Skip to content

Archive for

25
Sep

How to Force-Quit Misbehaving Apple Watch Apps


Apple Watch apps rarely misbehave, but if one becomes non-responsive or fails to refresh data, sometimes force-quitting the app and relaunching it can solve the issue.

Fortunately, it’s a simple procedure. The following steps show you how it’s done on Apple Watch models running watchOS 4 or watchOS 5.

Open the misbehaving app on your Apple Watch, either by tapping its complication or selecting it from the honeycomb-style app menu/list view, so that it takes over the display.

Now, press and hold the Side button.
Release the Side button once the power down menu appears.

Next, press and hold the Digital Crown. You can release it once the app is whisked away from view and you’re returned to the watch face.And that’s all there is to it. The next time you launch the app in question, it will load up as if for the first time, and hopefully play nice again.

If the problem you’re having still persists, try restarting your Apple Watch from the power down screen, or consider re-installing the related app on your iPhone.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 5Tags: WatchOS 4, watchOS 5Buyer’s Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

Advertisements
25
Sep

Microsoft and Shell build A.I. into gas stations to help spot smokers


The last thing you want to see when you pull into a gas station is some doofus lighting up a smoke.

Whether they missed the warning notices or, perhaps, the science class back at high school about open flames and flammable vapor is, in that moment at least, largely immaterial.

As for your own course of action upon seeing such reckless behavior, you can either put your foot down and hightail it out of there before the whole place goes up, or yell at the smoker to put it the hell out.

Tackling the very same issue, Shell has been working with Microsoft on a solution that aims to make all future visits to gas stations stress-free, at least in terms of potential explosive activity. The system uses Microsoft’s Azure IoT Edge cloud intelligence system to quickly identify and deal with smokers at a gas station, and it’s already being tested at two Shell stations in Thailand and Singapore.

It works like this: High-tech cameras positioned around the gas station filter the footage on site to identify behavior that suggests someone is lighting up, or already smoking.

Images that appear to show such behavior are then automatically uploaded to the Microsoft Azure cloud, which can power more sophisticated deep learning artificial intelligence (A.I.) models to confirm whether the person is actually smoking. If so, an alert is sent immediately to the station manager who can then shut down the pump before anything potentially cataclysmic happens. The system presumably could also be fully automated and configured to shut down the pump without the manager having to do it manually, with an audible warning given to the smoker via a speaker in the pump. Taking it to the extreme, the setup could even blast the perpetrator with foam from a fire extinguisher incorporated into the pump.

The entire process, from identification to shutdown, can take place in a matter of seconds. Shell said that this is because so much of the initial data is processed by on-site computers rather than sending everything to the cloud for processing — a feature of Azure IoT Edge. In other words, only the important data — in this case images that appear to show someone smoking or about to smoke — is sent to the cloud, a procedure that helps to speed up analysis and response time.

“Each of our retail locations has maybe six cameras and captures something in the region of 200 megabytes per second of data,” said Daniel Jeavons, Shell’s general manager for data science. “If you try to load all that into the cloud, that quickly becomes vastly unmanageable at scale. The intelligent edge allows us to be selective about the data we pass up to the cloud.”

As Microsoft explains on its A.I. blog, the intelligent computer vision tools could be used in a range of industries to automatically detect dangerous behaviors or conditions, for example, “it could be deployed on construction projects to flag when employees aren’t wearing proper safety equipment or to inspect equipment sitting on the seafloor thousands of feet underwater.”

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Ford recalls 2 million of its popular F-150 trucks due to fire risk
  • OneDrive leans on A.I. to simplify searches for multimedia files
  • Armormax’s AWD Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat may be the ultimate cop car
  • Get your Sagan on with 60 awe-inspiring photos of the final frontier
  • Don’t be fooled — this automated system sneakily manipulates video content



25
Sep

Microsoft and Shell build A.I. into gas stations to help spot smokers


The last thing you want to see when you pull into a gas station is some doofus lighting up a smoke.

Whether they missed the warning notices or, perhaps, the science class back at high school about open flames and flammable vapor is, in that moment at least, largely immaterial.

As for your own course of action upon seeing such reckless behavior, you can either put your foot down and hightail it out of there before the whole place goes up, or yell at the smoker to put it the hell out.

Tackling the very same issue, Shell has been working with Microsoft on a solution that aims to make all future visits to gas stations stress-free, at least in terms of potential explosive activity. The system uses Microsoft’s Azure IoT Edge cloud intelligence system to quickly identify and deal with smokers at a gas station, and it’s already being tested at two Shell stations in Thailand and Singapore.

It works like this: High-tech cameras positioned around the gas station filter the footage on site to identify behavior that suggests someone is lighting up, or already smoking.

Images that appear to show such behavior are then automatically uploaded to the Microsoft Azure cloud, which can power more sophisticated deep learning artificial intelligence (A.I.) models to confirm whether the person is actually smoking. If so, an alert is sent immediately to the station manager who can then shut down the pump before anything potentially cataclysmic happens. The system presumably could also be fully automated and configured to shut down the pump without the manager having to do it manually, with an audible warning given to the smoker via a speaker in the pump. Taking it to the extreme, the setup could even blast the perpetrator with foam from a fire extinguisher incorporated into the pump.

The entire process, from identification to shutdown, can take place in a matter of seconds. Shell said that this is because so much of the initial data is processed by on-site computers rather than sending everything to the cloud for processing — a feature of Azure IoT Edge. In other words, only the important data — in this case images that appear to show someone smoking or about to smoke — is sent to the cloud, a procedure that helps to speed up analysis and response time.

“Each of our retail locations has maybe six cameras and captures something in the region of 200 megabytes per second of data,” said Daniel Jeavons, Shell’s general manager for data science. “If you try to load all that into the cloud, that quickly becomes vastly unmanageable at scale. The intelligent edge allows us to be selective about the data we pass up to the cloud.”

As Microsoft explains on its A.I. blog, the intelligent computer vision tools could be used in a range of industries to automatically detect dangerous behaviors or conditions, for example, “it could be deployed on construction projects to flag when employees aren’t wearing proper safety equipment or to inspect equipment sitting on the seafloor thousands of feet underwater.”

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Ford recalls 2 million of its popular F-150 trucks due to fire risk
  • OneDrive leans on A.I. to simplify searches for multimedia files
  • Armormax’s AWD Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat may be the ultimate cop car
  • Get your Sagan on with 60 awe-inspiring photos of the final frontier
  • Don’t be fooled — this automated system sneakily manipulates video content



25
Sep

iPhone XR Production Issues Cause Apple to Reallocate Orders Among Suppliers


Apple is reportedly shifting around iPhone XR orders amongst its manufacturing partners to ensure production issues don’t cause supply constraints when the smartphone officially launches late next month.

According to a Chinese-language Economic Daily News (EDN) report, Pegatron has lost up to half of its original iPhone XR orders to Foxconn, following delayed shipments of some key components and a shortage of workers at its plants in China.

Apple had originally divvied up between 50 and 60 percent of total orders for the lower-cost LCD iPhone to Foxconn, with Pegatron taking about 30 percent of orders. However, Apple has recently lowered the portion of iPhone XR orders allocated to Pegatron to below 30 percent, while ramping up those to Foxconn substantially.

On top of that, the supply of LCD panels from Japan Display (JDI) for the production of the iPhone XR has not been steady, according to the report. Pegatron and Foxconn declined to comment.

Morgan Stanley analyst Katy Huberty cautioned in July that Apple’s 6.1-inch LCD iPhone would not launch until October because of issues with backlight leakage, although it’s not clear whether the latest LCD supply constraints are down to the same problem.

The iPhone XR starts at $749 in the United States. The October launch means Apple will likely lose a few sales to customers this month who are interested in a new iPhone but don’t want to pay several hundred dollars more for the iPhone XS and XS Max, which start at $999 and $1,099, respectively. Because of this, Huberty saw Apple delivering a “slightly weaker-than-consensus September quarter.”

Global shipments of Apple’s new iPhone lineup are expected to exceed 85 million units in the second half of the year, with the more budget-friendly iPhone XR expected to account for over half of all sales.

Apple’s lower-spec iPhone XR features an edge-to-edge “Liquid Retina” LCD display with wide color and True Tone support, and the same all-screen design as the OLED-based iPhone Xs and Xs Max, but with an aluminum frame instead of stainless steel.

Other downgrades from the iPhone XS that make the XR cheaper include a single-lens rear facing camera instead of the dual lens on the XS, and a lack of 3D Touch support.

The lower-priced iPhone XR becomes available to order on Friday, October 19, with orders shipping the following Friday, October 26.

(Via DigiTimes.)

Related Roundup: iPhone XRBuyer’s Guide: iPhone XR (Buy Now)
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

25
Sep

How to Use macOS Mojave’s New Dynamic Desktop Feature


Apple in macOS Mojave introduced Dynamic Desktops, which are wallpapers that shift with the time of day, changing the lighting and look of the wallpaper with the progress of the sun across the sky.

For example, in the afternoon, the lighting in the wallpaper is at its peak brightness and the image of the Mojave desert is depicted as it would be if you visited it in the daytime with well-lit sand dunes and a bright blue sky.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.
At night, the sky in the wallpaper shifts to darker blue to reflect that it’s now evening. The shift between daytime and nighttime happens gradually over the course of the day, so you’ll see subtle changes each time you look at your Mac’s display.


Dynamic Desktop is simple to enable. Here’s how:


Open up System Preferences.
Choose Desktop & Screensaver.
Select one of the options from the “Dynamic Desktop” section under “Desktop.”
Using the dropdown menu underneath the wallpaper’s name, make sure “Dynamic” is enabled.
At the current time, there are two wallpaper options in the macOS Mojave beta, which work with both Light and Dark Mode.

You can choose between the wallpaper that depicts the Mojave desert and a Solar Gradients wallpaper that shifts from a lighter sky blue in the daytime to a darker twilight blue. Apple is likely to add additional Dynamic Desktop options in the future.

Apple’s Dynamic Desktop feature relies on your location to be able to match the lighting of the wallpaper with the lighting outside, so to use it, you will need to have Location Services enabled.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

25
Sep

How to Use Quick Look in macOS Mojave


In previous versions of macOS, the Quick Look feature lets you view photos and files without having to open them in an app. In macOS Mojave, Apple has also introduced some convenient new editing tools to Quick Look, allowing you to perform actions specific to the kind of file you’re viewing. Let’s take a look at how it all fits together.

How Quick Look Works

For those unfamiliar with Quick Look, the feature can be used for items on the Desktop, in Finder windows, in emails, in messages, and other places. It supports numerous file types, including HTML, PDF, Plain text, RTF, iWork, MS Office, RAW, JPEGs, and QuickTime formats. To activate it, simply select one or more items, then press the Spacebar or force-click using your Mac’s trackpad.

In the top left of the Quick Look window you’ll find the Maximize button next to the Close button. (You can also manually enlarge the window by dragging the corners.) Open with [App] and Share buttons are located in the top-right corner of the Quick Look window, along with a Rotate Left button if you’re working with images or video.


As before, if you select multiple items, you’ll see arrow buttons to navigate through them, as well as a Sheet View button to see the items in an index sheet view. If you opened a document such as a PDF, you’ll see a column of thumbnails along the side of the window for quickly navigating through the pages.

What’s New in Quick Look

New to Quick Look in Mojave is the ability to access Markup tools. Simply click the Markup button to reveal the toolset.


Quick Look lets you draw on and annotate images or PDF documents using arrows, shapes, and text. You can also use Markup to quickly sign a document with your digital signature. Click Done, and your changes are automatically saved.


If you’re viewing a video file in Quick Look, you’ll see a new Trim button that allows you to trim the clip without having to open QuickTime.


Clicking the Trim button reveals the scrubbing and edit ribbon along the bottom of the clip. You can click anywhere in the ribbon to jump to another point in the video, and drag the edges of the yellow frame to trim the clip to the desired length.


Again, simply click Done when you’re finished and your changes are automatically saved.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

25
Sep

How to Use Finder Quick Actions in macOS Mojave


In macOS Mojave, Apple has introduced a range of new Finder Quick Actions that make it easier for you to perform quick edits to files without having to open the apps associated with them.

To view available Quick Actions, you need to enable the Preview panel in Finder. To do this, open a Finder window and select the menu bar option View -> Show Preview, or press the keys Shift-Command-P.

Quick Actions for Images, Video, and Audio

Quick Actions are located in the bottom right of the Finder window, just under the preview of the selected file. These actions will change depending on the file: For images, clicking Rotate Left turns the image counterclockwise, while clicking Markup invokes an enhanced Quick Look window containing a set of markup tools.


If two or more images are selected in Finder, the Markup button will change to Create PDF, allowing you to turn the images into a single portable document. If a QuickTime compatible video or audio file is selected, Markup will be replaced by Trim. Clicking this brings up a Quick Look window with an editing ribbon to trim the file.

How to Customize Quick Actions

You’ve probably noticed the More… button beside the default Quick Actions. Click this and then select Customize…, and you’ll be taken to the Extensions pane in System Preferences, where you’ll be able to select other actions to add to Finder’s Preview pane.


The actions available to you will depend on which applications you have installed and any pre-existing Apple scripts on your Mac. Apple is encouraging third-party developers to add support for more Quick Actions in their apps, but you can also create your own custom ones using the Automator app. For a useful example, check out our tutorial on how to quickly resize images using your very own Automator service.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

25
Sep

Critical MacOS Mojave vulnerability bypasses system security


macOS Mojave is Apple’s latest operating system.

With the launch of a new version of macOS from Apple typically comes a culmination of new features, better performance, and enhanced security. Unfortunately, the previous statement might not necessarily be true as security researcher Patrick Wardle, co-founder of Digita Security, has discovered that MacOS Mojave includes a severe security flaw; the bug is currently present on all machines running the latest version of macOS and allows unauthorized access to a users’ private data.

Wardle announced his discovery on Twitter, showcasing that he could easily bypass macOS Mojave’s built-in privacy protections. Due to the flaw, an unauthorized application could circumvent the system’s security and gain access to potentially sensitive information. With the Twitter post, Wardle also included a one-minute Vimeo video showing the hack in progress.

The short video begins with Wardle attempting to access a user’s protected address book and receiving a message that states the operation is not permitted. After accessing and running his bypass program, breakMojave, Wardle is then able to locate the user’s address book, circumvent the machine’s privacy access controls, and copy the address book’s contents to his desktop — no permissions needed.

Wardle is an experienced security researcher who has worked at NASA and the National Security Agency in his past; he notes that one of his current passions is finding MacOS security flaws before others have the chance. While it is unlikely Wardle will release the app as a malicious tool, he does want to spread knowledge of its existence so that Apple addresses the issue in a timely fashion.

As usual for such a discovery, Apple has yet to comment on the vulnerability, so our eyes will be tied to future OS updates, looking for a bug fix. As MacOS Mojave was only officially launched September 24, the finding is indeed considered a ‘day-zero’ vulnerability, and we hope that Apple will jump to address the problem as soon as possible.

For fellow security researchers who want to know more details about the attack, Wardle will be speaking about the bug at the upcoming Mac security conference ‘Objective by the Sea,’ hosted in Hawaii in November. For the rest of us, we are in Apple’s hands until the security vulnerability is patched.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Earn up to $10,000 by squashing printer-based bugs in HP’s bounty program
  • Facebook’s security chief has quit — now who’s watching the watchmen?
  • Apple’s unsafe Mac App Store is simply inexcusable
  • Researchers hack and steal a Model S; Tesla says vulnerability now fixed
  • California passes bill that regulates security for Internet of Things devices



25
Sep

How to Use the New Screen Capture Interface in macOS Mojave


In macOS Mojave, Apple has introduced a new screen capture interface that unifies the screenshot and screen recording features on Mac, making accessing them easier than it used to be.

A new floating palette brings the traditional Mac screen capture functions together under a single menu. You can access it by hitting Command-Shift-5. Let’s take a closer look at what’s on offer.

The three buttons to the left of the first menu divider provide you with options to take a screenshot of the entire screen, a selected window, or a selected portion of the screen. Note that the keyboard shortcuts for these actions still function as before in macOS.

Meanwhile, on the right of the palette’s first divider are two buttons to begin a screen recording – taking in the whole screen or just a portion of the action. These actions were previously only accessible in the macOS Grab utility.


If you choose to capture a window, hover your mouse cursor over it: The window will be highlighted and your cursor will change to a camera. Simply click your mouse button to take the capture.

If you’re capturing a selected portion of the screen, use the mouse cursor crosshairs to select the area you want to capture. When you take a screen recording, a button will appear in the menu bar for you to click when you’re ready to end the recording.

You can click the rightmost button on the palette to reveal an additional menu of options for controlling other variables, like where you want your captures to be saved (Desktop, Documents, Clipboard, and so on) and whether to include a 5 or 10-second delay before the capture takes place, giving you time to get your screen in order.

As you’d expect, unchecking the Show Mouse Pointer option ensures the mouse cursor doesn’t appear in your capture. The Show Floating Thumbnail option takes a little more explaining.

When you take a screenshot or screen recording in Mojave, a floating thumbnail appears in the bottom corner of the screen, just like it does when you take a screenshot on an iOS device running iOS 11 or later.

Clicking on the thumbnail opens the capture in a window, which includes image Markup tools, or a clip trimming option in the case of recordings, as well as options to share the image/recording or delete it if it didn’t turn out like you wanted.

If you’re taking multiple screenshots in sequence, you probably won’t want the floating thumbnail showing up in subsequent captures, which is why the option to turn it off exists.

For additional tips on controlling the behavior of screenshots using keyboard shortcuts, click here.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

25
Sep

Apple Outlines Metal-Capable Cards Compatible With macOS Mojave on 2010 and 2012 Mac Pro Models


Apple’s new macOS Mojave update is not compatible with mid-2010 and mid-2012 Mac Pros with stock GPUs, but it is supported on 2010 and 2012 Mac Pro models that have been upgraded with graphics cards that support Metal.

Apple today shared a new support document that provides a list of graphics cards that are Metal-capable, which will be useful for 2010 and 2012 Mac Pro owners who want to purchase a new graphics card to upgrade to macOS Mojave.

According to Apple, the following graphics cards are known to be Metal-capable and compatible with macOS Mojave on the mid-2010 and mid-2012 Mac Pro models:

  • MSI Gaming Radeon RX 560 128-bit 4GB GDRR5
  • SAPPHIRE Radeon PULSE RX 580 8GB GDDR5
  • SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7950 Mac Edition
  • NVIDIA Quadro K5000 for Mac
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 Mac Edition

Apple also lists other AMD graphics cards that “might” be compatible with macOS Mojave:

  • AMD Radeon RX 560
  • AMD Radeon RX 570
  • AMD Radeon RX 580
  • AMD Radeon Pro WX 7100
  • AMD Radeon RX Vega 56
  • AMD Radeon RX Vega 64
  • AMD Radeon Pro WX 9100
  • AMD Radeon Frontier Edition

You can check to see if your graphics card is compatible by holding down option while selecting Apple logo to access System Information. Under Graphics/Displays, if “Supported” is listed next to the Metal entry, the graphics card will work with macOS Mojave.

According to Apple, once a Metal-capable graphics card has been installed in a 2010 or 2012 Mac Pro, macOS Mojave can be downloaded and installed after turning off FileVault.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave
Discuss this article in our forums

MacRumors-All?d=6W8y8wAjSf4 MacRumors-All?d=qj6IDK7rITs

%d bloggers like this: