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8
Mar

AC editors’ apps of the week: Evoland, Autowear, Yahoo Weather and more


Our weekly app picks

It’s Appday Sunday and that means we’re back with more of our favorites to share. Every week we bring a handful of great apps to the table and share them with everyone. Sometimes they are new apps, sometimes old standards, but every time they are apps we love to use.

Give these a look and then take a minute to tell us all about the apps you are using and love so we can give them a try. We all find some of our favorites right in the comments on these posts!

8
Mar

Apple Watch Roundup Updated


There are less than 24 hours to go until Apple’s big “Spring Forward” Apple Watch event, where we’re likely going to find out about Apple Watch pricing and get a solid launch date on the device.

Leaks and details on the Apple Watch have been coming out at a rapid pace as we lead up to the event, so make sure to check out our Apple Watch Roundup for everything we currently know.

Read the roundup



8
Mar

Zagg Rugged Book keyboard case for iPad Air 2 review


If you need a keyboard case and a protective case all in one, the Rugged Book by Zagg is a great choice

The Rugged Book is one of Zagg’s newest keyboard case offerings for the iPad Air 2 and boasts great protection with 4 different modes, a backlit keyboard, up to two years of battery life on a single charge, and more. Let’s take a look at how it holds up out in the real world!

The good

  • Same great keyboard layout Zagg has been known for
  • Backlit keys
  • Awesome battery life
  • 4 different modes that offer a keyboard and protective case all in one
  • Lots of iOS specific function keys
  • Check battery life right from the keyboard in a button push
  • Multiple layers offer superior shock protection that isn’t too heavy or bulky
  • Easy Access to Control Center when in keyboard mode, the hinge doesn’t block it, yay!

The bad

  • Book mode is somewhat awkward
  • Top portion detaches too easily and sometimes does this while adjusting viewing angles or opening the case

I’ve been using the Zagg Rugged Book for the past week as the sole keyboard case on my iPad Air 2. My first observation is that for a rugged case, it’s not as thick or as bulky as I would expect, yet I feel it protects my iPad Air 2 well.

The Zagg Rugged Book offers 4 different modes; keyboard, case, video, and book. Keyboard mode is obvious. Case mode lets you easily detach the keyboard from the rest of the case so you can use your iPad in tablet mode. For video mode, just detach the top part from the keyboard, turn it around, and re-attach. The keyboard then works as a stand so you can interact with the screen and any media you need to. Book mode lets you stow the keyboard behind the case by attaching the same way you would for video mode. Just close the case with your iPad facing up instead. I never found a particularly good use for book mode and much preferred just detaching the iPad and using it in case mode. Why carry around the extra bulk?

When in keyboard mode, you have a spacious keyboard with several dedicated function keys. The top row of keys has lots of iOS specific keys such as a key for Home button, Siri, Spotlight search, quick toggle for international keyboards, and music controls. Along the bottom row you have a function key off the far left that you’ll use to check battery life and toggle the backlight on and off.

Zagg boasts that the Rugged Book will last up to two years on a single charge. This estimate is based on using the keyboard case one hour per day with no backlight. Additional usage and using the backlit keyboard requires you to charge more frequently. While I haven’t had the keyboard nearly long enough to fully work the battery, I have used it for more than 2 hours per day for a week or so and the battery is still showing as full.

You can quickly test the battery level by using the battery key on the keyboard. It will flash green 3 times if you have more than 50% battery remaining. Three yellow flashes indicates 25-49% and three red indicate less than 25%. In my experience, Zagg keyboards do a great job at sleeping themselves when idle. Both Zagg cases I had for my original iPad Air exceeded battery expectations so i’d expect the Rugged Book to do the same. Realistically, if you use the case each day for a few hours, you can expect to charge every 2-3 months or so.

One thing I’d like to point out that I feel is overlooked in keyboard case reviews is access to Control Center. Typically the hinge of every keyboard case blocks you from being able to swipe up. I was pleasantly surprised to see Zagg took this into account when designing the Rugged Book. The indent under the screen makes Control Center easy to access when in keyboard mode.

The bottom line

The Zagg Rugged Book is the case to beat in terms of protection and productivity packed into one. The keyboard layout is great and doesn’t feel clumsy. If you need a keyboard that can handle whatever you throw at it, the Rugged Book by Zagg is what you want.

8
Mar

Alto’s Adventure: Tips, tricks, and pointers to get you past the triple backflip and more


Alto’s Adventure is an addictive, delightful endless runner. Here’s how to master it.

As anyone who follows me on Twitter can attest, I’ve become a teensy bit obsessed with Alto’s Adventure. The endlessly-charming endless runner combines llamas, snowboarding tricks, beautiful landscapes, and devilishly hard goals to keep you coming back time and time again. I’ve spent the last week mastering Alto’s twisting slopes and precipitous chasms, and here are my top tips for acing each one of those 60 levels and beating your friends’ high scores.

Grinding is key

When you start out on the slopes with Alto, you can score points by performing a number of tricks, including backflips (by tapping and holding anywhere on the screen), jumping on rocks or campfires, and grinding on flag lines or rooftops.

Single backflips, though fun to do, score a paltry 10 points per flip; rock bounces are a bit better, offering 80 points. Grinds, though, stack depending on how long you stay on the line or roof: They start at 10 points, then add 5 points every 2 meters.

As such, grinds are your best bet for initial point values. Even better, you can combine grinds with other tricks to multiply your score. Every trick you do adds a multiplier value: For example, a backflip onto a grind with a backflip in-between or at the end of the grind will net you 3x your initial point value collection. There are even sections of the game where you can jump from line grind to roof grind to increase both your initial point value and your multiplier.

You’ll only get those points if you land your trick, however, so make sure to stick the landing and avoid crashing into the snow.

Use your cast of characters

The game may be called Alto’s Adventure, but Alto isn’t the only playable character in your arsenal. As you play through the game, you’ll unlock a total of six mountain-dwellers, each with their own unique abilities.

Alto is the protagonist, and as such sports all-around decent snowboarding abilities.

Maya (one of my three favorites) is spry and light and can make quick work of backflips, but has trouble with speed and chasms if she’s not coming off a trick boost. She’s great fun for doing long runs and scoring crazy combos, however.

Paz is a smasher: He’s big and not really a backflip kind of guy, but will pick up some serious speed on downhill runs, ice slides, and grinds. And when he’s riding a speed boost off a trick, he can demolish all manner of items for a much longer period of time than Alto or Maya.

Izel is reputedly responsible for all the fancy gadgets you can pick up in the workshop. She’s a faster backflipper than Alto or Paz, and gets extra speed boosts off tricks thanks to some fancy rocket-powered snowboard technology. I love using Izel to travel many meters quickly, though that speed sometimes means she can run into unpredictable chasms and snowbanks.

Felipe is my secret favorite character: a llama who snuck out of Alto’s home and has learned how to snowboard. Being a llama, Felipe has a bit more jumping ability than his human friends, and can double-jump to get some extra airtime. You can time Felipe’s jumps by either double-tapping instantly to get some initial big air, or tapping once and then tapping a second time to stall Felipe’s snowboard and give him a little extra time to land his jump.

Tupa is the eldest and wisest of Alto’s cast of characters, and by virtue of being the level 50 character unlock, he has skills stolen from each prior character. He has Maya’s quick flipping, Paz’s extra speed boost time, Izel’s rocket snowboard, and Felipe’s double-jump capability. Moreover, he has an extra-special power as it relates to chasms, which I won’t spoil for those who haven’t yet unlocked him.

Find order in the randomized maps

In true endless runner fashion, Alto’s maps are randomized, so you’ll take a slightly different snowboarding run each time you head down the mountain. That said, there are a few features that routinely and regularly appear, and if you pay attention, you can plan for them.

You’ll always have two minor hills at the top of each run, which I like to use to calibrate how quickly it takes your character to do a backflip. From there, you can expect to see one to two chasm jumps before your first elder (who usually appears around 2500m), then one to three chasm jumps in-between each subsequent elder.

Each elder you encounter will be slightly faster at chasing you than the last, and do expect to see more rocks pop up in your terrain as time goes on.

Look out for chasms

Chasms can be the bane of an otherwise awesome Alto run, in part because they feel so unpredictable and have a variety of different designs and styles. There are easy chasms that offer a ramp up to a flag line you can grind; there are multiple tiny chasm jumps; and there are downright scary chasms that require you to jump 15m upwards to land on the other side.

In general, the easiest way to get over a chasm is to ensure you’re riding on a speed boost from a recent trick, though if you have Alto’s Wingsuit, you can occasionally cheat and fly over a chasm rather than having to jump it.

There are two ways you can stay vigilant for chasm jumps: look out for the chasm signs, and pay attention to the map ceiling. The signs are fairly easy to spot: little triangle hazard wedges planted anywhere from 10 to 100 meters before a jump, depending on the chasm’s severity.

The latter is for speed runs: When you’re going speedily down the mountains in Alto’s Adventure, the map zooms out to let you see more of your run.

Chasms, however, have a fixed zoom, and as a result, if you’re going fast and suddenly the map starts to zoom in, you’ll probably want to start doing a backflip or activate the wingsuit to avoid accidentally dropping into a gap within the mountain, never to be seen or heard from again.

Escape pesky elders

On Alto’s mountain snore many a tired elder, and they don’t particularly like enterprising young snowboarders, llamas, or fellow elders doing backflips above their head. If you wake an elder, you want to stay ahead of him at all times, lest he fell you with a whack from his riding stick.

The easiest way to do this? Backflips and grinds. Lots and lots of backflips and grinds. Every little speed boost helps. Even if it looks like an elder is catching up with you while you’re in the air, the speed boost you’ll get from landing your combo will help you run far off down the mountain while he and his llama remain behind.

You can finally ditch an elder by escaping over a chasm, as pet llamas turn out not to be very good about chasm-jumping (unless they’re on a snowboard).

Lengthen your scarf by performing trick combos

Each of Alto’s characters sport a bright red scarf, which grows as they perform tricks and combos while speeding down the mountain. Stop doing tricks, and the scarf shortens.

You can use the scarf as a benchmark for your speed boosts, as well as measuring how close you are to activating the wingsuit (after you’ve purchased it from the Workshop).

Boost your screen brightness for nighttime and weather events

One of Alto’s charms is that the game has ever-changing weather, time, and scenery, but that can also be frustrating when you’re, say, trying to backflip through a dark, stormy night.

My solution: Pump up the brightness on your iPhone or iPad screen.

Buy the magnet timer from the Workshop first

There are three items in the Workshop: The Magnet timer, Hover timer, and Wingsuit, all of which can be purchased with the in-game coins you pick up along your runs. Though it may be tempting to buy the Wingsuit off the bat, I suggest investing in the five Magnet timer levels first: The Magnet automatically picks up coins for you, and the longer it runs, the more coins you can pick up without having to manually backflip or snowboard through them.

More automatic coin pickup means more money quickly, which gives you a faster path to buying the Wingsuit and the extended Hover timer.

Smash rocks and campfires with ice and combos

You can score bonus points (and avoid tripping over rocks) by smashing rocks and campfires using a post-combo speed burst: Any time your character has what looks like a force shield in front of them, they can break rocks and explode campfires.

Just be careful — that force shield only lasts for so long, and you don’t want to accidentally trip over a rock you wanted to destroy.

Master double and triple backflips

There are a couple of devilishly evil level goals within the game, one of which is “land two triple backflips in one run.” Though undoubtably hard, this goal is definitely achievable with Maya and some careful timing. Getting the top speed boost from a trick and jumping off one of the giant hill dropoffs is the best way I found to accomplish this, though you can also do a double backflip off a ramp or grind and use a rock bounce to achieve that third flip. (If you do a double backflip and hit the top of a rock, you’re still considered to be “mid-flip” and can complete an additional rotation to count as your third.)

I also suggest practicing your flips with a Hover feather: If you see a blue feather in the course, you can pick it up and flip to your heart’s content — if you land on your head, the hover timer will reorient you upwards and continue your route.

How to rock bounce to grind

I spent an ungodly amount of time trying to master rock bounces after running up against the goal “Rock bounce to grind twice in one run.” And, spoiler: Even with a lot of time and practice, this is a hard goal to achieve. In part, this is because rock bounces are tricky beasts: Most characters have high horizontal jump speed, so timing your jumps to land on a rock — especially a rock before a grind — is a difficult proposition.

I found a few different ways to finally achieve this goal: repeatedly jump with Maya to slow myself down before a field of rocks; activate Felipe’s double jump to jump early and use the second jump to stall over the rock; and use the wingsuit to fly over a rock, then deactivate it to drop right on top of the rock.

How to kiss the rail

The 250-point “kiss the rail” bonus happens when you land on the last two meters of a grind and then hop off again; it’s also the subject of a few different goals. The easiest way to do this is to backflip off the second-to-last chain on a flag line, then let go of the backflip to clip the very end of the line. You can also accomplish this by having Felipe or Tupa jump, then tap again to stall over the end of the line.

The best place to do a proximity backflip

Like kissing the rail, a proximity backflip — essentially, a backflip where your head rotates close to the ground — nets you some sweet bonus points. You’ll also need to perform a few of them for goals throughout the game. Luckily, there’s a great place to do a proximity backflip right at the start of the game using Maya: After the very first hill, jump right at the flat before the second bend.

If you miss out on a proximity backflip here, you might also try backflipping a lot with the Hover feather: If you land, you’ll get the points and the goal; if you don’t land it, you’ll get to continue your run.

Backflip over sleeping elders (with a wingsuit assist)

Generally, you should be able to backflip over a sleeping elder using Maya with little difficulty — the game’s randomized hills are almost always designed in such a way to make it a landable trick.

If you keep waking the elder up, however, you can always use my cheaty-mc-cheaterson way: Time your wingsuit flights and fly over the elder, then backflip before you hit the ground.

On catching llamas and scaring birds

The game’s length goals are often the most frustrating, but can be achieved if you focus on a trick-conservative, play-it-safe run. Especially when it comes to collecting scared birds, I found using Felipe and his double jump saved me from a lot of precarious situations — like coming into a chasm with no speed. Whoops.

How to use the wingsuit to boost your score and keep grinding

Once you pay your in-game currency to unlock the wingsuit, you don’t get it as an immediate option — because, really, would you really want to snowboard down the mountain when you could fly?

Instead, you activate the wingsuit’s controls once you’ve performed a certain number of tricks in a row and grown your character’s scarf accordingly. A white Wingsuit button appears along the left side of the screen; tap it, and your character sheds their skis and takes to the sky.

Tap to fly upwards with the Wingsuit, just as you would jump, and release to lower to the ground; if you tap and hold with enough speed, your character may even pull off a loop-de-loop. (Tip: Do this right after you’ve flown down a hill for maximum loopage.)

The wingsuit power lasts for approximately 10 seconds, though if you land a trick before the wingsuit timer runs out, you can reboost its power back to full. If you run the wingsuit all the way down and haven’t paired together at least a 6x combo, however, you’ll have to build everything back up.

That said, it’s pretty easy to build crazy-long combo chains with the wingsuit: Flying from grind to grind can let you chain together two long grind combos; you can fly straight upwards and attempt a 40-point loop-de-loop or get the air needed for double, triple, and quadruple backflips; you can fly and drop out on a rock to bounce; and flying through an archway nets you a 240-point “thread the needle” bonus.

I particularly like using the wingsuit to try and rack up multipliers: Backflip to grind to wingsuit loop to grind to backflip to grind to wingsuit loop to rock bounce to grind may sound insane, but it’s doable if you time your flights just right.

A tip for the frustration that is proximity flying

One of the level goals towards the end of your adventure has to do with proximity flying, or as I like to call it, “the bane of my snowboard-flying existence.” Proximity flying essentially requires you to activate your wingsuit and fly low and parallel to the ground for a certain amount of time; you’re doing it right if you kick up a cloud of snow dust.

Don’t give up!

Having played through most of the game’s 60 levels, there were points where I felt irrevocably stuck, only to walk away for a few hours and come back to beat it with ease. If you’re feeling like you can’t achieve a goal, don’t be afraid to take a break and come back to it, or try focusing on your energy solely on that goal for the run. I only managed my rock-bounce-to-grind-twice-in-one-run goal after about 300 failed runs; some goals will be similar. But each run lets you practice and get better at potential yet-to-be-discovered goals.

I also recommend pausing the game if you’ve completed one half of the goal, but feel too shaky to finish — you’ll get a three-count to come back into the game, and it can help reset your frame of mind and get you a bigger overall score.

Your tips?

So there you have it — all my top tips, collected into one strategy guide for Alto’s Adventure. Anything I missed? Anything you need help with or answered? Sound off in the comments.

8
Mar

Alto’s Adventure: Tips, tricks, and pointers to get you past the triple backflip and more


Alto’s Adventure is an addictive, delightful endless runner. Here’s how to master it.

As anyone who follows me on Twitter can attest, I’ve become a teensy bit obsessed with Alto’s Adventure. The endlessly-charming endless runner combines llamas, snowboarding tricks, beautiful landscapes, and devilishly hard goals to keep you coming back time and time again. I’ve spent the last week mastering Alto’s twisting slopes and precipitous chasms, and here are my top tips for acing each one of those 60 levels and beating your friends’ high scores.

Grinding is key

When you start out on the slopes with Alto, you can score points by performing a number of tricks, including backflips (by tapping and holding anywhere on the screen), jumping on rocks or campfires, and grinding on flag lines or rooftops.

Single backflips, though fun to do, score a paltry 10 points per flip; rock bounces are a bit better, offering 80 points. Grinds, though, stack depending on how long you stay on the line or roof: They start at 10 points, then add 5 points every 2 meters.

As such, grinds are your best bet for initial point values. Even better, you can combine grinds with other tricks to multiply your score. Every trick you do adds a multiplier value: For example, a backflip onto a grind with a backflip in-between or at the end of the grind will net you 3x your initial point value collection. There are even sections of the game where you can jump from line grind to roof grind to increase both your initial point value and your multiplier.

You’ll only get those points if you land your trick, however, so make sure to stick the landing and avoid crashing into the snow.

Use your cast of characters

The game may be called Alto’s Adventure, but Alto isn’t the only playable character in your arsenal. As you play through the game, you’ll unlock a total of six mountain-dwellers, each with their own unique abilities.

Alto is the protagonist, and as such sports all-around decent snowboarding abilities.

Maya (one of my three favorites) is spry and light and can make quick work of backflips, but has trouble with speed and chasms if she’s not coming off a trick boost. She’s great fun for doing long runs and scoring crazy combos, however.

Paz is a smasher: He’s big and not really a backflip kind of guy, but will pick up some serious speed on downhill runs, ice slides, and grinds. And when he’s riding a speed boost off a trick, he can demolish all manner of items for a much longer period of time than Alto or Maya.

Izel is reputedly responsible for all the fancy gadgets you can pick up in the workshop. She’s a faster backflipper than Alto or Paz, and gets extra speed boosts off tricks thanks to some fancy rocket-powered snowboard technology. I love using Izel to travel many meters quickly, though that speed sometimes means she can run into unpredictable chasms and snowbanks.

Felipe is my secret favorite character: a llama who snuck out of Alto’s home and has learned how to snowboard. Being a llama, Felipe has a bit more jumping ability than his human friends, and can double-jump to get some extra airtime. You can time Felipe’s jumps by either double-tapping instantly to get some initial big air, or tapping once and then tapping a second time to stall Felipe’s snowboard and give him a little extra time to land his jump.

Tupa is the eldest and wisest of Alto’s cast of characters, and by virtue of being the level 50 character unlock, he has skills stolen from each prior character. He has Maya’s quick flipping, Paz’s extra speed boost time, Izel’s rocket snowboard, and Felipe’s double-jump capability. Moreover, he has an extra-special power as it relates to chasms, which I won’t spoil for those who haven’t yet unlocked him.

Find order in the randomized maps

In true endless runner fashion, Alto’s maps are randomized, so you’ll take a slightly different snowboarding run each time you head down the mountain. That said, there are a few features that routinely and regularly appear, and if you pay attention, you can plan for them.

You’ll always have two minor hills at the top of each run, which I like to use to calibrate how quickly it takes your character to do a backflip. From there, you can expect to see one to two chasm jumps before your first elder (who usually appears around 2500m), then one to three chasm jumps in-between each subsequent elder.

Each elder you encounter will be slightly faster at chasing you than the last, and do expect to see more rocks pop up in your terrain as time goes on.

Look out for chasms

Chasms can be the bane of an otherwise awesome Alto run, in part because they feel so unpredictable and have a variety of different designs and styles. There are easy chasms that offer a ramp up to a flag line you can grind; there are multiple tiny chasm jumps; and there are downright scary chasms that require you to jump 15m upwards to land on the other side.

In general, the easiest way to get over a chasm is to ensure you’re riding on a speed boost from a recent trick, though if you have Alto’s Wingsuit, you can occasionally cheat and fly over a chasm rather than having to jump it.

There are two ways you can stay vigilant for chasm jumps: look out for the chasm signs, and pay attention to the map ceiling. The signs are fairly easy to spot: little triangle hazard wedges planted anywhere from 10 to 100 meters before a jump, depending on the chasm’s severity.

The latter is for speed runs: When you’re going speedily down the mountains in Alto’s Adventure, the map zooms out to let you see more of your run.

Chasms, however, have a fixed zoom, and as a result, if you’re going fast and suddenly the map starts to zoom in, you’ll probably want to start doing a backflip or activate the wingsuit to avoid accidentally dropping into a gap within the mountain, never to be seen or heard from again.

Escape pesky elders

On Alto’s mountain snore many a tired elder, and they don’t particularly like enterprising young snowboarders, llamas, or fellow elders doing backflips above their head. If you wake an elder, you want to stay ahead of him at all times, lest he fell you with a whack from his riding stick.

The easiest way to do this? Backflips and grinds. Lots and lots of backflips and grinds. Every little speed boost helps. Even if it looks like an elder is catching up with you while you’re in the air, the speed boost you’ll get from landing your combo will help you run far off down the mountain while he and his llama remain behind.

You can finally ditch an elder by escaping over a chasm, as pet llamas turn out not to be very good about chasm-jumping (unless they’re on a snowboard).

Lengthen your scarf by performing trick combos

Each of Alto’s characters sport a bright red scarf, which grows as they perform tricks and combos while speeding down the mountain. Stop doing tricks, and the scarf shortens.

You can use the scarf as a benchmark for your speed boosts, as well as measuring how close you are to activating the wingsuit (after you’ve purchased it from the Workshop).

Boost your screen brightness for nighttime and weather events

One of Alto’s charms is that the game has ever-changing weather, time, and scenery, but that can also be frustrating when you’re, say, trying to backflip through a dark, stormy night.

My solution: Pump up the brightness on your iPhone or iPad screen.

Buy the magnet timer from the Workshop first

There are three items in the Workshop: The Magnet timer, Hover timer, and Wingsuit, all of which can be purchased with the in-game coins you pick up along your runs. Though it may be tempting to buy the Wingsuit off the bat, I suggest investing in the five Magnet timer levels first: The Magnet automatically picks up coins for you, and the longer it runs, the more coins you can pick up without having to manually backflip or snowboard through them.

More automatic coin pickup means more money quickly, which gives you a faster path to buying the Wingsuit and the extended Hover timer.

Smash rocks and campfires with ice and combos

You can score bonus points (and avoid tripping over rocks) by smashing rocks and campfires using a post-combo speed burst: Any time your character has what looks like a force shield in front of them, they can break rocks and explode campfires.

Just be careful — that force shield only lasts for so long, and you don’t want to accidentally trip over a rock you wanted to destroy.

Master double and triple backflips

There are a couple of devilishly evil level goals within the game, one of which is “land two triple backflips in one run.” Though undoubtably hard, this goal is definitely achievable with Maya and some careful timing. Getting the top speed boost from a trick and jumping off one of the giant hill dropoffs is the best way I found to accomplish this, though you can also do a double backflip off a ramp or grind and use a rock bounce to achieve that third flip. (If you do a double backflip and hit the top of a rock, you’re still considered to be “mid-flip” and can complete an additional rotation to count as your third.)

I also suggest practicing your flips with a Hover feather: If you see a blue feather in the course, you can pick it up and flip to your heart’s content — if you land on your head, the hover timer will reorient you upwards and continue your route.

How to rock bounce to grind

I spent an ungodly amount of time trying to master rock bounces after running up against the goal “Rock bounce to grind twice in one run.” And, spoiler: Even with a lot of time and practice, this is a hard goal to achieve. In part, this is because rock bounces are tricky beasts: Most characters have high horizontal jump speed, so timing your jumps to land on a rock — especially a rock before a grind — is a difficult proposition.

I found a few different ways to finally achieve this goal: repeatedly jump with Maya to slow myself down before a field of rocks; activate Felipe’s double jump to jump early and use the second jump to stall over the rock; and use the wingsuit to fly over a rock, then deactivate it to drop right on top of the rock.

How to kiss the rail

The 250-point “kiss the rail” bonus happens when you land on the last two meters of a grind and then hop off again; it’s also the subject of a few different goals. The easiest way to do this is to backflip off the second-to-last chain on a flag line, then let go of the backflip to clip the very end of the line. You can also accomplish this by having Felipe or Tupa jump, then tap again to stall over the end of the line.

The best place to do a proximity backflip

Like kissing the rail, a proximity backflip — essentially, a backflip where your head rotates close to the ground — nets you some sweet bonus points. You’ll also need to perform a few of them for goals throughout the game. Luckily, there’s a great place to do a proximity backflip right at the start of the game using Maya: After the very first hill, jump right at the flat before the second bend.

If you miss out on a proximity backflip here, you might also try backflipping a lot with the Hover feather: If you land, you’ll get the points and the goal; if you don’t land it, you’ll get to continue your run.

Backflip over sleeping elders (with a wingsuit assist)

Generally, you should be able to backflip over a sleeping elder using Maya with little difficulty — the game’s randomized hills are almost always designed in such a way to make it a landable trick.

If you keep waking the elder up, however, you can always use my cheaty-mc-cheaterson way: Time your wingsuit flights and fly over the elder, then backflip before you hit the ground.

On catching llamas and scaring birds

The game’s length goals are often the most frustrating, but can be achieved if you focus on a trick-conservative, play-it-safe run. Especially when it comes to collecting scared birds, I found using Felipe and his double jump saved me from a lot of precarious situations — like coming into a chasm with no speed. Whoops.

How to use the wingsuit to boost your score and keep grinding

Once you pay your in-game currency to unlock the wingsuit, you don’t get it as an immediate option — because, really, would you really want to snowboard down the mountain when you could fly?

Instead, you activate the wingsuit’s controls once you’ve performed a certain number of tricks in a row and grown your character’s scarf accordingly. A white Wingsuit button appears along the left side of the screen; tap it, and your character sheds their skis and takes to the sky.

Tap to fly upwards with the Wingsuit, just as you would jump, and release to lower to the ground; if you tap and hold with enough speed, your character may even pull off a loop-de-loop. (Tip: Do this right after you’ve flown down a hill for maximum loopage.)

The wingsuit power lasts for approximately 10 seconds, though if you land a trick before the wingsuit timer runs out, you can reboost its power back to full. If you run the wingsuit all the way down and haven’t paired together at least a 6x combo, however, you’ll have to build everything back up.

That said, it’s pretty easy to build crazy-long combo chains with the wingsuit: Flying from grind to grind can let you chain together two long grind combos; you can fly straight upwards and attempt a 40-point loop-de-loop or get the air needed for double, triple, and quadruple backflips; you can fly and drop out on a rock to bounce; and flying through an archway nets you a 240-point “thread the needle” bonus.

I particularly like using the wingsuit to try and rack up multipliers: Backflip to grind to wingsuit loop to grind to backflip to grind to wingsuit loop to rock bounce to grind may sound insane, but it’s doable if you time your flights just right.

A tip for the frustration that is proximity flying

One of the level goals towards the end of your adventure has to do with proximity flying, or as I like to call it, “the bane of my snowboard-flying existence.” Proximity flying essentially requires you to activate your wingsuit and fly low and parallel to the ground for a certain amount of time; you’re doing it right if you kick up a cloud of snow dust.

Don’t give up!

Having played through most of the game’s 60 levels, there were points where I felt irrevocably stuck, only to walk away for a few hours and come back to beat it with ease. If you’re feeling like you can’t achieve a goal, don’t be afraid to take a break and come back to it, or try focusing on your energy solely on that goal for the run. I only managed my rock-bounce-to-grind-twice-in-one-run goal after about 300 failed runs; some goals will be similar. But each run lets you practice and get better at potential yet-to-be-discovered goals.

I also recommend pausing the game if you’ve completed one half of the goal, but feel too shaky to finish — you’ll get a three-count to come back into the game, and it can help reset your frame of mind and get you a bigger overall score.

Your tips?

So there you have it — all my top tips, collected into one strategy guide for Alto’s Adventure. Anything I missed? Anything you need help with or answered? Sound off in the comments.

8
Mar

What to Expect at Apple’s ‘Spring Forward’ Media Event


With just one day to go until Apple’s “Spring Forward” media event in San Francisco, there are still plenty of unknowns about what the company will be showing off beyond a focus on the Apple Watch. As a result, we’ve put together this summary of what we expect to see, what we might see, and what we probably won’t see at the event.

Apple Watch

Given the time-related tagline of “Spring Forward” and today’s start of Daylight Saving Time in the United States, it’s clear the Apple Watch is the focus of tomorrow’s event. We got a first look at the device last September, but now with just a month to go until launch, it’s time for Apple to provide final details and shape the marketing message. Expect more details on launch dates and pricing of course, as well as some updates on performance aspects such as battery life.

Also expect apps to play a significant role in the event, with Apple allowing a few developers to show off what they’ve been able to accomplish over the past few months since guidelines and developers tools for the device were made available.


Pricing will undoubtedly be one of the most interesting topics to be covered, with the company so far refusing to disclose any information beyond a $349 starting price. Daring Fireball‘s John Gruber has made his final predictions, arguing the stainless steel Apple Watch collection will be more expensive than people think.

[T]he steel Apple Watch, that’s something that most people still look at as for them. And so they expect the starting price to be around $500, and the various leather and metal band options to cost $100-300 more.

But if the starting price for the steel Apple Watch is $500, I don’t see why Apple Watch Sport exists at $350. $150 difference does not justify the difference. If they were that close in price, there’d only be one of them. […] With Sport and steel Apple Watches, everything you can see or touch is different. Different metal (aluminum vs. steel), different finishes (matte vs. highly-polished), different displays (glass vs. sapphire), different case backs (plastic vs. ceramic and sapphire).

With that in mind, Gruber predicts the steel Apple Watch collection will start at $749 while the gold Apple Watch Edition collection starts at $7500. He expects Apple will charge a small premium for the 42mm size compared to the 38mm casing, and various band options will quickly drive up the cost of the steel and gold models.

Gruber is of course only one voice among many who are speculating about pricing, but he offers a clear and thorough argument for his pricing predictions, serving as a solid basis for debate and discussion.
Read more »

8
Mar

BLOB offers addictively challenging games for you to play – 7000 free copies up for grabs


If you’re looking for a game just like Flappy Bird and more, check out BLOB. BLOB offers 8 different types of game play. You can even think of it like 8 games in 1. All games a very challenging but as we know with these games, that can often make them quite addictive. In each game you collect gems. Gems let you unlock other different colored BLOBs to use. The default BLOB color is green. Other BLOB colos are red, blue, yellow, even some with a headband.

Read More »

8
Mar

Audible beta update for Windows Phone is open to all to download


Back in January, we reported that after 14 long months, Audible (owned by Amazon) finally has an update for their audiobook app in the works. The app is extremely popular, in particular for those whose daily grind requires much quiet time. However, problems with resuming and even loading some audio titles have given the app some negative reviews.

This site WPArea.de has not only found the beta, but they have noticed that instead of the beta being closed (as intimated by the company), it is open to all. Of course, this free download may not last long, so if you are an Audible user, you may want to grab the app until the official update comes along.

8
Mar

Save 20% today on these Nexus 6 skin cases


Made from multiple thermoacrylics, this Nexus 6 skin case is highly elastic and resistant to oils. Say goodbye to annoying fingerprints! The back features a matte finish with a glossy edging that enhances the grip around your device. Available in black or white today for only $7.95!

8
Mar

From the Editor’s Desk: Wish you were here …


A week ago today we were running all over Barcelona in one of the more insane days of coverage in recent memory. So many devices, companies and events. So how’d we do?

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