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1
Aug

Latest HomePod Firmware Discovery Shares First UI Sounds of Apple’s Smart Speaker


In the continued release of Apple news originating from developers digging through HomePod firmware, we now have some of the first user interface sounds that HomePod users could be hearing once the smart home speaker launches this December.

Developer Avery Magnotti discovered the sounds within a file named “audioOS” of the HomePod firmware that Apple released this past weekend. In order of appearance in the file, the sounds are called:

alarm1.wav
Lighthouse.wav
SessionInactive-b238.wav
SetupFinal-b238.m4a
SetupStepSource-b238.m4a
SetupStepTarget-b238.m4a
timer1.wav
TwoShot-b238.wav
WOCAudioPasscodeTone.wav

In case anyone was curious, here are the new HomePod UI Sounds https://t.co/RT7H0hpNmp

— Avery Magnotti (@citrusui) August 1, 2017

To hear what the files sound like, Magnotti posted a video on his YouTube channel, sharing samples of each file listed. Alarm1 and Timer1 sound like simple tones that HomePod users might be able to choose from when setting up timers in their kitchens. The rest are a bit more unclear, although each Setup file is likely related to the initial pairing process of HomePod and a user’s iPhone.


HomePod firmware-related reveals have been steadily rolling out since Saturday, revealing the general design of the iPhone 8, referencing a “split” status bar, including potential new Apple Watch skiing workouts, and more. Magnotti himself revealed yesterday that the HomePod’s Siri display measures in at 272 x 340.

The reason that there are so many iPhone and Apple Watch bits of news coming out of the new HomePod firmware is because Apple’s smart speaker will run on a modified version of iOS when it launches, and the firmware being investigated by developers relates to iOS 11.0.2. Apple announced the HomePod at WWDC this year, and it will launch this December for $349.

Related Roundup: HomePod
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1
Aug

These are the best ways to print to PDF in Windows


Almost every computer and mobile device on the face of the Earth can open a PDF file, which makes the format extremely useful for sharing documents. The person you’re sending the document to doesn’t need any software or fonts to see it exactly what you’re seeing, and thanks to our ever-evolving operating systems, you can now print to PDF in Windows 10 with little to no hassle.

Doing so hasn’t always been easy, however. If you’re running an older OS, the option to print PDF may not be available. What’s more, you may want to opt for a third-party alternative, which will afford you additional functionality. Regardless of which method you prefer, though, creating a PDF in Windows is easier now than ever before.

Whether you want to use Windows 10’s own PDF printer, or remain loyal to Windows 7 and 8, this guide will walk you through the process every step of the way. Here is our comprehensive rundown of the best ways to print to PDF in Windows.

Looking to take things a step further? We also have a guide on how to convert PDFs into DocX files.

How to print to PDF using native tools in Windows 10

MacOS and Linux users have had a PDF printer included by default for more than a decade, and a number of browsers have made it a cinch for a while now, but Microsoft didn’t add the feature until Windows 10. Thankfully, it should be activated by default. To use it, go to print your document as you normally would, and select Microsoft Print To PDF as your printer.

You’ll be asked where you’d like to save the resulting file, and after a few seconds, you’ll have a brand-new PDF. If for whatever reason Microsoft Print To PDF isn’t listed as an option, don’t fret, as it’s easy to set up. The first step, is to navigate to the Windows 10 Settings page, which you can find in the Start menu. Once there, click on Devices.

The ensuing window automatically opens the Printers & scanners menu, which shows each printer available to the Windows 10 user. This is where — if all was well — you would see Microsoft Print to PDF listed alongside real-world printers. In this scenario, however, it’s not, so to fix that, you need to click Add a printer or scanner at the top of the window.

From there, Windows will attempt to find your elusive printer, but since the one we’re trying to install doesn’t exist in the physical world, it will come up short. Simply click the The printer that I want isn’t listed prompt, which should appear shortly.

This opens up a new window, one in which you can add a printer manually. Select Add a local printer or network printer with manual settings. In the next window, open the drop-down menu beside Use an existing port, select FILE: (Print to File), and click Next.

In the following window, choose “Microsoft” as the manufacturer, then scroll down to highlight Microsoft Print To PDF before hitting Next again. When given the choice to replace the current driver or use the driver already installed, we recommend simply using the current driver and selecting Next. After Windows 10 prompts you to name the print-to-PDF feature — we recommend just assigning it the default name so it’s easier to find — click Next one last time to install the desired printer.

With the function now available for use, simply open the document or webpage you wish to convert to PDF and navigate to the Print function. When prompted, select Microsoft Print to PDF in the list of printer destinations and click Print to convert the file to PDF.

If done correctly, the page will immediately ask you where you’d like to save the PDF document, and to give the file a name. Simply choose a save location on your storage drive, give it a unique name, and hit Save to create your PDF. Once saved, use one of these PDF editors to make any changes, if need be.

1
Aug

Inside Bullitt, the British company making crazy phones for Kodak, CAT, and more


Did you know there’s a successful British mobile phone company? You probably haven’t heard of the Bullitt Group, but this eight-year-old white label manufacturer helped build the rugged phone market. So far, Bullitt has turned out phones under the JCB, Caterpillar, and Kodak brands, and is set to launch a Land Rover smartphone later this year.

In an industry where few companies beyond Samsung and Apple are consistently making money, the Bullitt Group has managed to turn a profit by focusing on neglected areas of the market.

“There’s always a segment or an audience or a niche that’s left behind or ignored by the mainstream manufacturers,” Charlie Henderson, chief brand officer for Bullitt Group told Digital Trends. “They can be a really exciting group to work with.”

“There’s always a segment or an audience or a niche that’s left behind or ignored…”

Starting with the JCB brand, and now with Caterpillar, Bullitt initially pursued people looking for rugged and tough devices they could use anywhere from construction sites to the beach. By catering for all kinds of groups including farmers, engineers, the military, and extreme sports fans, they began to grow and build a loyal audience.

“We really get into the detail, and get to know who these people are,” Henderson said. “Working out where their pain points are, where they think they’re being ignored, and what would be their dream product.”

Most recently, the Bullitt Group won praise for the CAT S60, which tops our list of the best rugged phones. But just making an IP68-rated tough device wasn’t enough. Bullitt incorporated a lot of focus group feedback and worked to make sure that common complaints were dealt with, so, for example, people could use the phone with gloves on, with wet fingers, or in direct bright sunlight.

Charlie Henderson, Chief Brand Officer of Bullitt

The Cat S60 captured a lot of media attention because of the integrated infrared camera by Flir, which provides thermal imaging that instantly highlights hotspots around you. Construction workers can use it to see gaps in insulation, plumbers can track hot water, and there are lots of potential uses for emergency services. But Henderson tells us that people are fast finding their own use cases for the technology, from checking the temperature on grills, to finding their pets at night.

Part of the reason smartphones have been so successful is because of convergence — combining different devices to give you a lot of useful functionality in one device. Integrating the thermal imaging is an extension of that idea and Bullitt won’t be stopping there.

“We’re looking at putting more sensor technology into rugged devices,” Henderson said. “Because we know that people have got tools in their tool bag and it’s one less thing to have to worry about losing, breaking, charging, or whatever.”

Rugged phones have been Bullitt’s bread and butter for the last few years.

Rugged phones have been Bullitt’s bread and butter for the last few years. The company still sells a lot of feature phones in the rugged market and the Cat S60 has served as a flagship device for the brand, but Bullitt does not intend to be pigeonholed.

A partnership with Kodak resulted in the recent Kodak Ektra, an Android smartphone with a 21-megapixel camera, intended to mimic a point-and-shoot camera and tap into the analog renaissance. Bullitt worked closely with Kodak to develop the device.

“We were in touch on a daily basis debating design, materials, UI, UX, the whole lot,” Henderson said.

One of the key elements with a Kodak phone was to nail the camera, so Bullitt worked with Arcsoft, a leader in imaging technology with real expertise in camera optimization for smartphones. Rather than trying to develop their own Bokeh defocus background functionality or algorithms, for example, they relied on Arcsoft.

This willingness to work with outside expertise is an important part of Bullitt’s philosophy. The company also engaged radiofrequency specialists to help ensure that the ruggedized Cat S60, which has a metal band around it, could consistently get a signal.

“We don’t try and pretend we know everything,” Henderson said. “With the pace of technology change it’s important to have that network of relationships, that’s why we’re successful as a relatively small company.”

The Bullitt Group distributes devices to well over 100 markets now, but predominantly sells in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The U.S. market is complicated by carrier demands, but it’s on the horizon and Bullitt recently opened an office in Singapore to target Asia.

There hasn’t been a great deal of competition in the rugged phone market.

“A couple of the mainstream manufacturers have experimented, seen that it’s maybe not as easy as it looks,” Henderson said. “Maybe they shy away, maybe they stick with it, we’ll see, but they tend to leave it to us and that’s not because the opportunity isn’t there, it’s just because it’s difficult.”

“We know we need to innovate and be creative, but we feel well-positioned right now.”

Samsung has released Active versions of its Galaxy S range, most recently the Galaxy S7 Active, and LG recently released the X Venture, but it’s proven to be a harder market to crack than they might have expected. Bullitt has tapped into something that’s working and it doesn’t face the same pressure to sell vast numbers of devices.

“We’re not resting on our laurels,” Henderson said. “We know we need to innovate and be creative, but we feel well-positioned right now.”

Since Bullitt’s success with Caterpillar, more and more brands have been approaching the company, but they remain cautious about partnering and have said no a lot.

“It’s not about getting a cool brand and making something interesting,” Henderson said. “It’s about identifying an audience whose needs are unmet.”

That’s why Bullitt is so excited about the partnership with Land Rover, because they feel there is room for a device that targets the outdoor space. It will be interesting to see what the company delivers later this year.

As for devices under the Bullitt brand, we may see something soon, but it won’t be a Bullitt phone. The company has released other consumer electronics with brands like Ministry of Sound and Ted Baker, and it’s poised to unveil something new before the end of the year, but Henderson is tight-lipped. He admits being purposely vague when he says, “connected devices”.

“Whether we are ready to be a consumer-facing brand is a debate we’ll continue to have,” he said. “It’s something we debate energetically in-house a lot. Originally, it’s a business where the founders were very proud of our invisibility, because it was about the proposition and the brand speaking for themselves, but we’re reaching a critical mass now.”

The Bullitt Group expects to employ 200 people by the end of the year and it has agreements with suppliers across the globe, close relationships with factories in Taiwan and China, and partnerships with a number of big brands. If Bullitt continues to find success with other brands, then we may see it emerge from the shadows yet.




1
Aug

Mint SIM may not be right for everyone, but new low price makes it worth a try


Why it matters to you

If you’re looking for the best deals in wireless, you can now try Mint SIM risk-free for a week, and see how it works for you.

There’s never been a better time to be a wireless customer. In addition to fierce competition pushing down the cost of unlimited data in the United States, there are now a multitude of alternative prepaid carriers offering service for hundreds less than the likes of Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint.

It’s not just about cheaper rates, either — new business models are taking over. Ting and Google’s Project Fi, for example, allow you to pay only for the data you use. Meanwhile, another up-and-comer in the space, Mint SIM, has taken a totally unique approach.

Mint, which launched as a subsidiary of Ultra Mobile in August of last year and operates on T-Mobile’s coverage map, allows customers to buy multiple months of service at one time. In doing this, it’s able to provide rates far less than the competition, so long as you’re willing to pay up front. On Tuesday, the company unveiled a new pricing structure and a partnership with retailer Best Buy to offer its service as an option alongside unlocked devices.

Plans are packaged in three-, six-, or 12-month options. Under the deal for new customers, prices start at $15 per month for unlimited talk, text, and 2GB of data, totaling $45 over three months. The midlevel 5GB plan is $20 per month, and the largest one offers 10GB for $25 per month. With the three month offers recently being slashed, there’s currently no incentive to go for the six- or 12-month options, which bear the same or higher monthly costs.

Many customers of these kinds of prepaid carriers — also termed mobile virtual network operators, or MVNOs — like to try different networks, or perhaps have multiple phones and SIM cards and need to switch between competing services. The multimonth commitment to Mint might be initially prohibitive to testing the service, but fortunately the company has just introduced a seven-day money-back guarantee, giving prospective new customers a reasonable amount of time to try, with the opportunity to cancel if it doesn’t work for them.

Mint’s partnership with Best Buy provides another way to get started with the carrier. Beginning Tuesday, all the company’s plans will be available on Best Buy’s site, and shoppers purchasing an unlocked phone will have the opportunity to bundle it with Mint service from the get-go and receive $20 off their first payment.

Even though it won’t necessarily be the perfect solution for all customers, there’s certainly value in the wholesale pricing experiment. According to Aron North, Mint’s senior vice president of marketing and creative, the company is able to guarantee the low monthly rate simply by asking customers to handle just a bit of the prep work.

“When you go to retail, and you’ve got staff there and brick and mortar, what you’re paying for is them to do the SIM insertion for you, and very little beyond that,” North told Digital Trends. “When you think about the infrastructure needed to give people that level of comfort, and when you build a business like ours from the ground up, removing all of that overhead, that’s how we’re able to offer such an amazing price.”

Indeed, the process isn’t complicated. Mint’s service arrives via a package so small, it can only be described as a pack of gum. It contains the SIM and a tiny booklet that provides all the information you need to get started. We navigated to the activation website, set up the account, popped the card into our to our iPhone 7, and were up and running immediately.

Service was solid, though the T-Mobile network is bound to offer different coverage depending on where you live. Additionally, LTE speeds were occasionally fast, but inconsistent. Limited data speeds are often the caveat for most MVNOs, and unfortunately the same was true of Mint in our testing.

While some Mint customers have reported the maximum throughput of T-Mobile’s infrastructure — which averages nearly 17Mbps, according to current data from OpenSignal — we managed between 5 and 10Mbps over the course of a weekend, and even dipped slightly below that in a few cases.

It’s likely the slow data was the result of congestion, and it wouldn’t be surprising if Mint’s traffic was getting deprioritized behind T-Mobile’s postpaid users. Still, it’s comforting to know the company will allow you to achieve those really fast speeds if the network allows it. Customers of Cricket Wireless, AT&T’s fully-owned prepaid subsidiary, are restricted to a maximum of 8Mbps via LTE, no matter the conditions.

Surely the concept of a prepaid multimonth commitment will seem foreign to some, and Mint’s coverage and speed won’t be a winning combination for all users. The savings are significant, though, and the company’s new pricing structure and weeklong trial period make it well worthy of consideration if you’re hunting for the best deals in wireless.




1
Aug

Dell celebrates Precision’s 20th birthday with limited edition Precision 5520


Why it matters to you

The anniversary should be good news for Dell customers looking for their next workstation, and even more for those who loved the original Precision 5520 laptop.

Dell is now celebrating the 20th anniversary of the its Precision workstation brand with the launch of three new towers and a 2U rack. But that’s not all, as the company is also introducing a limited-edition Precision 5520 mobile workstation that will only be sold in a quantity of “a few thousand.” This special edition laptop will also have a custom shell, and limited hardware configurations. Dell is also finally making available its innovative Canvas interactive touchscreen input device that made its initial debut in early 2017.

Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition

Launched earlier this year, the Precision 5520 is promoted as the world’s thinnest, lightest, and smallest 15-inch workstation on the market. Typically, the laptop can be configured with sixth- and seventh-generation Intel Core processors, Xeon E3-1505M v6 and Xeon E3-1505M v5 processors, and Nvidia’s Quadro M1200 professional graphics chip. It also includes Thunderbolt 3 connectivity, up to 32GB of DDR4 system memory, and options for M.2 PCI Express-based SSD storage.

But with the new Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition, Dell is locking down on the configuration options. For this limited edition model there are only two processor options, one resolution option, and one battery option. Customers will be locked down to the M.2 storage options as well, meaning hard drives and standard SSDs, along with a second storage option, are not on the menu.

Outside the limited hardware configurations, Dell spruced up the exterior for this limited edition run. The top and bottom are based on anodized aluminum in a dark color Dell calls “abyss.” The chassis sports a brushed finish and an anti-smudge coating so that the laptop still looks pretty after intense fondling. A 20th anniversary logo is provided on the bottom badge, while special desktop wallpapers splash across the screen. The laptop will arrive in special Anniversary Edition packaging, too.

Here are the hardware specifications:

Screen size:
15.6 inches
Screen technology:
IGZO, 10-point touch input
Screen resolution:
3840 x 2160
Color space supported:
100 percent Adobe RGB
Processor:

Intel Core i7-7820HQIntel Xeon E3-1505M v6

Graphics:
Intel Pro Graphics 630 (integrated)Nvidia Quadro M1200 (discrete)
System memory:
Up to 32GB DDR4 @ 2,400MHz (two slots)
Storage:
Up to 1TB M.2 PCI Express SSD
Audio:
MaxxAudio Pro by Waves
Dual noise canceling digital array microphones
Connectivity:
Intel dual band Wireless-AC 8265
Dell DW1820 Wireless AC
Bluetooth 4.2
Ports:
1x SD card reader
2x USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A with PowerShare
1x Thunderbolt 3 (Type-C)
1x HDMI
1x headphone/microphone combo jack
Camera:
Light sensitive HD video webcam
Battery:
Six-cell 97-watt-hour lithium ion polymer
Dimensions:
14.06 (W)  x 9.27 (D) x 0.45 to 0.66 (H) inches
Weight:
~ 3.93 pounds
Operating systems:
Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Windows 10 Home 64-bit
Ubuntu 16.04 SP1 (Linux)
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3
Starting price:
$1,995

Dell Canvas

First introduced in January during CES 2017, Dell expands on the tablet form factor to create a 27-inch touch-based workspace for designers, engineers, CAD operators, and more. It comes packed with a Dell Canvas Pen stylus for drawing and note-taking on screen, and a dial totem for easy settings adjustment so that both hands stay on the Canvas screen. According to Dell, this is a “do” surface.

That said, this is not a stand-alone device. Dell Canvas requires video input via HDMI or DisplayPort (three dedicated ports), and data input/output via a USB connection (three ports). Thankfully, the device packaging comes loaded with everything you need to get started: one Type-C to Type-C cable, one Type-C to Type-A cable, one Mini DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort cable, one Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable, and one Mini HDMI to HDMI cable.

According to Dell, if the parent PC features Thunderbolt 3 or USB 3.1 with DisplayPort Type-C connectivity, the you can use the Type-C to Type-C cable without having to connect any other cables. But if the parent PC does not have Thunderbolt 3 or USB 3.1 with DisplayPort support, then you’ll need separate video and data connections.

Here are the Dell Canvas specs:

Screen size:
27 inches with 20-point touch input
Screen technology:
In-Plane Switching (IPS)
Screen resolution:
2560 x 1440
Work area size:
13.2 (H) x 23.5 (W) inches
Aspect ratio:
16:9
Color support:
1.07 billion colors
Contrast ratio:
1,000:1 typical
Maximum brightness:
280 nits
Supported color space:
100 percent Adobe RGB
Input ports:
1x Mini HDMI
1x Mini DisplayPort 1.2
1x DisplayPort Type-C
User ports:
1x USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-C
2x USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A
1x Headphone jack
Power adapter:
130 watts
Other:
Built-in pen holder (magnetic)
Built-in nibs holder
Price:
$1,799

And here’s a bit more on the included peripherals:

Pen type:
Electromagnetic resonance method
Pressure levels:
2,048
Pen tilt range:
Up to 50 degrees from vertical
Up to 40 degrees from horizontal
Pen tilt recognition:
~ 0.2mm with zero-degree tilt
~0,4mm with 60-degree tilt
More pen features:
Two programmable buttons
Two standard nibs
Two rubbery nibs
Two felt-type nibs
Programmable eraser
Totem:
Dial-based, knob-based optional
Totem technology:
Passive

Happy anniversary, Precision!

After all of that, Dell provided a few morsels of information regarding its Precision brand. The first Precision tower desktop PC launched in 1997 as the current celebration implies, and at the time it was state-of-the-art. Dell only sold 700 units in the first quarter of its availability, but by the second quarter, Dell sold an amazing 7,000 units. According to the company, the original Precision 400 desktop included a plug-in graphics card with 128MB of onboard memory (likely via the now defunct AGP port), and retailed for a massive $12,000. How about that for some trivia!




1
Aug

Dell celebrates Precision’s 20th birthday with limited edition Precision 5520


Why it matters to you

The anniversary should be good news for Dell customers looking for their next workstation, and even more for those who loved the original Precision 5520 laptop.

Dell is now celebrating the 20th anniversary of the its Precision workstation brand with the launch of three new towers and a 2U rack. But that’s not all, as the company is also introducing a limited-edition Precision 5520 mobile workstation that will only be sold in a quantity of “a few thousand.” This special edition laptop will also have a custom shell, and limited hardware configurations. Dell is also finally making available its innovative Canvas interactive touchscreen input device that made its initial debut in early 2017.

Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition

Launched earlier this year, the Precision 5520 is promoted as the world’s thinnest, lightest, and smallest 15-inch workstation on the market. Typically, the laptop can be configured with sixth- and seventh-generation Intel Core processors, Xeon E3-1505M v6 and Xeon E3-1505M v5 processors, and Nvidia’s Quadro M1200 professional graphics chip. It also includes Thunderbolt 3 connectivity, up to 32GB of DDR4 system memory, and options for M.2 PCI Express-based SSD storage.

But with the new Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition, Dell is locking down on the configuration options. For this limited edition model there are only two processor options, one resolution option, and one battery option. Customers will be locked down to the M.2 storage options as well, meaning hard drives and standard SSDs, along with a second storage option, are not on the menu.

Outside the limited hardware configurations, Dell spruced up the exterior for this limited edition run. The top and bottom are based on anodized aluminum in a dark color Dell calls “abyss.” The chassis sports a brushed finish and an anti-smudge coating so that the laptop still looks pretty after intense fondling. A 20th anniversary logo is provided on the bottom badge, while special desktop wallpapers splash across the screen. The laptop will arrive in special Anniversary Edition packaging, too.

Here are the hardware specifications:

Screen size:
15.6 inches
Screen technology:
IGZO, 10-point touch input
Screen resolution:
3840 x 2160
Color space supported:
100 percent Adobe RGB
Processor:

Intel Core i7-7820HQIntel Xeon E3-1505M v6

Graphics:
Intel Pro Graphics 630 (integrated)Nvidia Quadro M1200 (discrete)
System memory:
Up to 32GB DDR4 @ 2,400MHz (two slots)
Storage:
Up to 1TB M.2 PCI Express SSD
Audio:
MaxxAudio Pro by Waves
Dual noise canceling digital array microphones
Connectivity:
Intel dual band Wireless-AC 8265
Dell DW1820 Wireless AC
Bluetooth 4.2
Ports:
1x SD card reader
2x USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A with PowerShare
1x Thunderbolt 3 (Type-C)
1x HDMI
1x headphone/microphone combo jack
Camera:
Light sensitive HD video webcam
Battery:
Six-cell 97-watt-hour lithium ion polymer
Dimensions:
14.06 (W)  x 9.27 (D) x 0.45 to 0.66 (H) inches
Weight:
~ 3.93 pounds
Operating systems:
Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Windows 10 Home 64-bit
Ubuntu 16.04 SP1 (Linux)
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3
Starting price:
$1,995

Dell Canvas

First introduced in January during CES 2017, Dell expands on the tablet form factor to create a 27-inch touch-based workspace for designers, engineers, CAD operators, and more. It comes packed with a Dell Canvas Pen stylus for drawing and note-taking on screen, and a dial totem for easy settings adjustment so that both hands stay on the Canvas screen. According to Dell, this is a “do” surface.

That said, this is not a stand-alone device. Dell Canvas requires video input via HDMI or DisplayPort (three dedicated ports), and data input/output via a USB connection (three ports). Thankfully, the device packaging comes loaded with everything you need to get started: one Type-C to Type-C cable, one Type-C to Type-A cable, one Mini DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort cable, one Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable, and one Mini HDMI to HDMI cable.

According to Dell, if the parent PC features Thunderbolt 3 or USB 3.1 with DisplayPort Type-C connectivity, the you can use the Type-C to Type-C cable without having to connect any other cables. But if the parent PC does not have Thunderbolt 3 or USB 3.1 with DisplayPort support, then you’ll need separate video and data connections.

Here are the Dell Canvas specs:

Screen size:
27 inches with 20-point touch input
Screen technology:
In-Plane Switching (IPS)
Screen resolution:
2560 x 1440
Work area size:
13.2 (H) x 23.5 (W) inches
Aspect ratio:
16:9
Color support:
1.07 billion colors
Contrast ratio:
1,000:1 typical
Maximum brightness:
280 nits
Supported color space:
100 percent Adobe RGB
Input ports:
1x Mini HDMI
1x Mini DisplayPort 1.2
1x DisplayPort Type-C
User ports:
1x USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-C
2x USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A
1x Headphone jack
Power adapter:
130 watts
Other:
Built-in pen holder (magnetic)
Built-in nibs holder
Price:
$1,799

And here’s a bit more on the included peripherals:

Pen type:
Electromagnetic resonance method
Pressure levels:
2,048
Pen tilt range:
Up to 50 degrees from vertical
Up to 40 degrees from horizontal
Pen tilt recognition:
~ 0.2mm with zero-degree tilt
~0,4mm with 60-degree tilt
More pen features:
Two programmable buttons
Two standard nibs
Two rubbery nibs
Two felt-type nibs
Programmable eraser
Totem:
Dial-based, knob-based optional
Totem technology:
Passive

Happy anniversary, Precision!

After all of that, Dell provided a few morsels of information regarding its Precision brand. The first Precision tower desktop PC launched in 1997 as the current celebration implies, and at the time it was state-of-the-art. Dell only sold 700 units in the first quarter of its availability, but by the second quarter, Dell sold an amazing 7,000 units. According to the company, the original Precision 400 desktop included a plug-in graphics card with 128MB of onboard memory (likely via the now defunct AGP port), and retailed for a massive $12,000. How about that for some trivia!




1
Aug

Notice something wrong with your monitor? Here’s how to fix a dead pixel


Dead pixels are an unfortunate side effect of our modern, display-focused world, but they don’t have to be an ongoing problem. While you could pay someone to fix it for you or replace the offending screen entirely, there are some useful methods you can try to clear out dead pixels and return your screen to a near-new state. Here’s our guide on how to fix a dead pixel.

The first step in any intrepid pixel fixer’s journey is to learn the difference between a dead pixel and a stuck pixel. Each individual pixel in an LCD screen is made up of three subpixels (red, green, and blue) that appear white when turned on and black when turned off. Together, the three subpixels generate all the colors of the spectrum.

A stuck pixel is generated when one or two of the subpixels remain on and the rest off. Its look will vary in appearance based on which subpixels are working properly. A dead pixel on the other hand, appears when an entire pixel or set of subpixels remain off. Stuck pixels are generally easier to fix than dead pixels.

Neither should be confused with “hot pixels,” which are a temporary issue limited to photography or videography.

Whether your display’s pixels are stuck or recently departed to the afterlife, though, there may be a way to save them. That said, while we can vouch for the validity of the methods listed below, they can not be guaranteed in every case, so your first port of call should be to check if your display is still within its warranty period. A brand new, entirely-free replacement is likely to be preferable to a fixed one, but if you can’t get that or simply want the satisfaction of knowing how to fix a dead pixel yourself, read on.

How to fix a dead pixel in Windows – PixelHealer

PixelHealer is an entirely free application from Aurelitec that’s designed to fix pixel problems. If your dead pixel display is attached to a Windows PC, this should be your first port of call. It’s compatible with many versions of Windows, from XP through Windows 10. If you’re still running XP though, dead pixels could be the least of your problems.

Once downloaded, PixelHealer will present you with a colored box window and a settings menu. Either click and drag or use the position and size options to place the color box over the area of dead pixel(s). Taking care not to look directly at the box (especially if you’re sensitive to flashing images), click the “Start Flashing” button.

The window will then start flashing multiple colors very quickly. Leave it on for 30 minutes and then check the pixel again. Try this a few times to see if it works. This is the most common method when attempting to resuscitate a pixel. You’re essentially trying to shock the pixel back to life, forcing a proper response that will have it acting as it should.

It’s more likely to work on a stuck pixel that shows signs of life than a dead pixel which may stay unresponsive, but there’s a chance it can fix both, so give this method a try regardless of how your wounded pixel is behaving.

If you aren’t exactly sure where your pixel problem is, you can use the aptly-titled InjuredPixels application. The freemium pixel detector allows you to blank out your screen in multiple colors to test the display. The stuck or dead pixels will then show up against the color wall depending on the damage, which makes them easy to identify.

If PixelCleaner doesn’t work, try out the iOS fix below (it also works on Windows) or skip to the bottom of this piece and try the more hands-on “pressure method.”

How to fix a dead pixel on iOS – JScreenFix

JScreenFix is very similar to PixelHealer, but as a web-application, you don’t need to download anything to use it. That makes it suitable for a wide variety of platforms, including iOS, so if you’re looking to find out how to fix a dead pixel on Apple’s operating system(s), this tool could be your salvation.

In practice, the steps are basically the same as PixelHealer. Launch the web app, drag the window over the damaged pixel, and run the app for a half hour. JScreenFix claims that most stuck pixels can be repaired in under 10 minutes, though, so you shouldn’t worry too much if you’re the impatient type. Try using it a couple times if the first run wasn’t successful.

Keep in mind that this method uses both HTLM5 and JavaScript, and may work with LCD or OLED screens. JScreenFix reports a success rate of greater than 60 percent when it comes to restoring stuck pixels. Although your mileage may vary, that’s quite an endorsement for the free tool.

How to fix a dead pixel on Android – Detect and Fix

With a straightforward name, Dead Pixel Detect And Fix (DPDF) is a straightforward method for locating and potentially repairing dead or stuck pixels. The free app is available for Android 2.3 and later, and features an interface that is both self-explanatory and easy to navigate. Like many apps and programs in our guide on how to fix a dead pixel, DPDF lets you cycle through various colors to locate and potentially fix a dead or stuck pixel using an extended series of six flashing screens.

To download DPDF, head to the Google Play Store or tap the “Play Store” icon on your Android device to access it. Search for “Dead Pixel Detect and Fix” and then download it as you would any other app. Once installed, open it up by tapping the DPDF icon on your device.

Tap the screen to bring up the main app menu and then choose the “Colors” button in the top-left corner and individually cycle through the six presets: Red, green, blue, white, black, and gray. You can also choose the “Custom” option at the top and pick a color from the resulting palette (no need to use color theory, though).

Doing either will allow you to learn where a stuck or dead pixel on your display is, which as we know when it comes to fixing dead pixels, is half the battle.

When you’re ready, return to the baby-blue welcome screen and tap the screen once again to bring up the app’s main menu. Choose “Fix It” to begin the default, 30-minute color-cycling process. If you want to alter the duration yourself, use the “Settings” menu. Let the repair utility run for at least 20 minutes before finishing.

When it’s completed, return to the welcome screen and access the menu as before and once again choose the “Colors” option. Cycle through the same colors you used to locate the dead or stuck pixel previously and check to see if it has returned to normal.

Fixing a dead pixel with the pressure method

If none of the above methods have worked for you and you’re about to start searching “how to fix a dead pixel” once again, hold fire. We have one more method you can try, but be warned, it is much more ‘hands-on’ than the last few.

Applying pressure to your screen may seem a little aggressive — especially if it’s not a touch screen — but it has been known to do the trick. However, it’s also a method that risks furthering the problem and creating more dead pixels, so be careful.

With that in mind, whether trying to fix a dead or stuck pixel on your laptop-screen or smartphone display, apply pressure gently and steadily — no sudden stabs. If in doubt, use less pressure.

Begin as before by locating the dead pixel using some of the methods described above and make a mental note of its location.

Next, you’ll need to select the right tool for the job. You’re going to use it to apply pressure to the screen, so it must be blunt, but with a narrow edge. A corner of a pencil eraser would be ideal, though the cap of a pen or a stylus, if you have one handy, would also work well.

To protect against any scrapes or potential further damage, wrap the narrow tip of your chosen object in a damp (but not wet) scratch-free cloth.

Making sure to turn the screen off first, begin gently applying pressure to the troublesome area for five to 10 seconds using the wrapped tip. Do so several times, but try to apply pressure solely to the area where the dead or stuck pixel is located. The goal here is to adjust the pixel in the panel substrate back into proper alignment. For this reason, it may be more effective with stuck pixels than dead pixels.

When finished, turn the screen back on and try to locate the dead or stuck pixel in the same manner as you did previously. Check to see if the questionable pixel has returned to normal. If it hasn’t, and you haven’t tried the above software methods yet, we’d recommended giving them a go.

If none have produced the results you wanted, it may be time to replace the display or at least learn to live with it in the mean time. While not much consolation, at least you now know how to fix a dead pixel in the future, should the irritating issue arise once again.




1
Aug

Notice something wrong with your monitor? Here’s how to fix a dead pixel


Dead pixels are an unfortunate side effect of our modern, display-focused world, but they don’t have to be an ongoing problem. While you could pay someone to fix it for you or replace the offending screen entirely, there are some useful methods you can try to clear out dead pixels and return your screen to a near-new state. Here’s our guide on how to fix a dead pixel.

The first step in any intrepid pixel fixer’s journey is to learn the difference between a dead pixel and a stuck pixel. Each individual pixel in an LCD screen is made up of three subpixels (red, green, and blue) that appear white when turned on and black when turned off. Together, the three subpixels generate all the colors of the spectrum.

A stuck pixel is generated when one or two of the subpixels remain on and the rest off. Its look will vary in appearance based on which subpixels are working properly. A dead pixel on the other hand, appears when an entire pixel or set of subpixels remain off. Stuck pixels are generally easier to fix than dead pixels.

Neither should be confused with “hot pixels,” which are a temporary issue limited to photography or videography.

Whether your display’s pixels are stuck or recently departed to the afterlife, though, there may be a way to save them. That said, while we can vouch for the validity of the methods listed below, they can not be guaranteed in every case, so your first port of call should be to check if your display is still within its warranty period. A brand new, entirely-free replacement is likely to be preferable to a fixed one, but if you can’t get that or simply want the satisfaction of knowing how to fix a dead pixel yourself, read on.

How to fix a dead pixel in Windows – PixelHealer

PixelHealer is an entirely free application from Aurelitec that’s designed to fix pixel problems. If your dead pixel display is attached to a Windows PC, this should be your first port of call. It’s compatible with many versions of Windows, from XP through Windows 10. If you’re still running XP though, dead pixels could be the least of your problems.

Once downloaded, PixelHealer will present you with a colored box window and a settings menu. Either click and drag or use the position and size options to place the color box over the area of dead pixel(s). Taking care not to look directly at the box (especially if you’re sensitive to flashing images), click the “Start Flashing” button.

The window will then start flashing multiple colors very quickly. Leave it on for 30 minutes and then check the pixel again. Try this a few times to see if it works. This is the most common method when attempting to resuscitate a pixel. You’re essentially trying to shock the pixel back to life, forcing a proper response that will have it acting as it should.

It’s more likely to work on a stuck pixel that shows signs of life than a dead pixel which may stay unresponsive, but there’s a chance it can fix both, so give this method a try regardless of how your wounded pixel is behaving.

If you aren’t exactly sure where your pixel problem is, you can use the aptly-titled InjuredPixels application. The freemium pixel detector allows you to blank out your screen in multiple colors to test the display. The stuck or dead pixels will then show up against the color wall depending on the damage, which makes them easy to identify.

If PixelCleaner doesn’t work, try out the iOS fix below (it also works on Windows) or skip to the bottom of this piece and try the more hands-on “pressure method.”

How to fix a dead pixel on iOS – JScreenFix

JScreenFix is very similar to PixelHealer, but as a web-application, you don’t need to download anything to use it. That makes it suitable for a wide variety of platforms, including iOS, so if you’re looking to find out how to fix a dead pixel on Apple’s operating system(s), this tool could be your salvation.

In practice, the steps are basically the same as PixelHealer. Launch the web app, drag the window over the damaged pixel, and run the app for a half hour. JScreenFix claims that most stuck pixels can be repaired in under 10 minutes, though, so you shouldn’t worry too much if you’re the impatient type. Try using it a couple times if the first run wasn’t successful.

Keep in mind that this method uses both HTLM5 and JavaScript, and may work with LCD or OLED screens. JScreenFix reports a success rate of greater than 60 percent when it comes to restoring stuck pixels. Although your mileage may vary, that’s quite an endorsement for the free tool.

How to fix a dead pixel on Android – Detect and Fix

With a straightforward name, Dead Pixel Detect And Fix (DPDF) is a straightforward method for locating and potentially repairing dead or stuck pixels. The free app is available for Android 2.3 and later, and features an interface that is both self-explanatory and easy to navigate. Like many apps and programs in our guide on how to fix a dead pixel, DPDF lets you cycle through various colors to locate and potentially fix a dead or stuck pixel using an extended series of six flashing screens.

To download DPDF, head to the Google Play Store or tap the “Play Store” icon on your Android device to access it. Search for “Dead Pixel Detect and Fix” and then download it as you would any other app. Once installed, open it up by tapping the DPDF icon on your device.

Tap the screen to bring up the main app menu and then choose the “Colors” button in the top-left corner and individually cycle through the six presets: Red, green, blue, white, black, and gray. You can also choose the “Custom” option at the top and pick a color from the resulting palette (no need to use color theory, though).

Doing either will allow you to learn where a stuck or dead pixel on your display is, which as we know when it comes to fixing dead pixels, is half the battle.

When you’re ready, return to the baby-blue welcome screen and tap the screen once again to bring up the app’s main menu. Choose “Fix It” to begin the default, 30-minute color-cycling process. If you want to alter the duration yourself, use the “Settings” menu. Let the repair utility run for at least 20 minutes before finishing.

When it’s completed, return to the welcome screen and access the menu as before and once again choose the “Colors” option. Cycle through the same colors you used to locate the dead or stuck pixel previously and check to see if it has returned to normal.

Fixing a dead pixel with the pressure method

If none of the above methods have worked for you and you’re about to start searching “how to fix a dead pixel” once again, hold fire. We have one more method you can try, but be warned, it is much more ‘hands-on’ than the last few.

Applying pressure to your screen may seem a little aggressive — especially if it’s not a touch screen — but it has been known to do the trick. However, it’s also a method that risks furthering the problem and creating more dead pixels, so be careful.

With that in mind, whether trying to fix a dead or stuck pixel on your laptop-screen or smartphone display, apply pressure gently and steadily — no sudden stabs. If in doubt, use less pressure.

Begin as before by locating the dead pixel using some of the methods described above and make a mental note of its location.

Next, you’ll need to select the right tool for the job. You’re going to use it to apply pressure to the screen, so it must be blunt, but with a narrow edge. A corner of a pencil eraser would be ideal, though the cap of a pen or a stylus, if you have one handy, would also work well.

To protect against any scrapes or potential further damage, wrap the narrow tip of your chosen object in a damp (but not wet) scratch-free cloth.

Making sure to turn the screen off first, begin gently applying pressure to the troublesome area for five to 10 seconds using the wrapped tip. Do so several times, but try to apply pressure solely to the area where the dead or stuck pixel is located. The goal here is to adjust the pixel in the panel substrate back into proper alignment. For this reason, it may be more effective with stuck pixels than dead pixels.

When finished, turn the screen back on and try to locate the dead or stuck pixel in the same manner as you did previously. Check to see if the questionable pixel has returned to normal. If it hasn’t, and you haven’t tried the above software methods yet, we’d recommended giving them a go.

If none have produced the results you wanted, it may be time to replace the display or at least learn to live with it in the mean time. While not much consolation, at least you now know how to fix a dead pixel in the future, should the irritating issue arise once again.




1
Aug

Mophie’s 20,100mAh Powerstation XXL external battery features a USB-C port


Laptop batteries are often full of compromises — you’re usually giving up portability for capacity, or vice versa. Mophie’s Powerstation XXL is an external battery pack that wants to help.

The Powerstation XXL, the newest and largest in Mophie’s lineup of external battery packs, is one of the first with a USB Type-C charging port. It supports rapid charging rates up to 30 watts, and operates bidirectionally, meaning that the USB-C port both charges and discharges the Powerstation’s internal battery. Other nifty features include soft-touch housing, a pass-through charging mode, and an LED indicator. But the Powerstation XXL isn’t the only external battery competing for your hard-earned dollars. Here’s how it stacks up.

A stylish-but-functional design

The Powerstation XXL has a tapered, fabric-wrapped design that looks and feels like its $150 price tag. In our testing, the Alcantara-like grippy material prevented the battery from falling off surfaces, protecting it from nicks and scratches. (It matched our t-shirts, too.)

Kyle Wiggers/Digital Trends

We liked the four-LED capacity meter on the side, too, which also serves as a the Powerstation’s status indicator. Pressing and holding down on the power button lights up each LED sequentially in the direction of the charge, toward the USB ports when the Powerstation is discharging and away from the ports when it’s recharging.

Mophie says the LEDs will flash if there’s an error, but we’ll have to take their word for it — we never encountered one.

Power 101

It’s tough to contextualize the Powerstation XXL without basic electrical know-how, so let’s break it down. A battery’s charging power is based on electricity (energy), measured in Watts; current (electrical flow), measured in amps or milliamps; and voltage (electrical potential), measured in volts. Total power is determined by the product of the current (amps) multiplied by the the electrical flow (voltage).

It’s tough to contextualize the Powerstation XXL without basic electrical know-how.

So why don’t chargers with laptop-level wattage blow your iPhone 7 to smithereens? You can thank USB Power Delivery, the specs that dictate how quickly your phone, tablet, and laptop sip power, for that. Older specifications like USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 pull around 5 volts, while USB 3.1 maxes out at a whopping 20 volts.

As you know if you’ve ever plugged a new iPhone into a ten-year-old desktop, USB is backward compatible. That’s why your phone sips power happily from older chargers without short-circuiting — in USB devices with USB 2.0 and newer, a special chip called a CC pin communicates the device’s power requirements to the charger, and a micro-controller sets up the correct voltage and current settings.

A versatile charger

The Mophie Powerstation XXL is no different. A built-in Cyprus CCG2 chipset regulates the voltage, ensuring that plugged-in devices don’t receive more electricity than their circuits can handle.

How’s that work in practice? In output mode, the Powerstation’s USB-C port supplies up to 30 watts of power, or just over the 28-watt maximum of Qualcomm’s QuickCharge 4.0 spec. Mophie claims that’s enough to recharge a smartphone to 50 percent in 15 minutes.

Quick Charge 4.0-compatible devices are currently hard to come by, so we weren’t able to put those claims to the test. The Galaxy S8 Plus, which supports Samsung’s Adaptive Fast Charging tech, seemed to handle the Powerstation’s wattage just fine, as it noted it was fast charging. But with the phone plugged into the battery’s USB-C port, it took about 20 minutes to top off the battery from 90 percent — which may have taken so long due to Samsung’s fast charging technology. An HTC Bolt plugged into the USB-A port the same time as a Galaxy S8 Plus didn’t cause any problems, though it did not charge rapidly.

Kyle Wiggers/Digital Trends

A Moto Z2 Force charged from 40 to 48 percent within 10 minutes via the USB-A port, which is far better than the results for the S8; and the Google Pixel XL went from 86 percent to 100 percent in 16 minutes, via the USB-C port.

The Powerstation lasted for hours. After a 9-to-5 day of charging a Galaxy S8 Plus, an HTC Bolt, and a ZTE ZMax Pro, the battery LED indicator showed two full bars of power remaining (about 10,000mAh).

In the course of our testing, we came to appreciate the Powerstation’s pass-through feature, which charges a plugged-in device via the USB-A port while the battery’s tethered to a wall charger. It’s not a feature most people are likely to use, considering the Powerstation’s capacity. But it’s handy if, say, you ever want to top off the battery and your phone/laptop/tablet at the same time.

As good an external battery as the Powerstation is, though, it has room for improvement. The Powerstation’s 20,100mAh capacity isn’t as high as cheaper competitors like the Intocircuit Power Monster (32,000mAh) and XTPower MP (30,000mAh). While the addition of USB-C is very much appreciated, we would’ve liked to see more than two charging ports.

Still, few external batteries with as much polish have come across our desk. It’s priced a little steeply at $150, but if you’re in the market for a battery that’ll charge virtually any USB device you plug into it, the Powerstation XXL’s the one for you.




1
Aug

Mophie’s 20,100mAh Powerstation XXL external battery features a USB-C port


Laptop batteries are often full of compromises — you’re usually giving up portability for capacity, or vice versa. Mophie’s Powerstation XXL is an external battery pack that wants to help.

The Powerstation XXL, the newest and largest in Mophie’s lineup of external battery packs, is one of the first with a USB Type-C charging port. It supports rapid charging rates up to 30 watts, and operates bidirectionally, meaning that the USB-C port both charges and discharges the Powerstation’s internal battery. Other nifty features include soft-touch housing, a pass-through charging mode, and an LED indicator. But the Powerstation XXL isn’t the only external battery competing for your hard-earned dollars. Here’s how it stacks up.

A stylish-but-functional design

The Powerstation XXL has a tapered, fabric-wrapped design that looks and feels like its $150 price tag. In our testing, the Alcantara-like grippy material prevented the battery from falling off surfaces, protecting it from nicks and scratches. (It matched our t-shirts, too.)

Kyle Wiggers/Digital Trends

We liked the four-LED capacity meter on the side, too, which also serves as a the Powerstation’s status indicator. Pressing and holding down on the power button lights up each LED sequentially in the direction of the charge, toward the USB ports when the Powerstation is discharging and away from the ports when it’s recharging.

Mophie says the LEDs will flash if there’s an error, but we’ll have to take their word for it — we never encountered one.

Power 101

It’s tough to contextualize the Powerstation XXL without basic electrical know-how, so let’s break it down. A battery’s charging power is based on electricity (energy), measured in Watts; current (electrical flow), measured in amps or milliamps; and voltage (electrical potential), measured in volts. Total power is determined by the product of the current (amps) multiplied by the the electrical flow (voltage).

It’s tough to contextualize the Powerstation XXL without basic electrical know-how.

So why don’t chargers with laptop-level wattage blow your iPhone 7 to smithereens? You can thank USB Power Delivery, the specs that dictate how quickly your phone, tablet, and laptop sip power, for that. Older specifications like USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 pull around 5 volts, while USB 3.1 maxes out at a whopping 20 volts.

As you know if you’ve ever plugged a new iPhone into a ten-year-old desktop, USB is backward compatible. That’s why your phone sips power happily from older chargers without short-circuiting — in USB devices with USB 2.0 and newer, a special chip called a CC pin communicates the device’s power requirements to the charger, and a micro-controller sets up the correct voltage and current settings.

A versatile charger

The Mophie Powerstation XXL is no different. A built-in Cyprus CCG2 chipset regulates the voltage, ensuring that plugged-in devices don’t receive more electricity than their circuits can handle.

How’s that work in practice? In output mode, the Powerstation’s USB-C port supplies up to 30 watts of power, or just over the 28-watt maximum of Qualcomm’s QuickCharge 4.0 spec. Mophie claims that’s enough to recharge a smartphone to 50 percent in 15 minutes.

Quick Charge 4.0-compatible devices are currently hard to come by, so we weren’t able to put those claims to the test. The Galaxy S8 Plus, which supports Samsung’s Adaptive Fast Charging tech, seemed to handle the Powerstation’s wattage just fine, as it noted it was fast charging. But with the phone plugged into the battery’s USB-C port, it took about 20 minutes to top off the battery from 90 percent — which may have taken so long due to Samsung’s fast charging technology. An HTC Bolt plugged into the USB-A port the same time as a Galaxy S8 Plus didn’t cause any problems, though it did not charge rapidly.

Kyle Wiggers/Digital Trends

A Moto Z2 Force charged from 40 to 48 percent within 10 minutes via the USB-A port, which is far better than the results for the S8; and the Google Pixel XL went from 86 percent to 100 percent in 16 minutes, via the USB-C port.

The Powerstation lasted for hours. After a 9-to-5 day of charging a Galaxy S8 Plus, an HTC Bolt, and a ZTE ZMax Pro, the battery LED indicator showed two full bars of power remaining (about 10,000mAh).

In the course of our testing, we came to appreciate the Powerstation’s pass-through feature, which charges a plugged-in device via the USB-A port while the battery’s tethered to a wall charger. It’s not a feature most people are likely to use, considering the Powerstation’s capacity. But it’s handy if, say, you ever want to top off the battery and your phone/laptop/tablet at the same time.

As good an external battery as the Powerstation is, though, it has room for improvement. The Powerstation’s 20,100mAh capacity isn’t as high as cheaper competitors like the Intocircuit Power Monster (32,000mAh) and XTPower MP (30,000mAh). While the addition of USB-C is very much appreciated, we would’ve liked to see more than two charging ports.

Still, few external batteries with as much polish have come across our desk. It’s priced a little steeply at $150, but if you’re in the market for a battery that’ll charge virtually any USB device you plug into it, the Powerstation XXL’s the one for you.




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