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Posts tagged ‘OnePlus One’

9
Oct

In Bengaluru, India, OnePlus is promising that you’ll be able to get a OnePlus One in one hour or less



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There are a number of things you can get in an hour – pizza naturally comes to mind first. But OnePlus now is promising that if you live in the city of Bengaluru in India, you too can expect to get a OnePlus One in one hour from placing your order, or the phone is free. For most of us, this seems like an entirely unnecessary marketing stunt, but the intensity of OnePlus’ marketing is what has gotten it to where it is now – and it’s clear that it works. Considering that the OnePlus One has technically be superseded by the OnePlus 2, the One actually still holds up quite well with its Snapdragon 801 and 3GB RAM – and the lowered price shouldn’t be looked past either, going for Rs 18,998 right now (~$290 USD).

However, like many of OnePlus’ other campaigns, this one is only on from October 8th to the 10th (and you need to order it through the Blowhorn app), so you’ve only got just over a day to see whether OnePlus can follow through on its pizza-like delivery. Of course, if you don’t live in Bengaluru, OnePlus says that if this campaign is a success, it will attempt it in other Indian cities as well.


What do you think about OnePlus’ latest marketing stunt? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Mashable

 

The post In Bengaluru, India, OnePlus is promising that you’ll be able to get a OnePlus One in one hour or less appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

9
Oct

In Bengaluru, India, OnePlus is promising that you’ll be able to get a OnePlus One in one hour or less



http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push();

There are a number of things you can get in an hour – pizza naturally comes to mind first. But OnePlus now is promising that if you live in the city of Bengaluru in India, you too can expect to get a OnePlus One in one hour from placing your order, or the phone is free. For most of us, this seems like an entirely unnecessary marketing stunt, but the intensity of OnePlus’ marketing is what has gotten it to where it is now – and it’s clear that it works. Considering that the OnePlus One has technically be superseded by the OnePlus 2, the One actually still holds up quite well with its Snapdragon 801 and 3GB RAM – and the lowered price shouldn’t be looked past either, going for Rs 18,998 right now (~$290 USD).

However, like many of OnePlus’ other campaigns, this one is only on from October 8th to the 10th (and you need to order it through the Blowhorn app), so you’ve only got just over a day to see whether OnePlus can follow through on its pizza-like delivery. Of course, if you don’t live in Bengaluru, OnePlus says that if this campaign is a success, it will attempt it in other Indian cities as well.


What do you think about OnePlus’ latest marketing stunt? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Mashable

 

The post In Bengaluru, India, OnePlus is promising that you’ll be able to get a OnePlus One in one hour or less appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

9
Oct

Is OnePlus done? What next for the “Flagship Killer?”


oneplus 2 review aa (4 of 38)

Almost 18 months ago, a little known Chinese company by the name of OnePlus announced its arrival into a saturated marketplace in a big way, with the OnePlus One.

Dubbed the “Flagship Killer”, OnePlus adopted a strategy that revolved around viral marketing and aggressive pricing, and at the same time kept a high demand for their phone (or arguably the illusion of it) by making it difficult to buy, thanks to the (dreaded) invite system. The buzz around the company’s first handset was certainly large enough to see it through an entire year and while users have still ‘battled’ to get invites for this year’s OnePlus 2, the cracks are beginning to show in OnePlus’s armour.

Faced with rivals adopting parts of the model that proved so successful for OnePlus, coupled with the company’s public and abject failure in launching the OnePlus 2 properly, we’re asking: is the company done? Can it recover and if so, where does the “Flagship Killer” go from here?

What made OnePlus special?

Before we can look at the future of the company, we need to revisit its past to discover (and remind ourselves) of the things that made OnePlus special last year.


oneplus-logoSee also: Is OnePlus going to launch a Mini too?41

As a company, it launched with aplomb through clever teasers, a solid smartphone offering and a willingness to be public in its dislike of overpriced rival flagship devices. There’s an age-old saying that “You want what you can’t have” and this is a fundamental ingredient around the success of the OnePlus One; a short amount of supply.

OnePlus One in video:

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Far too often, startups hope to dominate the world from day one and these lofty ambitions result in over estimation of demand, resulting in too much supply and a bottoming of the price. The net result is the company ends up selling its stock at a loss and eventually falls by the wayside. To prevent the same, OnePlus came up with the invite system, which allowed it to only produce enough handsets to meet demand but of course, the company underestimated the demand (or did it?), resulting in stock shortages for the better part of a year.

Aside from the inability to buy the OnePlus One, resulting in an increased desire for consumers to own one, the handset was also special as it was the first time we’d really seen a company offer a flagship handset at an affordable price (aside from perhaps the Nexus 4 and 5). Although the likes of Xiaomi had done this before in select markets, OnePlus gained significant global traction very quickly and much faster than any of the established players had managed.

Were we looking at the birth of a new force to be reckoned with in mobile? At the time, yes; now, over a year later and several months after the OnePlus 2, the answer is unequivocally no.

What went wrong for OnePlus?

In a word; the OnePlus 2.

The OnePlus One was fantastic as OnePlus shocked the industry by offering the same specs as the flagships of the year at a significantly lower cost, but in the year that passed between these two handsets, OnePlus’s rivals caught up and surpassed the company.

Let’s take a look at the OnePlus 2 specs and how it compares to the flagships:

  OnePlus 2 Galaxy S6 One M9 Xperia Z3+ LG G4
Display 5.5-inch LCD
Full HD (1920 x 1080)
5.1-inch AMOLED
QHD (2560×1440)
5-inch LCD
FullHD (1920×1080)
5.2-inch LCD
FullHD (1920×1080)
5.5-inch LCD
QHD (2560×1440)
SoC Snapdragon 810 Exynos 7420 Snapdragon 810 Snapdragon 810 Snapdragon 808
CPU 4x 2.0GHz Cortex-A57
4x 1.5GHz Cortex-A53
4x 2.1GHz Cortex-A57
4x 1.5GHz Cortex-A53
4x 2.0GHz Cortex-A57
4x 1.5GHz Cortex-A53
4x 2.0GHz Cortex-A57
4x 1.5GHz Cortex-A53
2x 1.8GHz Cortex-A57
4x 1.4GHz Cortex-A53
GPU Adreno 430 Mali-T760 MP8 Adreno 430 Adreno 430 Adreno 418
RAM 4GB (64GB model), 3GB (16GB model) 3GB 3GB 3GB 3GB
Storage 16/64GB 32/64/128GB 32GB 32GB 32GB
MicroSD No No Yes, up to 128GB Yes, up to 128GB Yes, up to 128GB
Unlocked Price $329 (16GB), $389 (64GB) $700 $650 $650 $540

Now let’s take a look at the OnePlus 2 specs again and this time, how it compares to other similarly priced handsets:

  OnePlus 2 Huawei Honor 7 Moto X Play Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 BLU Pure XL
Display 5.5-inch LTPS
Full HD (1920 x 1080)
401 ppi
5.2-inch IPS-NEO
Full HD (1920×1080)
424 ppi
5.5-inch IPS
Full HD (1920×1080)
401 ppi
5.5-inch IPS
Full HD (1920×1080)
401 ppi
6.0-inch AMOLED
QHD (2560×1440)
490 ppi
SoC Snapdragon 810 Kirin 935 Snapdragon 615 Mediatek Helio X10 Mediatek Helio X10
CPU 4×1.82GHz Cortex-A57
4×1.56GHz Cortex-A53
4×2.2GHz Cortex-A53
4×1.5GHz Cortex-A53
4×1.7GHz Cortex-A53
4×1.0GHz Cortex-A53
4×2.2GHz Cortex-A53
4×2.0GHz Cortex-A53
8×2.0GHz Cortex-A53
GPU Adreno 430 Mali-T628 MP4 Adreno 405 PowerVR G6200 PowerVR G6200
RAM 4GB (64GB)
3GB (16GB)
3GB 2GB 3GB (32GB)
2GB (16GB)
3GB
Storage 16/64GB 16/64GB 16/32GB 16/32GB 64GB
MicroSD No Yes, up to 128GB Yes, up to 128GB Yes, up to 32GB
(Chinese version)
Yes, up to 64GB
Camera 13MP rear
5MP front
20MP rear
8MP front (+LED flash)
21MP rear
5MP front
13MP rear
5MP front
24MP rear
8MP front
Video 4K, 1080p, 720p slo-mo 1080p, HDR 1080p 1080p 4k, 1080p, HDR
Camera Features: OIS
Laser Autofocus
OIS Phase Detection AutoFocus
Effective Stabilisation
Phase Detection AutoFocus OIS
Laser Autofocus
NFC No No Yes TBC Yes
Battery: 3300mAh
Non-removable
3100mAh
Non-removable
3630mAh
Non-removable
3060mAh
Removable
3500mAh
Removable
LTE LTE Cat 4 (150/50) LTE Cat 6 (300/50) Yes (Cat TBC) Yes (Cat TBC) LTE Cat 4 (150/50)
Other Features: Dual SIM
Fingerprint Sensor
USB Type-C
Dual SIM
Fingerprint Sensor
Fast Charging
Fast Charging Fast Charging Dual SIM
Fingerprint Sensor
USB Type-C
Unlocked Price $329 (16GB)
$389 (64GB)
~$381 (16GB, £249) ~$426 (16GB, £270)
~$487 (32GB, £319)
$128/$144 (16GB)
$160 (32GB)
$349

As you can see, OnePlus ‘suddenly’ faces significant competition from more established players who have the distribution channels and partners to put their devices into more hands quicker than OnePlus can.

Coupled with this, OnePlus also failed in the launch of the OnePlus 2, which the company has publicly admitted; ahead of the handset’s launch, OnePlus said they would have 30 to 50 times the amount of inventory, yet they repeatedly missed dates for releasing invites and even after the handset’s “launch” on August 11th, customers with invites couldn’t buy the handset. The dreaded invite system, which worked so well for the company in its first handset, proved to be its downfall.

The OnePlus 2 also has another big issue; value for money. Last year, customers rushed to become part of OnePlus’ flock as the OnePlus One offered the same specs as handsets that were double (or more) the price. Ahead of the announcement, the rumours looked to be that the OnePlus 2 would do just this, with rumours suggesting that a Quad HD display, NFC, outstanding camera and much more would all make it onboard.

What actually transpired was that the OnePlus 2 failed to bring the Quad HD screen we expected – instead it has a 5.5-inch Full HD display that doesn’t stand out in anyway – and failed to have NFC, with the company suggesting they left it out as no-one uses NFC. There’s just one slight problem with the latter; mobile payments are growing to become a large part of the smartphone industry and the lack of NFC immediately rules out the OnePlus 2 from this key growth market.

Furthermore, OnePlus launched the OnePlus 2 by saying it was a “2016 Flagship Killer” and this is certainly a bold claim from the company. Let’s look at the OnePlus 2 specs again and when you’re reading through them, ask yourself one question: would a flagship handset in 2016 with these specs interest you or will the industry have moved on? I know what I think.

   
Display 5.5-inch LCD, Full HD
Processor 1.8GHz Snapdragon 810
RAM 3 or 4 GB (depending on storage option)
Storage 16 or 64GB storage
Networks US GSM: 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz WCDMA: Bands: 1/2/4/5/8 FDD-LTE: Bands: 1/2/4/5/7/8/12/17EU/India GSM: 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz WCDMA: Bands: 1/2/5/8 FDD-LTE: Bands: 1/3/5/7/8/20
Software OxygenOS based on Android 5.1
MicroSD No
Dual-SIM Yes
Wireless Charging No
Fingerprint Scan Yes
Camera 13MP rear
5MP front
Battery 3,300mAh
Dimensions 151.8 x 74.9 x 9.85 mm, 175g

The success of OnePlus last year was also largely down to the company being an unknown player with customers unaware of how the company would handle repairs, support and returns. Naturally, with the OnePlus One proving to be so appealing, these questions were put to the back of customer’s minds but a year later, customers had a lot more information and it wasn’t pleasant reading for OnePlus.

Simply put, the company doesn’t understand returns, repairs or support. Looking across the interwebs, there’s a lot of complaints about the company’s lack of action when it came to fixing issues and even when you want to return your handset.

Some of you may point towards these being false but I can say that they seem to be accurate; a friend of mine (Holly Brockwell) had a range of issues with her OnePlus One and when requested a repair, OnePlus asked her to provide video proof of each individual fault before they would even discuss the repair. To take it a step further, the company seems to have outsourced its entire customer service department with Holly receiving the following reply to an initial email about battery life concerns: “I’m sorry to hear about the problem with your XXX”.

While these were issues when dealing with the OnePlus One, it doesn’t seem that the company has improved this much in the year that’s passed. Looking at the OnePlus forums, there’s certainly a lot of people who feel the hype has died and, although I’ve not used one extensively (but have briefly), I do feel the same.

Yes, the OnePlus 2 is definitely a lovely phone and it has a lot of positives but from a marketing perspective, the handset fails in its bid to be a 2015 Flagship Killer, let alone a 2016 Flagship Killer as OnePlus is dubbing it.

What next? Is OnePlus done?

So what next for the Chinese company that has grown to be similar to marmite in that you love it or you don’t. Can it survive in a market where the big names are now encroaching into the same part of the market that OnePlus so successfully carved a niche in for itself?

In a word: maybe.

Being a startup, OnePlus has had to be different in its approach to ensure the long term survival of the company, but while the approach certainly worked with its first handset, the company misjudged exactly what its competition would do this year. There’s no denying that the company does understand customers and what they want from a smartphone but some decisions in the OnePlus 2 make no sense. NFC chipsets are certainly not expensive and the decision to leave it out of the OnePlus, coupled with the rest of the specs, suggests the company’s bottom line has come before the same fact that set it apart; flagship specs at a reduced price.

OnePlus 2 in video:

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Yes, the company can easily release another handset next year and it might pick up from the OnePlus One and prove to be a real flagship killer but doing so would only admit that the OnePlus 2 was a mistake.

What else can they do? Some suggestions include merging with another company – after all, OnePlus co-founder does want to intern at Samsung (read into that what you will), attempting to release another handset (but would it be successful?) or even being aggressive with pricing to really drive the cost of smartphones down.

All of these suggestions could theoretically work on paper but in truth, it does seem that OnePlus’ time is coming to an end. Had they launched the OnePlus One a year earlier and this year’s OnePlus 2 last year, it’s quite likely we’d have a completely different tale to tell but the fact is; in the past year, the big OEMs have launched heavily into the mid-range marketplace and rather than OnePlus offering flagship specs at a mid-range price, the company is now arguably just another mid-range player.

It will continue to sell a few phones but the glory days certainly seem to be over. After all, if companies such as BLU can offer a flagship phone with a Quad HD display and NFC at the same price as the OnePlus 2, there’s really no reason that OnePlus couldn’t have. Apart from its bottom line, that is.

What do you think, agree with my assessment or disagree completely? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

6
Oct

A second coming: Is OnePlus about to launch a Mini?


oneplus 2 unboxing initial setup aa (32 of 32)

Why settle for just One Two when you can also have a Mini One?

Earlier this year, rumors and not-so-subtle hints were suggesting China’s OnePlus will launch a pair of products in 2015. As of today, it has already released one Two, but not the second one. GforGames has – via a tipster who claims to have access to a prototype- published some interesting information about this mystery product, which many feel is meant to correct the “errors” of the this year’s first second One. The device will allegedly cost around $250 and hit virtual stores in either November or December.

Spec-wise, the Mini is said to come with a 5-inch FHD IPS display, a MediaTek Helio X10 (MT6795T) SoC, 2GB of dual-channel LPDDR3 RAM, 32GB of eMMC 5.0 on-board storage, a 13-megapixel Sony IMX258 (f/2.0) rear camera and 5-megapixel front facing wide-angle camera. The device will purportedly have a 3,000-3,100 mAh non-removable battery, USB Type C, Quick Charge 2.0 support, and a 1.2W front-facing speaker.

oneplus 2 unboxing initial setup aa (8 of 32)

The OnePlus Mini will allegedly have its fingerprint sensor on the back.

Other details mentioned suggest the screen will be a 2.5D Gorilla Glass 3 or 4 affair and include both oleophobic and hydrophobic coating. There will be no dual-camera setup however the rear camera will be able to record 4K video at 30fps and have a Dual-Tone LED flash. Unlike its big brother, the OnePlus Mini will include NFC to make use of Android Pay along with a fingerprint sensor to be placed on the back of the device.

Apparently, the SoC’s kernel source code will be made available to the public to support the development of custom ROMs.

While the device is to be made of plastic, users will apparently be able to purchase additional colors or styles separately to change the look and design of their phone. This would match with comments Carl Pei made earlier this year that indicated the second offering would be less about specs and more about style.

oneplus 2 vs oneplus one aa (1 of 27)

Three’s company: will the OnePlus Mini (not pictured, obviously) be a crowd-pleaser?

No mention was made as to the OS version running on the device, or details about its physical appearance or even naming convention. A special point was made that the prototype this information is supposedly based on is now a few months old and thus – assuming it is legitimate – OnePlus may have modified or dropped some specs since then.

Until something official comes along, readers should be sure to treat these specs as nothing more than rumors. With that said, does this device have some major potential? Can it fix all the “wrongs” with the OnePlus 2? Leave us your comments below!

 

10
Sep

You’ll be able to get the OnePlus 2 without an invite, for an hour


After the debacle that surrounded the OnePlus One, wait, OnePlus Two, Carl Pei, the co-founder, has decided to “apologize” for it. OnePlus under-estimated the demand for the second year in a row, and took far too long to get their first production devices out to those with invites in-tow.

In a move to try and appease everyone, Carl Pei announced in a statement posted to the OnePlus forums, the co-founder stated the following:

Over the past few days, we’ve been discussing how we can make it up to our fans for the delay. One of the best ideas we have is to open sales up for an hour sometime later this month or early next, to make the entire process a bit more painless for would-be OnePlus 2 users. We will need to look into production and operations to determine when this is most feasible. We’ll keep you posted.

So if you want a OnePlus 2, but haven’t gotten an invite yet, you’ll be able to hopefully purchase one later this month. However, you’ll only have a one-hour window to do so. Remember, the servers will probably be slammed the second that the floodgates are opened, so we can only wish everyone the best of luck with this adventure.

OnePlus 2 Invites

After messing up the release of the OnePlus One, you would think that OnePlus would get it right the second time around. At this rate, maybe it’s third times the charm for the folks over at OnePlus. But maybe next time, they shouldn’t promise that invites will be “30-50x easier to get”, or maybe they should just plan accordingly and get rid of the invites altogether.

Have you been one of the lucky few to get your hands on the OnePlus 2, or are you amongst the army of frustrated users who want it but can’t have it? Drop us a line in the comments below and let us know what you think about this planned one-hour charade. In the mean time, we’ll be sure to keep everyone updated as to when this one-hour free-for-all will be, so keep your eyes peeled.

Source: OnePlus Forums

The post You’ll be able to get the OnePlus 2 without an invite, for an hour appeared first on AndroidGuys.

10
Sep

You’ll soon be able to buy the OnePlus 2 without an invite, but only for one hour


oneplus 2 review aa (4 of 38)

If you’ve reserved your spot to get a hold of a new OnePlus 2, odds are you haven’t gotten an invite yet. Despite announcing that it would soon start ramping up invite rollouts to patient customers a few weeks ago, OnePlus has still managed to rack up over five million reservations for the OnePlus 2, leaving many folks wondering when they’d get to purchase the new device.

In an apology recently posted on the OnePlus forums, company co-founder Carl Pei talks about how OnePlus not only messed up the One’s launch, but also the release for the 2. Pei says:

We know how it feels waiting and waiting for something you really want, while being given ETAs that go unfulfilled. We appreciate the trust and support that you have given to a relatively small and unknown company like OnePlus. We know that you are rooting for us, and want nothing more than to see us succeed. Therefore, it feels extra terrible to let you down this time around, again.

OnePlus 2 in video

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Even though the phone is finally shipping out to users, the company is still extremely behind schedule. To make up for it, OnePlus has announced that it will open up sales for the OnePlus 2 sometime later this month or early next month, for one hour only. This means that during this hour, you can purchase your very own “2016 flagship killer”, no invite required. Details are still pretty scarce, but the company says an exact date and time will be given to us sometime soon. We’ll let you know when we hear more information.


oneplus 2 unboxing initial setup aa (32 of 32)See also: OnePlus 2 will be delayed 2-3 weeks for would-be North American buyers183311

Tell us, are you still waiting to get your hands on the OnePlus 2, or have you moved on to bigger and better things?

3
Sep

Cyanogen OS 12.1 rolls out for OnePlus One


The Android 5.1 update for Cyanogen OS, which brings it to version 12.1, is now rolling out via an over-the-air update to OnePlus One devices starting today. Not only this but the OTA update will also begin to rollout for other Cyanogen devices in the next few days.

What’s new in Cyanogen OS 12.1?

There’s a new LiveDisplay feature that adjusts the screen based on environmental and sensor data to also Cyanogen’s own browser that they are pitching as the fastest browser on a smartphone. In addition, the 600MB update brings the usual security and bug fixes to keep the OnePlus up to date with the latest security vulnerabilities found in Android.

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The OTA update should be hitting devices soon, but if you can’t wait then you can go ahead and download Cyanogen OS 12.1 below and flash the ZIP file manually.

DOWNLOAD: Cyanogen

The post Cyanogen OS 12.1 rolls out for OnePlus One appeared first on AndroidGuys.

1
Sep

OnePlus One handset explodes while charging overnight


Android smartphones_OnePlus One_Explosion_images_090115_1A really unlucky OnePlus One owner recently had their handset explode into flames while charging it overnight. Fortunately, the user was unharmed in the incident.

This past weekend, a OnePlus One user awoke in the middle of the night near 2-AM to the smell of fire. He shortly realized that his OnePlus One handset was in smoke and flames beside him. Luckily, he threw the handset away from his bed and managed to be okay. Nobody can be exactly sure to why the incident took place. Most signs point to a battery explosion due to fully exposed battery in the pictures below.

OnePlus customer service said they would replace the handset, but also mentioned that there is not much the company can do about it. The company definitely has some explaining to do as to why this occurred. If the user didn’t awake in his sleep, it could of took his life. The pictures below contain what was left of the handset after the explosion.

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Via: Gadgetraid

Come comment on this article: OnePlus One handset explodes while charging overnight

26
Aug

OnePlus starts pushing out Cyanogen OS 12.1 OTA for the One


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OnePlus has just started rolling out the much-anticipated Cyanogen OS 12.1 update for the One. In terms of added functionality, the upgrade brings many features present in Android 5.1.1, as well as a multitude of bug fixes and stability improvements.

As you’d expect, the update is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device to hit your unit, you could always search for the upgrade manually. To do so,  open the Settings app, scroll to the bottom and tap on “About Device”, hit “System Updates”, then select “Check for updates”.

Alternatively, you can download the firmware by clicking here and flash it onto your handset. However, we wouldn’t advise taking this route if you haven’t had an experience in the past as it could potentially render your device useless if carried out incorrectly.

 

Come comment on this article: OnePlus starts pushing out Cyanogen OS 12.1 OTA for the One

26
Aug

OnePlus One now getting Cyanogen OS 12.1 update


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Are you still rocking the OnePlus One? This legendary device continues to be one hell of a phone, even though it has been over a year since it was first launched and its successor, the OnePlus 2, is already out. The OnePlus One is not an aging phone, though, and today’s update will give it a bit more life.

The One is currently getting upgraded to Cyanogen OS 12.1, which happens to be based on Android 5.1.1 Lollipop. Your update should be showing up soon enough, but be patient. As it goes with most OTA updates, this one is also rolling our periodically. Only about 2% of users were getting the automatic download as of this afternoon.

The good news is you don’t really have to wait for the update to come to your device. You can download it straight from here if you don’t mind installing it manually. And those who were running the newer Android 5.0 release can also use a smaller file to upgrade their phones. But those who are not fans of tinkering with their phones should refrain from doing this and simply wait for the update to show up.

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The larger update weighs 645 MB, while the smaller file is only 304 MB. Have any of you gotten the update yet? Hit the comments and let us know how it’s treating you! We have heard rumors that the update sets your Chrome home button to Bing, which is totally weird (I guess they are getting to friendly with Cyanogen).

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