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17
Sep

CordCruncher Mic’d Headset review


CordCruncher_Mic'd_Pearl_Blue_July_2014

Back in the summer of 2012, we took a look at CordCruncher’s original headphones. We had a bit to say about these bad boys, and now the company has improved their model by adding an in-line microphone.

The Cord Cruncher Mic’d headset is wrapped around a sleeve of non-latex rubber. This headset has good sound quality and now a built in mic to ensure that you can meet all of your audio needs. The lows, mids, and highs are pretty good no matter the genre of music/audio. Bass and Treble do pretty darn well. The only thing we were possibly left looking for was better noise isolation for the earbud tips.

Here’s a small excerpt from our last CordCruncher headset review:

The cords are very light, thin, and the elastic sleeve comes in a variety of colors.

  • Guaranteed tangle-free headphone experience, anywhere and every time
  • Elastic-sleeve to customize headphone experience and allow user to take command of cord length
  • Adjusts from 16 inches to 3.5 feet of cord length
  • Elastic-sleeve manufactured with hypo-allergenic (99.9 percent protein-free) material
  • Easily crunch and be worn as a necklace or bracelet between use

This headset gets the job done well, and audio sounds pretty darn good. This is not your “studio quality” pair, but does well for everyday use. They are available in Hot Pink, Pearl Blue, Gun Metal Grey, Glo Green, and Pearl Pink in both Original non-headset earbuds and Mic’d Headset options. You can check out the CordCruncher Mic’d for $24.99. The company now offers cord crunching USB cables as well.


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The post CordCruncher Mic’d Headset review appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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17
Sep

Adidas miCoach teams up with MyFitnessPal, combines fitness and nutrition tracking


Balls, shoes, watches… Adidias miCoach line of smart things has been expanding to track your activity, no matter what you’re into. Until recently, the fitness platform was a closed one, meaning all that precious data was siloed from non-Adidas software. Now, the company has partnered with MyFitnessPal so that your digital coach can know what you’re eating in addition to how hard you have (or haven’t) been working out. Users can choose to automatically sync their data with MyFitnessPal, which, according to Adidas, will let folks “gain new insights that will enable them to balance nutrition and exercise.” Exactly what insights it’ll provide remain unsaid, but at the very least you’ll be able to compare your caloric intake and expenditures in one place — self-imposed guilt trips have never been easier.

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Source: miCoach blog

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17
Sep

​Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin has struck a deal with Boeing and Lockheed to build space rockets


Wondering why NASA gave Boeing the lion’s share of its space taxi funding? Jeff Bezos could have something to do with it. Shortly after NASA awarded Boeing $4.2 billion in funding, the Wall Street Journal claimed the company padded its bid with a partnership with Bezos’ Blue Origin. Turns out, the WSJ was right: today Blue Origin and the United Launch Alliance (a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed Martin) entered an agreement to fund and build the Blue Origin BE-4 rocket engine. Basically, Boeing is going to build NASA’s space taxi capsules and Bezos’ rocket company is going to launch them out of our atmosphere.

It’s a sensible alliance — the ULA has been the government’s preferred rocket provider for awhile now, while Blue Origin is striving to build better rockets for a lower price point. Still, it’ll be awhile before we see capsules climbing on Blue Origins engines: the plan is to develop and test the BE-4 over the next four years. Full scale testing isn’t expected until 2016, and the rocket even fly until 2019. Still, that’s right on schedule, and the firms expect the rocket to be an integral part of our nation’s next-generation launch setup.

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Source: ULALaunch

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17
Sep

Wireless charging for Chromebooks? It could be on its way



Wireless charging for out tablets and smartphones is always a topic that people love to explore. You have the more standard Qi and Rezence platforms that have been implemented and used on a variety of devices. Some have the compatibility built-in, while others have become wireless charging compatible with cases and small adapter strips that go behind your devices back plate. Some companies, like Patriot with the Fuel iON, are even building out their own wireless charging systems for devices. Not all charging systems give you the same charge rate as directly plugging in your device, but it is certainly a bit more convenient when you are at your desk and are constantly up and down. Not to mention it saves unnecessary wear and tear on your charging port. Now it would seem that Chromebooks could one day be on the list for wireless charging compatible devices.

Chromebook

 

 

Redditor basmith7‘s keen eye to details found a code commit that offers up a simple description that even us non coders can understand, “Enable inductive charging on Ryu.” Don’t go grabbing the credit card just yet though. Ryu isn’t the code name for a super fancy Chromebook, it is the code name of a development board used inside and is being worked on by Google/Chromium developers.


In my mind I can see a few various options that would be pretty beneficial to consumers. One would be a laptop stand system the you plug directly into the wall and place your Chromebook on top. Another would be a rubberized type pad that is plugged in and you simply place your Chromebook on top of it. That would be the better option for portability and universal use. I wouldn’t mind seeing a wireless battery brick or sorts as well.

This is all very early information and may not ever make it out of testing. However, it is nice to see that it is being tested in some capacity.

In addition to the inductive charging commit,  the Ryu board is also offering up additional references that features a light bar, Tegra chipset and reversible USB-C. Sounds like thee could be some backlit keyboards and a Tegra K1 mixed in there somewhere. At least that is where my mind wonders too.

What do you guys think? Would a wireless charging Chromebook be the bees knees or just another data point to add to your conversation?

Source: Reddit Via OMG! Chrome


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The post Wireless charging for Chromebooks? It could be on its way appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

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17
Sep

Four New Motorola Apps for the New Moto X Hit the Play Store



new-moto-x

For those of you that were lucky enough to pre-order your New Moto X; Motorola decided to release four different apps into the Play Store to keep you updated and happy. We love it that OEMs are releasing their most crucial apps into the Play Store so we don’t have to wait for an OTA to show up to fix the bugs, or improve the app.


The four apps that you will find in the Play Store are Moto, Moto Actions, Moto Display, and Moto Sensor Services. The “Moto” app is just a guide for newbies that need help with their new device, which a lot of you probably won’t need. Moto Actions has to do with the 3D gestures we have seen in the videos, where you can answer calls or deny calls by the wave of you hand. Moto Display is of course what used to be called Active Display. Then finally the Motorola Sensor Services is there to keep the sensor firmware updated and hopefully bug free.

So once you get your New Moto X make sure you have them all updated in the Play Store to keep your phone fresh.


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The post Four New Motorola Apps for the New Moto X Hit the Play Store appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

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17
Sep

Ive on Apple Watch: One of the Most Difficult Projects I’ve Ever Worked On


In a wide ranging interview with Bloomberg covering culture changes at Apple, Tim Cook’s personality, the company’s move into Apple Pay, and the development of the Apple Watch, Tim Cook, Jony Ive, and Jeff Williams share some fascinating details on the work that went into creating Apple’s new wearable device.

According to Jony Ive, Apple first began developing the Apple Watch three years ago, before wearables caught on in Silicon Valley. The Apple Watch, he says, is “probably one of the most difficult projects I have ever worked on.” A huge amount of research was conducted for the watch, which was touched on at Apple’s introductory keynote event.

apple_watch_blue
Apple invited several watch historians to speak at Cupertino, with one, French author and antique expert Dominique Fléchon saying that discussion centered around “the philosophy of instruments for measuring time.” Ive himself delved into horological history, studying clocks and watches throughout time.

Clocks first popped up on top of towers in the center of towns and over time were gradually miniaturized, appearing on belt buckles, as neck pendants, and inside trouser pockets. They eventually migrated to the wrist, first as a way for ship captains to tell time while keeping their hands firmly locked on the wheel. “What was interesting is that it took centuries to find the wrist and then it didn’t go anywhere else,” Ive says. “I would argue the wrist is the right place for the technology.”

Ive and his team experimented with a variety of interface interactions for the Apple Watch, including pinch-to-zoom, which the company joked about during the keynote as an unsuitable way to use the device because fingers cover the small screen. The team settled on the “digital crown” a physical button that can be used for a variety of tasks, including scrolling through options and accessing the home button. Ive went on to develop high-quality wristbands and unique packaging that “doubles as a charging stand.”

A staggering number of employees with various specialties worked on the Apple Watch, under the direction of Apple’s VP of operations, Jeff Williams. Hundreds of designers and engineers came together to design the S1 processor in the device, the heart rate sensor, and the special alloys used in casings and bands.

According to Williams, while Apple could have launched a watch in time for the holiday season, it wouldn’t have been “at the fit and finish and quality and integration of these products.” Apple wanted to make “the best product in the world” and is “willing to wait.”

Apple’s first wearable device is expected to be available to consumers in early 2015. Pricing details remain largely unknown, with the company stating that pricing will start at $349.

Cook and Ive’s complete interview with Bloomberg, which also has several details on how Apple runs under Cook, Cook’s personality and values, Jobs’ ongoing influence, recent hirings and acquisitions, and Apple’s partnership with IBM, is well worth reading to get a glimpse inside the walls of Apple’s Cupertino headquarters.




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17
Sep

Apple TV Updated With Beats Music Channel, Revamped Design, iOS 8 Feature Support [Mac Blog]


Along with iOS 8, Apple has also released the new Apple TV software update that’s been in development for the last few months. The updated software includes new icons, which are designed to resemble the icons in iOS 7, taking on a flatter, less glossy look.

Several icons, like Music, Computers, and TV shows have new colors, and the on-screen fonts have been updated as well. The update includes support for several features that have been built into iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, like Family Sharing and iCloud Photo Support.

appletvupdate
With Family Sharing, families of up to six people with iTunes accounts that use the same credit card can share content like apps, iBooks, music, movies, and more, across all of their devices using iCloud. Family Sharing also lets families share photos, videos, a calendar, reminders, and more, to keep everyone in the family connected.

In addition to introducing a new look and new features, today’s update brings a Beats Music channel to the Apple TV for the first time, allowing users to log into their Beats accounts to listen to streaming music from the Apple TV.

The new software can be downloaded for free on the Apple TV by going to the Settings channel and selecting General –> Software Update. The update is limited to users who have third-generation Apple TV boxes.




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17
Sep

Airbus’ helmet display concept would take your mind off your flight


Airbus' concept image for its in-flight helmet display

If you’ve ever been on a long flight, you’ve probably wanted to tune out your fellow passengers — and plugging in some headphones is only going to do so much. If Airbus ever brings a recently patented helmet display to market, though, you may never have to put up with mid-air distractions again. The headrest-mounted wearable would combine headphones with visor-projected video, producing “sensorial isolation” while you’re watching movies, listening to music or playing games. It could even beam a virtual keyboard on to the tray or seat back, so you wouldn’t need controllers that take up your already limited space.

If you think this all sounds too good to be true, you’d be right — at least, for now. Airbus tells Wired that there aren’t any current plans to outfit aircraft with a helmet like this. The company is mostly protecting ideas so that a rival doesn’t try this first. A projected visor display isn’t likely to be cheap, either, given that it’s the sort of technology normally reserved for fighter jets. Even so, it’s good to know that at least one aircraft maker could use technology to make your long-haul trips a little more bearable.

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Via: Wired

Source: USPTO

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17
Sep

Indiegogo’s pilot program lets successful projects keep raising money


When it comes to the wild and woolly crowdfunding space, it’s not hard to look at Kickstarter as the Goliath to Indiegogo’s David — that’s why the latter keeps trying to change up how young companies get the cash to build their products. First came Flexible Funding (which let project creators keep whatever money they’ve raised even if they didn’t hit their goal), and now the company is launching a pilot program to keep those campaigns open indefinitely. That’s right: if your crowdfunding project hit its initial milestone, you won’t ever have to stop taking money from the people waving their wallets at you. In a way, this new funding model could turn Indiegogo into the store that Kickstarter never wanted to be. Sounds great for all those upstart artists and hardware hackers out there, no? It can be, but it could also mean questionable products (like the much-maligned Healbe GoBe and the Ritot projection watch) maintain a stream of funding they may not actually be worthy of. Only a handful of projects have been given the so-called Forever Funding treatment so far, including runaway successes like the Tens tinted sunglasses and this tiny tracking device, but this particular privilege should go live for everyone “in the coming months.”

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Via: TechCrunch

Source: Indiegogo

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17
Sep

Apple’s iOS 8 is now available for you to download


Apple’s iOS 8 may not look too different from the version that preceded it, but trust us: there are plenty of new bits and bobs to get familiar with once you start poking around. Now that you’ve had some time to dig into our full review, you can take iOS 8 for a spin yourself — Apple has just pushed the update live, so check your iDevice’s settings to see if it’s your time to shine. Just keep a few things in mind before you enter the breach: the update will only install on the iPhone 4S and newer, the iPad 2 and newer and the 5th generation iPod Touch. Oh, and it looks like Apple is having some HealthKit trouble at the moment, so all HealthKit compatible apps have been temporarily removed from the App Store. According to tweets from Carrot Fit developer Brian Mueller, Apple has been saying that a fix is in the works but there’s no ETA on when it’ll actually take effect. Nothing like a few hiccups to kick off a massive software launch, no?

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