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Posts tagged ‘Nexus 5’

18
Nov

Deal: Grab a Nexus 5 for just $210 this week


Nexus 5 Newegg deal

There may be a couple of new Nexus handsets on the market now, but the original Nexus 5 still has its charms. At a discounted price of just $210, it’s a really tough bargain to beat.

Newegg is running a sale this week which sees a 58 percent discount applies to the handset, with the price dropping all the way from $500 to just $210. The model on offer is the unlocked North American LG-D820, which is important if you’re an AT&T or T-Mobile customer, along with 32GB of internal storage space.

Although it may be a couple of year’s old, the Nexus 5’s core hardware still stacks up fairly well with today’s mid/high tier handsets. There’s a 5-inch 1080p display, quad-core Snapdragon 800 SoC, 2GB of RAM, a 2,300mAh battery, and an 8 megapixel rear camera. Not to mention, it’s a cost effective way to receive a fast upgrade to the latest Android 6.0 Marshmallow OS.


Google Nexus 5 black aa 12See also: Google Nexus 5 review: best for the money, but is it enough?54

The phone is available from Newegg in both black and white color options and the deal will run for the next 5 days, ending on Sunday.

Grab a Nexus 5 from Newegg

14
Nov

Grab a refurb Nexus 5 for only $150 this weekend only


nexus 5 deal

This weekend only, Daily Steals is offering refurbished Nexus 5s, typically $300, for the record-low price of $150.

The LG smartphone runs Android Marshmallow and sports 2 gigs of RAM, 16GB of storage, an 8MP camera, and a Snapdragon 800 chip.  These unlocked, refurb Nexus 5 D820 devices don’t appear to have any warranty information, but Daily Steals has a standing policy to accept any returns within a month of purchase.


nexus 5xSee also: Nexus 5X review19

Although it’s now two years old, the Nexus 5 remains an excellent balance of cost and performance. At this reduced price, the bang-per-buck ratio is staggering. On release, the device was praised for its high-quality 5-inch screen and minimalist appearance. The Nexus 5 originally had a $400 price tag, but was compared favorably to devices costing $650 or more. Google’s no-frills approach to designing the Nexus 5 was thought to be an object lesson by the company that high-quality Android devices could be created without costing a fortune.

The Daily Steals’ offer for this smartphone expires on Monday, so if you’re in the market for an unlocked Android device on a budget, now is your time to act.

Head on over to Daily Steals to order your Nexus 5 for $150

What do you think? Going to pick one up? I’m almost tempted to grab one for resale at this price. Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

30
Oct

Deal: Grab a brand new Nexus 5 from eBay for just $175


Nexus 5 eBay deal

The LG-made Nexus 5 from 2013 was so popular that Google made another one. The Nexus 5X may be a worthy successor to the well-loved device, but for some, nothing beats the original. So if you’re looking to snag a 2013 Nexus 5 for cheap, eBay may have just the thing for you. Right now, you can purchase a brand new unlocked 16GB Nexus 5 in Black from eBay for only $174.99. The seller is also throwing in free shipping as an added bonus.


nexus 5x first look aa (24 of 28)See also: Is the Nexus 5X a good deal?71

If you need a refresher, the Nexus 5 comes with a 4.95-inch Full HD LCD display, a quad-core Snapdragon 800 processor, 2GB of RAM, an 8MP rear-facing camera and a 1.3MP front camera. It has a 2300mAh battery, support for wireless charging. It’s also running Android 6.0 Marshmallow. Speaking from experience, my Nexus 5 runs quite well on Marshmallow, so you shouldn’t have any problems there. It’s still a perfectly capable device. And for just $175, it’s a steal.

If you’re interested, follow the eBay link below to grab one for yourself before they’re all gone!

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19
Oct

Nexus 5X first impressions. The REAL flagship killer has just stood up.


I know it is too soon to say the Nexus 5X is the real flagship killer that the OnePlus 2 claims to be, but after two days of usage, the Nexus 5X is the real deal. Starting at $379.99 for the LG built Nexus 5x, the phone comes loaded with a Snapdragon 808, 2GB RAM, 16GB memory(not expandable), 5.2 inch LCD 1080P display, and most importantly the same 12.3MP rear camera, Android 6.0 and the game-changing fingerprint reader that the Nexus 6P is loaded with.

I would estimate that 75-90% of Android users out there, like my fantastic mother, don’t need octa-core processors and 4GB of RAM. The majority of users need a stable phone with security features to match, a great display, an even better camera, easy-to-use software and definitely long-lasting battery life. What all of us need more than anything is an affordable device. For far too long, smartphone prices have been out of control and Google is always doing its part to give high value for your dollar and that principle shows clear in the Nexus 5X.

For this initial impressions post, I didn’t get to focus on the Nexus 5X as much as I would have liked, because I was focused on the Nexus 6P instead. However I did try to test it out thoroughly to best inform you of what you should expect.

IMG_20151018_234704

Design

The Nexus 5X, built by LG, is no slouch when it comes to build-quality. No it doesn’t come with an all metal build or a Super AMOLED display, but that doesn’t mean this device is not premium in its own right. The Nexus 6P, P for “Premium”, would make you believe the 5X is something less, which it is not. I wish Google would have named the Nexus 6P the 6M for metal, because metal is really the main difference besides the base memory and size beyond the spec sheet.

20151018_170342

The Nexus 5X comes in a plastic housing that doesn’t feel cheap. It comes in three colors – Carbon(black), Quartz(white) and Ice(minty green shade). All of the colors are very appealing with Ice being the most different color I have seen on a mainstream phone in a long time. It was actually refreshing to see something other than black, silver, gold or white and I hope it is a trend other manufacturers pick up on. Google sent me the Quartz color, which is matte white, and after two days of use I do not see this phone attracting smudges. But I will update you on that when I have a full review in a month or two.

The display is 5.2 inches across, protected by Gorilla Glass 3, and has a front-facing speaker on the bottom portion of the phone. Weighing in at 136g, it is much lighter than the 178g Nexus 6p and is very easy to use one-handed. The main downside to the design of the Nexus 5X is the camera hump on the back of the device. I really dislike when I set my phone down onto the camera lens. It doesn’t sit flat and will probably wear in the spot where it touches flat surfaces.

Other than that minor detail, the Nexus 5X is definitely a premium device by build quality alone.

Fingerprint Reader

If you have read the Nexus 6P first impressions post, you will know I was gushing over the fingerprint reader that Google put so much effort into developing. The Nexus 5X lives up to its premium sibling when it comes to the fingerprint reader. Both are flawless.

The integrated fingerprint reader also lives on the back of the device, where you finger naturally rests when gripping the phone. Being that the Nexus 5X also uses the latest Android software in 6.0 Marshmallow, it uses Nexus Imprint to unlock and turn on your display with your fingerprint. As I stated in the Nexus 6P first impressions review, I truly believe this fingerprint reader is something all Android users will be using in the very near future.

Not only is it nice to unlock and turn on your display, but the fingerprint reader is needed for Android Pay and will replace pattern and code unlocks.

20151018_170858

Performance and internal hardware

Naturally you would think, based on price, that the Nexus 5X would be outperformed by the Nexus 6P. The Nexus 6P comes with 3GB of RAM and the Snapdragon 810 v2.1, while the Nexus 5X comes with 2GB of RAM and the lower Snapdragon 808.

In my initial usage, I have yet to experience lag or stutters from the 5X, and to be honest, the performance feels almost identical to the 6P. I ran an Antutu benchmark test and it confirmed my feelings as the score was nearly identical. How could this be? Well the Nexus 6P runs the higher resolution OLED display which needs more processing power to drive those extra pixels.

So if the Nexus 5X performs as well as the 6P, and you don’t care about having a metal build or a 5.7 inch display vs. a 5.2 inch display, the Nexus 5X might be a better option considering you will save over $100 dollars.

Google did happen to send me the 32GB version to review which is probably enough memory for the majority of users- the 16GB base model without the ability to add external memory may not be enough. Although I am sure many people get by just fine with 16GB of memory with options to upload pictures, videos and music to the cloud.

 

Camera

Considering the Nexus 5X has the same camera as the Nexus 6P, one should assume that it performs identically. I haven’t had the time to do head-to-head comparisons but I was equally impressed with the camera. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get a ton of shots in full daylight, but I did just walk around outside and take pictures at night.

Google knows cameras are important to people as they are documenting their lives more and more everyday through photos. My nieces can’t stay off Instagram. Who knows, in 100 years we might communicate through pictures instead of words(just kidding). Check out the gallery below.

Battery

The Nexus 5X has a 2,700mAh battery inside which is rated to last up to 420 hours on standby, 20 hours of talk time, 10 hours of video playback or 75 hours of audio playback. The battery is no slouch. According to Google, the 5X can last up to four hours on a ten minute fast charge. USB type-C is also integrated into the 5X replacing the antiquated micro-USB standard.

I was tickled at how well the battery has lasted. I gave it a full charge on Friday night, unplugged it Saturday morning around 9am and haven’t connected it to a charger since. As of right now, Monday morning at 12:42am, the Nexus 5X has 66% of battery life remaining! If that isn’t something to brag about, then I don’t know what is.

Screenshot_20151018-234345

Disconnected around 9am on Saturday.

Screenshot_20151019-004258

Still 66% without recharging on Monday at 12:42am.

Display and Speaker

Now, in my Nexus 6P review, I mentioned I am a display snob. I love Samsung’s OLED displays because of the resolution, color saturation and accuracy and brightness level, especially in full sunlight. In terms of resolution, I really cannot see any pixels on this 1080P 423ppi display. The colors are more than acceptable, and the brightness is great too. It does get very bright, from the naked eye it appears to get brighter than its sibling, although like other LCD displays the colors wash out a little bit at the highest setting.

Comparatively it is as good as all other LCD based displays I have laid my eyes on and I know for a fact I could learn to love this display.

The speaker is mounted in the front mouth piece area and does get loud. Being that it is a speaker built into a small area, it does lack bass and slightly distorts on maximum volume. It is still a solid performing speaker by most standards.

20151018_171011

Summary

Overall the Nexus 5X(I keep wanting to call it the 5P) is a great phone at an even better price. Don’t let the spec sheets fool you as this does perform equally well to its premium sibling, the Nexus 6P. Specs really mean nothing when it comes to overall performance. If you’ve been using devices with lots of bloat, you probably know what I am talking about.

Starting at $379.99, the Nexus 5X may not have the specs to match the OnePlus 2, but it does beat it in the performance section as well as the NFC category. Android Pay is still in its infancy but is something you’re going to want to use once more places accept it. It is similarly priced and also runs the latest version of Android unlike the OnePlus 2. The Nexus 5X has incredible battery life, a superb camera, high-end performance and should be dubbed The Flagship Killer.

Depending on your budget, I have no hesitations in recommending the Nexus 5X as a daily driver. If I wasn’t such a phone snob, I know with 100% certainty I would buy the Nexus 5X over any other phone for its total package offering including the price.

Let me know in the comments section what you think and let me know what I missed so I can add it to my full review in about a month. Thank you for taking the time to read my review!

 

 

 

The post Nexus 5X first impressions. The REAL flagship killer has just stood up. appeared first on AndroidGuys.

6
Oct

Is the Nexus 5X a good deal?


nexus 5x first look aa (24 of 28)

Google’s Nexus line-up has always been an interesting part of the Android story. We never know what to expect. This year, Google has changed things up again by releasing, not one smartphone, but two. The Nexus 5X is the long-awaited successor to the popular Nexus 5, while the Nexus 6P follows on from last year’s less loved Nexus 6.

If you felt the Nexus 6 was too expensive, and it looks as though many people did, then you might be excited by the pricing on the Nexus 5X. It starts at $379 for the 16GB version and it has a pretty enticing set of specs. But does it compare to the value for money that the original Nexus 5 represented two years ago? The market has moved on since then, prices have fallen, and the Nexus 5 was originally offered at $349. Is the Nexus 5X a good deal?

The high points

The first stand-out feature on the Nexus 5X, both figuratively and literally, is the 12.3MP main camera. Google knew it had work to do on this front. One of the biggest disappointments about the Nexus 5 was the performance of the 8MP camera. It looks as though the 5X is going to be capable of capturing quality shots, and it needs to be. The front-facing camera has also been overhauled in the wake of selfie-mania, and it’s rated at 5MP, undoubtedly a massive improvement over the old 1.3MP effort in its predecessor.

nexus 5x first look aa (3 of 28)

Nexus Imprint is the other thing that immediately jumps out about the 5X. A conveniently placed fingerprint sensor on the back of the phone, under the camera, is a smart move, and less awkward to use one-handed than a traditional home button placement. It only requires a single touch and it looks lightning fast.

If these two features are as good as they look, then they definitely make the Nexus 5X a tempting prospect at this price.

Middle of the road

The rest of the specs are less impressive. The screen is 5.2-inches with a standard 1080p resolution, it’s actually slightly less sharp than the Nexus 5, which was 4.95-inches and 1080p. The hexa-core Snapdragon 808 backed by 2GB of RAM looks a little lightweight compared to current flagships.

  LG Nexus 5X
Display 5.2-inch LCD display
1920 x 1080 resolution, 424ppi
Corning Gorilla Glass 3
Processor 2.0GHz hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 MSM8992 processor
GPU Adreno 418
RAM 2GB
Storage 16, 32GB
MicroSD No
Networks GSM 850/1900
W-CDMA 2/4/5
CDMA 0/1/10
LTE Band 2/4/5/7/12/13/17/25/26/41
Dual SIM No
Software Android 6.0 Marshmallow
Fingerprint scanner Yes, rear-mounted
Camera 12.3MP rear-facing camera, f/2.0 aperture, laser-assisted autofocus
5MP front-facing camera, f/2.2 aperture
Battery 2700mAh, non-removable
Wireless charging No
Dimensions 147.0 x 72.6 x 7.9mm, 136g
Colors Charcoal Black, Quartz White, Ice Blue

Storage options are the same: 16GB or 32GB. For most people, 16GB isn’t going to be enough in the long term, but the extra 16GB costs $50 and there’s no Micro SD card slot. $429 is still relatively cheap, but it’s not a special price when you look at what’s out there. The battery is a respectable 2,700mAh, and it’s not removable.

The compromises

There are also a couple of disappointing compromises in the Nexus 5X. Wireless charging support has been dropped. Google has gone all-in with USB Type-C instead. It’s reversible, so it should be much easier to plug in, but for anyone used to wireless charging it’s still going to feel like a step backward.

nexus 5x first look aa (25 of 28)

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but the Nexus 5X design certainly doesn’t stand out. The original Nexus 5 had the angular, monolith thing going for it, with curves top and bottom that gave it a unique, instantly recognizable profile. The 5X is a rectangle with rounded corners that would be tough to pick out of a line-up, though, it is at least slimmer.


nexus 5x first look aa (7 of 28)See also: Nexus 5X hands-on: a look at Google’s new affordable phone15

How does it compare?

When the Nexus 5 came out, it was the best value budget smartphone on the market. There really wasn’t another phone at the time that offered quite as much for $350. We can’t say the same about the 5X. If you’re thinking of dropping $379 on the Nexus 5X, there are actually quite a few other options that you could consider.

The Asus Zenfone 2 is only $300 and it manages to pack in a 5.5-inch display, with a 2.3GHz quad-core processor, and 4GB of RAM. The OnePlus 2 starts at $329 and has an octa-core processor, more RAM, a bigger battery, USB Type-C support, and a fingerprint sensor. You could pick up an LG G3 for around $330 now, with a 5.5-inch, 2560 x 1440 pixel display. Even the Moto X Style (Pure) is only $400 and it boasts a 5.7-inch display and a 21MP camera.

Moto X Pure Edition-28

Moto X Style/Pure

The Nexus 5X may be better than some or all of these, it’s impossible to say for sure until we get some decent time with it, but it’s clearly launching into a much more competitive landscape than the Nexus 5 did. If you agree that you’ll need at least 32GB, which will cost you $429, then it’s only an extra $70 for the Nexus 6P, which starts at 32GB, but also has a bigger and sharper screen, a better processor, more RAM, and an 8MP front-facing camera, not to mention a metal body.

Good, but not great

If we rewind to the beginning of LG and Google’s Nexus partnership we can put the Nexus 5X into some perspective. The Nexus 4 was a phone that had a surprisingly premium design with good build quality, a set of specs that didn’t look out of place with the flagships of the day, and it started at just $299. If the Nexus 5X was being offered at $299 we’d be lauding it as an incredible bargain. Even if it landed at $350, like the Nexus 5, it would stand out in the budget field, but at $379… it’s not so clear.

There are lots of other little improvements in the Nexus 5X, and it’s impossible to judge properly without using it for a while. It will run Android 6.0 Marshmallow out of the box, and there’s no telling when some of the competition mentioned above will get that. For Android fans, the stock nature of the Nexus 5X can’t be underestimated. We also have high hopes for the camera and the fingerprint sensor, but there’s no hiding the fact that there are some disappointments here, too.

On paper, the Nexus 5X looks good for the money, but it doesn’t look great.

6
Oct

Which T-Mobile phones will get Android 6.0 Marshmallow?


android 6.0 marshmallow

Wondering if your phone will get Android 6.0 Marshmallow? Be sure you are not alone, we’re all desperately waiting for that notification. Android fans are quick to jump on Google whenever they learn a new major update has become available from Google, and the lack of information can be rather frustrating. T-Mobile subscribers won’t have to look through multiple news sites and forums, though. Magenta is being awesome and revealing its entire upgrade plans for Android 6.0 Marshmallow.

T-Mobile’s dedicated Android 6.0 upgrade page is pretty straight forward. It shows a list of devices that will eventually get the new software. Devices are then labeled into 3 categories: Manufacturer Development, T-Mobile Testing and Completed. These pretty much describe the stage at which each phone can be found.

The list of devices to get Android 6.0 Marshmallow includes the following: 

  • HTC One M8
  • HTC One M9
  • LG G3
  • LG G4
  • LG G Stylo
  • Nexus 5
  • Nexus 6
  • Nexus 7
  • Nexus 9
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 4
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 5
  • Samsung Galaxy Note Edge
  • Samsung Galaxy S5
  • Samsung Galaxy S6
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab S2

t-mobile-logo-mwc-2015

As you can expect, very few of these devices are on the Completed stage at the time of this post’s publishing. Most of these are still under Manufacturer Development, essentially leaving Nexus devices alone in other categories. Most Nexi are under Completed, by the way; only the Nexus 6 is still undergoing network testing.

What a handy tool this is! T-Mobile users can just click on the button below to head over to the carrier’s Android 6.0 Marshmallow update page. Details will continue to be updated as the roll-out advances. Don’t we wish all manufacturers did this?!

See T-Mobile’s software updates page!

Also Read:

6
Oct

Factory images for Android Marshmallow have been released



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It was announced last week that Android Marshmallow for the Nexus devices would be released “next week”, and right on cue, the factory images for Android Marshmallow have been released today for your flashing convenience. Specifically, the images that are available today are for the Nexus 5, Nexus 6, Nexus 7 (2013), Nexus 9 and Nexus Player, just as we expected. If you’re looking for where to download them, you’ll be able to find all the images on the Google Developers website.

Just remember that if you’re going to be flashing a factory image to your device, you’ll need to back up all your essentials as it will wipe clean. If that sounds like too much effort, then you’re likely better off waiting for the OTA (over-the-air) updates that should be rolling out as we speak.


If you do take the plunge, we’d love to hear about how you’re finding it in the comments below.

Source: Google Developers via Droid-life

The post Factory images for Android Marshmallow have been released appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

6
Oct

Nexus Android 6.0 Marshmallow update downloads and release info


android 6.0 marshmallow

October 5th has finally arrived and that can only mean one thing for Nexus users – it is only a matter of time before those Android 6.0 Marshmallow updates begin showing up. As it goes with every large Android iteration, Nexus devices are the first in line to get the OTA update. This doesn’t necessarily mean your handset will be upgraded soon after the release date (October 5th), though.

In fact, it can take weeks for the fluffy marshmallow treat to hit your phone, depending on which one you own. That is, unless Google happens to move quicker than usual. Regardless, the update is coming and you could sit tight and wait for the notification to hit your own Nexus gadget… or you could just grab the darn file and manually install it!

nexus 5x first look aa (21 of 28)

We will provide you with the file download pages below, but keep in mind manually flashing an update to your Nexus device is not a cut-and-dry procedure. It takes some tech knowledge and a few requirements. You can use our ‘How to manually install Android 6.0 Marshmallow on a Nexus device” post if you are not feeling too comfortable about it.

Just make sure to remember that tinkering with your device may harm your device or void your warranty. Do this at your own risk, make sure to do a fair amount of research and corroborate that your device is rocking the latest possible software before making this update. If you are still up for it, keep reading and grab your required files!

Editor’s note: this list will continue to be updated as more information and files emerge, so keep it tuned to this page by bookmarking it! 

nexus 5x s8 chromecast pixel c (1)

Galaxy Nexus

Nexus 5

  • Still not available.

Nexus 6

  • Still not available.

Nexus 7 WiFi (2013)

  • Still not available.

Nexus 7 LTE (2013)

Nexus 9 WiFi

  • Still not available.

Nexus 9 LTE

Nexus Player

  • Still not available.
5
Oct

Android 6.0 Marshmallow factory images arrive for Nexus 5, 6, 7 (2013), 9 and Player


Android M Easter Egg-6

If you happen to own a Nexus device and you’ve been waiting to get your hands on the most recent version of Android, your wait is finally over – Google has just posted Android 6.0 Marshmallow factory images for all current Nexus devices. Owners of the Nexus 5, Nexus 6, Nexus 7 (2013), Nexus 9 and Nexus Player can now download and install Android 6.0 on their devices.

Remember that installing these updates directly from the Google Developer website requires a bit of know-how, and we’ve put together a walkthrough that should be able to help if you’re new to the manual installation method. If you aren’t keen on updating manually, Google should  begin rolling out Android 6.0 OTAs to these Nexus devices any day now.


Nexus event google (20)Related: Android Marshmallow launches next week30

To get started with the downloads, head to the Google Developers link below.

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5
Oct

Get the Android 6.0 Marshmallow factory images for Nexus devices!


android_6-0_marshmallow_sticks_in_jar

Today, Google posted the Android 6.0 Marshmallow factory images for various Nexus devices. You can now manually install Marshmallow on your Nexus 4, Nexus 5, Nexus 6, Nexus 7 (2013), Nexus 9, and Nexus Player. The exact version here is MRA58K.

Get ’em while they’re hot!

Source: Google Developers

Come comment on this article: Get the Android 6.0 Marshmallow factory images for Nexus devices!

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