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2
Mar

Fitbot, the fitness personal assistant (Review)


Overview:

Fitbot is a fitness assistant and guided workout app designed to help you get a routine and get in shape without the need for a personal trainer or gym.

Developer: RoboBot Studio

Cost: Free (with ads and microtransactions)

Impressions:

Fitbot is an app with a fitness focus and an interesting concept. It advertises guided workouts, rep counting and more all using fully voiced guides from a sort of “workout personal assistant.” IT certainly has a lot going for it in the guided workouts, the app features a good amount of workouts which describe the actions you’ll need to take as well as exactly what you may need to complete it properly, like dumbells or mats and chairs.

The guides are rather sparse on strong detail, however, simply describing the basics in a concise manner and offering no corrections in case you do it wrong. Also, the categories are centralized on specific body areas, but you can’t sort the workouts any other way so finding a specific one takes some time if you don’t know where it’s located.

I’m an exercise newbie so many of the workouts featured were foreign to me and I had some trouble figuring out if I was doing them correctly, but the app did feature some handy if crudely animated tutorials that sort of helped show me what to do.

1 of 5


I must say, the “workout virtual assistant” leaves a lot to be desired, as it is not much more than text-to-speech and offers no real interaction or voice-activated features. The app simply reads out the description of the workout and counts reps and keeps time. The voice is also the standard Google Assistant voice which gets rather grating after hearing it for long periods just counting at you.

Fitbot also has some neat health-tracking features such as water intake counter, a progress graphing system that charts your workouts over time as you complete them, and other handy tracking features for showing your progress. I do wish it integrated into Google Fit or other exercise apps or smart devices like my Moto 360 for step counting, but it’s limited only to the FItbot app.

The app features an XP system and microtransactions to get more XP, but I’m not entirely sure what the XP is used for or why it’s necessary. You gain XP from completing workouts and challenges pertaining to workouts, but there isn’t a clear progression system or reward besides more XP. It’s not clearly defined and needs some work for sure.

The app’s interface is also a mess, with poorly formatted text and odd color choices making it difficult to read and find out what you are supposed to do. The main screen is an odd button I think turns on the voice assistant but I’m not entirely sure, to be honest. The workout screens are not the clearest but they are not exactly exciting either.

Conclusion:

Fitbot offers at least some handy features in regards to helping you learn new workouts you can try at home to stay in shape, and providing at least a basic framework for getting it right so you don’t hurt yourself. The app would also benefit from integration with external devices like FitBits or smart watches and also some third-party apps to give you a complete picture of your workout. That being said, Fitbot isn’t all bad and the workout guides and rep counting features are functional enough that you could legitimately use this as a tool to help you if you desired.

Download Fitbot from the Google Play Store

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2
Mar

6 pro tips to taking amazing portrait photos with the Huawei P10


mwc17-topics-banner-280x75.jpg

The Huawei P10 has a dual-lens Leica camera on the back, just like the P9 and the Mate 9, but it also has several cool new software features — including a Portrait photo mode — and it has already impressed us with its ability. What’s more, the front camera has been given the Leica treatment, with a bokeh mode for some amazing selfies. However, a good camera is only part of the equation when it comes to taking great pictures. Your own ability, and a basic knowledge of how the camera app itself works, is just as important.

To prove it, and to show just what the P10 can do in the hands of a professional photographer, Huawei ran a “Photo Masterclass” at Mobile World Congress. Hosted by Manfred Baumann, known for his striking celebrity portrait photos and use of monochrome, he helped us put the P10 through its paces, while sharing some valuable tips on composition and editing. We concentrated on taking pictures of people, using the new Portrait mode on the P10.

More: Our first take review of the Huawei P10

While we used Huawei’s new phone, the tips we’re going to share with you equally apply to the P9 and the Mate 9, along with most other dual-lens cameras with a manual mode. Don’t worry if manual mode seems complicated, we actually used auto for all the images shared here, and some post-production editing.

Get closer

Don’t be afraid of putting your camera in the subject’s face. Baumann would get in really close, almost filled the frame on several occasions, which worked very well shooting monochrome against a stark, featureless background. To take one particular portrait, he stood on a chair, about two feet in front of the subject. He experimented with different angles and stances, too.

Huawei P10 Photo Masterclass
Inezdelprado Photography

If your camera has a bokeh mode, like the P10, it will blur out background detail. We took some spectacular photos in front of a window overlooking Barcelona, but it doesn’t over-power or detract from the person’s face in the picture. However, also try framing your subject against a featureless background — an alternative way of making them the focal point of the picture.

Ignore the camera

Yes it sounds like a cliché, but it really works. Baumann explained he shot a lot of celebrity pictures, but many are not models and wouldn’t automatically start posing for the camera. He’d have to choose his moments carefully, after getting the person to relax and act naturally. We were taking pictures of each other in a fun environment, and laughing about it produced fun, lively, and happy pictures. Standing back and just observing what’s going on around you, especially if people aren’t that comfortable around the camera, may end up giving the best results.

Monochrome

This is best experienced with the Huawei P10, the Mate 9, or the P9, due to its dedicated monochrome Leica camera lens. It produces amazingly detailed black and white pictures. However, pictures taken with other cameras will have filters that provide a similar effect. We were in a bright, airy room with a high ceiling, large windows, and neutral coloured walls. The afternoon light created shadows which could be used creatively when shooting with it behind the subject. We tried leaving parts of the face covered in shadow, for example.

Huawei P10 Photo Class

With the light in front of the subject, another option for classy pictures is to choose a dark or shaded background. The light ensures this comes out almost black, but the subject remains lit. The bokeh mode obscures any detail, pushing the subject to the forefront of the picture. We had particular success using this method, and took pictures in settings we’d never have considered before.

Highlights and shadows

Don’t get fixated on taking the best photo possible the first time. Take several, and then edit them. Most camera apps have extensive editing features that can change the end result after the picture has been taken. If you’ve been taking portrait or bokeh pictures on the P10, even the focal point can be altered. We came away with a really excellent tip, which transformed the way our monochrome images looked. Instead of changing the brightness and contrast settings, plays around with the highlights and the shadows. These settings exposed more detail, or made already moody shots even more effective.

Crop the picture in creative ways

Huawei P10 Photo Masterclass
Inezdelprado Photography

It turned out we’ve been cropping our selfies and pictures of other people all wrong. Rather than centralising our subject, try cropping faces right down, and setting them at the side of a photo. Don’t always stick to a basic aspect ratio either, play around with the sizes. Baumann sliced the very top of our heads off, which surprisingly ended up looking superb. He’d also cut off backs of heads, shoulders, and minimize background detail. Yet all the time, he was bringing the subject of the photo into better view. It’s a simple, yet incredibly effective trick to learn, which can transform a mundane selfie into one worthy of a professional.

More: GoPro’s Quik editing app is now standard on the Huawei P10

Don’t be shy

Perhaps the biggest tip we can share comes from our own experiences taking photos. Many of us (me included) probably don’t consider ourselves photogenic. However, this doesn’t mean you can’t be photographed well. Through our experience with Baumann, we saw it’s not always about the subject; it’s about taking the right picture in the right way, in the right environment, then using the tools available to creatively compose an attractive final image. Like us, you may end up being genuinely surprised and very pleased with the final result.

We had a great afternoon learning about getting the most from the P10’s Leica camera, and hope these suggestions will help you get the most from it too. The great thing is, because dual-lens camera phones made for producing bokeh-effect pictures are plentiful today — from the iPhone 7 Plus and the Honor 6X, to the ZTE Blade V8 Pro and Xiaomi Redmi Pro — so you can apply them to taking portrait photos with many phones.

2
Mar

Apple files patent for scroll-like mobile device with rollable display surfaces


Why it matters to you

Apple’s recently discovered patent indicates the company is interested in introducing an iPhone with a flexible display sometime in the future.

An Apple patent dating back to August 2015 has just surfaced, illustrating a scroll-like device with a bendable display. The design features two barrels into which the screen can roll up and be stored away, making for a smartphone or tablet that can be kept in a much more compact form factor when not in use.

The two barrels would house all of the device’s internal components between them, according to the filing. They would also contain either mechanized rollers or static structures around which the panel would coil. The screen would deploy and retract through a system of latches and springs, along with a brush to clear any potential debris as the device is returned to its stored state.

More: Samsung patent for flexible screen suggests a bendable device is on the way


US Patent and Trademark Office

As AppleInsider notes, the distance between the two cylinders when unfurled is suitable for a pair of cameras, one on each chassis, that could create a stereoscopic 3D effect. To make the most of limited space, the patent presents the possibility of stowing much of the circuitry within the rollers.

Apple specifically mentions OLED technology to power the flexible panel, and in the patent considers the usage of elongated metal support beams, running perpendicular and parallel to the device, that can keep the screen rigid when being used and snap and become flexible when it is rolled away. When not in use, magnets will hold the two barrels tightly together.

With Apple reportedly still struggling to lock down supply for conventional OLED displays in its upcoming iPhone, we are assuredly many years away from such a device coming to fruition. Flexible screens, though, are very much real, have been tried before, and could even return later this year in a completely foldable phone from Samsung or LG. However, the ability to mass produce them with the same kind of fidelity found in typical panels, along with the tight packaging and engineering challenges presented by Apple’s proposal, means this particular implementation is still in the experimental stages.

2
Mar

Apple files patent for scroll-like mobile device with rollable display surfaces


Why it matters to you

Apple’s recently discovered patent indicates the company is interested in introducing an iPhone with a flexible display sometime in the future.

An Apple patent dating back to August 2015 has just surfaced, illustrating a scroll-like device with a bendable display. The design features two barrels into which the screen can roll up and be stored away, making for a smartphone or tablet that can be kept in a much more compact form factor when not in use.

The two barrels would house all of the device’s internal components between them, according to the filing. They would also contain either mechanized rollers or static structures around which the panel would coil. The screen would deploy and retract through a system of latches and springs, along with a brush to clear any potential debris as the device is returned to its stored state.

More: Samsung patent for flexible screen suggests a bendable device is on the way


US Patent and Trademark Office

As AppleInsider notes, the distance between the two cylinders when unfurled is suitable for a pair of cameras, one on each chassis, that could create a stereoscopic 3D effect. To make the most of limited space, the patent presents the possibility of stowing much of the circuitry within the rollers.

Apple specifically mentions OLED technology to power the flexible panel, and in the patent considers the usage of elongated metal support beams, running perpendicular and parallel to the device, that can keep the screen rigid when being used and snap and become flexible when it is rolled away. When not in use, magnets will hold the two barrels tightly together.

With Apple reportedly still struggling to lock down supply for conventional OLED displays in its upcoming iPhone, we are assuredly many years away from such a device coming to fruition. Flexible screens, though, are very much real, have been tried before, and could even return later this year in a completely foldable phone from Samsung or LG. However, the ability to mass produce them with the same kind of fidelity found in typical panels, along with the tight packaging and engineering challenges presented by Apple’s proposal, means this particular implementation is still in the experimental stages.

2
Mar

11 annoying problems with the iPhone 7, and how to fix them


The iPhone 7 doesn’t look much different than its predecessors, but the deeper you dive, the more improvements you’ll find. The camera is a great performer, there are dual speakers, and Apple finally made its flagship device water-resistant. If you snagged one, then you’re likely enjoying it, but sometimes a single issue can kill the fun. We’ve been filtering feedback to isolate the main issues iPhone 7 users are running into, and we’ve got some potential fixes and workarounds to put the smile back on your face.

More: Check out 24 of the best iPhone 7 cases and covers for your shiny new phone

Annoyance: No 3.5-millimeter headphone jack

Apple’s decision to kill the headphone jack has, understandably, been very controversial. If you’ve already invested in a killer pair of headphones that rely on the standard port present in every phone up until now, you could be forgiven for being a wee bit peeved. Having to use the Lightning port also means that you can’t charge your iPhone 7 while you’re using headphones. There are some workarounds, but there’s no real solution for this one.

Workarounds:

  • There’s an adapter in the box with your iPhone 7, or you could consider snagging a Bluetooth adapter. Check out our guide on how to use your old headphones with the iPhone 7 for more ideas.
  • Maybe it’s time to go wireless? Check out our guide to the best wireless Bluetooth headphones.
2
Mar

The best cheap drone you can buy


dt-best-of-drones-under-500-150x150.jpgThese days, you’ll find essentially two groups of consumer drones. Those that are the super-cheap (and also super flimsy) drones that will fly for about five minutes on a full charge, and then the more enthusiast-oriented drones that cost upward of $1,000, but are fully stocked with all the features you’d want including HD camera, GPS, and long-range radio controllers.

Unfortunately, there’s very little in the middle which can provide both good value and at a price that doesn’t break the bank. While you’d be hard pressed to find a decent drone under $500, luckily we’ve taken the time to hunt down the best of the best in this price range, and put together a list.

We’ll also make recommendations based on different user types and drone activities, so you can rest assured you’ll find the best drone available for what you’re looking to do. Enjoy!

Our pick

DJI Phantom 3 Standard

Why should you buy this: It’s the most bang for your buck, and it flies like a champ.

DJI Phantom 3 Standard

The Phantom 3 Standard offers more high-end specs than any other drone.

$499.99 from Apple

Who’s it for: Anybody looking for an inexpensive but full-featured drone

How much will it cost: $400-$500

Why we picked the DJI Phantom 3 Standard:

DJI’s quadcopters are the cream of the crop, with some models fetching prices of close to $3,000. Have no fear though: With the Phantom 4 now its flagship mid-range drone, prices for the older Phantom 3 have fallen considerably – in fact some places sell it for as little as $400. And given that this drone was formerly one of DJI’s flagship models, you’ll get a UAV with features not normally found at this price point.

The Phantom 3 Standard has a built-in 2.7K camera capable of capturing video at 30 frames per second, along with 3-axis gimbal stabilization and the ability to live stream 720p video straight to your mobile device. It also touts 25 minutes of flight time, and an automatic return-to-home feature.

Another cool feature is that you can fly the Standard on a number of preset flight patterns. One is designed to continuously fly in a circle facing a set point of interest, one will track behind you, and a third allows you to map a series of waypoints, allowing you focus on your camera work while the drone flies in a preset pattern.

Read more here

2
Mar

LG G6 vs. Galaxy S7 vs. Galaxy S7 Edge: How does LG’s best stack up to Samsung?


LG has finally taken the wraps off of the long-awaited and heavily leaked G6 — a phone that could be LG’s crowning jewel after a somewhat lackluster release in the modular G5. But just because the G6 is getting good early reviews, that doesn’t mean it’s the best device out there — and there are plenty of great flagship devices to pit it against. Like, for example, the Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge.

Read our first impressions of the LG G6 and our rundown of the testing LG performs on its devices

The Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge are now year-old phones, but that doesn’t mean they’re not excellent devices. So how do they compare against the newer and perhaps more powerful LG G6? We put all three phones head to head to find out.

Specs

LG G6

Galaxy S7

samsung-galaxy-s7-640x640-220x220

Galaxy S7 Edge

samsung-galaxy-s7-edge

Size
148.9 x 71.9 x 7.9 millimeters (5.86 x 2.83 x 0.31 inches)
142.4 x 69.6 x 7.9 millimeters (5.61 x 2.74 x 0.31 inches)
149 x 72 x 7.62 millimeters (5.85 x 2.85 x 0.30 inches)
Weight
5.75 ounces
5.36 ounces
5.54 ounces
Screen
5.7-inch IPS LCD
5.1-inch Quad HD Super AMOLED
Dual-edge, 5.5-inch Quad HD Super AMOLED
Resolution
2,880 x 1,440 pixels
2,560 x 1,440 pixels
2,560×1,440 pixels
OS
Android 7.0 Nougat
Android 7.0 Nougat
Android 7.0 Nougat
Storage
32/64GB
32/64GB
32/64GB
SD Card Slot
Yes
Yes
Yes
NFC support
Yes
Yes
Yes
Processor
Qualcomm MSM8996 Snapdragon 821
Qualcomm MSM8996, Snapdragon 820 (U.S. Models),
Exynos 8890 Octa (International Models)
Qualcomm MSM8996, Snapdragon 820 (U.S. Models),
Exynos 8890 Octa (International Models)
RAM
4GB
4GB
4GB
Connectivity
Wi-Fi, 4G LTE, HSPA
Wi-Fi, 4G LTE, HSPA+
Wi-Fi, 4G LTE, HSPA+
Camera
Front 5MP, Rear dual 13MP
Front 5MP, Rear 12MP
Front 5MP, Rear 12MP
Video
2,160p 4K UHD
2,160p 4K UHD
2,160p 4K UHD
Bluetooth
Yes, version 4.2
Yes, version 4.2
Yes, version 4.2
Fingerprint sensor
Yes
Yes
Yes
Water Resistant
Yes, IP68
Yes, IP68
Yes, IP68
Battery
3,300mAh
3,000mAh
3,600mAh
Charger
USB-C
Micro USB
Micro USB
Quick Charging
Yes
Yes
Yes
Wireless Charging
Yes, WPC and PMA
Yes, Qi and PMA
Yes, Qi and PMA
Marketplace
Google Play Store
Google Play Store
Google Play Store
Color offerings
White, black, platinum
Black, white, gold, silver
Black, white, gold, silver
Availability
TBD

AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile

AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile

DT Review
First Take 
4 out of 5 stars
4 out of 5 stars

When it comes to specs, these two phones are more alike than we might have wanted — that’s because the LG G6 features a now aging Snapdragon 821, which is only slightly better than the older Snapdragon 820 found in the Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge. On top of that, all three devices feature a respectable 4GB of RAM, though we expect many new phones to begin shipping with a larger 6GB of RAM. And to be fair, that’s because Samsung’s phone is a year older. The upcoming Galaxy S8 may be different.

More: Apple iPhone 7 vs Samsung Galaxy S7: Which flagship is best?

Still, there is something to be said for that slight performance boost in using the Snapdragon 821 over the 820, and it should help the new G6 run that much faster — or stay relevant for slightly longer. Of course, to complicate things, not all Galaxy S7 models feature the Snapdragon 820 — the international model instead opts for Samsung’s self-built Exynos 8890. In most benchmarks, the 8890 has been found to be slightly more powerful than the Snapdragon 820, though slightly less powerful than the Snapdragon 821 — so the LG G6 still has the edge here.

When it comes to storage, both Galaxy S7 phones offer 32GB and 64GB options, but the G6 only has a 64GB version in some markets. However, all three have a MicroSD card slot, meaning you can expand upon that storage if you so choose.

While the phones are close in performance, the LG G6 has a slight edge. In reality, we would have liked the G6 to have more than a slight advantage in the performance department given the fact that it’s almost a year newer — but there’s no denying what the winner is here.

Winner: LG G6

2
Mar

Researchers put graphene to work manufacturing optoelectronics


Why it matters to you

This project demonstrates one of many ways that graphene could have a major impact on current manufacturing processes.

Researchers at the United Kingdom’s University of Exeter have demonstrated a new technique that could be used to create the next generation of computers. The team used microfluidics technology to develop a new method of engineering computer chips that’s easier and less expensive than the current methodology.

Microfluidics uses minute channels to control the flow and direction of tiny quantities of fluid, according to a report from Science Daily. The tests carried out at the University of Exeter saw flakes of graphene oxide mixed into the fluid, which was then mixed together in the channels to create the chips.

These flakes were two dimensional, taking advantage of graphene’s thinness — one of the attributes that has led to it being dubbed a wonder material. The researchers used an advanced light-based procedure to facilitate the creation of three-dimensional structures that comprise the resulting chip.

More: Graphene’s latest miracle? The ability to detect cancer cells

There are hopes that this project could have a profound impact on the way optoelectronic materials are manufactured. Optoelectronics refers to devices that can emit, detect, and control light, and this kind of technology has applications in fields including renewable energy and security, according to the researchers.

“This breakthrough will hopefully lead to a revolution in the development of vital new materials for computer electronics,” said Dr. Anna Baldycheva, the author of the paper and an assistant professor at the university’s Centre for Graphene Science. “The work provides a solid platform for the development of novel next-generation optoelectronic devices. Additionally, the materials and methods used are extremely promising for a wide range of further potential applications beyond the current devices.”

The researchers have analyzed their findings to determine the best way to put this research into practice, as well as confirming that the technique is successful. This will hopefully accelerate the process of implementing the technology in a real-world scenario.

2
Mar

Google’s Allo messenger gets GIF sharing, animated emojis in latest update


Why it matters to you

Google’s Allo messaging app is gaining emojis and an easier way to access the Google Assistant.

Google’s Allo may be the youngest messaging app in the search giant’s family of six, but it’s quite possibly the sharpest. It features the Assistant, Google’s AI-powered tool that serves up restaurant recommendations, reminders, flight information, and more. It boasts Smart Reply, which suggests personalized responses to incoming messages. And starting today on Android and soon on iOS, it’s gaining a host of new features that will make Allo even smarter than it was before.

First up is new an improved GIF search function. Now, a new “smiley” icon in the app’s chat bar opens a carousel of selectable reactions. But if you can’t decide which one to use, Allo’s Lucky feature, which launched first in January, will choose one for you. Simply tap on a Smart Reply with the Lucky icon or type “@lucky” (without quotes), follow it with a phrase, and Lucky will share a random GIF to friends within earshot.

Need suggestions? Google says that “LMAO,” “wow,” and “I love you” are among the most used phrases with Lucky.

01-ALLO-GIF-SEARCH.gif

More: Google Allo’s second bot, Lucky, tosses GIFs into your conversations

If you’d rather express your emotions with a little more nuance, animated emojis are joining the Allo fray. Once you’ve chosen an emoji, dragging it up and down animates it. And letting go of the Send button shares it to your waiting chat partners.

03-ALLO-ANIMATED-EMOJI.gif

Also in tow with the new Allo is an easier way to pull up the Google Assistant. A new Assistant button in the Compose box pulls up Google’s all-knowing AI, at which point you can ask it questions about the weather, your agenda, historical factoids that will impress your friends, or pretty much anything else that happens to come to mind.

Google says one in every 12 messages in group chats is to the Google Assistant.

02-ALLO-ASSISTANT-ICON.gif

More: The Google Assistant can now call up personal info via Allo

Google’s shown Allo a lot of love, recently. A major update added a monochrome theme, a landscape orientation, direct messages, and the ability to reply to messages directly from notifications on iOS and Android. And on smartphones running Android 7.1 Nougat, the app gained compatibility with the operating system’s split-screen mode.

And Google’s collaborated with third parties on Allo-branded marketing efforts. In October 2016, it teamed up with Netflix to release a Stranger Things sticker pack. And in December, it coincided the launch of animated Star Wars stickers with the release of Disney’s Rogue One. 

An even bigger development might be right around the corner. Last week, Nick Fox, Google’s vice president of communications, tweeted out a screenshot of a desktop app for Allo. That’s telling — Allo only supports smartphones, and requires a telephone number, but that seems poised to change.

2
Mar

Microsoft starts to limit ‘unlimited’ OneDrive storage packages


Why it matters to you

If you have a too much data stored on Microsoft’s One Drive, you need to delete some of it or risk it being denied access

The promised culling of Microsoft’s OneDrive unlimited storage accounts has begun. No longer will a minority of users be able to “abuse” Microsoft’s top-tier cloud storage solutions to store tens of terabytes of data. The most Microsoft now offers is a terabyte per user, and anyone using more than that has three months before their data is locked up for an extended time.

Microsoft announced in late 2015 that due to what it called “abuse” of its unlimited storage package by some members of its system, it would be killing off unlimited packages. It also announced a reduction in free-account storage space. While this would likely be quite a drastic reduction for some users, Microsoft did offer 12 months for people to get their files in order.

More: OneDrive for Android takes the hassle out of deleting backed-up photos

Now that grace period is up, and it’s time to pay the cloud-storage piper. Starting Thursday and running through the next 48 hours, Microsoft is limiting unlimited accounts to one terabyte per user, even on family accounts for up to five people. OneDrive Basic users, who pay nothing for their storage, can only expect 5GB of space moving forward.

Despite the yearlong lead-in to this crackdown, Microsoft isn’t drawing a line in the sand. Any users found using more than their accounts are now rated for will be put into “over quota mode.” From that point on, users have three months to get their data down to their prescribed limit or they will face being unable to access their data. They also won’t be able to add any more files or data to the cloud storage platform until they get below the threshold.

Users who don’t comply with the new regulations and have their information locked up by Microsoft, will be granted one 30-day period within the following six months to get the data out or reduce the amount stored with OneDrive.

Although it’s understandable why Microsoft might not want to store upwards of 100TB for some users who pay the same as those storing just one or two terabytes, as Neowin points out, there is perhaps some hypocrisy in punishing users for taking the “unlimited” marketing literally. That said, Microsoft is not the only company that claims users who are given unlimited packages are “abusing” the system.

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