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8
Oct

After Math: Starting up, shutting down


While the tech industry focused on all of the new shinies Google unveiled on Wednesday, the rest of the world turned. The Supreme Court shut down Kim Dotcom’s attempts to get his millions back, Toys R Us made a last ditch effort to save itself from obscurity, and the FCC finally got around to starting the rebuilding process for Puerto Rico’s crippled telephonic infrastructure.

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8
Oct

FDA clears implant that treats severe sleep apnea


Sleep apnea (where your brain doesn’t properly send breathing signals while resting) is horrible enough by itself, but the solutions to it can be scary: you may have to take medication, rely on ungainly breathing machines or opt for invasive surgery. You might have a gentler treatment going forward, though. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved an implantable device, Respicardia’s Remede System, that fights more serious cases of sleep apnea.

The hardware amounts to a battery pack (slipped under your skin in the upper chest) and wires that enter the blood vessels near the nerve that stimulates your breathing. If you stop breathing normally in mid-sleep, Remede stimulates that nerve to move your diaphragm and keep you breathing. Think of it as an on-demand jumpstart for your respiratory system.

This isn’t a surefire fix. While there’s evidence that Remede works, only about half of study subjects saw the hoped-for dramatic reduction in breathing problems. Also, it can’t be used for obstructive sleep apnea (where the upper airway is blocked), people with active infections or those who need MRI scans. An implant is better than having to wear bulky equipment to bed, however, and even a modest improvement could add years to your life.

Source: FDA

8
Oct

From the Editor’s Desk: Google’s commitment to hardware is no longer in doubt


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There is always intense hype around a Google event, and this time the company also delivered.

Google, it turns out, really cares about making self-branded hardware. The first two Chromebook Pixels weren’t a fluke, nor were the 2016 Google Pixel phones a one-off thought. With its October 4 event, Google didn’t just “double down” on hardware — it quadrupled down, announcing four new versions of existing products (Pixel 2, Pixel 2 XL, Pixelbook, Daydream View) and four altogether new ones (Home Max, Home Mini, Pixel Buds, Clips).

Google announced a great mix of practical and aspirational products.

Google’s announcements all held their own purpose, and from my perspective importantly split between both practical and aspirational products. The Pixel 2 and 2 XL are ready-for-market high-end smartphones, and the new Daydream View headset and Google Home Mini are meant to get out there in the millions at low price points to support the phones. But just as importantly Google also showed off new hardware that’s meant to be an exercise in “let’s show people what we’re capable of” rather than aiming for the mass market: the Google Pixelbook, Google Home Max, Pixel Buds and Google Clips. None of these will be big sellers, but they are aspirational products that help people associate Google with lust-worthy hardware even if they end up just buying a Pixel 2 or Google Home Mini instead.

For once, the amount of effort Google’s putting behind hardware isn’t in question.

When paired with last month’s acqui-hire of 2,000 HTC engineers and some valuable IP licenses, this event looks even more enticing to those of us who enjoy Google’s hardware experiences. Not only is Google clearly improving on many of its hardware offerings that it intends to sell at scale, but it’s also introducing new product lines and hiring product-focused people to continue them. For once, the amount of effort Google’s putting behind hardware isn’t in question.

Now, as ever, we need some execution. Rick Osterloh, the head of Google’s hardware division, made a funny quip on stage this week about making enough Pixels this time around. It’s fun to joke about in a room full of people who are in the industry … but Google’s inability to keep together a supply line of phones seriously hurt Pixel sales and public perception of the company’s store. You have to graduate from the amateur ranks of logistics — all of these great-looking products depend on it.

And with that, a few more thoughts on the week that was:

  • I’m still waiting for the other shoe to drop with Google making changes to Project Fi to support these new Pixels and the Moto X4. If Google cares about growing the service, it has to offer more to family plans and cut its per-gigabyte pricing.
  • As I ranted about on this week’s podcast (great episode, by the way), what rubs me the wrong way more than the lack of a headphone jack is Google’s decision to not ship headphones with the new Pixels.
  • I know a lot of phones don’t come with headphones, but we’re not at the point where people already have USB-C headphones — Google needs to seed the market by putting a pair in the box, especially with phones this expensive.
  • Sonos announcing Alexa support got completely squashed by Google’s event on the same day, but I’m not sure how big it would’ve been on any other wide-open Wednesday. For someone who isn’t already invested in the Sonos system, It feels like too little too late.

Have a great week, everyone.

-Andrew

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL

  • Google Pixel 2 and 2 XL hands-on: Act two is great
  • Google Pixel 2 specs
  • Google Pixel 2 vs. Pixel 2 XL: What’s the difference?
  • Pixel 2 vs iPhone 8: Camera Showdown
  • Pixel 2 FAQ: Everything you need to know!
  • Join our Pixel 2 forums

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8
Oct

Ben Heck’s Super Glue Gun: Scoping out the Autostand


59d730270c2aff31a259c129_o_F_v0.jpg

Is Ben over-engineering the Super Glue Gun? Working on an idea from Felix, Ben prototypes the automatic deploying kickstand for the super glue gun build, and develops code for the ATTiny microcontroller for servo control. Though all is not as straightforward as it seems! Ben discovers the intricacies of the processor from the hardware’s datasheets and ensures he’s setting the correct bits to get the timing just right. Of course, it helps to sanity check it with an oscilloscope! Would you design this any different? Let the team know on the element14 Community!

8
Oct

iPhone X With New Dynamic Wallpaper Appears in the Wild


There are still 26 days to go before Apple officially launches iPhone X, but at least one person has already gotten their hands on one of the sought-after 5.8-inch devices, if a video shared on Reddit is anything to go by.

The short clip, embedded below, shows someone swiveling in their hand what looks like a silver glass-backed iPhone X with a new, previously unseen dynamic wallpaper on the lock screen.

As the handset is rotated, the padlock above the time visibly shudders as Face ID refuses to unlock, suggesting the person holding the phone is not the owner.

Speculation is rife among Redditors as to who the owner could be and how they ever got hold of an iPhone X so far ahead of the official launch next month.

According to the original poster, the video was uploaded from the San Jose area, California, making it likely that the clip was recorded by someone who knows an Apple employee with early access to the device. The iPhone X in the clip is also displaying an AT&T logo in the upper left corner, adding further weight to the suggestion this was recorded in the U.S.

Another iPhone X in the wild from apple

For the rest of us, pre-orders for iPhone X begin on Friday, October 27, with the device’s official launch date the following Friday, November 3.

Related Roundup: iPhone XTag: Reddit
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8
Oct

Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: Treepods, robot cutters, Firefly flints


At any given moment, there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the Web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you’ll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there – alongside some real gems. We’ve cut through the Pebble clones and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting new crowdfunding projects out there this week. That said, keep in mind that any crowdfunding project — even the best intentioned — can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams.

Colorspike — dynamic set lighting

A few years ago, a small NYC-based startup called BitBanger Labs released a gizmo called the PixelStick: a programmable LED rail designed to take light painting photography to the next level. It was a huge hit with the crowdfunding community, quickly gathering up over $620,000 from more than 2,000 backers. It’s been nearly four years since the project went live on Kickstarter, and now the creators are back with yet another device aimed at photographers and videographers.

The Colorspike is a lot like the PixelStick in terms of operation, but is intended for a completely different purpose. Just like the PixelStick, ColorSpike is essentially just a row of programmable LEDs. The difference, however, is that ColorSpike’s lights are more powerful and customizable, since they’re meant to light up sets with a splash of color during video shoots.

The idea is that, rather than swapping out films and gels on their set lights, filmmakers can just change the color (or brightness, or pattern) of the ColorSpike through an accompanying smartphone app. If you’re an indie filmmaker, this is for you.

Treepod — hanging lounge tent

You know those suspended tents from companies like Tentsile and Treez? They not only provide a super-comfortable platform to sleep on while you’re in the great outdoors, but also a superior view of your surroundings. The only downside is that they’re a bit cumbersome to transport, and their multi-strap setup is far more laborious than erecting your average ground tent. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could enjoy all the benefits of a hanging shelter, but without all the extra effort and setup they generally require?

Enter the Treepod. It’s a suspended tent that’s not only durable and easy to transport, but also outrageously easy to set up. The key here is that the Treepod is suspended by only a single line, rather than multiple tension straps like you’ll find on most other hanging shelters. On top of that, Treepod tents also break down and pack up into reasonably-sized packages for easy transport.

That means you don’t need a six-man crew and a flock of pack mules just to haul it out into the woods. You can easily toss it over your shoulder and bring it along on a solo adventure.

Firefly — fire-starting accessory for Swiss Army Knives

It’s tough to improve on an outdoor product as revered as the Swiss army knife. After all, this iconic multitool has been around for more than 120 years, and has achieved legendary status due to its simple, utilitarian design. But a new product called the Firefly, which recently launched on Kickstarter, delivers a handy new feature that does the impossible: it improves your Swiss army knife in a big way. How? By giving it the ability to start a fire! It’s a sparking tool that fits neatly into your existing pocketknife, so you’ll always have it handy when you need it.

Made from a custom sparking material developed by Tortoise Gear, the Firefly is essentially a flint/steel rod that fits snugly into the toothpick slot of your Swiss army knife. Unfortunately, that means you’ll have to ditch that flimsy plastic toothpick that you use so much in the backcountry — but we’re willing to bet that if you had to choose between freezing to death or having an annoying piece of beef jerky stuck between your molars, you’d probably choose the latter. Really, if you think about it, couldn’t you just use the corkscrew as a toothpick anyway? It’s a wonder that Victorinox didn’t think of this decades ago.

Goliath CNC — robotic milling machine

3D printers may hog the limelight, but CNC mills, which cut materials with extreme precision, have also come a long way in the past few years. It used to be that these devices could only be found in machine shops, but over the course of the past decade or so, the technology has largely been democratized. You can now get your hands on a user-friendly desktop CNC mill for less than $1,000, but size remains a major restraint. Unless you shell out a lot of money, you can’t really find a machine that will mill parts larger than a foot in any dimension, so you’re fairly limited in terms of what you can create.

Goliath CNC is one attempt to change that. This beast can mill shapes up to four feet wide and eight feet long — and it only costs a hair over $1,400. The machine’s creators at LA-based startup Springa designed it from the ground up to be simple and affordable, so it’s a complete reimagining of the concept of a CNC milling machine.

In place of rails, the Goliath CNC uses multidirectional wheels and sensor pylons that tell the robot precisely where it is on the cutting surface. Plus, since it’s really no bigger than a fat Roomba, Goliath won’t take up a ton of space in your garage like a traditional CNC machine would.

WT2 — real-time in-ear language translator

In the iconic Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series, author Douglas Adams introduced the world to the Babel Fish: a “small, yellow, leech-like” creature that lives inside the ear of a host and “feeds on brainwave energy received not from its own carrier, but from those around it. It absorbs all unconscious mental frequencies from this brainwave energy to nourish itself with. It then excretes into the mind of its carrier a telepathic matrix formed by combining the conscious thought frequencies with nerve signals picked up from the speech centres of the brain which has supplied them.”

A Babel Fish allows the user to understand anything anyone says to them, no matter the language. While Adams’s creation was somewhat whimsical and far-flung when the book was released in 1979, the real world might soon be filled with devices that function much like the fictional creature. Case in point? The WT2 in-ear translator. Promising natural, hands-free communication, the WT2 seeks to enable conversations in two different languages via two earphone translators and one app.

Simply remove the earphones from their charging case, done one of them and give the other one to your friend. Speak in your language, and your interlocutor will hear it in their language. The earbuds will automatically pair with an iOS app, and begin listening for your communication. If you’re speaking in Spanish to an English speaker, your friend will hear your Spanish words in their native tongue after a short delay. And when your friend replies in English, you’ll hear said response in Spanish. Pretty cool, right?




8
Oct

Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: Treepods, robot cutters, Firefly flints


At any given moment, there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the Web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you’ll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there – alongside some real gems. We’ve cut through the Pebble clones and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting new crowdfunding projects out there this week. That said, keep in mind that any crowdfunding project — even the best intentioned — can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams.

Colorspike — dynamic set lighting

A few years ago, a small NYC-based startup called BitBanger Labs released a gizmo called the PixelStick: a programmable LED rail designed to take light painting photography to the next level. It was a huge hit with the crowdfunding community, quickly gathering up over $620,000 from more than 2,000 backers. It’s been nearly four years since the project went live on Kickstarter, and now the creators are back with yet another device aimed at photographers and videographers.

The Colorspike is a lot like the PixelStick in terms of operation, but is intended for a completely different purpose. Just like the PixelStick, ColorSpike is essentially just a row of programmable LEDs. The difference, however, is that ColorSpike’s lights are more powerful and customizable, since they’re meant to light up sets with a splash of color during video shoots.

The idea is that, rather than swapping out films and gels on their set lights, filmmakers can just change the color (or brightness, or pattern) of the ColorSpike through an accompanying smartphone app. If you’re an indie filmmaker, this is for you.

Treepod — hanging lounge tent

You know those suspended tents from companies like Tentsile and Treez? They not only provide a super-comfortable platform to sleep on while you’re in the great outdoors, but also a superior view of your surroundings. The only downside is that they’re a bit cumbersome to transport, and their multi-strap setup is far more laborious than erecting your average ground tent. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could enjoy all the benefits of a hanging shelter, but without all the extra effort and setup they generally require?

Enter the Treepod. It’s a suspended tent that’s not only durable and easy to transport, but also outrageously easy to set up. The key here is that the Treepod is suspended by only a single line, rather than multiple tension straps like you’ll find on most other hanging shelters. On top of that, Treepod tents also break down and pack up into reasonably-sized packages for easy transport.

That means you don’t need a six-man crew and a flock of pack mules just to haul it out into the woods. You can easily toss it over your shoulder and bring it along on a solo adventure.

Firefly — fire-starting accessory for Swiss Army Knives

It’s tough to improve on an outdoor product as revered as the Swiss army knife. After all, this iconic multitool has been around for more than 120 years, and has achieved legendary status due to its simple, utilitarian design. But a new product called the Firefly, which recently launched on Kickstarter, delivers a handy new feature that does the impossible: it improves your Swiss army knife in a big way. How? By giving it the ability to start a fire! It’s a sparking tool that fits neatly into your existing pocketknife, so you’ll always have it handy when you need it.

Made from a custom sparking material developed by Tortoise Gear, the Firefly is essentially a flint/steel rod that fits snugly into the toothpick slot of your Swiss army knife. Unfortunately, that means you’ll have to ditch that flimsy plastic toothpick that you use so much in the backcountry — but we’re willing to bet that if you had to choose between freezing to death or having an annoying piece of beef jerky stuck between your molars, you’d probably choose the latter. Really, if you think about it, couldn’t you just use the corkscrew as a toothpick anyway? It’s a wonder that Victorinox didn’t think of this decades ago.

Goliath CNC — robotic milling machine

3D printers may hog the limelight, but CNC mills, which cut materials with extreme precision, have also come a long way in the past few years. It used to be that these devices could only be found in machine shops, but over the course of the past decade or so, the technology has largely been democratized. You can now get your hands on a user-friendly desktop CNC mill for less than $1,000, but size remains a major restraint. Unless you shell out a lot of money, you can’t really find a machine that will mill parts larger than a foot in any dimension, so you’re fairly limited in terms of what you can create.

Goliath CNC is one attempt to change that. This beast can mill shapes up to four feet wide and eight feet long — and it only costs a hair over $1,400. The machine’s creators at LA-based startup Springa designed it from the ground up to be simple and affordable, so it’s a complete reimagining of the concept of a CNC milling machine.

In place of rails, the Goliath CNC uses multidirectional wheels and sensor pylons that tell the robot precisely where it is on the cutting surface. Plus, since it’s really no bigger than a fat Roomba, Goliath won’t take up a ton of space in your garage like a traditional CNC machine would.

WT2 — real-time in-ear language translator

In the iconic Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series, author Douglas Adams introduced the world to the Babel Fish: a “small, yellow, leech-like” creature that lives inside the ear of a host and “feeds on brainwave energy received not from its own carrier, but from those around it. It absorbs all unconscious mental frequencies from this brainwave energy to nourish itself with. It then excretes into the mind of its carrier a telepathic matrix formed by combining the conscious thought frequencies with nerve signals picked up from the speech centres of the brain which has supplied them.”

A Babel Fish allows the user to understand anything anyone says to them, no matter the language. While Adams’s creation was somewhat whimsical and far-flung when the book was released in 1979, the real world might soon be filled with devices that function much like the fictional creature. Case in point? The WT2 in-ear translator. Promising natural, hands-free communication, the WT2 seeks to enable conversations in two different languages via two earphone translators and one app.

Simply remove the earphones from their charging case, done one of them and give the other one to your friend. Speak in your language, and your interlocutor will hear it in their language. The earbuds will automatically pair with an iOS app, and begin listening for your communication. If you’re speaking in Spanish to an English speaker, your friend will hear your Spanish words in their native tongue after a short delay. And when your friend replies in English, you’ll hear said response in Spanish. Pretty cool, right?




8
Oct

Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: Treepods, robot cutters, Firefly flints


At any given moment, there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the Web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you’ll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there – alongside some real gems. We’ve cut through the Pebble clones and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting new crowdfunding projects out there this week. That said, keep in mind that any crowdfunding project — even the best intentioned — can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams.

Colorspike — dynamic set lighting

A few years ago, a small NYC-based startup called BitBanger Labs released a gizmo called the PixelStick: a programmable LED rail designed to take light painting photography to the next level. It was a huge hit with the crowdfunding community, quickly gathering up over $620,000 from more than 2,000 backers. It’s been nearly four years since the project went live on Kickstarter, and now the creators are back with yet another device aimed at photographers and videographers.

The Colorspike is a lot like the PixelStick in terms of operation, but is intended for a completely different purpose. Just like the PixelStick, ColorSpike is essentially just a row of programmable LEDs. The difference, however, is that ColorSpike’s lights are more powerful and customizable, since they’re meant to light up sets with a splash of color during video shoots.

The idea is that, rather than swapping out films and gels on their set lights, filmmakers can just change the color (or brightness, or pattern) of the ColorSpike through an accompanying smartphone app. If you’re an indie filmmaker, this is for you.

Treepod — hanging lounge tent

You know those suspended tents from companies like Tentsile and Treez? They not only provide a super-comfortable platform to sleep on while you’re in the great outdoors, but also a superior view of your surroundings. The only downside is that they’re a bit cumbersome to transport, and their multi-strap setup is far more laborious than erecting your average ground tent. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could enjoy all the benefits of a hanging shelter, but without all the extra effort and setup they generally require?

Enter the Treepod. It’s a suspended tent that’s not only durable and easy to transport, but also outrageously easy to set up. The key here is that the Treepod is suspended by only a single line, rather than multiple tension straps like you’ll find on most other hanging shelters. On top of that, Treepod tents also break down and pack up into reasonably-sized packages for easy transport.

That means you don’t need a six-man crew and a flock of pack mules just to haul it out into the woods. You can easily toss it over your shoulder and bring it along on a solo adventure.

Firefly — fire-starting accessory for Swiss Army Knives

It’s tough to improve on an outdoor product as revered as the Swiss army knife. After all, this iconic multitool has been around for more than 120 years, and has achieved legendary status due to its simple, utilitarian design. But a new product called the Firefly, which recently launched on Kickstarter, delivers a handy new feature that does the impossible: it improves your Swiss army knife in a big way. How? By giving it the ability to start a fire! It’s a sparking tool that fits neatly into your existing pocketknife, so you’ll always have it handy when you need it.

Made from a custom sparking material developed by Tortoise Gear, the Firefly is essentially a flint/steel rod that fits snugly into the toothpick slot of your Swiss army knife. Unfortunately, that means you’ll have to ditch that flimsy plastic toothpick that you use so much in the backcountry — but we’re willing to bet that if you had to choose between freezing to death or having an annoying piece of beef jerky stuck between your molars, you’d probably choose the latter. Really, if you think about it, couldn’t you just use the corkscrew as a toothpick anyway? It’s a wonder that Victorinox didn’t think of this decades ago.

Goliath CNC — robotic milling machine

3D printers may hog the limelight, but CNC mills, which cut materials with extreme precision, have also come a long way in the past few years. It used to be that these devices could only be found in machine shops, but over the course of the past decade or so, the technology has largely been democratized. You can now get your hands on a user-friendly desktop CNC mill for less than $1,000, but size remains a major restraint. Unless you shell out a lot of money, you can’t really find a machine that will mill parts larger than a foot in any dimension, so you’re fairly limited in terms of what you can create.

Goliath CNC is one attempt to change that. This beast can mill shapes up to four feet wide and eight feet long — and it only costs a hair over $1,400. The machine’s creators at LA-based startup Springa designed it from the ground up to be simple and affordable, so it’s a complete reimagining of the concept of a CNC milling machine.

In place of rails, the Goliath CNC uses multidirectional wheels and sensor pylons that tell the robot precisely where it is on the cutting surface. Plus, since it’s really no bigger than a fat Roomba, Goliath won’t take up a ton of space in your garage like a traditional CNC machine would.

WT2 — real-time in-ear language translator

In the iconic Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series, author Douglas Adams introduced the world to the Babel Fish: a “small, yellow, leech-like” creature that lives inside the ear of a host and “feeds on brainwave energy received not from its own carrier, but from those around it. It absorbs all unconscious mental frequencies from this brainwave energy to nourish itself with. It then excretes into the mind of its carrier a telepathic matrix formed by combining the conscious thought frequencies with nerve signals picked up from the speech centres of the brain which has supplied them.”

A Babel Fish allows the user to understand anything anyone says to them, no matter the language. While Adams’s creation was somewhat whimsical and far-flung when the book was released in 1979, the real world might soon be filled with devices that function much like the fictional creature. Case in point? The WT2 in-ear translator. Promising natural, hands-free communication, the WT2 seeks to enable conversations in two different languages via two earphone translators and one app.

Simply remove the earphones from their charging case, done one of them and give the other one to your friend. Speak in your language, and your interlocutor will hear it in their language. The earbuds will automatically pair with an iOS app, and begin listening for your communication. If you’re speaking in Spanish to an English speaker, your friend will hear your Spanish words in their native tongue after a short delay. And when your friend replies in English, you’ll hear said response in Spanish. Pretty cool, right?




8
Oct

Google’s Pixel 2 phones fight distracted driving


You don’t have to own an iPhone or Samsung phone to get a modern handset that keeps your eyes on the road. The 9to5Google team has discovered that the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL include a buried feature in their software (namely, Ambient Services) that automatically invokes a Do Not Disturb mode when it detects that you’re moving at high speed, much like what you see in iOS 11. You’ll want to turn this off if you’re only a passenger, but it could be very helpful if you’re behind the wheel and don’t want your phone pinging you every time there’s an Instagram like or Twitter mention.

This isn’t the only understated Pixel 2 feature we’ve seen. Their support for electronic SIMs caught some by surprise. However, the anti-distracted driving mode is a good representation of what Google is trying to achieve. Where it used to stick to pure Android in the Nexus line, the Pixel line is increasingly defined by features that help them either stand out or compete against other flagship devices.

Via: 9to5Google

Source: Google Play

8
Oct

Apple CEO Tim Cook to Meet French President Macron on Monday


Apple CEO Tim Cook will meet French president Emmanuel Macron on Monday, according to the Élysée Palace’s official published agenda. Cook has been invited to the head of state’s Paris residence for an afternoon meeting, but the reasons for the visit have not yet been made public.

Topics up for discussion could include Apple’s code-learning drive in schools, or perhaps more likely, the issue of corporate tax law in the country.

France has called for an aggressive overhaul of how tech companies like Apple pay tax across the European Union, and President Macron is one of the leaders behind the tax crackdown, which has a goal of bringing a more unified corporate tax system across the euro states.

EU officials recently gathered to look at existing loopholes which are said to have allowed tech companies to minimize taxes and grab market share at the expense of Europe-based companies, and Macron has personally been unhappy with the way French firms struggle to compete with countries where taxes and social security payments are lower.

Cook was last in France back in February when he toured the country, dropping in at local Apple Stores and meeting with French creatives and businesses.

(Via MacGeneration.)

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Tags: Tim Cook, France
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