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Posts tagged ‘iPhone’

20
Dec

Apple Offering Free Next Day Shipping for the Holidays


Apple today updated its online website to announce free next-day shipping for all orders placed by 2:00 p.m. by Friday, December 23, giving last minute shoppers a chance to place orders before Christmas.

Orders placed before the December 23 cut off date will arrive in time for Christmas in most cases, but customers will need to confirm delivery times at checkout.

Apple normally limits free next-day delivery to iPhones, with free two-day shipping on most other products, but during the holidays, Apple often offers upgraded shipping. Apple also has an online gift guide for customers who need gift ideas, recommending iPhones, iPads, Macs, and related accessories.

Customers who live near an Apple Store who are looking for last minute gifts can also get items using in-store pickup. Today’s new shipping policy comes just as AirPods have begun shipping out to customers, but in-store sales are the only way to get Apple’s newest accessory as online sales are sold out through January.
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17
Dec

Apple Adds 21 New Aerial Screen Savers to Apple TV


One of the best features on the fourth-generation Apple TV is its high-quality aerial screen savers that play on the screen after a short period of inactivity. The Aerial screen saver option on the Apple TV features an aerial view of different locations around the world, which Apple has added to over time to keep content fresh.

The Aerial screen saver picks a random video option from a data source maintained by Apple, and that data source was recently updated with 21 new screen savers. iDownloadBlog has parsed the data and shared direct links to each of the new screen savers that can be watched on iOS devices and Macs.

Screen savers are time-based and show off various cities and locations in slow motion, with the lighting changing based on the time of day. New screen savers of video captured in China, Dubai, Greenland, Hong Kong, Liwa, and Los Angeles have been added.

China:
– Day 4
– Day 5
– Day 6

Dubai:
– Day 1
– Day 2
– Day 3
– Day 4
– Night 1
– Night 2

Greenland:
– Day 1
– Day 2
– Night 1

Hong Kong:
– Day 1
– Day 2
– Day 3
– Night 1

Liwa (United Arab Emirates):
– Day 1

Los Angeles (United States):
– Day 1
– Day 2
– Day 3
– Night 1

These screen savers aren’t likely to be immediately available to all users, as the Apple TV downloads new aerial content on a regular basis depending on your Apple TV settings. New screen savers can be set to download on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis in the Settings app on the Apple TV.
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15
Dec

Apple to Charge $69 to Replace a Lost or Broken AirPod


On its iPhone Service Pricing page, Apple recently updated its repair and replacement costs for AirPods, which went on sale earlier this week.

Apple doesn’t appear to be offering AppleCare+ for AirPods, instead providing a standard one-year warranty that’s available on all Apple products. If the AirPods need service during that one year period, all work will be covered for free.

After the one-year warranty has expired, Apple will charge a $69 fee for out-of-warranty service repairs. Battery service for AirPods that lose battery capacity is free during the one-year warranty period or $49 out of warranty.

If you lose or damage one of the AirPods or the charging case, Apple will charge $69 for a replacement, regardless of whether or not the AirPods are still under warranty. The pricing in Apple’s support document is U.S. pricing, and will vary based on country.

airpodrepairs
AirPods first went on sale Tuesday morning with shipment dates as early as December 21, but supplies were quickly exhausted. Within an hour, delivery estimates slipped to December 29, and shortly after that, fell again to four weeks.

AirPods orders placed today in the United States will not ship out for six weeks, arriving to customers towards the end of January. Apple is expected to start offering AirPods in stores starting next week, so customers who did not get a chance to pre-order may still be able to get a set of AirPods.

Apple has said stores will be receiving “regular AirPods shipments,” but supplies are likely to be tight as demand is high.

Priced at $159, AirPods are wire-free Bluetooth-equipped headphones that are able to provide up to five hours of music playback. AirPods use a new Apple-designed W1 chip to quickly switch between devices, and include features like touch-based controls and Siri. AirPods charge via an included charging case and a Lightning cable.
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15
Dec

Florida court rules police can demand your phone’s passcode


A Florida man arrested for third-degree voyeurism using his iPhone 5 initially gave police verbal consent to search the smartphone, but later rescinded permission before divulging his 4-digit passcode. Even with a warrant, they couldn’t access the phone without the combination. A trial judge denied the state’s motion to force the man to give up the code, considering it equal to compelling him to testify against himself, which would violate the Fifth Amendment. But the Florida Court of Appeals’ Second District reversed that decision today, deciding that the passcode is not related to criminal photos or videos that may or may not exist on his iPhone.

Obviously, this has implications for Constitutional protections of a civilian’s data contained behind a smartphone’s multi-digit passcode. Previously, a 2014 decision by the Virginia Beach Circuit Court found that individuals can’t be compelled to give up their phone’s code, but they could be forced to unlock it with a fingerprint, should that option be available.

The distinction? A passcode requires a person to divulge actual knowledge, while a fingerprint is considered physical evidence, like a handwriting sample or DNA. This interpretation sources back to the Supreme Court’s 1988 Doe v. U.S. decision, in which it ruled that a person may be compelled to give up a key to a strongbox, say, but not a combination to a wall safe.

The three-judge Appeals Court panel in Florida disagreed with this distinction. They also found the comparison out of step with the current state of technology, such that providing the passcode would not be as similarly self-incriminating as directly giving the authorities evidential documents. Further, the police were beyond probable cause of searching suspect Aaron Stahl’s code-locked phone, as Judge Anthony Black wrote for his fellows in the court’s decision:

“Moreover, although the passcode would allow the State access to the phone, and therefore to a source of potential evidence, the State has a warrant to search the phone—the source of evidence had already been uncovered … Providing the passcode does not “betray any knowledge [Stahl] may have about the circumstances of the offenses” for which he is charged.”

Black clarified what kind of foreknowledge authorities would need to possess to compel someone to divulge their phone’s passcode:

“In order for the foregone conclusion doctrine to apply, the State must show with reasonable particularity that, at the time it sought the act of production, it already knew the evidence sought existed, the evidence was in the possession of the accused, and the evidence was authentic … Although the State need not have “perfect knowledge” of the requested evidence, it “must know, and not merely infer,” that the evidence exists, is under the control of defendant, and is authentic.”

Via: The Daily Dot

Source: Courthouse News

14
Dec

Google Drive creates a shortcut for iOS to Android migrations


If you’re switching from iOS to Android, Google Drive might be able to help you out: its latest feature gives it the powers to back up your calendar events, contacts, photos and videos. It probably doesn’t sound that useful if you regularly use GCal for your schedule or Google Photos to store your images. But if you don’t, then Drive ensures you don’t have to manually transfer your data — all you have to do is start the backup process within the settings page.

Since the whole thing could take few a hours, and you’ll have to keep Drive active and on screen the whole time, Google advises you to plug your phone in and connect to WiFi. Now, you might not ever put this to use if you got a Pixel and the Quick Switch Adapter that comes with it, but it sure sounds useful for other Android devices. Just don’t forget to switch off iMessage before you leave.

Give the gift of @Android. Drive now makes transferring photos, videos, contacts & calendar events easier than ever. https://t.co/xZpaA3Zmgq pic.twitter.com/TRdH4AYEKd

— Google Drive (@googledrive) December 13, 2016

Via: The Verge

Source: Android

12
Dec

Apple releases iOS 10.2 and its companion TV app


Apple is making good on its promise of giving you a unified video streaming experience. The company has released iOS 10.2 and tvOS 10.1, both of which include the company’s centerpiece TV app. So long as a given service supports the feature, you no longer have to jump into and out of apps to catch up on your viewing — you can resume your favorite show or check out recommendations from a single place. Netflix isn’t included in TV at the moment, alas, but this and the recently launched single sign-on should save you a lot of hassle.

The iOS update isn’t just a one-trick pony, of course. It includes a slew of new emoji, including a face palm, a gorilla (read: Harambe) and female equivalents for most job emoji. And of course, there are numerous subtler tweaks. You’ll see improved music controls with quicker access to your queue and shuffling, better stabilization and improved frame rates for Live Photos, a dedicated News app section for saved articles and notifications for smart home devices like smoke detectors and door sensors.

Combine these with general fixes (there’s a significant upgrade to Bluetooth performance, for example) and you’ll definitely want to upgrade — if just to see Apple fulfill one of its big end-of-year promises.

Source: MacRumors

9
Dec

‘Super Mario Run’ won’t work offline due to piracy concerns


Super Mario Run doesn’t arrive for another few days, but when it does, you’ll need a constant internet connection to play the game. In an interview with Mashable, Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto confirmed that due to piracy concerns, the latest installment of Mario doesn’t have an offline mode. The company is worried about piracy because the game will be available in 150 countries on devices that it doesn’t have direct control over.

“For us, we view our software as being a very important asset for us,” Miyamoto explained to Mashable. “And also for consumers who are purchasing the game, we want to make sure that we’re able to offer it to them in a way that the software is secure, and that they’re able to play it in a stable environment.”

The constant network connection will not only be used to save progress, but it will also sync that saved info across devices. Nintendo apparently wanted to make the World Tour available offline, but the technical hurdles to doing so and having it still play nice with the Toad Rally and Kingdom modes proved problematic.

“We wanted to be able to leverage that network connection with all three of the modes to keep all of the modes functioning together and offering the game in a way that keeps the software secure,” Miyamoto continued. “This is something that we want to continue to work on as we continue to develop the game.”

In a statement to Engadget, Nintendo said that Super Mario Run’s online connection allows it to “enhance the play experience.” An internet connection provides access to scores from other players’ Toad Rally challenges and handles new in-game events while you’re playing. The company also reiterated that being constantly connected lets users to link to a Nintendo Account so that saved progress can sync across all of their iOS devices. You know, if you need to switch from your iPad to your iPhone for some reason.

Super Mario Run arrives for iPhone and iPad on December 15th. While the game is free to download, you’ll need to hand over $10 to unlock all of its levels. Of course, with no offline mode, you won’t be able to play during your next flight or on a commute that takes you underground. Here’s Nintendo’s full statement on the matter:

Online connectivity allows us to offer a variety of features and services that enhance the play experience. Super Mario Run is not a static experience, but rather one that players can continue to return to again and again to enjoy something new and unexpected. For example, online connectivity can offer the following:

  • Access to other users’ play data and scores for automatically generated Toad Rally challenges.
  • In-game events that will offer players new challenges and rewards for a limited time.
  • Linkage to Nintendo Account to access save data from multiple devices. For example, if players have Super Mario Run on their iPhone and iPad, they can share one save file across the different devices. However, this save data cannot be used with different devices at the same time.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Mashable

9
Dec

Mixed reality comes to your iPhone thanks to the Bridge headset


There’s something more than a little magical about seeing the world in front of you being devastated by dragons or augmented with arrows pointing you to your next meeting. Alas, while mixing realities like that with our smartphones is already possible, the tech still is a long way off from reaching its potential — just look at early, disappointing efforts like Lenovo’s enormous Tango phone. Luckily, startups are chasing the mixed reality dream too, including one — Occipital — that has a solid track record of solving the tricky problems that pop up when blurring boundaries between worlds. That’s why the team’s new mixed reality, the Bridge, seems so impressive right out of the gate.

Oh, and another thing: it’s specifically for iPhones. For years now, most mobile virtual reality fun has been confined to Android, with cheap Gear VRs and Daydream Views making it easy to see what all the hype was about. While some VR games and apps exist for iPhones, Apple hardware historically hasn’t gotten the same kind of developer love as Android has. To Occipital, that smelled like an opportunity. The Bridge will go one sale to the masses for $399 starting in March, but developers and the adventurous can snag their Explorer Editions as soon as next week. To understand what you’ll actually get for your money, we’ll have to rewind a bit.

Three years ago, the company released the Structure sensor, a fascinating bit of depth-sensing tech that was originally meant to bring augmented reality experiences to the iPad. Mixed reality still seemed like a hard sell back then, but there no denying the sensor’s ability to measure the world around it was the real deal. To hear Occipital marketing chief Adam Rodnitzky tell it, the sensor eventually started being used by real estate agents, interior decorators and doctors, and after three years, the Structure was still excellent at its job.

So, with headsets being hawked alongside smartphones all over the place, Occipital decided to make their own — they took a Structure sensor, slapped a five-element wide-angle lens in front of it, and built a sturdy, balanced frame around it. Turning an existing product like the Structure into headset might seem like opportunism at its finest, but the end result has so much potential it almost doesn’t matter.

I played with one of the Explorer Editions recently, and it was more impressive — and elaborate — than I expected. You can pop an iPhone 6 (or newer, but no SEs) into the frame and a magnetically latched door keeps it in place. From there, you place the Bridge on your head as you would a crown, and use a dial in the back to tighten it. Yes, it sounds like a sort of torture device, but the system actually works like a charm. The only real problem I came across was that the lenses sit closer to your eyes than in most other mobile VR headsets — that meant they pushed right up against my glasses most of the time. It could’ve been worse, but Rodnitzky assured me future models wouldn’t smash my frames so noticeably.

Actually using Bridge was a much smoother experience. Occipital doesn’t have any launch titles planned for the Bridge’s debut, but it does come with a demo app that stars at adorable robot pet of sorts named Bridget. With the help of a Wiimote-like Bluetooth controller, I spent a good ten minutes tossing a virtual ball around the office and watching Bridget loop around coffee tables to retrieve it. Her understanding of the world around her was fueled by a depth-scanning session that only lasted a few seconds — once that was done, I had a mapped out a corner of our office with a level of precision that Lenovo’s Phab 2 Pro wasn’t able to match.

That might not be the fairest comparison to make, though: for now, the Structure sensor’s software is only tuned to capture spaces of about 10 ft. by 10 ft., while Tango software usually tries to record whole swaths of a room at once. Structure’s scope might be more limited, but it does a much better job within those constraints.

After dropping that ball one time too many, Bridget was tired and needed to charge. The answer? To grab her power cord and connect it to something that lit up, like a lamp. This is what I so sorely missed when I played with Tango — I wanted to badly for someone standing next to a virtual dinosaur to be able to interact with it or to pluck a virtual domino off the ground. This was a pretty basic example, but the sort of object recognition the Structure can pull off was unexpectedly good for a headset.

Don’t think the Bridge is only capable of the usual augmented reality tricks, either: at one point, I was directed to drop a portal on the ground in front of me. Once I stepped into it, I found myself walking around inside a space station with a planet hanging lazily in the dark outside a hatch. A red mesh enveloped real-world obstacles, allowing me to dodge coffee tables and loungers as I (all too briefly) explored the station. After a few more moments of stumbling, that was that — demo over. I was just a little crushed.

With any luck, Occipital gets the sort of support from developers it’s been gunning for. The Bridge system isn’t perfect for a whole host of reasons, like the iPhone’s non-AMOLED display and the potentially big hit on the phone’s battery, but even the unfinished demo software was almost enough to make me toss the Phab 2 Pro in a desk drawer. The right kind of love could turn the Bridge into a must-have down the road — for now, I’ll just have to wait and hope.

9
Dec

TSMC plans a new factory to pump out tomorrow’s 3 nm chips


News leaked in late August that chipmaker Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co (TSMC) and Apple were working shrinking the A11 processor set to go in next year’s iPhone down to 10nm. But to ensure it stays in business with the tech titan and other device manufacturers, TSMC is planning to build a new plant to build future chips at 5nm and 3nm sizes.

According to Nikkei Asian Review, TSMC announced the new $15.7 billion facility a day after Taiwan’s minister of science and technology, Yang Hung-duen, told local media about it. His ministry might select a site in Kaohsiung for the factory, which could start production as early as 2022.

That gives TSMC’s competitors a few years’ breathing room, but the race to smaller and smaller chips continues. While Intel claims it will produce a 10nm processor before its competitors, it conceded that production facilities equipped to pump out increasingly-smaller chips will only get more expensive. That’s why the company is slowing its two-year cycle “tick-tock” innovation cycle to reduce chip size every three years instead, focusing instead of improving internal architecture and performance in the interim.

But even that lead might not be enough: On a conference call back in January, TSMC said it has a plan to push out 7nm chips by 2017 and 5nm by 2020.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Nikkei Asian Review

8
Dec

Spotify Won’t Be Purchasing SoundCloud After All


Rumors last month suggested Apple Music rival Spotify was in advanced talks to acquire audio distribution platform SoundCloud, but it appears discussions have ended after Spotify pulled out of the deal.

According to TechCrunch, though months of talks took place, Spotify ultimately decided not to purchase SoundCloud because of worries the acquisition would negatively impact its impending IPO.

Spotify hasn’t officially said it will go public in 2017, but there has been plenty of speculation, including a funding round with incentives tied to a listing. The source said Spotify went cold on SoundCloud because “it doesn’t need an additional licensing headache in a potential IPO year.”

SoundCloud, which allows users to upload, promote, and share audio recordings, would have allowed Spotify to add user-created content to its own music catalog, but Spotify would have needed to deal with licensing issues, something it did not want to do ahead of an IPO.

SoundCloud has upwards of 175 million total listeners a month, while Spotify has 40 million paying subscribers. Apple Music, Spotify’s main competitor, has been gaining subscribers steadily and as of December 2016, boasts 20 million subscribers.
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