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22
May

Bionic eye implant promises a lifetime of perfect vision


An optometrist in British Columbia claims to have invented an easily implantable device that provides its wearer with vision “three times better than 20/20″ for life. Dubbed the Ocumetics Bionic Lens by its inventor Dr. Garth Webb, this device appears to be very similar in structure to the conventional artificial lenses employed in cataract surgery. The eight-minute installation procedure is reportedly painless. It involves injecting the folded lense into your eye where it unfurls to replace your natural lense and correct your vision. There’s also an added benefit in that with these artificial lenses in place, you’ll never develop cataracts.

The technology is still quite untested, mind you. And despite Webb’s assurances to Business Insider that the technology is both safe and effective, there isn’t a whole lot of available information as to how the devices actually work. Webb presented his research on the lenses at the Latin American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons‘ annual conference in April. His company, Ocumetics Technology Corp, plans to first test the lenses on animals before moving on to blind humans trials. If all goes according to plan, the lenses could receive regulatory approval in Canada by 2017.

[Image Credit: Ghost in the Shell]

Filed under: Science

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Source: Business Insider

22
May

Silk Road Survival: In conversation with ‘Deep Web’ director Alex Winter


An unassuming, Mormon family man. A brilliant physics and engineering student with a goofy smile. Five years ago, neither of these men knew each other, let alone suspected that they’d be drawn into a web suffused with libertarian dogma, hard drugs and the sort of rhetorical dedication that allegedly drove that student — Ross Ulbricht — to order a hit on that family man.

That’s the weighty world that digital documentarian Alex Winter set out to explore in his new film, Deep Web. By his own admission, the documentary — which first appeared at SXSW in March and hits Epix on May 31st — can’t tell the whole story of the Silk Road, an anonymous bazaar of hallucinogens, hitmen and, really, whatever you were looking for. Ulbricht is still behind bars after being found guilty of all seven charges leveled at him earlier this year, which included narcotics trafficking, computer hacking and money laundering. One even crowned him a “kingpin,” and stuck him with the punishment attached to the title. While he and the rest of us wait to see what his sentencing holds, though, Deep Web acts as an important crash course in the events that led to all this. We spoke to director Winter to understand how and why he put the story together on film.

The documentary starts off as a primer on Tor (a crafty bit of anonymizing communications software), the web of secretive and mostly inaccessible “dark” sites like Silk Road and the sentiments that led to their creation. Where it really shines, though, is the second act, which explores the long, transformative path that helped turn Ulbricht from a brilliant student and book seller into the Silk Road’s owner, Dread Pirate Roberts, who would eventually be caught red-handed in a San Francisco library. The events surrounding the collapse of the Silk Road have been recounted and retold from just about every perspective, which left Winter the unenviable job of finding an objective, nuanced thread to wind through his work.

“I think that the media does the best they can with these kinds of stories, which, first and foremost, are incredibly confusing to the average journalist,” Winter told me over the phone. “They have to be very tech-savvy to get the ins and outs of what’s going on, and they will generally go for the easy or salacious headline. Whatever you think of Ross Ulbricht, I think it’s fairly evident the motives for creating Silk Road were more idealistic, even if they were reckless and naive.”

That recklessness and naïveté can be spotted again and again as the film traces the growth of Ulbricht’s masterwork. The Silk Road first started as a sort of economic experiment, one that balanced allowing its members to sell whatever they damn well pleased with an adherence to an ethos that sought to reduce harm where possible. “We don’t allow the sale of anything that’s main purpose is to harm innocent people, or that it was necessary to harm innocent people to bring it to market,” Ulbricht wrote in an interview with Forbes. According to Winter, who interviewed a number of vendors and dealers who peddled on the Silk Road, most present just ate it all up.

“I kind of expected to find the Walter White or the Jesse Pinkman of the internet, and that’s just not what I found,” he said. “It wasn’t there. What I found were tech-adept, politically active people pretty much across the board. Obviously some were there strictly for criminal purposes, but I’d argue they’re not the primary architects or vendors on the Silk Road. Some of the people I encountered were even involved in the drug trade since the ’80s, in the Usenet and BBS era, on alt.rec.drugs, but none of them were that significant.”

“The core architects,” he went on, “were — pretty much to a man — more interested in it for more libertarian reasons, or crime- and harm-reduction reasons, or combating the drug war or changing policy through technology.”

The system worked, and perhaps too well. During its years of operation, Ulbricht had to protect — desperately — not just the sanctity of what he’d created, but also his own identity. The evidence unearthed in the FBI’s investigation alleged he was even willing to have lieutenants like mild-mannered Mormon Curtis Green killed after he was arrested by the DEA in his Utah home. Green is still alive, as are the handful of other people Ulbricht supposedly paid to have killed too. These hits were eventually deemed a hoax by authorities and dropped from the official charges against him, but it seemed in those dark, desperate moments, Ulbricht might have turned his back on his cherished harm-reduction principles. That, or there were yet other people clamoring behind the mask of Dread Pirate Roberts, a contention that continues to this day.

It’d be simple enough to chalk Ulbricht up as yet another man turned corrupt by the power he grew to wield, but Deep Web endeavors to make us remember he was just a person, thanks to videos provided by his friends and family. Behind the fierce libertarian rhetoric and his dedication to building a marketplace for potentially dangerous unmentionables was a guy who occasionally strapped on a tutu and sang, “I’m a little teapot,” for laughs. Watching him in a StoryCorps booth with his best friend reveals the faintest hint of native Texan drawl. Winter says Ulbricht’s loved ones knew he wasn’t in this to craft a work of advocacy, but they were at least comforted by his hesitance to go with the typical “table-thumping rhetoric” being wielded by other media outlets.

His portrayal in Deep Web even surprised his mother, who’s all too used to seeing the media jump to salacious conclusions about her son. “I read things by people who don’t have a clue who Ross really is,” his mother Lyn said in the film while bold-faced headlines inched across the screen. “He’s been tried and convicted in the media. Nothing has been proven at all. I don’t know what’s happened to the presumption of innocence in this country.”

Winter doesn’t try to answer her question. Amid dueling narratives, Winter can’t quite decide if he likes Ulbricht/DPR either. Fair enough: The two have never met and Ulbricht declined to be interviewed for the film. What Winter was more concerned with was painting a nuanced portrait of a man facing charges and a trial that only could have happened “in the digital age,” even if the result can be less than satisfying. “It’s difficult to get concrete answers when you’re dealing with anonymized marketplaces and anonymized currencies,” he said. Of course, there’s only so much one could squeeze into an hour and a half, and Ulbricht’s odyssey absolutely refuses to taper off. As such, Winter’s work isn’t complete, at least not in the sense that it wraps up nicely at the end. Between the film’s premiere back in March and the present day, exhaustive in-depth stories have cropped up to shine additional light on what played out on the Silk Road. A television show and at least one nonfiction book are in the works. There’s still plenty more in this story to tell, but when asked if he planned to continue his exploration on film, Winter was pointed.

“I don’t,” he said, laughing. “The film is about unknowables. It’s about the way the media covers digital issues. It’s about the way the federal government deals with digital crimes. It’s about anonymous communities. It’s about fighting the drug war. It’s not about wrapping the story up with a neat little bow.”

How appropriate. With a sentencing on the horizon, and a near-guaranteed appeal from Ulbricht’s defense and family to follow, there’s no neat little bow in sight here in real life either.

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22
May

Navy AR goggles turn a golf course into a battleground


Marines on a sunny golf course in Quantico, Virginia, this week demonstrated a pair of augmented reality glasses that simulate combat scenarios. The Office of Naval Research recently completed development of the goggles and this week hooked them up to a larger training system known as the Augmented Immersive Team Trainer for the first time. Representatives from the Army, Navy and Marine Corps showed up at Marine Corps Base Quantico to see the AITT in action. The AR glasses themselves have a wider field of view than similar products on the commercial market, and the full AITT experience incorporates real-life weapons props, binoculars and other physical equipment necessary in a potential combat zone. “For Marines, this system increases their situational awareness, whether for training or operations, giving them a wider aperture for information to help make better decisions,” ONR action officer Le Nolan said.

[Image credit: Eve A. Baker, Staff Writer, Quantico Sentry]

Filed under: Peripherals, Wearables, HD

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Via: Phys.org

Source: ONR

22
May

Cooking with Watson: Scandinavian salmon quiche


Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson‘ is a collaboration between IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City. Once a week, as part of an ongoing series, we’ll be preparing one recipe from the book until we’ve made all of them. Wish us luck.

Sometimes the ingredient lists for these Watson recipes reads like a Chopped contestant’s worst nightmare.

Inside the basket you will find: Tart shells, gruyere, sour cream and salmon filets.

Almost any time you mix cheese and fish you know you’re in trouble. But, if anyone is capable of taming the culinary cruelty of Watson it would be the brilliant minds at the Institute of Culinary Education, like Florian Pinel and Michael Laiskonis. So, even though the idea of a Scandinavian salmon quiche is a little off putting, I put my faith in the human interpreters to steer me and my captive taste testers in the right direction.

There are a lot of ingredients here. And many of them go together quite well. Salmon, when smoked at least, pairs beautifully with eggs and roasted tomatoes. Dill and salmon are pretty much a match made in heaven. The gruyere and mushrooms also play well together, and are magic when put in an omelette. But bringing all those things together sounds less like a recipe for a quiche than for chaos.

SONY DSC

Unlike many of the other recipes in this book, all of the ingredients are readily available in your local megamart. And the techniques are about as simple as it gets. Basically the most difficult part of the process is making the dough for the shells. Pasta frolla is a pretty basic style of dough, however, that relies on the biscuit method of mixing — cutting cold fat into your dry ingredients before mixing in the wet team. If you’ve ever made a dough before, this shouldn’t be a huge obstacle, but you do need a stand mixer. If you don’t feel like attempting the dough on your own, you could probably find a reasonable replacement in a local Italian specialty shop or maybe even a bakery.

The rest of the recipe simply involves cooking up the salmon, the mushrooms and the tomatoes. Then dumping pretty much everything (except the tomatoes) in a bowl with the eggs, mixing it together, filling the shells made from the pasta frolla and baking it.

SONY DSC

Now, lets be 100-percent clear — I am no chef. There is a very good chance that I simply screwed something up along the way, but my taste testers were not happy with this dish. And I can’t say I was either. Guyere is a mild Swiss cheese that often finds a home in quiche thanks to its relatively subtle flavor and great melting qualities. The problem is, that subtle flavor is kind of funky. And not P-Funk funky, like gym sock funky. You don’t want to taste that alongside your salmon. More than the two not going well together (which they don’t really), its incredibly unsettling for your fish to taste like feet.

It seems like this time around Watson might have gotten a little too out there for even the pros to tame. That cognitive spark that has made other dishes surprising either in flavor or presentation simply seems to have gone too far this time. Or maybe my palate just isn’t refined enough, who knows.

SONY DSC

Scandinavian Salmon Quiche

Pasta Frolla

2 ½ cups all purpose flour
½ teaspoon fine sea salt
¼ cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ cup unsalted butter, cold, cut into small cubes
2 eggs
All purpose flour, as needed for rolling
Butter, as needed for greasing ring molds

1. Thoroughly combine the flour, salt, sugar, and baking powder in the bowl of an electric stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment.

2. Add the butter and mix on low speed until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. The mixture should remain cool and powdery.

3. Add the eggs and continue mixing just until homogenous dough is formed, taking care not to overwork the dough.

4. For the dough into a flat square and wrap in plastic film. Chill for 1 hour.

5. Divide the dough in half (reserve the other half in the freezer for future use) and roll to a thin square on a flat, flour-dusted work surface measuring 12X12 inches and about ¼-inch thick

6. Cut from the dough 2 circles measuring 8 inches in diameter and carefully line 6-inch tart rings. Arrange the rings on a parchment-lined sheet pan.

7. Blind-bake the tarts in a preheated 300 degrees Fahrenheit oven for 15 to 20 minutes (just until the tart shells turn a light golden brown). Remove from the oven and cool completely.

Quiche

2 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced
Extra virgin olive oil, as needed
Fine sea salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
8 ounces salmon filet, cleaned
4 medium button mushrooms, sliced
4 eggs
½ cup plus 2 tablespoons whole milk
¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons sour cream
½ cup Gruyere, grated, divided
1 tablespoon fresh dill, finely chopped, divided
Parsley leaves, as needed

1. Arrange the sliced tomatoes on an oiled sheet pan, lightly season with salt and pepper, and drizzle with an additional spoonful of olive oil. Bake in an oven preheated to 300 degrees Fahrenheit for approximately 20 minutes, until partially dried, but not browned.

2. Meanwhile, season the salmon with salt and pepper on both sides, and top with half of the butter. Gently roast in the preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and, once cooled, carefully flake the salmon into bite-sized pieces.

3. Heat a small sauté pan and lightly brown the mushrooms with the remaining butter over medium heat. Season with salt and pepper. Once browned, remove from the heat and cool.

4. Place the whole eggs in a bowl, whisking to combine. Add the milk, sour cream, and salt to taste. Fold in the cooled salmon, mushrooms, two-thirds of the Gruyere, and half of the chopped dill.

5. Divide the quiche mixture among the baked tart shells (for best results, keep the shells within the tart rings during the baking process).

6. Bake in a preheated 300 degrees Fahrenheit oven for 15 to 20 minutes until partially set. Remove and arrange the dried tomato slices atop each quiche, along with the remaining Gruyere. Return to the oven to continue baking for 7 to 10 minutes.

7. Remove the quiches from the oven and cool slightly. Before serving, sprinkle the tops of each with parsley leaves and the remaining chopped dill.

This recipe and others can be found in Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson.

Filed under: Household

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22
May

Some Apple Watch Users Experiencing Issues With Inconsistent Heart Rate Data Following Update


Following the release of Watch OS 1.0.1 on Tuesday, Apple Watch users have been noticing a problem concerning the frequency with which the Apple Watch sends heart rate data to the iPhone. Prior to the update, the Apple Watch sent heart rate information to the iPhone’s Health app every 10 minutes, but now some users are seeing inconsistent update times.

As highlighted by everythingiCafe on Wednesday, Apple Watch owners on the MacRumors forums and Apple’s Support Communities have been complaining that their Apple Watches are sending data sporadically, with gaps up to eight hours in some cases.

heartratemonitoring101

Before update on left, after update on right. Image via MacRumors forum member twisted-pixel.
Many of the users are still seeing occasional updates to the Health app, but at unpredictable intervals that are not as frequent as the previous 10 minute update intervals, and some are also seeing duplicate readings. This bug is not affecting all users, as some people are still reporting regular data transfers, but for the users experiencing issues, unreported heart rate data seems to be irretrievable.

I also noticed that my heart rate data in the health app for about a week period is gone and my heart rate data is now updating into the app intermittently. I spoke with Apple customer service this morning, but data could not be restored and their advice was to restart both the iPhone and the Watch, clean the sensor back, and keep an eye on it. That, unfortunately, has not fixed anything and I think there might be a bigger problem on our, er, hands (or wrists).

For those unaware, the heart rate information collected by the Apple Watch’s sensors is aggregated in the Health app on the iPhone, giving users a picture of their overall heart health throughout the day. With consistent 10 minute readings, the iPhone is able to provide clear and consistent data that wearers can share with doctors and use to make health evaluations.

Data that is sent sporadically is less useful for these purposes, causing this bug to significantly impact the health tracking abilities of the Apple Watch for users who are affected.

Some individuals experiencing issues have said that restarting their devices temporarily solves the problem, but the sporadic measurement times return shortly after. On the Apple Support Communities, one affected user who spoke with Apple suggested that his Apple Watch stopped sending heart rate measurements when he was actively moving.

Apple is collecting information from users who call in with the issue, and some have been told that the company is working on a fix.




22
May

Sprint set to launch the LG G4 on June 5th with 3 free goodies






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LG’s newest flagship device has been the talk of the town even before the company officially announced it. We know all the major carriers here in the states will offer the LG G4, but many have been waiting for specific launch dates and price tags. Today we find out the details for the launch of the device on Sprint’s Now Network. Being Sprint, they have a few options for consumers to choose in order to get their hands on the photo centric device.

The least expensive option is Sprint Lease where you pay nothing upfront and tag on $18 a month to your phone bill for the lease. Kind of like renting it, you never actually own the device. The second option comes in the more traditional Sprint Easy Pay, which is Sprints branding for financing. Again, you put $0 down, but you tack on $25 a month to your bill. This option does make the device yours and you will eventually pay off the phone. If 2-year contracts are still your go to choice the LG G4 will set you back the usual $199.99. If you have the spare Benjamins you can drop $599.99 for the device outright. As for options in device appearance, the Sprint pre-order page lists the Genuine Leather back and a Metallic Gray. You will be able to purchase other back plates at your leisure of course.

If you are super eager to make sure you get your device by launch day, you can opt to pre-order right now. Same pricing options apply. An added benefit to pre-ordering comes in the way of some bonus goodies. For a limited time, between 5/22 – 6/21, those of you that purchase the LG G4 will also get a 32GB micro SD card, a spare 3,000 mAh battery and a charging cradle. That alone saves you just over $100 in viable and useful accessories. The extras will be shipped to you a bit later from LG directly though.


Any current or would be Sprint customers jumping on the device?

Source: Sprint | LG G4 pre-order

 

The post Sprint set to launch the LG G4 on June 5th with 3 free goodies appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

22
May

Google’s Project Fi backlogged, invite requests to take until mid-summer to complete






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Gogole’s Project Fi, the pay-as-you-go Wi-Fi/cell service, was officially announced on April 22nd. At that time would be users had to sign-up and keep their fingers crossed for an invite to use the low-cost alternative. No doubt many of you pushed your details through hoping for a chance to give it a shot. I know I have seen a few people I follow on G+ get in, while many more are checking every email notification intently. It now looks like you can save some battery life, quite refreshing your email account and making sure it didn’t hit the spam folder for some odd reason.

 


Project_Fi GoogleThe above image is an email I received last night from Google in regards to my Project Fi submission. As you can see, they are projecting a mid-summer completion. While that is some sad news, there is a small light at the end of the tunnel. They also mentioned that they will be launching a way for you to check on your Project Fi status invite. I am assuming they will list out something like your current position on the list so you can watch the count down. Hopefully it isn’t just a page that say “processing”. That would be irritating.

How many of you that signed up on announcement day already have your invite in?

The post Google’s Project Fi backlogged, invite requests to take until mid-summer to complete appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

22
May

Nexus 6 may get Android 5.1.1 Lollipop update with T-Mobile Wi-Fi calling sometime soon


nexus 6 first impressions (9 of 21)

A good amount of Nexus devices have already begun receiving the update to Android 5.1.1 Lollipop, though the update for Google’s most recent flagship is still nowhere to be found. No, it’s not the most important update that Google has ever pushed out, though it would still be nice to see it make its way to the Nexus 6 in a timely fashion. As it turns out, we might not have to wait much longer, according to Des, a Product Evangelist at T-Mobile.

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A little over a week ago, Des mentioned on Twitter that T-Mobile and Google are still working on bringing Wi-Fi calling to the Nexus 6, and that the update would begin testing within 7-10 days. Take a look:

Now that it’s been ten days, many folks are probably wondering the status of the update. Thankfully, Des came back this morning to give everyone a little teaser on what’s to come for the weekend.

We’ll have to wait and see whether or not Google and T-Mobile have worked out all of the bugs associated with this update. But as for right now, Nexus 6 owners can expect to see Android 5.1.1 roll out sometime this weekend.



22
May

5 Android Apps you shouldn’t miss this week! – Android Apps Weekly



transformers battle tactics Android apps weeklySponsor: Transformers: Battle Tactics

[Price: Free with in-app purchases]
Transformers: Battle Tactics is an online game where you assemble a team of Transformers and duel it out online versus other players in real time. The premise is fairly simple. You build a team that can have Autobots, Decepticons, or both and then you take that team online to face other people. In battles your Transformers have their own stats and you have extra bonus powers to help you along the way. There are a whole bunch of ways to build your team and use your powers to your advantage. DeNA also throws events fairly frequently where almost every player gets a little something. It’s a good time and free to download so it won’t hurt to give it a shot.
Get it on Google Play


Welcome back to Android Apps Weekly! Here are your headlines for this week:

  • Last week we talked about Sega’s plans to remove games that didn’t fit their standard. This week, three apps got the chop including After Burner Climax, Jet Set Radio, and Super Monkey Ball 2. On top of that, 16 games were removed from the Apple App Store. We expect the removals to continue.
  • A new Humble Bundle is out now and this time it’s all about developer Artifex Mundi. You can pay whatever you want and get three games, pay the average and get four additional games, or pay a flat $9 and get all nine. These games would cost $41 if you bought them individually and it’s a great way to give to charity.
  • There is now evidence to support that Google will begin its “Designed for Families” program at Google I/O this year after developers received an email asking them to opt in by May 28th. For those who don’t know, “Designed for Families” is essentially a family friendly version of Google Play that will feature apps and games for all ages.
  • According to a report from Bloomberg, Google may be launching a new photo sharing service at Google I/O this year. It would be totally separate from Google+ photos and would let you share to other social media like Twitter and Facebook. We’ll tell you more when we find out more.
  • In our last bit of news this week, Spotify has announced a slew of new features. Among them is a new Now start page, Spotify Running which is music to specially picked for exercising, video clips, news clips, original content, and a lot more. If this hasn’t already rolled out, it will be soon.

For even more Android apps and games news, updates, headlines, and new releases, don’t forget to check out this week’s newsletter! There we round up everything that happened this last week and it’s the best way to stay up to date in the world of apps. If you’re so inclined, you can sign up using your email address and we’ll beam that straight to your inbox every single Friday.

Subscribe to our Android Apps Weekly newsletter!


twtich android apps weeklyTwitch

[Price: Free]
Twitch released a sort-of update this last week that includes some security fixes, on-demand video, and the usual array of bug fixes and performance improvements. The interesting part is that instead of just releasing an update, Twitch has actually released a whole new application that starts at version 4.0. This is due to the security fixes that could not be implemented properly if it’d just been updated. So in order to get it, you’ll have to delete your current installation and download the new one which is linked using the button below.
Get it on Google Play


ire blood memory android apps weeklyIre: Blood Memory

[Price: Free with in-app purchases]
Ire: Blood Memory is the first action RPG out of developers Tenbirds and this one is rather interesting. It adheres to an old-school feel which means it’s tough as nails, you will die a lot, and that’s perfectly okay with us. The game also features the ability to summon companions, and a combat system that requires actual thinking, strategy, and your environment. It’s definitely no Dark Souls, but it’s pretty fun.
Get it on Google Play


layout by instagram android apps weeklyLayout from Instagram

[Price: Free]
Layout from Instagram has actually been around for a long time as an iOS exclusive but no longer because it has been released for Android. This application allows you to create collages from your photos and then post them to Instagram. Some other features include the ability to find pictures with faces in them, integrated Instagram filters, and more. The best part is you don’t actually need to use Instagram to use this application. In fact, you don’t need an Instagram account at all. It’s worth a shot if you like collages.
Get it on Google Play
Layout by Instagram Android Apps Weekly


sunburn android apps weeklySunburn

[Price: $2.99]
Sunburn is a new game out of Noodlecake Studios, the developers responsible for Mikey Shorts, Punch Quest, and many others. In this retro-style game, you play as a ship captain that has lost your ship and your crew. You must navigate the harshness of space using your jetpack and find your crew without being hit by a comet. You must also do so before you run out of oxygen. It’s $2.99 with no in-app purchases and it’s a pretty decent little retro game.
Get it on Google Play


mixradio android apps weeklyMixRadio

[Price: Free]
MixRadio has finally made its way to the Google Play Store. The UK-based streaming service is a competitor to Pandora and attempts to create playlists of music based on your tastes. The idea is that the more you listen, the better it gets at predicting what you like but you can listen to curated playlists as well if that’s your thing. It also supports offline mode, has over 35 million tracks, and a fairly modern design.
Get it on Google Play


Wrap up

If we missed any great Android apps or games news, let us know about it in the comments!



22
May

LG G4 making its way to Sprint on June 5th


lg g4 review aa (7 of 34)

Sprint has just announced that the LG G4 is coming to the carrier on Friday, June 5th. Offered in both Metallic Gray and Genuine Leather Black color options, you’ll be able to pick up a G4 on this date in-store and online.

If you’d like to sign a two-year contract with the carrier, the G4 can be yours for $199.99, or for $599.99 without a contract. You can also lease the device for $0 down and $18 per month. At the end of the leasing period, customers can either purchase the device or return the G4 and begin leasing another smartphone. The G4 is also available through Sprint Easy Pay, which means you can finance the device for $25 per month over a 24-month period.

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.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
.rvs_wrapper
width: 100%;
text-align: center;

#page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;
display: inline-block;
float: none;
vertical-align: top;

Additionally, Sprint is throwing in a few extra goodies along with the handset for a limited time. Through June 21st, folks who purchase a G4 will receive a backup 3,000mAh battery, a 32GB microSD card and a battery charging cradle. You’ll need to register for your goodie bag by 7/6/15, otherwise the offer will no longer be valid.

Is anyone going to buy the G4 on Sprint? Let us know!



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