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Posts tagged ‘Galaxy Note 4’

16
Sep

A History of the Galaxy Note Smartphone Series


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Samsung’s Galaxy Note series is still a mystery to some. “Who would want a device so massive?” is a common statement among onlookers. Many of us prefer the 5-inch form factor, which is why past Nexus devices, Moto X’s, and others have been so popular. Despite a market saturated with devices having a 5-inch form factor, the Galaxy Note series has managed to firmly corner a market wanting much larger options.

That isn’t a bad thing. After all, that’s what Android is all about–a variety of devices to fit different personalities, likes, and dislikes. However, the Galaxy Note series has an interesting history with the original Note launching in October of 2011.

Original Galaxy Note

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The original Galaxy Note was, at first, a strange device, not knowing what it really was. It featured specifications that are foreign to flagship devices today. It has a 5.3-inch 1280 x 800 Super AMOLED display, an Exynos chipset, a dual-core 1.4GHz ARM Cortex-A9 CPU, a Mali-400 GPU, 1GB of RAM, 16/32GB storage options, microSD support up to 64GB, an 8MP rear camera, a 2MP front camera, a, 2500mAh battery, and Android 2.3 Gingerbread.

The element that made this device unique was the inclusion of the S Pen, giving users more options and control with their smartphone.

Samsung created the Galaxy Note to be a user’s primary device for on-the-go activities. It would do whatever you needed it do–take notes by recreating the ease of traditional pencil and paper, take good photos for family vacations, be a great multimedia device, and so on. In essence, Samsung wanted to get rid of all the extra devices and accessories you take with you–pen, notepads, point-and-shoot cameras, and replace it with a single device: the Galaxy Note.

The most interesting aspect of the device is that the media wasn’t sure just how well the original Galaxy Note would fit in with its 5.3-inch display. At the time, that was a massive display and was considered extremely large for a phone, and almost unnecessary. However, it was still met with success, selling over 10 million units in a year.

This isn’t where the Note’s success stopped, though.

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Galaxy Note II

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Samsung’s Galaxy Note II was a big upgrade from the original Galaxy Note on the hardware and software side of things. It has a bigger, 5.5-inch 1280 x 720 Super AMOLED display, an Exynos 4412 chipset, a quad-core 1.6GHz Cortex-A9 CPU, a Mali-400MP4 GPU, 2GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB storage options, microSD support up to 64GB, 8MP rear camera, a 2MP front camera, a 3100mAh battery, and it’s running Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, upgradeable to KitKat.

Another modification was a revised S Pen, along with many added S Pen features. Added to the Galaxy Note II was pen gestures, split-screen multitasking, and Air View, a feature that lets users preview content by hovering the pen over the screen. There were some other new TouchWiz features included that was introduced with the Galaxy S III.

The original Galaxy Note’s success pales in comparison to what the Note II saw, selling well over 30 million units worldwide. Samsung certainly saw their was a market for large devices like this, and has seen a lot of success as result. However, after the Galaxy Note II, many other manufacturers began developing devices of a similar size to take advantage of this popularity.

Many still thought 5.5 inches was massive for a display at the time, but it would quickly become the norm in future editions.

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Galaxy Note 3

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The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 launched in September 2013, succeeding the Galaxy Note II. It was an extreme upgrade in hardware and offered more productivity options than the Galaxy Note series had seen in the past. The Galaxy Note 3 also ushered in a less blocky design, focusing on a much more premium offering.

It has a massive 5.7-inch 1920 x 1080 Super AMOLED display, a Snapdragon 800/Exynos 5 Octa 5420 chipset (varies by market), a quad-core 2.3GHz Krait 400/quad-core 1.9GHz Cortex-A15 and quad-core 1.3GHz Cortex-A7 CPU (varies by market), 3GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB storage options, microSD support up to 64GB, a 13MP rear camera, a 2MP front-facing camera, a 3200mAh battery, and the device is running Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, which is upgradeable to Android 5.0 Lollipop.

What was unique about the Galaxy Note 3 is that it introduced a plastic leather back as opposed to the silicone seen in the past. The faux leather gave the device a premium feel, though some didn’t like the new design at all. This new Galaxy Note 3 brought with it expanded S Pen functionality, such as Air Command, Action Memos, handwriting recognition, and much more.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The Galaxy Note 3 was met with yet more wild success, selling 10 million units in its first two months. Interestingly just a few months later, Samsung decided to offer a downgraded version of the device, the Galaxy Note 3 Neo.

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Galaxy Note 3 Neo

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The Galaxy Note 3, announced by Samsung Poland in January 2014, was intended to be a less pricier version of the Galaxy Note 3. The Galaxy Note 3 Neo’s specs were all downgraded, but nothing too bad. The only major change was that the display was reverted to a 5.5-inch 720p panel and the camera was reduced down from 13MP to 8MP.

Software and S Pen functionality remained the same. However, it turned out to be a big disappointment in that it was essentially a Galaxy Note 2 with an artificial leather back. Its biggest complaint was the extremely drop in screen resolution. After this, Samsung never made a “budget” Galaxy Note again.

Galaxy Note 4

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Samsung later in 2014 at IFA in Berlin announced the Galaxy Note 4, which was essentially a Galaxy Note 3 with a few minor changes, although there was a major improvement in resolution with the display.

It has a 5.7-inch 2560 x 1440 Super AMOLED display, a Snapdragon 805/Exynos 5433 chipset (varies by market), a quad-core 2.7GHz Krait 450/a quad-core 1.3GHz Cortex-A53 and quad-core 1.9GHz Cortex-A59 CPU (varies by market), 3GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB of internal storage, microSD support up to 128GB, a 16MP rear camera, a 3.7MP front camera, a 3220mAh battery, and it’s running Android 4.4 KitKat, which is upgradeable to Android 5.0 Lollipop.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The Galaxy Note 4 didn’t see as much success as previous entries in the Note series, only garnering 4.5 million units in its first month. This would also be the last Note device to see the faux leather back.

As with every release, more software features was brought to the device for added S Pen and TouchWiz UI functionality. While many of these aren’t necessary to the goals of the Note series, it reiterates Samsung’s effort to make the Galaxy Note an all-in-one device so that you won’t ever need to bring anything else with you, whether that be a notepad, camera, and so on.

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Galaxy Note Edge

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The Samsung Galaxy Note Edge can be pictured as Samsung’s “Frankenstein,” an experimental device. We’ve seen many devices with an edge-to-edge display, but nothing like the Galaxy Note Edge where it’s actually a curved display.

The device features a 5.6-inch 2560 x 1600 Super AMOLED display, it has Snapdragon 805 chipset, a quad-core 2.7GHz Krait 450 CPU, 3GB of RAM, 32/64GB of internal storage, microSD support up to 128GB, a 16MP rear camera, a 3.7MP front camera, a 3000mAh battery, and it’s running Android 4.4, which is upgradable to Android 5.1 Lollipop.

Aside from a small bump in resolution and a downgrade in battery, the Galaxy Note Edge’s specifications largely resemble that of the Galaxy Note 4. However, what makes it unique is that it has a curved display of 160px, running into the right side of the smartphone.

There was some additional functionality that worked with the curved display, but besides that, the device remains identical to the Galaxy Note 4. There’s been differing opinions regarding the Note Edge, but overall it seemed to do well, however, we haven’t heard news or rumors of another one in the works.

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Galaxy Note 5

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And here we arrive to this year’s refresh of the Galaxy Note. The device received a small bump in specifications, but nothing major. After all, Samsung’s focus this year wasn’t hardware, but offering a more premium device than it has in the past through a new design and better software features.

The phone totes a 5.7-inch 2560 x 1440 Super AMOLED display, a Exynos 7420 chipset, a quad-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A53 and a quad-core 2.1GHz Cortex-A57 CPU, 4GB of RAM, 32/64GB storage options, no microSD support, a 16MP rear camera, a 5MP front camera, and a 3000mAh battery, which isn’t field removable. It’s also on the latest version of Lollipop.

There’s been a lot of controversy regarding this device, largely because of closing off microSD access and sealing up the smartphone’s battery. There isn’t much reasoning behind getting rid of microSD support, however, we’re sure Samsung felt like they could seal up the battery by offering fast wireless charging features.

More controversy surrounds this device due to the S Pen. If you put it in its tray backwards, it gets stuck and generally cannot be removed without wrecking the device, though there have been some methods posted online to “unstick” the S Pen.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Overall, it’s a very nice looking device with a gorgeous glass back. There’s been a bevy of improved software features, and this is truly one of Samsung’s best, despite the controversy around it. Personally, the most upsetting aspect of this device is that European users won’t be able to get their hands on it, as Samsung, thus far, hasn’t revealed any plans to bring the device to European markets.

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Wrap Up

And that’s quick primer on Samsung’s Galaxy Note series. It truly is an interesting device, and its history is quite intriguing, especially considering that many thought anything above 5-inches was way too large for a smartphone. It still did very well, despite those thoughts, which were largely portrayed by the media.

Do you own a Galaxy Note device? Have you owned one in the past? If so, what do you like or even dislike about the Note series? Be sure to let us know in the comments below.

Come comment on this article: A History of the Galaxy Note Smartphone Series

27
Aug

Samsung starts rolling out the Android 5.1.1 OTA for the International variant of the Galaxy Note 4


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Samsung has now starting rolling out the long-awaited Android 5.1.1 update to all International variants of the Galaxy Note 4. The upgrade was initially detected in Poland and bundles all the performance and security improvements you’d expect to find in Lollipop, alongside a patch for the open-source operating system’s Stagefright vulnerability.

Unfortunately, we don’t have a complete changelog for this update just yet, but we do know that the majority of changes are aimed at performance, battery life and overall user experience. Although, some users have encountered a severe lag issue when multitasking after upgrading to the new version.

As is the norm, the update is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device to hit your unit, you could always search for the upgrade manually. To do so, open the Settings app, scroll to the bottom and tap on “About Device”, hit “System Updates”, then select “Check for updates”.

Alternatively, you can download the update via Samsung Kies. If you’re not entirely sure how to do that, check out our comprehensive guide.

Come comment on this article: Samsung starts rolling out the Android 5.1.1 OTA for the International variant of the Galaxy Note 4

5
Aug

AT&T and Sprint are pushing Stagefright updates to many Samsung phones


samsung-galaxy-s6-themesStagefright is a new Android security vulnerability that affects millions of Android devices. It is critical it gets fixed right away. Google is pushing out an update to Nexus phones today, but now AT&T and Sprint are pushing the update to many Samsung phones.

 The phones AT&T will be updating are:

  • Galaxy Note 4 (N910AUCU2COC6)
  • Galaxy S6 Active (G890AUCU2AU2AOF4)
  • Galaxy S5 (G900AUCU4BOF3)
  • Galaxy S5 Active (G870AUCU2BOF3)

Sprint will be updating:

  • Galaxy S6 (G920PVPU2BOGA)
  • Galaxy S6 Edge (G925PVPU2BOGA)
  • Galaxy S5 (G900PVPU3BOG1)
  • Galaxy Note Edge (N915PVPU4COG1)

To check for these updates, head into Settings>System update>Update now.

Source: AT&T (1), (2), (3), (4), Sprint (1), (2), (3), (4)

Come comment on this article: AT&T and Sprint are pushing Stagefright updates to many Samsung phones

21
Jul

Samsung starts rolling out Lollipop update for the Note 4 in Chile, Colombia and Uruguay


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Samsung is currently rolling out the much-anticipated Lollipop update to all unlocked variants of the Galaxy Note 4 located in Chile, Colombia and Uruguay. As far as added functionality goes, this upgrade transports Android 5.0.2 to the handset, in addition to a truckload of bug fixes and stability improvements.

Hit the break for the full changelog.

  • OS Upgrade – Lollipop 5.1.1
  • Security Enhancements
  • Improved User Interface
  • Stability Improvements
  • Further Improvements to Performance
  • Enhanced Features

As is the norm, the upgrade is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device to hit your unit, you could always search for the update manually.

To do so simply open the Settings app, scroll to the bottom and tap on “About Device”, hit “System Updates”, then select “Check for updates”. Once done, the upgrade will start downloading from Samsung’s servers.

 

 

Come comment on this article: Samsung starts rolling out Lollipop update for the Note 4 in Chile, Colombia and Uruguay

11
Jul

[Deal] Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and Note Edge on AT&T get $200 discount


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With the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 and Galaxy S6 Edge Plus drawing close, chances are good buyers interested in last year’s Galaxy Note 4 and Galaxy Note Edge can find a deal on those devices. Earlier this week Samsung started a promotion offering a rebate on the Galaxy Note 4. Now U.S. carrier AT&T has launched their own $200 discount on the devices.

Visiting the AT&T site reveals the discount is only applicable for users willing to jump into a 2-year contract with AT&T. Buying the Note Edge device outright or using the AT&T Next program to make installment payments means paying the full price of $966 while the Note 4 runs $846.

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The discount is listed as an “Online Discount” and may not be available if you drop in at your local AT&T retail shop. Pricing details indicate AT&T’s smartphone sale offers are only valid through July 13th, although it is not clear whether that also applies to these discounts.

With the discount, the Galaxy Note Edge ends up costing $199 while the Galaxy Note 4 can be obtained for only $99.

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sources: AT&T (Note Edge), AT&T (Note 4)
via: GSMArena

Come comment on this article: [Deal] Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and Note Edge on AT&T get $200 discount

7
Jul

[Deal] Samsung offering $200 rebate on Galaxy Note 4 through July 26th


Samsung_Galaxy_Note_4_Back_Galaxy_Note_4_Logo_TAThe Galaxy Note 5 might be close to launching, but that doesn’t mean the Note 4 isn’t still a fantastic phone, especially if you can pick one up at a discounted price. Samsung is pushing a new promotion for July that will offer potential Note 4 buyers a $200 rebate for purchasing the phone through select retailers, which is a pretty substantial discount on a phone that’s still one of the best on the market.

The rules for the promo are pretty simple. Buy the phone from an approved retailer, fill out the required info on Samsung’s promotion site, and upload a photo of your receipt. Samsung should then send you a $200 rebate within 8 to 10 weeks. The only drawback is that waiting period, but hey, you’d end up with some cash back in your pocket right in time for the holidays.

This promo kicks off today and runs through the 26th of July, so you’ve got almost all month to think about it.

source: Samsung Promotions

Come comment on this article: [Deal] Samsung offering $200 rebate on Galaxy Note 4 through July 26th

7
Jul

Man makes his own Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition




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Many of you may know that Samsung recently released the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Iron Man edition into the wild, and frankly, it might be the biggest nerdfest a comic book and Android fan could ever ask for. Unfortunately, for those of us who don’t want to pay potentially stupid amounts of money (read: a “Tony Stark” amount of money), there may be a simpler do-it-yourself solution, which one man has taken to spruce up his device. Buying himself some appropriately coloured 3M film, one user created his own Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition, and we have to say the end result is pretty damn awesome. Take a look:

Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition
Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition
Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition

Topped off with an Iron Man wallpaper, it definitely fits the bill. Sure, it’s not quite the same finish as Samsung’s version of it, but if you’re keen to get your hands dirty, this might be a way for you to live out your dreams.


What do you think of this guy’s Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Galaktyczny via SamMobile

The post Man makes his own Samsung Galaxy Note 4 Iron Man edition appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

6
Jul

Samsung starts rolling out the Android 5.1.1 Lollipop update for the Note 4 in Russia


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Samsung has finally begun rolling out the much-anticipated Lollipop update to all unlocked variants of its flagship phablet, the Galaxy Note 4, located in Russia. As for as added functionality goes, this upgrade transports the latest build of the Android operating system to the handset, in addition to a truckload of bug fixes and stability improvements.

All the changes you’d expect to find in the Lollipop software are bundled into this upgrade, including support for multiple accounts, improved notifications, stronger 256-bit encryption, a smoother multitasking experience and the recently-announced Material Design guidelines.

As usual, the upgrade is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device to hit your unit, you could always search for the update manually.

To do so simply open the Settings app, scroll to the bottom and tap on “About Device”, hit “System Updates”, then select “Check for updates”. Once done, the upgrade will start downloading from Samsung’s servers.

Come comment on this article: Samsung starts rolling out the Android 5.1.1 Lollipop update for the Note 4 in Russia

20
Jun

Best Android phones for taking gorgeous photos [June 2015]


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As much as we tell ourselves that smartphone cameras aren’t suitable for professional photography, manufacturers seem to be adamant on proving that wrong every year. Manufacturers up the ante with their smartphone cameras, bringing professional grade quality to your fingertips.

HTC Desire EYE

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This one gets an honorable mention in our list for packing an insanely large 13MP camera on the front. The back is also accompanied by the same sensor, but with some added software customization. If you’re one for selfies, the Desire EYE has to be an instant choice given the kind of hardware on offer. It also has LED flash paired with both the rear and front-facing cameras, so you can take selfies even in a dimly lit room.

Samsung Galaxy Note 4

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It’s no secret that the Galaxy Note 4 from Samsung is an excellent multi-featured device as the company has covered all its bases with this 2014 device. There’s a beautiful Quad HD AMOLED display, plenty of storage and the gorgeous 16-megapixel camera sensor on the back which can take incredible pictures and video.

Samsung has used a dedicated optical image stabilization sensor on the smartphone to provide better images even when you’re slightly rushed. Ultimately, the Galaxy Note 4 is an incredible handset and is well worth a look if you want a high-end phone with a camera to rival the best in the market.

Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge

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Currently rated as the best smartphone(s) camera in the world, the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge offers the best experience as far as mobile cameras are concerned.

The exposure level and the autofocus speed have been praised by the experts, which are some of the most crucial aspects of a mobile camera as most of the images are taken in a hurry. Low light images on the handset are very capable too.

Video quality of the handset has received significant praise as well, so the cameras on the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge have scored very good points overall.

LG G4

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This might be a bit of a surprise inclusion for many, but from what we’ve seen, the 16-megapixel camera on the LG G4 trumps the competition by a fair margin. In our camera shootout with the Galaxy S6, it was revealed that the sensor on the G4 allows for more manual controls, with the ability to take RAW images by default available as well.

The larger sensor allows for more light to make its way in the images, which is always a good thing, especially in a low light setting. With an aperture size of f/1.8, it is the best mobile camera sensor (at least one paper) to have launched to date.

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What do you make of this list? Let us know in the comments.

Come comment on this article: Best Android phones for taking gorgeous photos [June 2015]

18
Jun

Best Android phones [June 2015]


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There are a wide range of smartphones that are up for grabs today with varying price points. So it can get a bit tricky to pick the best of them, mainly due to the sheer volume of devices. Some handsets, however, stand out in the crowd and we’re going to discuss the best of the best. Choice is one of the best things about choosing an Android device over other platforms.

The phones listed here have all been released by the end of June.

OnePlus One

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Despite being on the market for an entire year, the OnePlus One continues to make its way onto our list on the basis of price and performance. It runs a clean, customized version of Android in the form of OxygenOS and that makes the overall experience even better.

Right now, the model with 16GB of internal storage is available for $249 and $349 returns 64GB of internal storage along with year-long subscription of Dropbox Pro. The OnePlus One features a 5-inch display (1920×1080), 13MP rear camera, 5MP front-facing camera, Snapdragon 801 processor, 3GB of RAM, and a 3,100 mAh battery. It runs Android 5.0.2 Lollipop and this summer should see Android 5.1 arrive in the form of a software update.

Samsung Galaxy Note 4

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This is another device from last year that has held up months later. The Galaxy Note 4 goes to show that some devices have stood the test of time quite convincingly. The Galaxy Note 4 was launched amidst plenty of hype and buzz during IFA 2015 in September. The smartphone was soon to be overshadowed by the launch of the Apple iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus, but that doesn’t change the fact that this is a stellar handset.

Following the long range of Galaxy Note devices, this one too comes with the iconic S-Pen, an accessory that has some fancy tricks up its sleeve. On the hardware front, customers are greeted to a 5.7-inch display (2560×1440), 16MP rear camera, 3.7MP front-facing camera, Snapdragon 805 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of internal storage with a microSD card slot, Android 5.0.1 Lollipop, and 3220 mAh battery.

The Galaxy Note 4, even though its approaching the anniversary of its release, still maintains a high two-year contract price. With a two-year contract, the price is $299. Without a contract, the Galaxy Note 4 costs around $699. And any carriers with payment plans charge around $29 per month. The Galaxy Note 4 really gives you what you pay for.

Nexus 6

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The Nexus 6 was originally supposed to be an Android Silver device before the program was scrapped by Google. The program was touted to bring high-end hardware to consumers, a shift from the principles of selling stock Android devices on the cheap.

Although its size was a bit of a disappointment for the customers, there’s no denying that it is by far the best Nexus device to be sold by Google, perhaps after the Nexus 4 and 5. We highly doubt anyone would give the Galaxy Nexus that acclaim.

The handset has a massive a 5.96-inch display (2560×1440), 13MP camera, 2MP front-facing camera, 3GB of RAM, an abundance of internal storage, Snapdragon 805 processor, Android 5.1 Lollipop, and 3220 mAh battery housed inside.

The device, available directly from Google and select retailers, will set you back by $649 and $699 for the 32 and 64GB models, respectively. Don’t forget that the Nexus 6 will likely be among the first devices to receive Android M when it launches this fall.

LG G4

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The LG G4 was announced recently and is only making its way to the markets now. It’s the company’s flagship handset, which means you’re getting the very best of LG. The smartphone is selling for just under $600 from T-Mobile off contract, which is a remarkable price for a flagship smartphone.

It features all the necessary hardware to grab your attention, including a 5.5-inch display (2560×1440) and an impressive design with a leather rear panel option available as well. The device hosts a 16MP camera with an f/1.8 lens underneath its gorgeous exterior and is accompanied by an 8MP front-facing camera with an aperture size of f/2.0, which is quite impressive for a front camera.

Other specifications, too, make the G4 the beast that it is. The internal storage is set at 32GB but is expandable by 2TB through a microSD card slot. The G4’s hexa-core processor, the Snapdragon 808, is paired with 3GB of RAM so performance is not an issue. For those looking to get the G4, T-Mobile is offering a 128GB microSD card for free along with the device, thus offering you an added incentive to get the device from Team Magenta.

The price of the G4 is set around $599 without a contract but carriers have payment plans to spread the cost across twenty-four months.

Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge

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Adjudged the best smartphones available in the market, the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge have topped the performance and usability charts from critics and users alike. In addition to featuring a groundbreaking design and technology underneath, the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge were also voted to be sporting the best camera sensors in the industry by DxOMark, which is an industry approved site for judging mobile camera performance.

If you’re in the market for a flagship Android phone and money is no bar, you can’t do much better than the Galaxy S6 or the Galaxy S6 Edge right now. The smartphones are available from all major carriers as well as plenty of retailers, so you have a multitude of options to get either of the two devices.

The Galaxy S6 comes with a 5.1-inch Quad HD display, 16MP rear camera, 5MP front-facing camera, Exynos 7420 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32/64/128GB options when it comes to internal storage, Android 5.0.2 Lollipop or higher, and a 2550 mAh battery. The Galaxy S6 Edge has the same hardware specs sheet but with the curved edges on either side and a slightly larger 2600 mAh battery pack.

The Galaxy S6 starts from $599 off-contract, while the pricing for the Galaxy S6 Edge starts from $699 from major carriers in the United States. Of course, you can also get the devices by signing a two-year contract for $199.99 and $299.99, respectively.

What devices do you think are among the best available right now? Let us know in the comments.

Come comment on this article: Best Android phones [June 2015]

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