room, you’ll find yourself in that room again, but the hint on how to play the game has changed. For example, gravity is now weak or you may have to tilt your phone to control your character.
  • The third installment of the game is actually a love story with a few separate levels. Here you’ll team up with your crush to solve puzzles and find the exit.

Install That Level Again

Logic Pic

What it is:

A logic game developed by Tapps Games where you use logic to color blocks in a given grid and reveal a hidden picture.

Why we like it:

  • Use your deduction skills, solve puzzles and discover awesome colorful pixel art illustrations.
  • You solve puzzles by placing black squares in the correct place according to the numerical patterns on the side of the grid. After the puzzle is complete, the black and white patterns reveal the pic underneath.
  • The game includes a great range of puzzles, interactive tutorial and in-game tips. Extra daily challenges are also part of the bundle.

Install Logic Pic

Logic Master 2

What it is:

Logic Master 2 is an unusual logic game in which you sometimes have to come up with strange, creative solutions.

Why we like it:

  • The game challenges users to think in unconventional, yet logical ways to come up with answers to the questions.
  • Stuck at one of the trickiest levels? Not to worry, you can use hints. And there are also video solutions if you need more help.
  • Logic Master 2 includes three different levels of difficulty and 120 questions packed inside 30 levels.

Install Logic Master 2

16
Jun

How to Calculate Linear Actuator Force


As you know nowadays people got used to everything automatical. Stuff that moves on its own does not surprise us, but the words like “electric actuators” or “force equations” may astonish the cleverest. In order to lift very heavy constructions or create devices, like automatically moving doors or even put down the bed at a hospital, you will obviously need to choose the right linear actuator. And that is possible only with the help of special equations. Having missed the step of counting the force, you may never reach your goal or even break something you have already spent time on creating. As it is easier to pull down than to build, spend several minutes, rack your brains and welcome to the world of physics.

First of all, check out the terms that will be used in the formula, you are looking forward to understanding and implement in your case. You may find the units of forces and other things that will come in handy and better the understanding.

T= Total Linear Force (lbf)
FF = Force From Friction (lbf)
FA = Acceleration Force (lbf)
FG = Applied Force (lbf)
WL =Weight of Load (lbf)
U = Angle of Inclination (lbf)
TA =Acceleration Time (sec)
V = Final Velocity
μ = Coefficient of Sliding Friction
G = Acceleration of Gravity = 386,4 in/sec

Some of integral parts of equation have to be calculated in a advance. Just imagine you are to thrust mass of 200 pounds on 2 inches. Your time is limited for, say, 2 seconds. Let’s assume the object is inclined at 30 degrees. Then the leaning coefficient of friction will be 0,15.

Never forget about resistance. There is always the opposing force that equals 25 pounds against the actuator. Always take that into account as well.

Read the info above for several times, just so you get it. Look through the unfamiliar notions as we explain the calculations later on. Then let’s move to the action.

The first thing to calculate is the total force. Here you have to put together 4 constituents in order to get the necessary element of our main equation. These are acceleration, friction, applied force, and gravity.

Total Linear Force = FF + FA + FG + FP

Having summed up the forces, move on to calculation of the total force equation.

T = WL μ cos(??) + (WL/386.4) * (v/ta) + WL sin(??) + Fp

Here you have to insert all the necessary numbers of your particular situation. Here we will demonstrate the numbers mentioned above. Be very precise with the numbers!

WL = 200 pounds

μ  = 0.15

?? = 30 °

Cos(??) = 0.866

V = 8 inches

Ta=0.2(2 sec)

Sin(??) = 0.5

FP = 25 pounds

Next, you can see the right equation with all correct numbers. We highly recommend training on this example in order to get the most precise answer in your real case.

T = 200*0.15*0.866+(200/386.4)*(8/0.2)+200*0.5+25

Having made all the simple actions, you will get the following equation.

T = 26+20.73+100+25=171.73 lbf

Keep in mind that solving the equation in a right way is still not the final solution to you. You have to work through your task, go to websites and decide which actuator will be a cornerstone of your project. Now in our case we understood that the necessary rating of a linear actuator we should pick will be up to 200 pounds. Only this way it will be 100% effective. For the kind of load we have today, we would choose a standard 12-volt linear actuator.

As a conclusion, we would like to wish you good luck with your physics/math calculations and choosing the perfect device. Remember that each element has its place in equations, because without a single number, the whole, general results will not mean a thing.

16
Jun

Six Fitbit employees are charged with stealing Jawbone trade secrets


The battle between Fitbit and Jawbone was thought to have ended many moons ago, as Fitbit dropped its legal case against its onetime Kickstarter darling competitor in late 2016, and Jawbone ultimately began its liquidation process in July 2017. But as it turns out, there still remains bad blood between these two companies, and now, that is resulting in a round of legal casualties.

On Thursday, June 14, U.S. federal prosecutors charged six Fitbit employees, both current and former, in an indictment for possession of stolen trade secrets from Jawbone. According to the indictment, the employees once worked for Jawbone and received these secrets when they left the company. This violates the confidentiality agreements they signed with the now-defunct company, but it still lands them in a world of legal trouble.

The drama between Fitbit and Jawbone has been raging on since 2015, as Jawbone originally brought a lawsuit against Fitbit for “systematically plundering” so-called trade secrets. Jawbone accused Fitbit of stealing more than 300,000 confidential files, but in court, a judge decided that Fitbit had done no wrong. The case then continued involving patent infringements, but the two parties ultimately settled in December. At that point, Jawbone had already shuttered operations, so the decision seemed like a moot point.

But now, old skeletons seem to be emerging from the proverbial closet, and it would appear that Jawbone may have been correct all along in claiming that Fitbit had attained its rival’s plans. In a statement to the Verge, Fitbit noted that the original 2015 lawsuit actually involved the same six former Jawbone employees,

“In a trade secret misappropriation case brought by Jawbone in the International Trade Commission in 2016 that involved these same individuals, a federal administrative law judge during a nine-day trial on the merits found that no Jawbone trade secrets were misappropriated or used in any Fitbit product, feature or technology.”

These six employees will now face trial and should they be convicted, they could be looking at up to 10 years in prison. Of course, this case will continue to develop in the coming days and weeks and we will be sure to update you with any news.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Tesla settles Autopilot class-action lawsuit with Model S, Model X owners
  • Facebook’s photo tag suggestions could violate Illinois law — and cost billions
  • Judge says Samsung ‘rigged the deck, fixed the game’ with Galaxy
  • Google and ‘Google, You Owe Us’ begin $4.3 billion court battle
  • 9 things to know about Facebook privacy and Cambridge Analytica



16
Jun

Intel finally ships an updated Radeon driver for its all-in-one ‘module’ CPUs


A new driver for the graphics portion of Intel’s “Kaby Lake G” modules with Radeon graphics baked into the chip is now available. Listed as version 18.6.1, this is the latest graphics driver release since Intel originally revealed its new modules in November 2017. Unfortunately, Intel’s notes don’t list any specific changes since that time, but the new driver reveals a significant change in how Intel will release updates in the future. 

The big deal with these modules is the marriage between Intel and AMD. This all-in-one module contains Intel’s seventh-generation processor cores and integrated graphics in one chip, AMD’s Radeon RX Vega M discrete graphics cores in another chip, and HBM2 memory dedicated to graphics. All three are connected by a super-fast “freeway” within a single module. 

The big fear when Intel officially introduced these modules was that the company would drag its feet regarding updates to the graphics driver. The modules didn’t become readily available in devices until January during CES 2018, thus Intel hasn’t distributed a new driver in six months — eight months if you count the date of the original driver. 

That said, the driver released in November 2017 was version 23.20.792.2048 presumably based on AMD’s own Radeon Software Crimson ReLive 17.11.2. The new driver ditches Intel’s previous numbering scheme and gravitates to AMD’s system so you know where Intel’s graphics drivers are in relation to AMD’s own driver releases outside the module family. This new version is based on AMD’s Radeon Software Adrenaline suite, version 18.6.1. 

Despite Intel not providing detailed release notes, these mega all-in-one chips officially move from Crimson to Adrenaline, which is a significant change regarding performance and new features. AMD typically introduces a new suite each year and spends the next 12 months improving that suite with fixes, enhancements, and injecting support for new games. 

What we still don’t know is whether Intel will synchronize its graphics driver updates with AMD’s current driver distribution schedule. The latest version is 18.6.1, but will Intel issue a new update when AMD refreshes its drivers for desktop and mobile? If the release schedule thus far is any indication, that is a possible no. Still, the modules are fairly new and both Intel and AMD may still be working on driver synchronization. 

Intel currently provides five “Kaby Lake G” modules ranging from the Core i5-8305G to the Core i7-8809G. For instance, the Core i7-8706G chip consists of four processor cores based on Intel’s seventh-generation design, integrated Intel HD Graphics 630, and 1,280 Radeon RX Vega M GL discrete graphics cores (20 compute units) backed by dedicated HBM2 memory. The Radeon RX Vega M GL is supposedly on par with Nvidia’s GTX 1050. 

The marriage between Intel and AMD is definitely strange. Given that Intel grabbed AMD’s Radeon head Raja Koduri to produce discrete graphics in 2020, we can’t help but wonder what is to become of these modules by then.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Memorial Day discounts have begun and here are our favorite laptop picks
  • Intel’s 10nm CPU finally makes it to retail in a refreshed Lenovo IdeaPad laptop
  • AMD combats upgrade woes with ‘crates’ featuring discounted hardware bundles
  • Acer crams a Ryzen 7 CPU, discrete RX Vega 56 graphics into a 17-inch laptop
  • Intel Hades Canyon NUC8i7HVK



%d bloggers like this: