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28
Jun

Samsung Releasing Refurbished Note 7 Devices as ‘Fandom Edition’ in South Korea


About ten months after the first reported cases of Galaxy Note 7 fires began circulating online, Samsung is gearing up to re-launch the smartphone “initially” only in South Korea, according to people familiar with the company’s plans (via The Wall Street Journal). Referred to as the Galaxy Note 7 FE, or “Fandom Edition,” the launch is said to be coming on July 7 in the country, and it’ll represent the third debut for Note 7 devices following the original launch last August, and a widespread recall and replacement later in 2016.

Even those replacement devices caught fire, but Samsung has chosen to continue the Note 7 brand with the new Fandom Edition and bring a “relatively modest” stock of inventory to retailers in South Korea. In total, it’s believed 400,000 Note 7 Fandom Editions will debut among three major telecom companies in the country.

Samsung will bring the Fandom Edition to market “with different components,” instead of the faulty battery components that caused the first launch and some replacement devices to catch fire. Any word on a wider launch for the Fandom Edition was not mentioned by the sources.

A refurbished version of the premium smartphone, whose global recall last year garnered unwanted attention for the South Korean technology giant after some caught fire, is coming to retailers’ shelves on July 7 with different components under the name Galaxy Note 7 FE, according to people familiar with the matter.

The refurbished Note 7 will be priced below 700,000 South Korean won ($616), although smartphone prices are generally adjusted up to the point of release due to fluctuating market conditions, the person said.

Samsung’s intent to keep the Note brand alive was detailed in a report earlier this month, which also pointed towards the unveiling of the Galaxy Note 8 coming sometime in August. Since the Note 7 was discontinued, Samsung released the mid-cycle Galaxy S8 smartphone in April, with the company saying pre-orders for the device were its “best ever” and analysts suggesting that the S8’s messaging and launch helped it to begin recovering from the Note 7 disaster.

Tags: Samsung, Galaxy Note 7
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28
Jun

Brand Behind Steve Jobs’ Iconic Turtleneck Plans New Edition Coming in July for $270


Steve Jobs’ iconic black turtleneck will be making a comeback of sorts this summer, with the company behind the original garment, Issey Miyake Inc., announcing a new version coming this July for $270 and called the “Semi-Dull T” (via Bloomberg).

The model that Jobs wore was officially retired from production following his death in 2011, and a protege of Miyake, Yusuke Takahashi, is said to be the designer of the new turtleneck.

The new garment is said to have the same slim black aesthetic as the ones worn by Jobs throughout the latter half of his career as Apple CEO, particularly on stage during major product announcement keynotes.

The model was retired from production in 2011, after Jobs’s death, but in July, Issey Miyake Inc.—the innovative craftsman’s eponymous clothing brand—is releasing a $270 garment called the Semi-Dull T. It’s 60 percent polyester, 40 percent cotton, and guaranteed to inspire déjà vu.

Don’t call it a comeback. The company is at pains to state that the turtleneck, designed by Miyake protégé Yusuke Takahashi with a trimmer silhouette and higher shoulders than the original, isn’t a reissue. And even if the garment were a straight-up imitation, its importance as a cultural artifact is more about the inimitable way Jobs wore it.

All the same, the company said that it’s not a reissue or “comeback,” because it has an even “trimmer silhoutte and higher shoulders” than the one Jobs wore, including during his final Apple keynote appearance at WWDC 2011.

The new Semi-Dull T
Bloomberg’s report on the turtleneck includes a bit of the shirt’s origin story, wherein Jobs unsuccessfully attempted to pitch a vest-like uniform for workers at Apple. Instead, the former Apple CEO came up with a uniform for himself based on his existing wardrobe of jeans, sneakers, and “stacks of black turtlenecks” he had already purchased from Miyake.

Tag: Steve Jobs
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28
Jun

Apple Seeds Fifth Beta of iOS 10.3.3 to Developers


Apple today seeded the fifth beta of an upcoming iOS 10.3.3 update to developers, one week after seeding the fourth beta and over a month after the release of iOS 10.3.2, which was a minor bug fix update.

Registered developers can download the fifth iOS 10.3.3 beta from the Apple Developer Center or over-the-air with the proper configuration profile installed.

There were no significant features or notable bug fixes found in the first four iOS 10.3.3 betas, suggesting iOS 10.3.3 is an update that’s minor in scale, focusing primarily on security updates and bug fixes.

iOS 10.3.3 will likely be one of the last updates to the iOS 10 operating system as Apple shifts development to iOS 11. The first beta of iOS 11 was released to developers on June 5 following Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference keynote, and two betas have been seeded thus far.

Related Roundup: iOS 10
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28
Jun

Apple Seeds Fifth Beta of macOS Sierra 10.12.6 to Developers


Apple today seeded the fifth beta of an upcoming macOS Sierra 10.12.6 update to developers, two weeks after seeding the fourth beta and over a month after releasing macOS Sierra 10.12.5, a minor bug fix update.

The fifth beta of macOS Sierra 10.12.6 can be downloaded through the Apple Developer Center or through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store.

We didn’t find any significant features or notable bug fixes in the first four macOS Sierra betas, and because Apple does not provide beta release notes, we may not know just what’s included in the update until its public release.

macOS Sierra 10.12.6 is likely to be one of the final updates to the Sierra operating system as Apple transitions to macOS High Sierra, which was introduced at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June.

Related Roundup: macOS Sierra
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28
Jun

Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 34 With Bug Fixes and Performance Improvements


Apple today released a new update for Safari Technology Preview, the experimental browser Apple first introduced one year ago in March of 2016. Apple designed the Safari Technology Preview to test features that may be introduced into future release versions of Safari.

Safari Technology Preview release 34 includes fixes and improvements for Media, JavaScript, Security, Web Inspector, Web API, WebCrypto, WebAssembly, Rendering, and Accessibility. Today’s update also moves WebRTC options from the Experimental Features menu to the developer menu and introduces WebRTC improvements and fixes.

With Safari 11 now available to developers through the macOS High Sierra beta, Apple is providing two versions of Safari Technology Preview, one for macOS Sierra users and one for those using macOS High Sierra.

The Safari Technology Preview update is available through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store to anyone who has downloaded the browser. Full release notes for the update are available on the Safari Technology Preview website.

Apple’s aim with Safari Technology Preview is to gather feedback from developers and users on its browser development process. Safari Technology Preview can run side-by-side with the existing Safari browser and while designed for developers, it does not require a developer account to download.

Tag: Safari Technology Preview
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28
Jun

How to easily navigate the redesigned App Store in iOS 11


Download the iOS 11 public beta yet? You may have noticed the App Store looks totally different. Fret not — we’ve got you covered on how to navigate the new space with ease.

The redesigned App Store showcases apps in ways that are more recognizable through top picks, editors choices, and reviews to help you navigate based on popularity and user experience. By tapping from tab to tab, you’re brought to different sections ranging from games to apps along with updates and the search tool. You also now have the option to buy the app directly where it’s listed — with the purchase button located to the right of each app — instead of having to click through to the app’s main page. This makes purchases easier and quicker for the consumer as well as developers.

The Today tab

The “Today” tab refreshes daily, highlighting apps and games of the day, while also featuring original stories from Apple’s editors based on current events. These stories can range from interviews with developers — like the ones behind Monument Valley 2 — where the article also offers a glimpse inside the game, to listicles that name the top apps to use. The tab also lets you go back in time to see days prior, so even if you forget to visit the store, you’re always able to look back. Whether it’s a game or app, or you want to read an interesting article on anything app related, this section will give you daily insight.

The Games tab

With games being an extremely popular part of the App Store, Apple has finally given it it’s own section. At the top, you’re greeted by a feed of different games that fall in sections like editor’s choice, a game to rediscover, or games the Apple team is currently playing. As you scroll down, you’ll find top categories of games such as action, arcade, simulation, puzzle, adventure, among others, and clicking on one will bring you to a variety of games related to it. Other sections on the games tab include games you might like based on your past history, newly-released games, along with the familiar top paid, and top free games. Towards the bottom of the feed is a themed section that changes regularly, such as “The Most Beautiful Games” —  which showcases the top picks based on their graphics and art, with a short synopsis underneath. Once you click on a particular game, it will bring you to a short trailer along with ratings and reviews to read through. Another section titled “Let’s Play” features auto-playing trailers and videos as you scroll through.

The Apps tab

The Apps tab collectively places everything other than games into one section. Aesthetically, the feed is exactly the same as the games tab, but it incorporates different activities based on your past interests — such as cooking and exercise, or photography and travel. At the top, there is a carousel gallery that lists a trending app, one that has received a major update, a new app suggestion, and an app you’ve haven’t used in a while. You can still find the familiar top paid, top free, and top categories for apps. “New Apps We Love” is another similarly-themed section also featured in the games tab — also with auto-playing videos.

The Updates tab

The Updates tab didn’t receive a huge redesign — it does look more polished with larger and bolder typeface. At the top, you’ll find apps available for updates that you need to approve. Towards the bottom is a list of all the apps you updated recently. Underneath each app, you’ll see a clear description of what’s available in the update, and what has changed within each one. You can choose to update particular apps or update them all at once.

The Search tab

The Search tab still serves its main purpose — to help you locate certain apps quickly. This section also received minor changes. Simply type in the app you’re looking for, and it will provide you with a feed of that exact app along with similar suggestions to choose from. You also get the rating underneath each app, and the option to download it on the spot while scrolling through the stream of results.




28
Jun

Best app deals of the day! 6 paid iPhone apps for free for a limited time


Everyone likes apps, but sometimes the best ones are a bit expensive. Now and then, developers put paid apps on sale for free for a limited time, but you have to snatch them up while you have the chance. Here are the latest and greatest apps on sale in the iOS App Store.

These apps normally cost money and this sale lasts for a limited time only. If you go to the App Store and it says the app costs money, that means the deal has expired and you will be charged. 

Biorhythms 4U

Looking to empathize with others in a new way? You might want to explore biorhythms. This app gives you the opportunity to check out the biorhythms of those around you.

Available on:

iOS

Ohajiki Web Browser

Ohajiki is a powerful web browser that packs complete browsing control into a unique circle-gesture function. With tilt scrolling, bookmark importing, QR code scanning, and more, Ohajiki Web Browser is filled with features.

Available on:

iOS

DMD Panorama

Because this app lets you complete the entire turn of a panoramic photo, works with the front camera for panoramic selfie, and comes with a 3D viewer, it bests the panoramic feature built into your iPhone.

Available on:

iOS

BoothClub

What’s a party without a photo booth? Why, that’s no party at all. Luckily, BoothClub is here to help you turn even the most boring of situations into a laugh with this photo booth app.

Available on:

iOS

Pixagram

Easily create stunning images with Pixagram, and share them to your favorite social network. Add unique filters, effects, and frames to create a great design piece.

Available on:

iOS

Workout Playlist

Workout Playlist is the first weightlifting-oriented app to introduce the playlist format for a workout. Select the muscle groups you would like to train, and target time and intensity. “Shuffle” a workout playlist based on your selection, or build your own from the library of exercises.

Available on:

iOS




28
Jun

Huawei Mate 10: News and rumors


Why it matters to you

Huawei’s Mate 10 smartphone could be one of 2017’s best phones. Here’s everything we know about it so far.

Huawei’s Mate 9, which boats a generous screen, a huge battery, and a high-quality camera, was one of 2016’s most impressive devices. Now, it seems the sequel — tentatively dubbed the Huawei Mate 10 — is right around the corner.

But the competition is fierce. Huawei’s upcoming flagship will go toe to toe with Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 and Galaxy S8 Plus, and Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus. If rumors are to believed, though, the Mate 10’s hardware will speak for itself.

Here’s everything we know about the Huawei Mate 10 so far.

Specs

The Huawei Mate 10’s official specs remain a mystery, but rumors suggest they’ll pack quite a punch.

According to a report in gadget blog iGeekPhone, The Mate 10 will likely boast a metal body with plastic inserts for antennas, like the Mate 9. It’s expected to sport a curved, 2.5D Quad HD (2560 x 1440 pixels) screen — an upgrade from the previous generation’s HD (1920 x 1080 pixels) display — and up to 8GB of RAM.

Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

Android Headlines reports that the Mate 10 has an edge-to-edge design and innovative biometric sensors. Huawei’s handset has a screen-to-body ratio of 83.6 percent (higher than the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus), rumor has it, and the fingerprint scanner embedded in its touchscreen.

Rounding out the Mate 10’s processor are accouterments like GPS and Bluetooth 4.2 radios, a fingerprint scanner, and a whopping 4,900mAh battery with support for Huawei’s Super Charge 3.0 rapid charging tech. The handset is said to be compatible with LTE Cat.12 networks, and ship in storage configurations up to 128GB.

Processing power

The Mate 10 could have a beast of a mobile processor.

It’s said to pack Huawei’s new Kirin 970, an eight-core, 64-bit chip made on a 10nm FinFet+ process that comprises four Cortex-A73 high-speed cores (up to 3GHz), four low-power Cortex-A53 cores (up to 1.8GHz), and an i6 co-processor that juggles sensor data. A paired chip, the eight-core ARM Mali-G71 MP8, will reportedly supply graphics muscle.

There’s more to the Kirin 970 it than meets the eye. According to iGeekPhone, the processor boasts improved thermal dissipation, increased power efficiency, and better overall performance than its predecessor, the Kirin 960.

Camera

Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

The Mate 10’s processor might be the headliner, but its cameras are no slouch either.

According to a report in iGeekPhone, the Mate 10 will feature dual rear cameras in the form of a 16MP RGB sensor (up from the Mate 9’s 12MP) and a 23MP monochrome sensor (up from 20MP), both with apertures of f/2.0, phase and laser autofocus. Interestingly, it’s rumored to sport a dual-sensor selfie camera with a 12MP and 8MP camera. It wouldn’t be the first — Oppo’s F3 has a dual-sensor selfie cam — but it would no doubt help the Mate 10 stand out in an increasingly crowded field.

Release date and availability

Huawei has yet to reveal the Mate 10’s release date, but it won’t be long if history is any indication.

We’re expecting the Mate 10 to debut this December, ahead of a ship date during the holiday season. It’ll likely fall in line with the Mate series’ historical pricing — around $600 — but we’ll have to wait until later this year to find out for sure.




28
Jun

Facebook Messenger update makes it easier to discover helpful bots


Why it matters to you

You may be skeptical about the whole idea of chatbots, but a new Messenger update will help you find ones that might actually be useful to you.

Facebook first launched Discover at F8 as a way for users to quickly and easily find new Messenger bots and businesses straight from the Messenger app. Now, Discover is getting a little more intuitive and relevant for day to day use with the rollout of the so-called “Discover v1.1.”

Using Discover is pretty easy to do — all you have to do is tap the Discover icon at the bottom, after which you can browse bots by category, recently visited businesses, or “featured,” which basically shows the bots that Facebook recommends. This should help users more easily discover bots that directly relate to them and what they need, rather than going through a slew of bots that may or may not be helpful.

Messenger bots have grown a lot since they were first launched, and many argue that they could completely revolutionize how we interact with businesses. Not only that, but they’ve fast become a way to cut down on the number of apps you need to have installed on your devices — instead of having a Domino’s app installed on your phone to order pizza, you can just use the Domino’s bot, which will help you place your order quickly and easily.

“Our goal with Discover is to ensure that experiences in Messenger are compelling, high-quality, and easy to find. This latest update makes it even more intuitive for people to find what they care about most,” said Facebook in a statement. “And be sure to keep coming back — new experiences are always added!”

It’s nice to see Facebook highlighting great bots and helping people discover new bots, but it also highlights the fact that bots may not have caught on quite as much Facebook may have hoped. As mentioned, when bots first launched, they were tipped to completely change how people interact with businesses, but they’ve seen somewhat of a slow adoption. Still, they’re getting more and more useful, and as businesses invest in developing bots, those businesses are likely to promote them more — which could help push them more into the consumer consciousness.

The update to Messenger is rolling out across the United States now. It comes soon after a previous update to Messenger, in which Facebook added more smart capabilities to Facebook M, the company’s digital assistant.




28
Jun

Study shows taking photos improves visual memory, reduces auditory recall


Why it matters to you

If you want to remember how something looked, take a picture. If you need to recall auditory data, put the camera down.

Sure, taking pictures captures the visual details of our memories, but a new study suggests pressing that shutter button improves visual memory. The problem? The improved visual recall is at the expense of auditory memories. The data comes from a new study led by New York University Stern School of Business professor Alixandra Barasch and recently published in Physiological Science.

With the dominance of digital and the slowing rate of actually printing photos, the researchers wanted to ask, “what happens if we take photographs, but never actually look at them again?” To answer that, the group completed multiple studies that asked half of the participants to take photos and then tested their memory compared to the half that didn’t take photos.

The first study led 294 people through a museum with an audio guide then asked several questions at the end of the tour to see what each participant remembered. Those that were instructed to take at least 10 pictures during the tour were able to visually identify more of the artifacts from the museum, but didn’t score as high on the details that were presented inside the audio of the tour.

The researchers conducted a second, more controlled study leading participants through a virtual tour of an art gallery, with half asked to take pictures using an on-screen camera. The results supported the first study, with those that used the virtual camera able to recall more visual details but fewer auditory details.

In variations of those studies, some participants were told their photos would be deleted after the tour and others were asked to “take a mental picture,” with both groups showing more visual recall than the participants that were not instructed to take pictures at all.

“These findings suggest that having a camera changes how people approach an experience in a fundamental way,” the researchers said. “Even when people don’t take a photo of a particular object, like a sculpture, but have a camera with them and the intention to take photos, they remember that sculpture better than people who did not have a camera with them.”

The study’s authors concluded that taking pictures doesn’t necessarily reduce the ability to recall that experience, but focuses that recall on visual details more than those who do not take pictures. The results are the opposite of a similar study that suggested taking photos impairs memory, but didn’t dig into which memories are affected.

The study is part of a growing number that take a look at how modern technology influences cognitive ability and memory, like one study that suggests the internet impacts our ability to learn.




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