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24
Sep

After Math: Like looking into the future


It was an exciting week for futuristic technologies. Knightscope debuted its newest roboguard, Nest showed off a face-recognizing outdoor camera, and Google came up with a way to close your garage from anywhere in the neighborhood. Numbers, because how else will you know how long to wait for the future to arrive?

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24
Sep

The best air purifier


By Tim Heffernan and John Holecek

This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a buyer’s guide to the best homewares. When readers choose to buy The Sweethome’s independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read the full article here.

After carrying out 300 hours of research, three lab tests in the past four years, and a new weeklong real-world test encompassing 18 purifiers, we’re more confident than ever that the Coway AP-1512HH Mighty is the best air purifier for most people.

Who should get this

Despite prolific marketing to the contrary, scientific studies do not support claims that air purifiers improve your health, in part because it’s exceptionally difficult to disentangle their impact from the many other factors that influence your health. There is, however, overwhelming evidence that breathing particulate pollution can exacerbate asthma, allergies, heart disease, and other medical conditions. And removing particulates is a job HEPA-rated air purifiers excel at.

How we picked and tested

For this guide, we focused on portable air purifiers, which is a blanket term for any purifier not installed directly into your home HVAC system. Several criteria guided our selection:

  • We required true HEPA certification (the US definition), which means an air filter removes 99.97 percent or more of airborne particles of 0.3 micron diameter.
  • Generally, each air purifier had to be rated for at least 350 square feet—bigger than the average living room. We did test one inexpensive purifier rated for spaces smaller than 150 feet in response to reader feedback.
  • Each air purifier should cycle all the air in a room at least twice per hour, and ideally four or five times.

Based on these criteria, we’ve surveyed hundreds of models, read dozens of editorial reviews, and tested 18 air purifiers since 2014. This year, we conducted two tests. First, John Holecek re-created his 2016 lab tests, measuring factors like filtration speed and efficiency, noise level, and ownership cost over time. Read more about John’s tests in detail in our full guide to air purifiers.

In the second test, Tim Heffernan used seven air purifiers for a week in a 200-square-foot room in a New York City apartment. This helped us form a detailed picture of how each air purifier performed in the real world. The week he ran the tests was one of the worst of the year in terms of air pollution, with numerous health advisories related to outdoor air quality. Learn more about Tim’s tests in our full guide.

Our pick: Coway AP-1512HH Mighty

Photo: Michael Hession

After three tests in the lab, one in a New York City apartment, and three years of in-home use, we are more confident than ever that the Coway AP-1512HH Mighty is the best air purifier for most people. It’s one of the best-performing air purifiers we’ve ever tested, and has maintained that level of performance for several years. On long-term costs, it’s also one of the cheapest air purifiers we’ve tested, costing just $600 to buy and run 24/7 for five years.

In terms of measured particle removal, the Coway is very nearly the best we’ve tested. In our 2016 lab test, it purified better than all but two units (the differences were marginal), and in the 2017 lab test, it again outperformed the competition, reducing particulates to as little as 12 percent of the initial level in just 20 minutes. It performed just as well in the 2017 New York City apartment test, reducing particulate pollution to less than 20 percent of the starting level in 20 minutes—again, better than all but two much pricier models, and the differences marginal.

We ran our original test model virtually nonstop for two years without replacing the filter—twice the length of time Coway recommends—and it still worked as well as it did on day one. That’s not hyperbole: In 2016 we measured its performance using both the original and new filters, and found no significant difference.

Runner-up: Winix 5500-2

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Photo: John Holecek

If the Coway AP-1512HH Mighty is unavailable, the Winix 5500-2 is a close runner-up. It, too, is HEPA-certified and rated to 350 square feet. In our 2016 lab test, it slightly outperformed the Coway, reducing particulate levels to 10 percent of their initial levels, versus 12 percent for the Coway. We prefered the Coway because of its aesthetics, proven long-term performance, and lower five-year purchase-and-operating cost: The Winix costs roughly $180 more, or $36 per year, to run than the Coway.

Upgrade: Coway Airmega 300

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Photo: John Holecek

If you need to purify the air in a seriously large space, we recommend Coway’s Airmega 300. It’s HEPA-certified to clear spaces of roughly 500 square feet at five complete air changes per hour, or 1,250 square feet at two complete air changes. Its unique twin filters permit very high airflow, allowing it to rapidly filter large volumes of air. Although the Airmega is a great machine for large, open rooms, it’s quite expensive, setting you back about $1,200 to run 24/7 for five years. That’s almost exactly twice the cost of the Coway—and if you need to clean (for example) a bedroom and a living room, two Coways would be a better choice.

Also great: Austin Air HealthMate Standard HM-400

Photo: Austin Air

Most air purifiers (including our picks) claim to reduce VOCs, odors, and molecular-sized pollution that’s far smaller than the particulates a HEPA filter can catch. But only the Austin truly delivers that claim, with a 15-pound activated-carbon filter that easily outperformed all other air purifiers (their thin, lightweight activated-charcoal filters proved far too small to make a meaningful difference). In our tests for VOC/odor/molecular-pollution removal, the Austin reduced a heavy load of ethanol vapors to 13 percent of the starting level within 20 minutes, performing twice as well as the nearest competitor. This is a big reason FEMA and the Red Cross deployed Austin Air units for at Ground Zero after 9/11.

The Austin is also a very solid performer on particulates, reducing them to less than 20 percent of starting levels after 30 minutes on high in our real-world test and to 50 percent on low. However, the dense carbon filter means it consumes more electricity than our pick. Its five-year cost is about $1,300, more than double the price of the Coway.

Budget pick: GermGuardian AC4825

Photo: Michael Hession

If you need to use a purifier only in a bedroom, small office, or dorm room, the GermGuardian AC4825 is a decent choice. It’s rated for 156 square feet of space, but in our 350-square-foot lab, it still reduced particulates by about 80 percent, and by about 70 percent in the 200-square-foot NYC apartment (compared with approximately 87 percent by the Coway in both spaces; 30-minute tests, on the high setting). It’s cheaper up front than the Coway, but costlier long-term: about $740 to run for five years, or roughly $140 more. So it’s a budget pick only if you plan to use it short-term, or if you aren’t paying the utility bill (as in an office or dorm).

This guide may have been updated by The Sweethome. To see the current recommendation, please go here.

Note from The Sweethome: When readers choose to buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn affiliate commissions that support our work.

24
Sep

Not happy with the latest? Here’s how to downgrade from iOS 11 to iOS 10


Some may be celebrating all the new iOS 11 features, but others may already regret updating their iPhone. A new iOS version can mean incompatibility issues with older apps, or may lead to battery life issues — and have you wondering how to downgrade from iOS 11.

Whatever the reason, we’re glad you’re here now. There’s still time for you to go back to the previous version of iOS, which was iOS 10.3.3. The way it works is that Apple signs iOS software for a while until newer versions are released. Because iOS 11 was just released, Apple is still signing iOS 10.3.3, so that means you can roll back to that version of iOS. If you want to do this, you’ve picked the perfect time, because when newer versions of iOS 11 come out, Apple will stop signing iOS 10.3.3 and then you will no longer be able to roll back to iOS 10.

So, how do you do it? How can you go back to a previous version of iOS? The process isn’t very difficult, but you have to keep two things in mind. The first thing is that you’ll have to download iOS 10.3.3 manually, but don’t worry because we’ll show you how in the steps below. Secondly, if you need to restore a backup, you’ll only be able to restore backups made under iOS 10.3.3 or restore your iPhone or iPad as a new device.

With that out of the way, let’s get into it. Follow the steps below to downgrade from iOS 11 to iOS 10.3.3

How to downgrade from iOS 11

Step 1: Make sure that you have the latest version of iTunes installed. Go to Help > Check for Updates.

Step 2: You will have to download the iOS 10.3.3 IPSW file for your particular device manually. Download it to your desktop or somewhere easy to find.

Step 3: Before you perform a restore you have to turn off Find My iPhone. To do this, go to Settings > [Your Name] > iCloud. Scroll down to Find My iPhone and make sure that it is turned off.

Step 4: Connect your iOS device to your computer and make sure that iTunes is open.

Step 5: Let’s put your iOS device into DFU recovery mode. If you don’t know how to do this, please follow our guide on how to reset your iPhone. Once you enter DFU mode, iTunes will let you know that it detected an iPhone in recovery mode. You can click OK on this message and begin the recovery process.

Step 6: Hold down the SHIFT key if you’re on Windows, or the Option key if you’re on a Mac, and at the same time click on Restore iPhone in iTunes.

Step 7: A window will come up asking you to browse for the iOS IPSW file. In this case, you want to select the iOS 10.3.3 IPSW file that you downloaded in step 2. For example, if you have an iPhone 7 Plus the file name will be “iPhone_7Plus_10.3.3_14G60_Restore.ipsw.”

Step 8: At this point, iTunes begins the process of restoring your device.

Once finished, iOS will ask you if you want to restore a backup or if you want to set up as a new device. Note that you’ll only be able to restore backups made with iOS 10.3.3.

If you have any issues in the future, don’t forget to check out our guides on how to perform a Factory Reset on any iPhone, and tips on how to fix the most common problems with the iPhone 7 or iPhone 6S.




24
Sep

The best 360-degree stories on YouTube


storytitle.jpg?itok=KnBsuFXr

Here is a chance to see something truly magical and fun

When Google first released Cardboard we got our first view of a “360 Story” from Motorola. It featured a cute mouse looking for his hat and was so endearing it spawned a host of other stories. We will take you through some of them today. Here’s our top 5.

Read more at VRHeads!

24
Sep

The Ben Heck Show: Motor control


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Stepping onto the other side of the camera, Max decides he wants to learn more about motors, from motor control to motor drivers. Luckily, Felix is on hand to play teacher as he takes Max on a comprehensive tour. Will the combination of DC motors, transistors, electromagnets and Arduino coding prove too much for Mr. Olmstead to master? Or can Felix push his new student to create a successful working concept? Connect with the team over on the element14 Community.

24
Sep

Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: 8K VR, smoke-free fires, a drone for your home


At any given moment, there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the Web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you’ll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there – alongside some real gems. We’ve cut through the Pebble clones and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting new crowdfunding projects out there this week. That said, keep in mind that any crowdfunding project — even the best intentioned — can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams.

Pimax — 8K VR headset

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VR headsets have come a long way in the past few years. Ever since the Oculus Rift reignited the world’s enthusiasm for virtual reality, tech companies have been in an arms race to develop better and better headsets. Today, VR enthusiasts have a smorgasbord of different options to choose from — everything from the accessible and affordable Samsung Gear VR, all the way up to the industry-leading HTC Vive. But in many ways, the competition is just starting to heat up — especially now that Pimax’s much-hyped 8K headset has landed on Kickstarter.

On paper, the Pimax 8K is an absolute beast. With a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 per eye, a refresh rate of 90Hz, and a 200-degree field of view, it’s easily one of the most hi-spec VR headsets ever conceived. To put that in perspective, the current VR heavyweights, the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, both boast 1,080 x 1,200 pixels per eye and a meager 110-degree field of view. With all those extra pixels, Pimax aims to offer “the ultimate VR experience” — one devoid of the dreaded “screen door effect” that many currently-available headsets suffer from.

Biolite Firepit — Smoke-free, power harvesting fire pit

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

Biolite originally won the hearts of the outdoor community with its gadget-charging, biomass-burning Campstove, which was first released back in 2013. And in the past couple years, the company has increasingly branched out and expanded its product offerings. And the best part? For its latest product (an ultra-efficient, power-harvesting fire pit) the company has once again turned to Kickstarter, so if you hop on the Biolite bandwagon and pledge your support early, you can snag one for a discounted rate.

The company’s new Firepit, as it’s called, incorporates some innovative features that are designed to drastically improve the traditional campfire experience. The designers at Biolite know that most of the smoke generated from such fires is a result of how inefficiently wood tends to burn. To change that, the FirePit features a built-in fan that pushes air through 51 individual jets, providing more oxygen directly to the flames. This helps the wood to burn more efficiently, resulting in less smoke and a warmer, more fuel-efficient fire. In other words, no more switching seats because the wind changes and blows campfire smoke in your face!

‘Arduventure’ — 8-bit RPG for Arduboy

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In a world where smartphone owners have an endless library of games at their fingertips, it’s increasingly difficult to justify buying a handheld gaming console like a Game Boy or PlayStation Vita. That said, standalone gaming devices still have some distinct advantages. If you’re in the market for something that’s portable, has physical buttons, and won’t bombard you with app notifications while you play, then the latest Arduboy might be worth looking into.

For those of you who might not be familiar, Arduboy is a miniature game system the size of a credit card. It comes installed with a single 8-bit game, and can be reprogrammed from a library of open source games available online. Until recently, the creators of the system generally let the community make games that you can play on Arduboy, but now they’re flipping the script.

Arduventure is a home-brewed RPG that’s purpose-built for the Arduboy console. Back the project now and you can be one of the first to play it. Oh, and don’t worry about the dreaded Kickstarter failure on this one. Arduboy has been producing these systems for the past couple years and has worked out all the kinks in the manufacturing process, so as soon as it’s done with the software, it’ll ship!

Aire — Home security drone

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Some ideas you hear about in the tech world are so “now” that it’s like they were birthed by popular culture itself. Others make you feel like you’re living in the future. Aire is definitely one for the latter category. Launched on Kickstarter earlier this week, the Aire is described as the first self-flying robot designed specifically for the home. It’s essentially a drone security camera that flies around your house investigating any security alerts, snapping photos of you and your family (if requested), or just keeping an eye out for anomalies.

“Unlike typical drones, which are optimized for outdoor flight, Aire is meant to be operated around people so we focused on safety, approachability, industrial design, and user experience with an emphasis on sound quality,” creator Jeffrey Tseng told Digital Trends in an interview. “With this in mind, we decided to go with a flight platform called a ducted fan, which is far more complex than a quadcopter, but was able to satisfy our vision of building a human-friendly flying robot. To complement the novel mechanical flight platform, we added processors, sensorsm and software very similar to what you would find in a self-driving car to enable intelligent behaviors.”

Delfast eBike — long distance electric bike

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We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: humanity is living in the golden age of rideable technology right now. In the past few years, electric motors have become smaller and more powerful, and batteries have become more capacitous and long-lasting. The two trends that have coalesced and kicked off a renaissance in personal mobility devices.  There’s almost too many of them to keep track of anymore. Between all the electric skateboards, gyroscopically stabilized unicycles, and motorized skates, staying on top of all the new rideable gizmos that get announced each month is near impossible.

Case in point: this ridiculously badass ebike from Delfast. It straddles the line between electric mountain bike and electric motorcycle — but its beefy, fat-tire design isn’t even its most important feature. What sets the Delfast ebike apart from the rest of the pack is its range. According to the bike’s creators (who got their start running courier service that relies on a fleet of efficient, all-terrain ebikes), a fully-charged Delfast electric bike can travel up to 236 miles before it craps out and needs to be juiced up again. We can’t confirm that those numbers are legit or not, but even if they’re remotely close to the truth, this bike will have a a ridiculous reach when it rolls off the production line.




24
Sep

Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: 8K VR, smoke-free fires, a drone for your home


At any given moment, there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the Web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you’ll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there – alongside some real gems. We’ve cut through the Pebble clones and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting new crowdfunding projects out there this week. That said, keep in mind that any crowdfunding project — even the best intentioned — can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams.

Pimax — 8K VR headset

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

VR headsets have come a long way in the past few years. Ever since the Oculus Rift reignited the world’s enthusiasm for virtual reality, tech companies have been in an arms race to develop better and better headsets. Today, VR enthusiasts have a smorgasbord of different options to choose from — everything from the accessible and affordable Samsung Gear VR, all the way up to the industry-leading HTC Vive. But in many ways, the competition is just starting to heat up — especially now that Pimax’s much-hyped 8K headset has landed on Kickstarter.

On paper, the Pimax 8K is an absolute beast. With a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 per eye, a refresh rate of 90Hz, and a 200-degree field of view, it’s easily one of the most hi-spec VR headsets ever conceived. To put that in perspective, the current VR heavyweights, the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, both boast 1,080 x 1,200 pixels per eye and a meager 110-degree field of view. With all those extra pixels, Pimax aims to offer “the ultimate VR experience” — one devoid of the dreaded “screen door effect” that many currently-available headsets suffer from.

Biolite Firepit — Smoke-free, power harvesting fire pit

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

Biolite originally won the hearts of the outdoor community with its gadget-charging, biomass-burning Campstove, which was first released back in 2013. And in the past couple years, the company has increasingly branched out and expanded its product offerings. And the best part? For its latest product (an ultra-efficient, power-harvesting fire pit) the company has once again turned to Kickstarter, so if you hop on the Biolite bandwagon and pledge your support early, you can snag one for a discounted rate.

The company’s new Firepit, as it’s called, incorporates some innovative features that are designed to drastically improve the traditional campfire experience. The designers at Biolite know that most of the smoke generated from such fires is a result of how inefficiently wood tends to burn. To change that, the FirePit features a built-in fan that pushes air through 51 individual jets, providing more oxygen directly to the flames. This helps the wood to burn more efficiently, resulting in less smoke and a warmer, more fuel-efficient fire. In other words, no more switching seats because the wind changes and blows campfire smoke in your face!

‘Arduventure’ — 8-bit RPG for Arduboy

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

In a world where smartphone owners have an endless library of games at their fingertips, it’s increasingly difficult to justify buying a handheld gaming console like a Game Boy or PlayStation Vita. That said, standalone gaming devices still have some distinct advantages. If you’re in the market for something that’s portable, has physical buttons, and won’t bombard you with app notifications while you play, then the latest Arduboy might be worth looking into.

For those of you who might not be familiar, Arduboy is a miniature game system the size of a credit card. It comes installed with a single 8-bit game, and can be reprogrammed from a library of open source games available online. Until recently, the creators of the system generally let the community make games that you can play on Arduboy, but now they’re flipping the script.

Arduventure is a home-brewed RPG that’s purpose-built for the Arduboy console. Back the project now and you can be one of the first to play it. Oh, and don’t worry about the dreaded Kickstarter failure on this one. Arduboy has been producing these systems for the past couple years and has worked out all the kinks in the manufacturing process, so as soon as it’s done with the software, it’ll ship!

Aire — Home security drone

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

Some ideas you hear about in the tech world are so “now” that it’s like they were birthed by popular culture itself. Others make you feel like you’re living in the future. Aire is definitely one for the latter category. Launched on Kickstarter earlier this week, the Aire is described as the first self-flying robot designed specifically for the home. It’s essentially a drone security camera that flies around your house investigating any security alerts, snapping photos of you and your family (if requested), or just keeping an eye out for anomalies.

“Unlike typical drones, which are optimized for outdoor flight, Aire is meant to be operated around people so we focused on safety, approachability, industrial design, and user experience with an emphasis on sound quality,” creator Jeffrey Tseng told Digital Trends in an interview. “With this in mind, we decided to go with a flight platform called a ducted fan, which is far more complex than a quadcopter, but was able to satisfy our vision of building a human-friendly flying robot. To complement the novel mechanical flight platform, we added processors, sensorsm and software very similar to what you would find in a self-driving car to enable intelligent behaviors.”

Delfast eBike — long distance electric bike

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: humanity is living in the golden age of rideable technology right now. In the past few years, electric motors have become smaller and more powerful, and batteries have become more capacitous and long-lasting. The two trends that have coalesced and kicked off a renaissance in personal mobility devices.  There’s almost too many of them to keep track of anymore. Between all the electric skateboards, gyroscopically stabilized unicycles, and motorized skates, staying on top of all the new rideable gizmos that get announced each month is near impossible.

Case in point: this ridiculously badass ebike from Delfast. It straddles the line between electric mountain bike and electric motorcycle — but its beefy, fat-tire design isn’t even its most important feature. What sets the Delfast ebike apart from the rest of the pack is its range. According to the bike’s creators (who got their start running courier service that relies on a fleet of efficient, all-terrain ebikes), a fully-charged Delfast electric bike can travel up to 236 miles before it craps out and needs to be juiced up again. We can’t confirm that those numbers are legit or not, but even if they’re remotely close to the truth, this bike will have a a ridiculous reach when it rolls off the production line.




24
Sep

Axon hopes you’ll submit smartphone video as evidence


In theory, handing your smartphone video over to the police if you have evidence of a crime is the right thing to do — it provides accountability and could be the key to a conviction. However, those contributions are about to enter a gray area. Axon (the brand formerly known as Taser) has confirmed that it’s working on a “Public Evidence Product” that would let you submit photos and videos to Evidence.com, its cloud platform normally used for police footage. That doesn’t sound so bad on the surface, but the handling and potential motivations are raising concerns that this amounts to excessive privatization of the justice system.

Axon maintains that it doesn’t own or watch footage, which instead goes directly to the department. However, civil rights advocates are concerned that it might still use the shots for profit, or for things other than the direct case at hand (such as building biometric databases). And what happens if the footage concerns police abuses. Shouldn’t it go to an independent body? Even if Axon lives up to its promise not to watch footage, it’s not going to be completely neutral ground.

There’s also the question of whether or not it’s wise to encourage crowdsourcing for criminal evidence. Axon says its effort isn’t a “fishing expedition,” so your neighbor can’t use this to snitch on your littering habit. This is aimed at specific crimes where there’s already a case. However, there’s a worry that this may spur people to take unnecessary risks, such as doing things that expose them to immediate danger or intimidation. This could help police land convictions they might not otherwise get, but there are plenty of opportunities for unintended consequences.

Source: Intercept

24
Sep

Uber is ready to cut a deal to get its London license back


Uber may have lost its London taxi license with no small amount of drama, but it’s already willing to make concessions. The ridesharing outfit’s city manager Tom Elvidge tells the Sunday Times that he would “like to know what [Uber] can do” to “get this right.” He’s willing to make tradeoffs to get business back, in other words. That’s a sharp contrast to Elvidge’s tone on Friday, when he denounced the move and was promising an immediate legal response. And importantly, it sounds like officials might be willing to give Uber a break.

Times insiders claim that Transportation for London is encouraged by the warmer stance and says that it’s open to talks. It’s not certain how close Uber and TfL are to actually sitting down and talking, but this is clearly the first step. There’s no secret as to what changes Uber is likely to make, at least. In Denmark, Uber had talked about guaranteed benefits like paid sick time — it may promise better conditions for drivers.

The conciliatory attitude isn’t completely unheard of, but it does suggest that Uber’s change of leadership might be having an effect on the company’s once antagonistic approach. After all, new CEO Dara Khosrowshahi suggested that Uber was paying the price for its historical behavior — it’s hard to imagine the previous management saying it earned any kind of punishment. While Uber doesn’t have that much of a choice if it wants to return to such an important market (TfL has the upper hand here), it’s notable that Uber is changing its tone more quickly than it has in the past.

Via: Reuters

Source: Sunday Times (sign-in required)

24
Sep

‘Super Mario Run’ update breathes life into Nintendo’s mobile plans


You’d be forgiven for wondering what was happening with Super Mario Run. After a flurry of activity in its first few months, things have mostly quieted down. However, Nintendo is about to spark a bit of life into its signature mobile game. It’s releasing an update on September 29th that adds some (frankly needed) variety. You can play as Daisy, for instance. There’s a new world (World Star) with new gameplay elements, and a Remix 10 game mode that randomizes parts of 10 levels for a fast, perpetually fresh experience. You can also listen to your own music while you play, and your character will even don headphones to reflect that you’re not listening to the usual Super Mario themes.

To help spur interest, Nintendo will cut the full game’s price in half between September 29th and October 12th.

It’s no secret that Nintendo is less than thrilled with the game’s performance. Although it was successful in its first few months compared to many mobile games, it didn’t become a major contributor to Nintendo’s bottom line. However, this update shows that Nintendo is committed to mobile gaming for the long haul — it’s not stopping work on a title just because it’s no longer the hot new thing (it helps that this is clearly Nintendo’s marquee mobile game).

The real question is whether or not an update will spur a mini renaissance — that’s not so clear. Few games achieve the same evergreen status you get out of a title like Angry Birds or Words With Friends. And it doesn’t help that Super Mario Odyssey for the Switch is right around the corner. If you’re a big fan of Nintendo’s ex-plumber, you’re probably focusing your attention on that title instead.

A new #SuperMarioRun update arrives 29/09, including a new world, new mode, new playable character, and more! pic.twitter.com/JevstvBtr7

— Nintendo UK (@NintendoUK) September 23, 2017

Via: Polygon

Source: Nintendo (Twitter), App Store (iOS required)

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