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August 7, 2018

AMD’s new 32-core Ryzen Threadripper desktop CPU rips into wallets at $1,800

by John_A

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

As promised, AMD now provides a new batch of Ryzen Threadripper desktop processors for enthusiasts based on its refreshed Zen design. Leading this second wave is the 32-core chip AMD teased in June during Computex that uses the same TR4 motherboard socket seating as the first-generation Threadripper chips but consumes a bit more power than the former flagship model.

“With the second-gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and 2970WX processors, AMD adds the new Ryzen Threadripper WX Series above the existing Ryzen Threadripper X Series processors, meeting creators’ demands for the ultimate desktop computing power for the most intense workloads,” the company states.

AMD’s newest flagship chip for enthusiasts, the 2990WX, packs 32 cores with a base speed of 3.0GHz and a maximum speed of 4.2GHz. It also packs 64 threads, 64MB of L3 cache and supports 64 PCI Express 3.0 lanes. It’s the first chip in AMD’s new Threadripper 2 quartet to hit the market, costing a hefty $1,800 when it rips onto shelves August 13.

Following the 2990WX will be the 2950X 16-core desktop processor on August 31. At half the price ($900), this chip will have a base speed of 3.5GHz and a maximum speed of 4.4GHz. It will have 32 threads, 32MB of L3 cache, support 64 PCI Express 3.0 lanes and consume a lower 180 watts of power.

AMD won’t release its remaining set of Threadripper 2 processors until sometime in October. The 2970WX will be a 24-core chip costing $1,300 with a base speed of 3.0GHz and a maximum speed of 4.2GHz. Drawing 250 watts of power, the chip will pack 48 lanes, 64MB of L3 cache and support 64 PCI Express 3.0 lanes.

Rounding out the foursome will be the 2920X 12-core chip costing $650. Packing 24 threads and 32MB of L3 cache, it will have a base speed of 3.5GHz and a maximum speed of 4.3GHz. Like the 2950X arriving August 31, this chip will only consume 180 watts of power when it arrives this October.

“We created a new standard for the HEDT market when we launched our first Ryzen Threadripper processors a year ago, delivering a ground-breaking level of computing power for the world’s most demanding PC users,” said Jim Anderson, senior vice president and general manager for AMD’s computing and graphics business group. “Our goal with second-gen Ryzen Threadripper processors was to push the performance boundaries even further and continue innovating at the bleeding edge.”

The new 2950X and 2920X processors essentially replace AMD’s first-generation 1950X and 1920X Ryzen Threadripper chips released in 2017. By comparison, the 2950X increases the base speed by 100MHz and the maximum speed by 400MHz. Meanwhile, the 2920X doesn’t increase the base speed over its predecessor but provides a 300MHz boost in its maximum speed.

According to AMD, the second-generation Ryzen Threadripper processors can be air-cooled by the new Wraith Ripper now available from CoolerMaster. The new Threadrippers work on all existing and new TR4-based motherboards with the X399 chipset manufactured by ASRock, Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, and more.

You can pre-order the 32-core 2990WX chip now from participating retailers listed here.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • AMD’s second-gen Ryzen Threadripper CPUs could rip into stores in August
  • AMD’s 32-core Threadripper 2990X could cost a whopping $1,800
  • AMD’s next batch of Ryzen desktop CPUs may focus on better power efficiency
  • AMD’s Ryzen desktop CPUs for 2019 may double the core count
  • AMD vs. Intel



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