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20
Sep

Heavily overclocked RTX 2080 Ti steals every 3DMark record


VinceLucido/Facebook

Nvidia’s new RTX-series graphics cards might have fallen short of the performance hype that Nvidia pushed at its original Gamescom reveal, but the top-tier RTX 2080 Ti has some serious power and it seems, serious overclocking potential, too. Thanks to a hefty dose of liquid nitrogen, one overclocker has managed to push the flagship card to new heights. As a reward for his efforts, he’s managed to take the top spot on every modern 3DMark benchmark.

In terms of stock speed, the RTX 2080 is roughly comparable to the 1080 Ti, and the 2080 Ti is more like a Titan enhancement than the typical Ti revamp of an architecture. Perhaps that’s why it was so capable of demolishing the scores of Titan V graphics-powered rigs which have dominated the rankings of 3DMark results for the past year. It took a heavy overclock and some liquid nitrogen to do it, but that does nothing to diminish the results.

Overclocker Vince “Kingpin” Lucido has been a major figure in the hardware overclocking scene for years and especially so when it comes to extreme cooling. He famously overclocked the GTX 1080 Ti to more than 3GHz last year and now has an impressive RTX 2080 Ti overclock feather to put in his cap, too. Under extreme liquid nitrogen cooling, he pushed his 2080 Ti to 2,415MHz, according to WCCFTech. That’s a notable improvement over the stock Founders Edition clock of 1,635 MHz.

That, plus a hefty memory overclock, meant that Kingpin was able to steal the spot in Time Spy Extreme testing, beating out the Titan V-powered competition by more than 500 points. He’s top of the Fire Strike Ultra rankings, too, with a lead of more than a thousand points, and Fire Strike Extreme by an even greater margin.

Although we would expect to see other overclockers reach similar scores in the days and weeks to come as more cards proliferate out through the hardware enthusiast crowd, the big takeaway should be the impressive overclocking potential of the 2080 Ti. Although it is expensive, if powerful cooling solutions can be brought to bear, it seems that its performance headroom is far greater than the stock clocks would suggest. Liquid nitrogen isn’t a viable everyday solution, but if a high-wattage watercooling loop can keep it from getting too hot, longterm overclocks should certainly be possible.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Everything you need to know about the Nvidia GeForce RTX GPUs
  • Leaked benchmark shows the RTX 2080 outperforming the GTX 1080 Ti
  • Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 vs. RTX 2080 Ti
  • We tested Nvidia’s RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti. Are they a worthy upgrade?
  • The best graphics cards



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20
Sep

Apple Watch Series 4 Unboxing Videos Reveal New Packaging for Aluminum and Stainless Steel Models


A few days after unboxing videos for the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max were shared online, some of the same YouTubers have now provided a glimpse into the unboxing experience of the Apple Watch Series 4. Unlike this year’s new iPhones, the Apple Watch Series 4’s packaging is noticeably different from previous generations.

Image via iJustine
To start off, iJustine unboxed the Apple Watch Series 4 40mm Gold Stainless Steel Case with a Milanese Loop, as well as the Hibiscus Sport Loop and Lavender Sport Band. Apple changed up the packaging for the Series 4, and instead of a square box for stainless steel cases, this year the higher-end Apple Watch models also come in a rectangular box.


The outer packaging opens up to reveal Apple Watch artwork, and inside there are two separate boxes: one holding the Apple Watch, charging cord, power brick, and paperwork, and the second holding the Apple Watch band.

The Apple Watch case itself is also protected by a small fabric sleeve. Previous stainless steel Apple Watches were protected in a large, square plastic case that also held the Apple Watch band.

Image via Emkwan Reviews
YouTuber Emkwan Reviews unboxed the same Apple Watch as iJustine, but in 44mm instead of 40mm.


Spanish YouTuber Victor Abarca unboxed the Apple Watch Series 4 with the 40mm Space Gray Aluminum Case, showing off packaging that mimics the stainless steel Series 4’s packaging. Aluminum owners will see the same pull tabs on the back of the packaging that opens up to two separate boxes inside, one holding the Apple Watch and another holding their band of choice.

Additionally, it appears that if you get the Space Gray Apple Watch, the small fabric sleeve protecting the case will also be Space Gray.


Apple’s decision to package each version of the Apple Watch the same in 2018 is a big difference from previous Apple Watch generations. For the Apple Watch Series 3 and prior versions, the aluminum Apple Watch models came in slimmer, rectangular boxes, while the premium stainless steel models were encased in larger, square boxes that included the plastic case.

The Apple Watch Series 4 will launch tomorrow, September 21, so the first pre-order customers can expect to receive their Series 4 devices throughout the day on Friday. After reviews for the Apple Watch Series 4 praised the smartwatch’s display and health benefits, Apple highlighted some review snippets on its website.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 5Buyer’s Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)
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20
Sep

New Apple Watch Series 4 Faces Were Captured as Live Effects, Not Computer Rendered


The Apple Watch Series 4 has multiple new watch faces for users to choose from, including Fire, Water, Liquid Metal, and Vapor faces that were custom-designed for Series 4 to interact with the edges of its larger display. Apple briefly showed off these faces during its September 12 keynote in Cupertino, but more information about the making of the watch faces has been shared today in a new behind-the-scenes video by Cool Hunting.

Left image via Cool Hunting
Alan Dye, vice president of user interface design at Apple, revealed that the visuals seen in each Fire, Water, Liquid Metal, and Vapor Apple Watch face were not rendered through a computer, but were shot using high resolution video capturing real fire, water, liquid metal, and vapor elements. The watch faces were captured in one of Apple’s design labs, which can be seen in the video below.


Dye said that while the design team could have gone digital for the faces, they opted for the live effects recorded in a studio:

Talking to Alan Dye, Vice President of User Interface Design at Apple, about this particular project he shared that “it’s more of a story about the design team. We could have done this digitally, but we shot this all in a studio. It’s so indicative of how the design team works—bringing our best and varied talents together to create these faces.”

…When asked about how these face concepts were chosen Dye shared that “in terms of design in general, for every thing we do there’s probably 100 things we don’t do and that’s just part of the design process.”

The visual faces aren’t the only new watch faces on Series 4. You’ll also be able to choose from the Infograph face, which supports up to eight complications, as well as a redesigned Modular watch face. watchOS 5 also has a few new watch faces, including one for the mindfulness app Breathe.

Apple Watch Series 4 launches tomorrow, September 21, and ahead of its debut reviews for the smartwatch have already emerged. Most reviewers say that this generation is definitely worth an upgrade if you’re on an older model Apple Watch, thanks to the new screen, haptic digital crown, improved health tracking, speed, and more.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 5Buyer’s Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)
Discuss this article in our forums

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20
Sep

iPhone XS Teardown Reveals New Single-Cell L-Shaped Battery


Dutch repair site FixjeiPhone today shared a teardown of the iPhone XS, providing us with our first look inside the 5.8-inch model.

A side-by-side comparison shot with the iPhone X reveals that the internal layout of the iPhone XS has not changed significantly, with the most obvious difference being a new single-cell L-shaped battery with a capacity of 2,658 mAh.

The battery was also L-shaped in the iPhone X, but it was a two-cell configuration, instead of a single lithium-ion battery pack.

While the iPhone XS’s battery has around 2.2 percent less capacity than the 2,716 mAh battery in the iPhone X, Apple says the iPhone XS gets up to 30 minutes longer battery life than the iPhone X per charge cycle, presumably due to efficiency gains from the A12 Bionic chip and other components.

FixjeiPhone shared a photo of the iPhone XS almost completely disassembled, but it has not labeled any components or manufacturers.


Their video teardown, which can be watched with English subtitles on YouTube, indicates that the display is a bit harder to remove due to additional seals that help the iPhone XS achieve its improved IP68-rated water resistance.


Repair site iFixit should have more detailed iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max teardowns soon after the devices launch in stores tomorrow.

Related Roundup: iPhone XSTag: teardown
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20
Sep

Apple Working With Health Canada to Bring Apple Watch Series 4’s ECG Functionality to Canadian Market


Apple says it is working with Health Canada to bring the Apple Watch Series 4’s all-new ECG functionality to the Canadian market, according to MobileSyrup’s Patrick O’Rourke. No timeframe was specified.

This likely means that Apple has submitted an application with Health Canada for clearance to sell the Apple Watch Series 4 with the ECG functionality enabled. Health Canada has similar requirements as the FDA in the United States for medical devices to be sold in the country.

In the meantime, Apple says the ECG functionality will be limited to the United States, where it has received clearance from the FDA. However, the ECG app for watchOS 5 won’t be available until later this year.

Apple Watch Series 4 models include a new electrical sensor on the rear that’s designed to take an electrocardiogram using Apple’s ECG app, the built-in sensor, and the electrode built into the Digital Crown. This allows the Watch to display a single-channel ECG, similar to a Lead I ECG, according to the FDA.

To take an ECG reading from the Apple Watch, users will need to place a finger on the Digital Crown while wearing the watch. The reading is completed in 30 seconds, allowing users to determine whether their hearts are beating in a regular pattern or if there are signs of atrial fibrillation.

As a potentially life-saving feature, Apple surely wants the ECG functionality to be available in as many countries as possible, so it’s likely the company is working with public health agencies in other countries too.

Via: iPhone in Canada

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 5Tags: Canada, ECGBuyer’s Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)
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20
Sep

Samsung looks at Huawei for inspiration, comes up with the Galaxy A7


Samsung has announced the 2018 Galaxy A7, its first smartphone with a triple-lens rear camera, following in the footsteps of Huawei’s excellent P20 Pro. However, this is a Galaxy A series phone, not a Galaxy S, so it’s not going to challenge the Huawei phone in terms of outright speed and ability. Instead, it will be slightly more affordable route into the world of three-lens mobile photography.

We’re used to dual lenses on phones today. What’s the big deal about three? The primary lens has 24 megapixels and an F/1.7 aperture, and it’s matched to an 8 megapixel ultra-wide lens, and a 5 megapixel depth lens. The camera takes separate photos with the main lens, where four pixels can also combined into one for improved lowlight photos, and with the wide-angle 120-degree field of vision lens. Switching between the two lenses this way mimics LG’s approach to a regular and wide angle lens setup. The depth lens enables Live Focus portrait shots, just like the Galaxy S9 Plus and the Galaxy Note 9.

The front camera has 24 megapixels, and uses clever software to create a bokeh-style blurred background, plus some studio lighting effects too. All this is viewed on a 6-inch Super AMOLED screen with a 2220 x 1080 pixel resolution, and driven by a 2.2GHz octa-core processor which although it’s not mentioned, we expect to be a Samsung-made Exynos chip in most places the phone is sold.

The design is simple by Samsung’s standards. The lenses are set inside a rectangle on the left-hand side of the rear panel, which is made of glass. There are bezels above and below the screen on the front. The one aspect that does make the phone standout is the fingerprint sensor appears to be mounted inside the sleep/wake key on the side of the phone.

Android 8.0 is the operating system, not Android 9.0 Pie sadly, and there is a choice of 64GB or 128GB of internal storage space with 4GB of RAM, or a special 6GB.128GB model too. The Galaxy A has a MicroSD card slot, Dolby Atmos sound, a 3,300mAh battery, and a choice of blue, black, gold, or pink color schemes. If you’re hoping to use Android Pay, Samsung says NFC will only be included on some versions. Samsung Pay will work normally though.

The 2018 Galaxy A7 will be sold in Europe and Asia, but the price and release date have not been confirmed. It’s also not the only new Galaxy A series phone we’re expecting from Samsung either, as the company will hold a dedicated online event for a new A series on October 11. The teaser says it’ll be 4x the fun. Does this mean it’ll have four lenses on the back, as arguably the A7 also has four lenses in total. We’ll see in the near future.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • The Huawei P20: Here’s everything you need to know
  • Huawei Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro: News, rumors, specs, and more
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 9 vs. Huawei P20 Pro: Two high-end phones clash
  • Best smartphones of IFA 2018
  • Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL: Everything we know



20
Sep

How to Use App Limits and Downtime in iOS 12


In iOS 12, Apple’s digital health push includes a couple of special new features for iPhone and iPad users who want to cut down on their app usage: App Limits and Downtime. In this article, we’ll show you how to use them.

App Limits allows you to set specific time limits on a particular app category (games, for example). When you’ve spent the designated time using the app category, iOS sends you an alert notifying you of the fact. Of course, you’re free to ignore these alerts, but the idea behind them is that they’ll help you manage your time better.

The second feature, Downtime, enables you to set a daily schedule for when you’d rather not use your iOS device at all. Once activated, the feature restricts device usage to phone calls and any apps you’ve specifically exempted from Downtime. Like App Limits, you can override these restrictions – they’re more like good guidance than anything else, and can still help if you honestly want to self-regulate your mobile usage.

How to Set Individual App Limits in iOS 12

Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
Tap Screen Time.
Tap the Screen Time graph for this device. Alternatively, tap All Devices.

Scroll down to the Most Used list and tap an app you want to set a limit for.
Tap Add Limit at the bottom of the menu.

Select a time limit using the hour and minute wheels. If you want to set different limits for particular days of the week, tap Customize Days.
Tap Add to apply the app limit.

How to Set App Category Limits in iOS 12

Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
Tap Screen Time.
Tap App Limits.
Tap the categories in the list that you’d like to include in the limit, or select All Apps & Categories.

Tap Add in the upper right of the screen.
Select a time limit using the hour and minute wheels. If you want to set different limits for particular days of the week, select Customize Days.
Tap Back when you’re done.
Add another limit if desired, or tap Screen Time to return to the main Screen Time menu.When you’re approaching a designated limit, iOS will alert you in advance with a standard notification. When you finally reach the limit, the alert will take over the screen.


If you want to override the custom limit, simply tap Ignore Limit. You can then select either to Reminded Me in 15 Minutes or Ignore Limit for Today.

To delete app category limits and individual app Limits at any time, go to Settings -> Screen Time -> App Limits, tap on the limit you want to remove, then tap Delete Limit.

How to Use Downtime in iOS 12

Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
Tap Screen Time.
Tap Downtime.

Slide the Downtime toggle to enable it.
Select a Start and End time using the dropdown hour and minute wheels.

How to Exempt Certain Apps From Downtime

If there are particular apps which you’d like to remain accessible during Downtime, you can add these to your Allowed Apps list, located in Settings -> Screen Time -> Always Allowed.


Simply tap the green plus buttons beside apps that you want to add to the list, or the red minus buttons to remove them.

Related Roundup: iOS 12
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20
Sep

Fitbit’s new health care platform sets out to improve wellness in the workplace


Fitbit is known for its selection of fitness wearables and apps that help a wide range of individuals to stay on top of their health game. But with its new platform called Fitbit Care, it’s now zoning in on health care plans and employers.

To encourage preventive care and improve disease management, Fitbit is leveraging its wearable health-tracking devices to help people get healthy. The debut of Fitbit Care follows the company’s February 2018 acquisition of Twine Health, which uses health coaching in the workplace to help people achieve better health and attempts to lower health care costs for employers.

To take advantage of Fitbit Care, users will have to download the Fitbit Plus app. In order to gain access, you will have to be enrolled through your employer, health system, or health plan before downloading it — meaning, it’s not available to the general public.

Fitbit’s wearables will work with the new platform in the same way they always have, by tracking users’ activity, heart rate, sleep, and additional metrics like female health tracking — a feature that was announced for the Fitbit Versa. With user consent, the health data will be given to care teams in an effort to provide more personalized fitness recommendations.

Users will also have access to a health coach and care teams who will create, and participate in, customized care plans. Participants that already work with an established care team will be able to maintain their existing service through the plan. They can maintain a connection with their coach by scheduling in-person meetings, phone calls, and more, to make sure they’re achieving their health goals.

Fitbit Plus enables employees to use the app to communicate with their care team and health coach, who will then provide them with guidance whenever needed. The app also has the ability to support health metrics like blood glucose, blood pressure, and other data from third-party connected devices. Users will be able to see and track important health data through the app as well.

Like the main Fitbit App, Fitbit Care also provides users with social support tools. This includes connecting with groups via Fitbit’s social feed and accessing guided workouts. Employers can also use it to provide support for participating staff members —  like sending messages of encouragement or forming groups that will help keep employees motivated.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • Fitbit heart rate data shows which people have the best cardiac health
  • The Fitbit Versa: everything you need to know
  • Fitbit Versa vs. Apple Watch Series 4: Which wearable is the best?
  • Fitbit Charge 3: Everything you need to know
  • Fitbit Charge 3 vs. Fitbit Versa: Which one should you choose?



20
Sep

An A.I. is designing retro video games — and they’re surprisingly good


Google DeepMind demonstrated a few years back that artificial intelligence (A.I.) could learn to play retro video games better than the majority of human players, without requiring any instruction as to how they should accomplish the feat. Now, researchers from Georgia Tech have taken the next logical leap by demonstrating how A.I. can be used to create brand-new video games after being shown hours of classic 8-bit gaming action for “inspiration.”

The results? New titles like “Killer Bounce” and “Death Walls,” which look like they could have stepped directly out of some grungy 1980s video arcade, designed by machines way more sophisticated than any 1980s computer scientist could have imagined.

“Our system operates in several stages,” Mark Riedl, associate professor of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech, told Digital Trends. “First, we take video of several games being played. In this case, the games are Super Mario Bros., Kirby, and Mega Man. Our system learns models of the level design and game mechanics [and] rules for each game. The machine learning algorithms we use are probabilistic graphical models for learning level design, and a form of causal inference for learning game mechanics.”

Had these models been used to generate new games, Riedl said the resulting games would have looked just like the ones that inspired them. (This has been the basis for previous work by the team.) Instead, their algorithm carries out something called “conceptual expansion,” which infers the existence of models for games that do not exist, but potentially could, based on what is learned from the input game video. The A.I. then generates games that fall into the overall hypothetical game models — bearing enough resemblance to other titles’ game mechanics to be familiar, but not exact copies.

For instance, in the game Death Bounce, the system has learned that some objects disappear when hit from above, and applies this concept to the ground instead of enemies. In the fame Killer Walls, the A.I. creates an enemy wall based on a combination of its understanding of enemies and wall obstacles.

Ultimately, what interests Riedl and Ph.D. student Matthew Guzdial is the question of whether machines can play a role in carrying out creative acts, such as designing video games. “Games are really complex and really hard to make, even for experts, so the ability of an algorithm to create interesting, working games is a notable achievement,” Riedl said.

A paper describing the work is available to read here.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • The best free-to-play games of 2018
  • The best PS1 games of all time
  • Best Gear VR apps and games
  • Best family-friendly games both parents and kids love
  • ‘God of War’ review



20
Sep

An A.I. is designing retro video games — and they’re surprisingly good


Google DeepMind demonstrated a few years back that artificial intelligence (A.I.) could learn to play retro video games better than the majority of human players, without requiring any instruction as to how they should accomplish the feat. Now, researchers from Georgia Tech have taken the next logical leap by demonstrating how A.I. can be used to create brand-new video games after being shown hours of classic 8-bit gaming action for “inspiration.”

The results? New titles like “Killer Bounce” and “Death Walls,” which look like they could have stepped directly out of some grungy 1980s video arcade, designed by machines way more sophisticated than any 1980s computer scientist could have imagined.

“Our system operates in several stages,” Mark Riedl, associate professor of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech, told Digital Trends. “First, we take video of several games being played. In this case, the games are Super Mario Bros., Kirby, and Mega Man. Our system learns models of the level design and game mechanics [and] rules for each game. The machine learning algorithms we use are probabilistic graphical models for learning level design, and a form of causal inference for learning game mechanics.”

Had these models been used to generate new games, Riedl said the resulting games would have looked just like the ones that inspired them. (This has been the basis for previous work by the team.) Instead, their algorithm carries out something called “conceptual expansion,” which infers the existence of models for games that do not exist, but potentially could, based on what is learned from the input game video. The A.I. then generates games that fall into the overall hypothetical game models — bearing enough resemblance to other titles’ game mechanics to be familiar, but not exact copies.

For instance, in the game Death Bounce, the system has learned that some objects disappear when hit from above, and applies this concept to the ground instead of enemies. In the fame Killer Walls, the A.I. creates an enemy wall based on a combination of its understanding of enemies and wall obstacles.

Ultimately, what interests Riedl and Ph.D. student Matthew Guzdial is the question of whether machines can play a role in carrying out creative acts, such as designing video games. “Games are really complex and really hard to make, even for experts, so the ability of an algorithm to create interesting, working games is a notable achievement,” Riedl said.

A paper describing the work is available to read here.

Editors’ Recommendations

  • The best free-to-play games of 2018
  • The best PS1 games of all time
  • Best Gear VR apps and games
  • Best family-friendly games both parents and kids love
  • ‘God of War’ review



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