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8
Mar

The Huawei Watch is michievously priced at €999/$1083 on Amazon.de pre-order page


Huawei Watch silver  Amazon.de  ElectronicsA few days ago, we ran a story refuting the rumour that the Huawei Watch might be retailing for $1000. However, Amazon.de now has the Huawei Watch available to pre-order for €999 ($1083), which is an eye-watering amount to spend for an Android Wear smartwatch. As you can probably tell though, all is not as it seems.

Unsurprisingly, this (€999/$1083) pre-order price is just a placeholder, as alluded to by the Important Note from Amazon on the listing page:

“There is no suggested retail price of pages of the manufacturer. The Amazon selling price can therefore change.”

It’s something that Amazon often do with pre-order items, placing wildly unrealistic price tags on items with no official retail value so that the online retailer isn’t out of pocket when the actual price is revealed. It’s just a matter of waiting for Huawei to announce an official price for the smartwatch. Whatever the official price for the Huawei Watch turns out to be, it’s extremely doubtful that it will be priced anywhere near the $1000 figure. Even the gold variant with its 3 ounces of 24-karat gold will be much, much cheaper than that.

Source: Amazon.de

Come comment on this article: The Huawei Watch is michievously priced at €999/$1083 on Amazon.de pre-order page

8
Mar

Apple is making it easier for schools to put iPads in classrooms


iPads in school

Apple’s dreams of putting iPads in classrooms have run into a number of roadblocks, but one of the biggest is simply the amount of work involved — each slate needs its own account, making it a nightmare if you want to outfit an entire school. That won’t be a problem for much longer, however. Both MacRumors and 9to5Mac have discovered that Apple is ditching the requirement for individual IDs on school-supplied iPads as of this fall. Staff will just have to decide which devices get apps or books, letting teachers focus on the actual education instead of getting things running. They’ll still have plenty of control, so kids can’t load up on games and other distractions unless they get the green light. It’s too soon to know if this will lead to more kids taking home tablets instead of textbooks, but there will at least be fewer barriers to making that happen.

[Image credit: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images]

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Source: MacRumors, 9to5Mac

8
Mar

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge international giveaway!


Welcome to the Sunday Giveaway, the place where we giveaway a new Android device each and every Sunday.

A big congratulations to last week’s winner of the Samsung Galaxy S6 Vojtech K. from the Czech Republic.

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This week we are giving away the device that caught everyone’s eye: Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge!

The Samsung Galaxy S6 edge is the phone to have if you want to stand out from a crowd of nondescript slabs. Featuring a sleek aluminum frame and a mirror-smooth glass back, the S6 Edge looks and feels truly premium. But it’s the dual sloping edges that really make this phone stand out, both in terms of looks and functionality – the edges can act as a customizable notification light when the phone is placed on its screen, or as a notification area that gives you key info at a glance.

On the inside the Galaxy S6 Edge is almost identical to the S6, offering best in class specs, including a 14-nm processor, 3GB of RAM, a 16MP camera, and a Quad HD AMOLED screen. Everything is packed into a compact and light body, available in four colors.

With the Galaxy S6 Edge, Samsung really delivered what people have been clamoring for: a truly premium phone, with no compromise in terms of functionality.

How to enter the giveaway

You can earn entry tickets into the giveaway by completing the following tasks in the RaffleCopter widget located below.

  • [1 Ticket] Follow AA on Twitter.
  • [1 Ticket] Tweet about the giveaway on Twitter.
  • [1 Ticket] Join the AA Community Forums.
  • [1 Ticket] Subscribe to one of the AA newsletters.
  • [1 Ticket] Download the AA App.
  • [10 Tickets] Refer friends to the giveaway. You will be given a unique URL to share with your friends or social networks. You will receive 1 bonus entry (up to 10 max) for every person who you refer to the giveaway using your unique URL.

Join Now!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Talk about the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge in our forums.

Terms & Conditions

  • The giveaway is an international giveaway (Except when we can not ship to your Country.)
  • If we can not ship to your country, you will be compensated with an online gift card of equal MSRP value to the prize.
  • We are not responsible for lost shipments.
  • You must be age of majority in your Country of residence.
  • We are not responsible for any duties, import taxes that you may incur.
  • Only 1 entry per person, do not enter multiple email addresses. We will verify all winners and if we detect multiple email addresses by the same person you will not be eligible to win.
  • We reserve all rights to make any changes to this giveaway.
  • The prize will ship when it is available to purchase.

Full terms & conditions and FAQ | Past giveaway winners [Gallery]

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8
Mar

UK arrests man over US Department of Defense hack


The Pentagon building

No matter how serious you are, you’re going to draw a lot of attention if you hack the US military — and one Brit may be learning this the hard way. The UK’s National Crime Agency has arrested an unnamed young man over allegations that he breached the Department of Defense’s network last June. He reportedly swiped little more than non-confidential contact and device information (the attack was largely for bragging rights), but that was enough to invoke an international collaboration that led to the bust. There’s no conviction, but there’s little doubt that the arrest was meant as a deterrent to cyberattackers and pranksters in either country.

[Image credit: David B. Gleason, Flickr]

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Via: New York Times

Source: National Crime Agency

8
Mar

Self-driving vehicles and robotic clerks could take your job in 20 years


Rethink Robotics' Baxter robot

It’s no secret that computers and robots have been putting people out of work in recent years, but that trend is about to accelerate… at least, if you ask the computers themselves. A machine learning algorithm from Oxford University has sifted through US Bureau of Statistics data and believes that up to 47 percent of American jobs could be replaced by technology within the next 20 years. One of the biggest concerns is in logistics — self-driving vehicles are advancing quickly enough that they could replace the likes of taxi drivers, truck drivers and forklift operators. Retail is also at risk, since companies can collect enough data about your shopping habits that they might predict what you want more effectively than human clerks.

Don’t be too quick change career paths, though. The research assumes that this technology will transition from experiments to practical reality relatively quickly. There are sill plenty of technical and legal hurdles in the way, such as clearing autonomous vehicles for use on public roads. With that in mind, the research is a reminder that society isn’t really prepared for tech-related job disruption on a grand scale. While Oxford’s Michael Osbourne believes that humans will still have a place in creative and social work, many people aren’t training that way — and it’s not clear that the market can handle a flood of new designers, artists and strategic thinkers.

[Image credit: Rethink Robotics]

Filed under: Robots, Transportation

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Via: Huffington Post

Source: Fusion

8
Mar

Sony to bring Android 5.0 Lollipop only to Xperia Z branded devices


We know Android 5.0 Lollipop is a very powerful version of Android. It is also one that requires very little hardware in order run. With manufacturers like Motorola stuffing it inside lower end devices like the Moto E, it would only make sense to assume that other manufacturers might be looking to do the same, […]

The post Sony to bring Android 5.0 Lollipop only to Xperia Z branded devices appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

8
Mar

T-Mobile HTC One M7 to see Android 5.0 Lollipop starting March 10th


All those HTC One M7 owners out there holding out on T-Mobile will have something delicious to look forward soon. HTC’s Mo Versi let loose a tweet this afternoon that the magenta carrier has shipped over technical approval for Android 5.0 Lollipop for the first One device and is set to start on March 10th. […]

The post T-Mobile HTC One M7 to see Android 5.0 Lollipop starting March 10th appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

8
Mar

What makes Samsung’s mobile VR consumer-ready? Marketing


A consumer release is en route for Gear VR. Hey, alright! If you’ve been paying attention, you might realize the problem with that first sentence, though. Think for a few minutes, I’ll be here. Give up? Well, here’s the answer: Unlike Oculus’ still-in-prototype Rift headset, you can go to Best Buy’s website today, throw down $200 and, boom, you’ll have a head-mounted virtual reality display. Just like that. Okay, you’ll need a Galaxy Note 4 too. But still, it already exists.

What’s largely separating the “consumer” Gear VR from the currently available Innovator Edition is a marketing push from Samsung. “We’ve got a plan now; we’ve got a date,” Oculus Chief Technology Officer John Carmack said during his lengthy (and dense!) presentation at the Game Developer’s Conference this week. “You can kind of mark it on the calendars. Oculus is going to go for it as hard as we can [with] broad consumers, trying to sell as many units as possible, unleashing Samsung [marketing] with the next Gear VR.”

So essentially, when the Note 5 gets its multimillion-dollar marketing blitz, the consumer version of Gear VR will too. This all sounds a little like double-talk, though, considering how well-received the current Gear VR’s been to this point. And Carmack’s aware of that. He seems hopeful that older hardware will get a retroactive boost from the new awareness. It’s what he sees as hitting an “infection vector” for VR. In so many words, he means that it won’t be sitting in your “VR cave” where you’re tethered to a high-end PC that’s going to push virtual reality into the mainstream; it’ll be tech like Gear VR.

The current Note 4 Gear VR (left) and Galaxy S6/edge Gear VR (right) — not many differences!

“When we say we’re ready, which is really on Oculus from a platform structure, software and content level, we’re going to be able to sort of back-unlock the promotion and sales of multiple products there,” Carmack said. He continued that Samsung’s hardware “probably” could’ve gone wide with the Gear VR available currently, but that Oculus is taking the hit for not having enough stuff that everyone would expect to be there at launch. Namely, more software, more paid apps, in-app purchases and internationalization.

“We’re still not ready for Samsung to go out and do their blitz,” he said. “We expect when everything is ready, Samsung can go out. You’ll see ads everywhere; [Gear VR will] be in all the cellphone stores, all these things that we really wanted and sort of expected to do in the beginning” will be in place.

So don’t worry that the Gear VR you might already own, or the Galaxy S6-powered Gear VR, is somehow deficient (Carmack says there’ll only be “minor tech improvements”) compared to the one you’ll be inundated with later this year — that’s just Samsung’s marketing department talking. Carmack’s entire speech is just below, and the Gear VR bits run roughly from the 15-minute to 30-minute mark.

Don’t miss out on all the latest from GDC 2015! Follow along at our events page right here.

Filed under: Cellphones, Gaming, Home Entertainment, Wearables, HD, Mobile, Samsung

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8
Mar

Market share numbers for January show almost no changes from last year


market shareComScore has reported their numbers for the US smartphone market share for November 2014 through January 2015. The numbers are almost identical to how things looked three months ago, with Apple claiming the top spot, Samsung close at #2, and LG, Motorola, and HTC pulling up the next three places.

In total market share, Apple still held the crown, but their numbers dipped by roughly half a percent. Samsung’s market share sat at 29.3%, which was exactly the same in October of 2014, and Motorola’s market didn’t grow or shrink either. LG showed some improvement, but HTC took a slight dip.

As far as operating systems go, Android is still the top dog with over half of the market, but that’s split up among several manufacturers. These numbers look a little different globally, but in the US, Apple still holds an edge over Android OEMs.

source: ComScore

Come comment on this article: Market share numbers for January show almost no changes from last year

8
Mar

Secret Apple Watch controls: How you’ll control what’s on your wrist!


The Apple Watch only has two hardware buttons but, just like the iPhone, there’s a lot you can do with them!

Tim Cook introduced the Apple Watch back in September and while much was shown off, much still remains to be seen. What we do know is that it has two buttons — a digital crown that can also be pushed, and a traditional hardware button beneath it (or above it if worn on the right wrist). Rumor has it, though, when you combine multiple and long presses, there’ll be a lot you can do with it.

Scroll and zoom

Spin the digital crown to scroll through lists or zoom in or out of the home screen, maps, photos, and more. Like the click-wheel on the classic iPods, it’s a new way to navigate the digital world. (And it prevents your fingers from obscuring the screen while you do!)

Home

Single click the digital crown and get taken to the Home screen. Think of it like the Home button on your iPhone or iPad. No matter where you are, it’ll take you home.

Siri

Single click and hold down to activate Siri, Apple’s personal digital assistant. Of course, you can also raise your wrist and just say, “Hey, Siri!”. Still, it’s nice to have something physical to press.

Time switch

Double click the digital crown to switch between your watch face and the last app you used. It’s a convenient way to go from the time, to what you’re doing, and back.

Accessibility

Triple click the digital crown to bring up Accessibility options. It’s a rumor for now, but it would also match the triple click option on the iPhone and iPad.

Friends

Single click the button to bring up Friends, which shows icons of all the people that matter to you. Tap to message, call, sketch, tap, or send them your heartbeat.

Power off

Single click and hold down the button is said to bring up a power down screen, just like the iPhone and iPad.

Apple Pay

Double click the button to bring up Apple Pay, the NFC-based credit and debit service. Once authorized on your iPhone 5 or up, it’ll work for as long as the watch stays in contact with your skin.

Swipe and tap

Swipe and tap on the display to change screens — for example, to move between Glances — and tap to make selections. Yes, even though there’s a digital crown, multitouch still works on the Apple Watch.

Force touch

Press down on the display to activate Force Touch. Think of it like a secondary mouse click (right click) that brings up context-sensitive options.

And more!

Again, there’s still a lot we don’t know. But that’s what makes the Apple Watch so interesting. It’s something new to discover. And we’ll know doubt discover a lot more on Monday, March 9. So, make sure you join us for our Spring forward liveblog starting 10am PT, 1pm ET!

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