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1
Nov

Some Samsung Galaxy Note 8 owners say their phones are freezing with certain apps


Experiencing a frozen Samsung Galaxy Note 8? You’re not alone. Galaxy Note 8 users around the world are complaining of phones freezing up on Samsung’s community forums. These reports first appeared shortly after the release of the Note 8, but have been growing in numbers over the past few weeks.

The problem does not appear to be tied to a specific model of the Samsung Galaxy Note 8, though Android Police reports that SM-N950U units on U.S. carriers, unlocked European (SM-N950F), and dual-SIM (SM-N950D) models have been listed in the forums.

An exact cause is not known, users have noticed the phones tend to freeze when using the Contacts app or other apps that pull information from the Contacts app, such as the dialer, messaging apps, and more. Several people suggest the issue stems from downloading the Google Contacts app, which may be conflicting with Samsung’s Contacts app, though this has not been confirmed.

Potential Solutions:

Currently there is no solution to the problem, but the following two inconvenient workarounds can restore functionality, at least temporarily, to your phone:

  • A hard reset is the primary workaround for a frozen Galaxy Note 8.  A hard reset will take several minutes and will completely erase all information on your phone. To perform a hard reset on your phone, press the Volume up, Bixby and Power buttons at the same time.  In 30 to 45 seconds you should see the Android Recovery Menu. Use the Volume down button to select the Wipe data/Factory reset option and press the Power button to select it.
  • An alternative, but even more time consuming, option is to allow your battery to die and then recharge. While this will take a lot longer, you will likely not lose any data if you regularly backup your phone.

For people who are experiencing frequent freeze-ups, Android Authority is reporting that you can contact Samsung support to arrange an “evaluation and repair.” Samsung’s U.S. support number is 1 (800) 726-7864. Users outside the U.S. can check out Samsung’s country-specific site to find relevant support options.

We’ve reached out to Samsung for comment, and will update this story when we hear back.

Editor’s Recommendations

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  • Samsung Galaxy Note 8 review




1
Nov

MIT app listens to a car to diagnose problems before symptoms are apparent


Why it matters to you

A new MIT app that analyzes the sounds and vibrations made by a car to detect problems could save drivers $125 per year on car costs.

In the next couple years, you may be able to diagnose your car’s ailments with little more than a smartphone app, thanks to research from engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The system works by turning a phone’s microphone and accelerometers into a kind of automotive stethoscope that analyzes the sounds and vibrations made by a car to detect problems, even before the vehicle shows any obvious symptoms.

The MIT app has the potential to save the average driver $125 per year, according to Joshua Siegel, one of the research scientists behind a recent paper describing the app. That savings could be as much as $600 per year for trucks. Gas mileage is could possibly increase by a few percentage points for all vehicles.

“Right now, we’re able to diagnose several common engine and suspension problems,” Siegel told Digital Trends. “Our engine diagnoses include identifying misfires and optimally timing filter changes, while our suspension diagnostics include identifying wheel imbalances and variations in tread depth and tire pressure.”

As with much of today’s emerging tech, Siegel and his team owe a lot to recent advancements in AI algorithms and cloud computation. Thanks to machine learning, the more data the app is able to collect, the more its performance improves.

“For each diagnostic or prognostic, we collect data from the sensor or sensors best able to measure the physical manifestation of a defect, and then train models to look for certain characteristic “fingerprints” of each fault type,” Siegel explained.

To analyze air filters, the app listens to how the car “breathes” to detect how clogged the airflow is. For misfires, it listens for what Siegel called the “characteristic popping sound” that tends to scare the wits out of people in the passenger seat. By measuring vibrations, the app can pick up on wheel imbalances.

“We’re able to do this because the sensors in your phone — the same microphone you use to talk, and the same accelerometer your phone uses to rotate the screen when you switch from portrait to landscape — are far more sensitive to small changes than people are,” Siegel said.

The MIT team is currently testing the app internally with promising results, Siegel said. Moving forward, the team will train the app on various vehicle types to add to their data, with the hope that the app will work on any type of consumer vehicle.

A paper detailing the research will be published in the November issue of the journal Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence.

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1
Nov

HTC may reveal its China-bound stand-alone VR headset later this month


Why it matters to you

A possible launch during HTC’s developer conference in Beijing could be a sign that its Daydream-based stand-alone VR headset will make a North American debut, too.

HTC originally teased a stand-alone headset for virtual reality earlier this year during Google’s developer conference. It will be based on Google’s Daydream platform baked into Android, and Google’s WorldSense technology that provides six degrees of freedom without the need for external sensors. HTC said it was also working directly with Qualcomm to produce a stand-alone VR headset for China without any ties to Google. Now we know more about the latter unit.

Reports have surfaced that HTC will officially reveal its stand-alone VR headset for the Chinese market during its annual Vive Developer Conference in Beijing starting November 14, 2017. This model will be based on Qualcomm’s VRDK developer kit packed with its Snapdragon 835 processor, and its inside-out positional tracking developed with Leap Motion for full-body movement in VR.

In addition to the Snapdragon processor, Qualcomm’s developer kit includes a single 2560 x 1440 AMOLED display, two built-in monochromatic global shutter cameras (1280 x 800) for motion tracking, two monochromatic VGA global shutter cameras for eye tracking, 4GB of system memory, and 64GB of storage. It also includes Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, and a Type-C port for charging the battery.

According to Qualcomm, the inside-out motion tracking provides a better experience for mobile VR. While products like Samsung’s Gear VR only track head movement (aka three degrees of freedom), it’s new mobile VR platform also tracks your physical location in the real world (aka six degrees of freedom). And unlike the HTC Vive for PC, there are no external sensors tracking your movement, nor is there a physical tether to a PC. Even more, you don’t need a smartphone.

HTC’s deal with Google to produce a Daydream-based stand-alone VR headset likely relies on the same developer kit, only Google has created its own method for tracking movement called WorldSense. Content will likely be distributed through Viveport and Google Play when the stand-alone unit arrives before the end of 2017. It also won’t be sold in China, hence HTC’s partnership with Qualcomm to produce a version specifically for that market.

That said, the model shown during the conference on November 14 won’t include Google’s Android and Daydream platforms. But there’s still a possibility that HTC will officially reveal its Daydream version in the United States at the same time. It may be marketed as Vive Eclipse or Vive Focus whereas the China-bound model may simply be coined as Vive M, or Vive Mobile.

Virtual reality is about to become a bit more mainstream before the end of the year. As previously reported, both HTC and Lenovo are providing Daydream-based stand-alone models before December’s end. Samsung is supposedly working on a stand-alone unit too while the Oculus Go headset is slated for early 2018. None of these units require a smartphone or external motion-tracking sensors.

Meanwhile, VR headsets designed specifically for Windows 10 are making a splash. Five are now listed on Microsoft’s online store selling for under $500, manufactured by Acer, Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Samsung. All support the new Windows Mixed Reality platform for virtual reality and augmented reality experiences and applications.

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  • Why Google bought part of HTC’s smartphone team for $1.1 billion
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  • HTC Vive, the best virtual reality headset, is now $200 cheaper
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  • Oculus Rift vs. HTC Vive: Prices are lower, but our favorite remains the same




1
Nov

HTC may reveal its China-bound stand-alone VR headset later this month


Why it matters to you

A possible launch during HTC’s developer conference in Beijing could be a sign that its Daydream-based stand-alone VR headset will make a North American debut, too.

HTC originally teased a stand-alone headset for virtual reality earlier this year during Google’s developer conference. It will be based on Google’s Daydream platform baked into Android, and Google’s WorldSense technology that provides six degrees of freedom without the need for external sensors. HTC said it was also working directly with Qualcomm to produce a stand-alone VR headset for China without any ties to Google. Now we know more about the latter unit.

Reports have surfaced that HTC will officially reveal its stand-alone VR headset for the Chinese market during its annual Vive Developer Conference in Beijing starting November 14, 2017. This model will be based on Qualcomm’s VRDK developer kit packed with its Snapdragon 835 processor, and its inside-out positional tracking developed with Leap Motion for full-body movement in VR.

In addition to the Snapdragon processor, Qualcomm’s developer kit includes a single 2560 x 1440 AMOLED display, two built-in monochromatic global shutter cameras (1280 x 800) for motion tracking, two monochromatic VGA global shutter cameras for eye tracking, 4GB of system memory, and 64GB of storage. It also includes Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, and a Type-C port for charging the battery.

According to Qualcomm, the inside-out motion tracking provides a better experience for mobile VR. While products like Samsung’s Gear VR only track head movement (aka three degrees of freedom), it’s new mobile VR platform also tracks your physical location in the real world (aka six degrees of freedom). And unlike the HTC Vive for PC, there are no external sensors tracking your movement, nor is there a physical tether to a PC. Even more, you don’t need a smartphone.

HTC’s deal with Google to produce a Daydream-based stand-alone VR headset likely relies on the same developer kit, only Google has created its own method for tracking movement called WorldSense. Content will likely be distributed through Viveport and Google Play when the stand-alone unit arrives before the end of 2017. It also won’t be sold in China, hence HTC’s partnership with Qualcomm to produce a version specifically for that market.

That said, the model shown during the conference on November 14 won’t include Google’s Android and Daydream platforms. But there’s still a possibility that HTC will officially reveal its Daydream version in the United States at the same time. It may be marketed as Vive Eclipse or Vive Focus whereas the China-bound model may simply be coined as Vive M, or Vive Mobile.

Virtual reality is about to become a bit more mainstream before the end of the year. As previously reported, both HTC and Lenovo are providing Daydream-based stand-alone models before December’s end. Samsung is supposedly working on a stand-alone unit too while the Oculus Go headset is slated for early 2018. None of these units require a smartphone or external motion-tracking sensors.

Meanwhile, VR headsets designed specifically for Windows 10 are making a splash. Five are now listed on Microsoft’s online store selling for under $500, manufactured by Acer, Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Samsung. All support the new Windows Mixed Reality platform for virtual reality and augmented reality experiences and applications.

Editor’s Recommendations

  • Why Google bought part of HTC’s smartphone team for $1.1 billion
  • PlayStation VR review
  • HTC Vive, the best virtual reality headset, is now $200 cheaper
  • The $400 Oculus Rift promotion makes a dent in the battle with the HTC Vive
  • Oculus Rift vs. HTC Vive: Prices are lower, but our favorite remains the same




1
Nov

Want a Star Wars font for your Powerpoint presentation? Here’s how to install


Sometimes the default fonts supplied in Windows 10 just don’t cut it in your PowerPoint presentation or graphic design project. We totally get it.

That’s where our guide on how to install fonts in Windows 10 comes in. The process is easy, and there are two ways to get the job done that we’ll teach you below.

Keep in mind that you can only install the most commonly used fonts: TrueType, OpenType, and PostScript. Plus, any free font you download typically can’t be used for money-generating purposes without permission from the font’s creator.

You can find fonts at a variety of places, such as FontSpace, which has an incredible 62 Star Wars fonts.

In addition to installing fonts, we also provide instructions on how to remove unwanted, possibly troublesome fonts, restore the default Windows 10 fonts, and scale them in the desktop interface if needed. Let’s start with the easiest way to get fonts into Windows 10!

The Easy Method

Download the font to your device. Typically, Windows 10 wants to dump everything into the Downloads folder in File Explorer, but you can use Save As to stash the font anywhere on the machine. Just make sure to keep track of where you put it.
Locate the download. The font may or may not be packed into a ZIP file. If it’s zipped, right-click on the file, select Extract All, and then follow the instructions to dump the font into a folder.
After extraction (or accessing the file at its downloaded destination), right-click on the file and select Install. KA-BAM! That’s it!

The Scenic Route

If you like taking the long way to reach your goal, you can use the old-school drag-and-drop method that requires two open windows. Feast your eyes on these instructions:

Instead of right-clicking on the file to install the font, navigate to Cortana’s search field on the taskbar, and type Control Panel. The assistant will conjure up a link to this somewhat-hidden Windows 10 “desktop app” component. Tip: if you go to the Control Panel often, just pin it to the taskbar!

With the Control Panel open, navigate to Appearance and Personalization, and click on Fonts in the main window.
Once your font library loads, simply drag your new font from the destination location in File Explorer into the font window. Consider it installed (the long way)!

Killing Them Softly

Since we’re here, you might as well learn how to delete fonts from Windows 10 also. This is useful information to know in case a font is corrupted, and is causing problems with Windows 10 and/or an installed program. Here’s how you can delete these pesky typefaces:

Follow the steps to find the Control Panel, locate the Appearance and Personalization section, and load up your font library.
Single-click on the font you want to kick out of Windows 10. You will then see options to Organize, Preview, Delete, and Hide above the list of fonts.
Click Delete, and a window will pop up confirming your decision. Here is where you can turn back if the targeted font is just too cute and precious to nuke.

Whoops! Restoring Your Default Fonts

Oops! What if you accidentally nuked one of the core fonts in Windows 10 when tapping on the Delete button? It happens, and thankfully Microsoft has your trigger-happy finger covered:

Follow the steps to find the Control Panel, locate the Appearance and Personalization section, and load up your font library.
On the menu to the left, you should see the Font settings. Click that to open the next panel.
Under Font Settings, click on the Restore default font settings button. Windows 10 will then begin shoving the default fonts back onto your hard drive.

Semi-Resizing Fonts

Finally, there’s a way to resize fonts in Windows 10, but its tied into scaling the overall desktop interface. You can’t simply resize text and leave everything else alone unless you’re manually manipulating fonts in documents, spreadsheets, ad designs, and so on. Here’s how you can increase or decrease the size of your Windows 10 interface:

Right-click on the desktop and select Display settings.
Locate the Scale and layout section on the screen.
Click the arrow to activate a menu providing percentages you can select; or
Click the custom scaling link to create a custom interface scale.

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1
Nov

How to take the best photos with your Google Pixel 2


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For many, the most important feature of a smartphone is its camera.

The Google Pixel 2 has a superb camera. There’s no doubt about that. But we know that with all photography, it’s not just the tools — it’s how you use them that makes a huge difference. Even though you can open up your Pixel 2 with no knowledge of photography and take some great shots, you should strive to do more — and we have a handful of great tips to help you get the most out of this phone’s camera.

Turn on location

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Every time you take a photo with a modern smartphone, it’s capable of having its GPS-based location tied to that photo — that is, if you turn on this setting. Keeping a location tied to a photo may not seem important right now, but think about years down the road when you want to remember even more about the photo that you took — knowing more than a date and time will be super valuable. It also lets services like Google Photos easily group and make your photos searchable by location.

To turn it on, hop into your camera settings and you’ll see the toggle for “Save location” right at the top. You can always turn this feature back off later, and Google Photos will also remove location information from photos when you share them from the app.

Use Smartburst with moving subjects

Google’s camera app has a typical burst function: press and hold the shutter button, and it’ll take photos in quick succession until you release it. But behind the scenes, this isn’t actually a regular burst shot — it’s a “Smartburst.” Basically what this means is that the camera app will take a whole bunch of photos in quick succession, as expected, but also pick out what it thinks are the best ones after processing. The camera takes roughly 10 shots per second to hopefully grab one that’s just right.

Smartburst can do a better job than you can.

This is super useful when you or your subject (or both) are moving, where Smartburst will very often get photos you’d never get by guessing when to hit the shutter yourself. If you’re in a situation like this, just press and hold that shutter and see what the results were later. You may not have another opportunity for that exact shot, so do it when you can.

When you go to review the burst shots, you’ll see them grouped together with the “best” one highlighted. It’s then easy to keep that photo and delete the rest.

Choose your grid lines

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You may think that having grid lines on your viewfinder will be distracting, but they can be super useful for helping you line up shots from the get-go. Tap the grid-like button on the side of the camera viewfinder, and you’ll see four different options — no grid, 3 x 3, 4 x 4 and Golden Ratio — to choose from. Most people will be best off with the 3 x 3 grid.

Use these lines to easily center your subject, get a flat horizon on that next sunset shot, or fill out the frame evenly with various elements dispersed into the three sections. Don’t let the initial distraction of the lines put you off — this is super helpful to have!

Use focus and exposure lock

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Unlike most phones, the Pixel 2 doesn’t have a “Pro” or “Manual” mode that lets you tweak settings for a custom shot. The closest thing it has is an option to change the exposure manually, as well as lock the focus and exposure when you change it.

You don’t get a full manual mode, but this is pretty helpful

When you tap on the camera viewfinder, the phone will focus on that point and also set the exposure to what it thinks is right for the point. But you can override that by moving the exposure slider on the right side of the viewfinder after tapping — up to +2 or down to -2, as you see fit. As soon as you move the camera, though, it’ll re-focus and re-expose the image — that is, unless you hit the little “lock” button at the top of the exposure slider. Once you lock it, the settings stay put no matter how you move the camera or subject.

Most of the time you’ll want to just let the camera choose the exposure and even the focal point. But if you need a different part of the frame to be your subject or want to change the exposure for a unique look, you have the option.

Don’t be tempted by the flash

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Lighting is everything in photography, so many amateur photogs will immediately think “more is better” and want to turn on their flash to get a “better” photo — but this is hardly ever the case. With the advanced HDR+ processing in the Pixel 2, chances are you can get a better photo by leaving the flash off and letting the camera do its magic.

Take control of the light — just don’t do it with a flash.

In other cases, re-positioning the camera to direct the light in different ways will have a better effect on quality as well. It is true that many pro photographers use flashes in certain circumstances, but the inherent issues of having a very small, direct flash on a phone so close to the lens makes it far less useful than a professional camera flash.

The best way to look at it is this: the flash on your phone should be used as an absolute last resort. Try a few shots, reposition, find other light sources, exhaust your other options — and if you need to get more light, then you can turn on the flash.

Increase the panorama resolution

The Pixel 2 can take super-high-resolution panorama shots, but by default it actually isn’t set to the highest possible resolution — presumably for size and processing time concerns. But you should be willing to deal with those things in order to get the best possible panoramas.

Go into the camera settings, scroll down to “Panorama resolution” and select “High” — now you’ll take the best possible panoramas, even if it means dealing with a larger file and longer processing time in the end.

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL

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1
Nov

This $45 Yi Home Camera has 1080p, night vision, and motion detection


Catch those thieves in 1080p.

Is this deal for me?

The Yi 1080p wireless home security camera is down to $44.99 on Amazon. This is part of Amazon’s daily deals, which means the price is good today only. This camera normally sells for around $60. This price is so low it puts the camera only $5 above the regular 720p Yi camera.

yi-1080p-camera.jpg?itok=OOKWO4-u

The Yi not only comes with a motion sensor but it can also activate when it detects a baby crying, making it useful as a baby monitor. Night vision allows you to view a live feed of your child’s room without disturbing them when they’re sleeping. The camera works with the Yi Home app to send alerts directly to your phone or computer. The Yi Home app lets you view up to four live camera feeds at a time. Plus, with a two-way microphone system, you can give commands through the camera or engage in a conversation with someone on the other side using the app. It also has Yi Cloud support so you won’t lose your footage when misplace that tiny SD card.

If you plan to record your footage without using the Cloud (or as a supplement to the Cloud), you’ll want to get a 32GB SD card. The camera doesn’t support higher capacities, so you might want a couple if you’re recording in 1080p.

TL;DR

  • What makes this deal worth considering? – This is $3 better than the last deal we saw on this same camera. It’s a very temporary price as part of Amazon’s daily deals.
  • Things to know before you buy! – You will need to supplement this camera with a microSD card unless you’re planning to stick entirely with Cloud recording.

See at Amazon

Happy Thrifting!

1
Nov

10 Amazon Echo Commands You Must Try


Speak, Alexa, and Enter.

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The big feature with every connected speaker is the ability to speak and get something interesting in response. Right now, the connected speaker with the most spoken word features is without a doubt Amazon Echo. The Alexa platform is full of amazing skills and features just waiting for you to enable and test, but that list is considerably longer than most people have time to sort through.

Here’s a look at my favorites, the Amazon Echo commands everyone should try!

Control Time

Alarms and timers are a big part of how I use Amazon Echo. “Alexa, set an alarm for 6am” is right up there with “Alexa, set a timer for 45 minutes” when I tell my kids it is time for quiet reading time. You can set quick alarms and timers for anything, and as long as you’re within earshot of the system, the timer on it can be a lifesaver.

Get Nerdy

While this may not be an every day feature for most, Alexa has a few Star Wars features hiding in preparation for The Last Jedi this December. You can say ask Alexa to “use the force” or ask it to “speak like Yoda” and the end result is good for a few laughs.

If Star Wars isn’t your think, you can entertain yourself for hours by turning the wake command from “Alexa” to “Computer” and indulge a little Trek fantasy instead.

Still not impressed? What about Game of Thrones? Ask Alexa “What does Jon Snow know?” or tell it “Winter is coming” to have some Westerosi fun.

Buy Stuff

Your Amazon Echo can order just about anything available on Amazon, and sometimes you’ll find there are actually sales that are only available by ordering through your Echo. The best part is that Alexa looks at your previous orders, so when you say “Alexa, order more toilet paper” it will confirm you want more of the brand you most recently purchased.

Echo can also be used to track existing orders, so you know whether the FedEx truck is going to be there for you today.

Drinks on Me

Alcohol and Amazon go surprisingly well together. Wine drinkers can call upon the MySomm Skill and say “Alexa, ask Wine Gal to recommend a wine for tacos” and get some thoughts on what you should buy.

Not into wine? The Bartender lets you say “Alexa, ask the bartender, what’s in a Moscow Mule?” and get everything you need in return.

Kitchen Control

Your Echo is the perfect kitchen companion. It will answer any question you have about measurement conversions when you’re trying to tweak a recipe, and if you’re not sure what to make you can ask Trending Recipes for the best new things.

Just say “Alexa, ask Trending Recipes for a recent recipe” and you’ll get a detailed breakdown of something new to make!

Rules Czar

Family Board Game Night is a lot of fun, right until you’re playing the family version of Monopoly with no paper rules and everyone has a different idea of how things work.

Board Game Answers lets you step in and say “Alexa, ask board games how much money everyone starts with in Monopoly” and you’ll get started smoothly.

Find my Phone

When tearing your living room apart looking for the phone you are absolutely sure you set down a few minutes ago, Where’s My Phone is a little closer than your computer.

Just say “Alexa, ask Where’s My Phone to find my phone” and it’ll start ringing for you in a couple of seconds.

Translate Languages

Alexa isn’t ready to teach you a new language, but it can help you translate some simple sentences thanks to the Translated skill. Enabling this will allow you to say thing like “Alexa, ask Translated how do you say Good Morning in Polish?” and get the correct phrase spoken back to you.

Translated currently supports 36 languages, including Chinese, German, Hindi, and Welsh with more being added regularly.

Shut Up!

Sometimes all you really want from your Amazon Echo is silence. If loud music is playing or Alexa is in the middle of a lengthy explanation you don’t want to hear, just say “Alexa, Shut Up!” and you’ll get some silence in return. Or, if you just want some background noise, say “Alexa, volume one” and get back to work.

Amazon Echo

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  • Get the latest Alexa news

See at Amazon

1
Nov

iOS 11 Predictive Text Bug Automatically Changes ‘I’ to ‘A[?]’ for Some Users


A growing number of iOS 11 users have been encountering a strange predictive text bug over the course of the last few days, with the problem outlined on the MacRumors forums.

It seems some users are seeing “A[?]” as the first recommended predictive text word when using the iOS keyboard, and whenever “I” is typed, it autocorrects to A[?].

It’s not clear what’s causing the bug, but a fair number of MacRumors readers and Twitter users seem to be experiencing the problem. Not everyone is affected, though, and we have been unable to replicate the issue on our own devices.

It may potentially be linked to emoji, as a strange “I” character also appears under the frequently used emoji for some customers who are affected.


The problem seems to be affecting devices running both iOS 11.0.3 and iOS 11.1, and some users are also seeing the odd predictive text show up on Macs, too, as predictive text is available on all devices via iCloud.

Turning off predictive text is a reliable way of putting an end to the issue, as is using a third-party keyboard, but neither of these options are long term solutions for customers who want to use the full-featured built-in keyboard.

Resetting the keyboard dictionary does not appear to fix the issue, nor does a device restart or reset. One MacRumors reader who got in touch with Apple Support about the issue was told that Apple is aware of the problem and working on a fix.

Related Roundup: iOS 11
Discuss this article in our forums

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1
Nov

Periscope to award Super Broadcasters with more of their earnings


In June, Periscope introduced Super Hearts, which are hearts you’d use to support your favorite broadcasters. The system is a little confusing, but here’s how it works: You pay for Super Hearts with “coins,” which in turn cost real money (1050 coins costs $0.99 and so forth). Those Super Hearts are then translated into “stars.” If the broadcaster is enrolled in the Super Broadcaster program, those stars are then converted back into cash. That sounds great, except some of that money was lost to transaction fees and other costs. Now, Periscope is changing this so that Super Broadcasters can get more of what you give them.

Starting tomorrow, Periscope will now reward all Super Heart earnings to Super Broadcasters except for a $1 administrative fee. The fee, Periscope says, is for operation and payment processing costs. Plus, Periscope is also offering an additional holiday bonus incentive during the next two months. If Super Broadcasters earn over a million stars a month, they’ll get a $100 bonus. If they earn more than three million stars, they’ll get a $250 extra for a total of $350. The caveat is that the Super Broadcaster must earn all of those stars in either November or December — you can’t count an existing balance towards the total.

The Super Hearts program is just one incentive that Periscope is trying in order to lure more broadcasters to its platform, as it competes against YouTube, Facebook and Twitch for views. Some of these rivals offer similar benefits; Twitch has audience tips via Cheer emotes and YouTube Live viewers can pay extra for pinned Super Chats. It’s not clear yet if Periscope has the same kind of numbers that its competitors do, but this is certainly one way to win people over.

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