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Feb

‘Star Wars’ VFX Oscar nominees on making ‘The Force Awakens’


If there’s one thing you can be certain to find in a Star Wars movie, it’s glorious special effects. So after The Force Awakens opened last year, an Academy Award nomination for the film’s VFX leads seemed inevitable. Roger Guyett and Patrick Tubach will be going up against visual effects teams behind other big-budget sci-fi films, including Mad Max: Fury Road and The Martian, as well as a rare indie nominee, Ex Machina. We sat down with Guyett and Tubach ahead of the Oscars on February 28th to explore how they went about bringing Star Wars back to life. (Warning: This interview is naturally full of spoilers.)

Star Wars: The Force AwakensRey (Daisy Ridley)Ph: Film Frame© 2014 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All Right Reserved.

How did you approach balancing classic Star Wars effects with the need for something new?

Roger: That’s exactly what was running through our minds. How do we balance those two things together? The feeling very strongly from J.J. [Abrams, the director] was to go back to the spirit of the first movies: see what were the fundamental qualities about it. A lot of it had to do with traveling to locations, building as many sets as we could. And that infused the movie with that sort of tactile quality, feeling like you’re really going to those places.

[It was] a lot of collaboration between the creature department and J.J. We came up with notions of using practical creatures where we could. At the same time, it was sort of a strange thing jumping to the other end of the technology meter and going full-out on using all of the most recent contemporary technologies to create what we hoped were very photorealistic effects. Essentially we’re marrying all of this together. What we’re hoping for is a much more visceral, tactile thing. It’s sort of like a combo platter of old school and new school.

Star Wars: The Force AwakensPh: Film Frame©Lucasfilm 2015

Patrick: Specifically working on the Star Destroyer, we had these moments where we’re designing new ships and we’re really quite proud of them. There’s a lot of design work, with J.J., that went into the new Star Destroyer. It looked really cool and sleek, but there was a moment we realized we hadn’t put as much of an emphasis on the top of the ship, and I think it really lost some of that Star Wars charm.

And I remember that moment, Roger, where you actually said, it really was missing something. We went back into that ship and added something in, and I think it really was that marriage of looking at something new that looks cool but wanting to bring back a bit of that old Star Wars vibe.

Can you talk a bit more about the need to balance practical and digital effects? Is that more difficult than trying to cram a lot of special effects in?

Roger: It’s always one of those things where you’re watching the movie, you just want to create the best and most striking things you can to support that story. Basically, how you arrive there is interesting to discuss afterwards. But what we’re trying to do is make the whole thing a continuous experience. I wouldn’t say necessarily we had more digital shots than The Phantom Menace. Fundamentally, the makeup of that movie was quite different.

We’d often talk a lot about whether we should do something practically or not. And sometimes, digital work is very difficult. You could go through the movie and try to figure out the digital version of BB-8. Sometimes the guys did such a great job of it; it’s very difficult to tell. Fundamentally it doesn’t really matter how you get there. But the thing is, it’s how that image actually looks. And the technology where we are now, I think it’s just possible to do things to a level where you just don’t know the difference.

Star Wars: The Force AwakensL to R: Rey (Daisy Ridley) and Finn (John Boyega)Ph: David James©Lucasfilm 2015

The first scene where I noticed special effects being used in a really interesting way was the Millennium Falcon escape from Jakku. It felt like I was watching something very different for a Star Wars movie. Could you talk more about how you designed that?

Patrick: Roger deserves a lot of credit for working with Paul Kavanagh, our animation supervisor on a lot of those camera moves. That chase being something that’s sort of born a little bit more in post[-production]. You know going in that yes, you’re going to a real location, and you’re going to film that desert, but in the end, you’re going to be creating camera moves and everything that require you to do more than a helicopter can do. I think the Falcon is flying at like 600 miles per hour most of the time. So going into that sequence, we had the idea from J.J. that this had to be an exciting chase, but you also want to ground it in that reality of the language of a chase sequence from a regular film that people are used to seeing, like a car chase or an air chase.

Roger: Fundamentally what that meant was that we were, along with Susumu Yukuhiro, who was in charge of our environments, we got to a place where we could rebuild that desert. Basically, from the first moment the the Millennium Falcon takes off to the end of that chase, it’s a digital sequence. And our feeling was that, clearly, in order to get there we have to do a lot of leg work in terms of recording the environment and scanning it. We needed to have the flexibility to be able to move the camera. There was no way we would ever be able to recreate those camera moves in the desert, with equipment we didn’t have access to.

In terms of designing that scene, how much of that came from you and how much from J.J.?

Roger: It was a big collaboration. That scene was one of the first ideas. It’s such a metaphor, isn’t it, of the old Star Wars you’re leaving that behind. It was a sequence J.J. had discussed, and it was in one of the earliest versions of the script that I ever saw.

We started shooting in May of 2014, and J.J. was very much writing that script with Larry Kasdan [The Force Awakens co-writer, who also wrote The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi] during that pre-production period. So we didn’t have the opportunity to do too much previz [previsualizations of special effects] on some of those sequences. But we did have some key moments that we knew we were going to be incorporating into that sequence.

It was very important for a number of reasons, but it really was sort of a collaboration. So there were ideas we started to incorporate into it. Like the notion that they fly off the edge of the Star Destroyer and drop down in height. J.J. would sometimes very specifically give us directions, some other times he would suggest an idea, and we’d take that and elaborate or come up with a version of it.

Star Wars: The Force AwakensL to R: BB-8 and Rey (Daisy Ridley)Ph: Film Frame© 2014 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All Right Reserved.

Did you always want to do BB-8 in a mostly practical way?

Roger: There were some things so fundamentally in the DNA of these movies, and one of those is obviously a droid. J.J. wanted to introduce new characters, and the notion of a new droid came up in one meeting. And actually, very early on, as he was talking about it, he actually pretty much drew BB-8 on a Post-It. And that essentially was what BB-8 turned into.

We did some tests on the size of the droid, the coloring. It’s a very complicated piece of mechanics to make it work. But fundamentally the notion of having a droid that could interact with the actors, that could be puppeted, essentially we were able to direct that character. You could see it come to life, you could see the idiosyncrasies of the personality of BB-8, you could see all that happening in front of you. It was an incredible blueprint of who BB-8 was. By building it, we could also scan it, we could measure the crap out of it. We could do everything we needed to do to build an incredibly accurate digital version of it.

And the other thing, when we started to animate it, we absolutely knew what the personality was because it had been defined by the puppeteer. Essentially, it’s probably digital in about a quarter or a third of the shots in the movie. It was clearly doing more complicated stunts digitally, where he was using his thumbs-up flame, or he fires the lines out to steady himself in the Millennium Falcon, when he pulls himself out of the hiding place. Things like this, and sometimes when he’s going through the desert in wider shots. But the [digital] guys got incredibly good at matching the spirit of the puppeteers’ performance.

Star Wars: The Force AwakensFinn (John Boyega)Ph: Film Frame© 2014 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM. All Right Reserved.

The big thing all of our editors were wondering about: How did you go about changing the lightsaber effects?

Patrick: We definitely wanted to approach the lightsabers differently in this film. Having been on some of the other prequels — I started on Episode II — the technique for creating those was still very much stuck in the past, where basically we were just rotoscoping the sticks and applying a 2D effect. We knew that we wanted to both up the game on the production side and on the effects side.

On the production side, Roger and the practical effects team worked to create these amazing LED sabers that actually reacted to when they hit each other; you could change the color, the intensity and the temperature of the light. Of course, that gives you an awesome light source that really can service as your primary light. Then Daniel Mindel, our director of photography, could actually light some scenes very dramatically.

On the effects side, we were able to turn them into full 3D light sabers for the first time. That allowed us to have them actually clash with each other and see a reaction, and have effects that come as a result of that. That gives a sort of visceral, very brutal quality to that final lightsaber fight, where they’re hitting each other and there’s almost always something happening. It doesn’t just seem like a couple of glowing tubes touching.

Onto Kylo Ren, specifically, that lightsaber was an idea that J.J. had that was borne out of the original intent of the character, which was Kylo Ren being the younger, angrier bad guy.

Star Wars: The Force AwakensKylo Ren (Adam Driver)Ph: David James©Lucasfilm 2015

Roger: It sort of reflects his personality. It’s a little tempestuous, a bit out of control. It’s also home-built, as well. I think that shows him as an undeveloped bad guy.

Some of the choices in having that kind of three-part sword came out of a dinner J.J. had with Apple. Jony Ive is a very big Star Wars fan, so he had plenty to say about lightsabers. There was an opportunity to do something different. The idea was [Kylo] lightsaber being wild and out of control.

Maz Kanata [Lupita Nyong’o’s character] feels almost as soulful as Yoda from Empire. Was that what you were going for with her?

Roger: For us, every choice that we were making was based on what we felt helped the movie. Trying to make sure that everything we did was specific and story driven; we weren’t just going for spectacle. For Maz, we rebuilt a lot of the motion capture stuff that Industrial Light & Magic is constantly updating. Really what she represented to us was the most up-to-date version of that system. If you think about how quiet her performance was, it was really a subtle performance.

Clearly, Maz’s facial physiognomy, her shape is obviously different from a human being, so we had to work very hard in translating Lupita’s action to her performance. It really resonated into Maz. Lupita did a very nuanced performance, and that’s what we wanted to capture. We wanted to make sure she was in the moment, so we’d always photograph her with the other actors so that they could see the way she was reacting to moments, and she could react to them. Part of that involved using more of an image-based motion capture for all the motion of her limbs.

Star Wars: The Force AwakensPoe Dameron (Oscar Isaac)Ph: Film Frame©Lucasfilm 2015

How did you approach the 3D conversion? There was one scene, when a Star Destroyer was just floating in the middle of space, where it felt like it was in my lap.

Roger: The bottom line was we wanted to make the 3D version an experience for the audience. If you just want it to be very mild, then you’ve got to question why you’re doing these things. In other words, if people are going to pay more money to see this movie, what can we do to enhance that version, rather than making it so sedate? Sometimes, I’ve been guilty of this; I tend to like my 3D relatively mild. You want to give the audience an experience.

Just doing that kind of thing, the fun of seeing that Star Destroyer come out in the audience, I think for the fans, if you’re interested in that world, you’re just more inside it. I couldn’t get over the fact that all the cockpit shots suddenly became much more interesting when you’re in 3D because you really began to understand the space. It changed the way that you were able to look at that movie. We wanted to make sure it had a personality. J.J., as a fan of that world, realized with tests that by going a little stronger with 3D, the fans would just enjoy that. It’s always a delicate balance.

Patrick: There is something to keeping the VFX crew and director involved in that process, even if you’re doing a [3D] conversion. Obviously the technical process is one thing but then, having us sit there and consult on that stuff, and talk to them about sets not being that big … being able to mention that really makes the difference too. And then, having J.J. weigh in and say, I think this is an opportunity to have a moment, that isn’t going to break narrative continuity. Like that Star Destroyer scene, it doesn’t really take you out of the movie to have a bold shot in that moment.

Roger: We worked with those guys. We built the ships, we’ve been on all the locations, we built the set. I was there on all the sessions with the 3D guys. We had a great team at StereoD that was very amenable, and we’ve worked with them many times. They’ve worked on the last Star Trek movie. It’s about setting those moments, using the dimension appropriately.

Images courtesy of Lucasfilm. This interview has been edited and condensed.

3
Feb

Google staffer makes his own smart bathroom mirror


Smart mirrors are everywhere in tech companies’ visions of future homes, but they never seem to show up in real homes — at best, you might find them in fitting rooms. That just wasn’t good enough for Google’s Max Braun, though. He recently built his own smart bathroom mirror, and it even matches some of the lofty expectations set by concept videos and sci-fi movies. Thanks to the combination of a two-way mirror, an Amazon Fire TV Stick and a display board, Max gets the weather, news headlines and other key facts while he’s busy brushing his teeth. All it’s doing is calling on data that would normally go into a Google Now card — Max can even use his voice to search for info, like a tech-savvy version of Snow White‘s Evil Queen.

This is just a “messy” prototype at the moment, and Max hasn’t been too specific about how it works. However, he’s teasing the possibility of a more detailed making-of post, and notes that the mirror only needs a “few hundred lines” of code to work as slickly as it does. There’s a chance that you’ll get enough info to build your own smart mirror well before you can find one sitting in your local home supply store.

Source: Max Braun (Medium)

3
Feb

Microsoft Band 2 gets better battery life with new GPS mode


Despite its flaws, the Microsoft Band 2 is an improvement from Redmond’s first attempt at wearables. With an update, the version 2.0 is getting a fix for one of our biggest gripes with the device: battery life. Thanks to a new GPS Power Saver mode, you can extend your tracking time by up to four hours, according to Microsoft. The option tells the wearable to nab your GPS location in intervals rather than monitoring your movements continuously. Power Saver mode is ideal for activities like running and bike riding, and the Microsoft Health app will still map your course on both mobile and the web.

Speaking of the Health app, it’s getting a new feature, too. With a weight-tracking tool, you can keep tabs on how much you’ve lost and get an approximate BMI reading. After entering your weight on a regular basis, you can view your progress in charts for 1-month, 3-month and overall timelines. Both the Microsoft Band 2 update and the weight-charting feature in the Health app are rolling out now.

Via: The Verge

Source: Microsoft

3
Feb

Google’s new head of search is an AI research leader


There’s a changing of the guard underway at Google… and it could have big ramifications for how the company tackles its main business. Senior VP of search (and early employee) Amit Singhal is retiring on February 26th, and he’s being replaced by John Giannandrea, the VP who leads the company’s artificial intelligence and research work. In the process, Google is folding its research division into search — it’s now an integral part of how Google operates.

The shift isn’t surprising. Google has been big on AI for a while, whether it’s defeating board game champions, developing image recognition or building self-driving cars. It’s only logical that the company would want someone who understands that technology to occupy a key role. Also, it’s not as if the competition is standing still. Apple, Facebook and Microsoft are all adopting AI to various degrees, so it makes sense to promote someone who can keep Google competitive on that front. Giannandrea hasn’t said just what he’ll do in his new role, but it’s entirely possible that AI will power more of your web searches.

Via: Recode

Source: Amit Singhal (Google+)

3
Feb

Oklahoma private university makes Fitbits mandatory


fitbit-charge-2

A Christian university in Tulsa, Oklahoma has made wearing Fitbits required of all students at all hours. They’re calling this part of their “whole person education” approach, and students’ fitness statistics will even be collected across holidays like spring break.

Oral Roberts University has been pushing better fitness for its students for a long time. Previously, students had to manually log workout routines as a part of a mandatory health regimen. This battle against the “Freshman Fifteen” has just gotten a little bit simpler (if more expensive) thanks to wearable technology. All 900 incoming students must now purchase and wear Fitbits that will relay data to a “central learning management system.”

Perhaps controversially, students’ fitness information will be made available to professors, who are encouraged to lower a student’s grade if they fail to meet their fitness goals. Some may argue (reasonably) that grades are typically regarded as a figure that represents a student’s comprehension of a particular topic, and that it would be nonsensical to say that, although Kyle understands 98% of vectors calculus, he’s only going to be slipping by with a B- because he didn’t go jogging as often as he should have. But hey, at least there will be some new style options coming up.


Fitbit Alta 2See also: The Fitbit Alta is a new fashion-forward fitness tracker with interchangeable bands1

Although students will not be tracked via GPS (a feature offered by Fitbit Surge), they will still be monitored at all times. Meaning if you’re logging footsteps while you should be sitting in Biology 101, your hooky-playing may be noticed. Rest assured that in some dorm on campus, some engineering student is putting together a Fitbit-gaming device – possibly involving a metronome or drill – to ensure that he or she can meet the requisite fitness goals without falling behind on League of Legends.

Oral Roberts University was founded by a televangelist who was one of the main players in what came to be known as the “prosperity gospel,” a sect of theology that considers prosperity to be a hallmark of God’s favor. Roberts once told his television audience that if he failed to raise $8 million, God would call him home. When the fundraising was over, Roberts had netted $9.1 million.

What are your thoughts regarding required fitness tracking at a private university? Let us know in the comments below.


best health apps for androidNext: 10 best health apps for Android7

3
Feb

Textra brings Android 6.0.1 emoji to KitKat and Lollipop devices


emoji1-1 Ars Technica

Textra, alternatively known as “the best text message app that there is” or alternatively “God’s gift to the Android operating system,” is bringing Marshmallow’s trove of brand spanking new emoji to those of us who haven’t had the luxury of upgrading to Android 6.0.1 yet. Moreover, they’re also adding diversity options so that you can make those little Simpson-esque yellow figures more accurately reflect the color of your skin.

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Even without the update, this text messaging app brings a lot to the table including Lollipop-style Material Design and a slew of customization options. The app is lightweight, and flexible, and although it has ads, a $3 upgrade to professional is some of the best money you’ll ever spend on a mobile app.

The update hasn’t hit the Google Play Store quite yet, but if you’re anxious to get your hands on it, Textra tweeted a link to the apk:

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

With the added emoji, the number of little emoticons available at your fingertips has exploded to over 1600. Soon you’ll be able to walk like an Egyption through the mobile world, communicating exclusively in hieroglyphics to convey even the most complex thoughts to your friends and families.


best texting apps for AndroidSee also: 10 best texting apps for Android29

What are your thoughts of Textra? If you disagree with my hyperbolic praise in the first paragraph, let us know which texting app you prefer and why in the comments!

Get it in the Play Store

best twitter apps for androidNext up: 10 best Twitter apps for Android84

3
Feb

Textra brings Android 6.0.1 emoji to KitKat and Lollipop devices


emoji1-1 Ars Technica

Textra, alternatively known as “the best text message app that there is” or alternatively “God’s gift to the Android operating system,” is bringing Marshmallow’s trove of brand spanking new emoji to those of us who haven’t had the luxury of upgrading to Android 6.0.1 yet. Moreover, they’re also adding diversity options so that you can make those little Simpson-esque yellow figures more accurately reflect the color of your skin.

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Even without the update, this text messaging app brings a lot to the table including Lollipop-style Material Design and a slew of customization options. The app is lightweight, and flexible, and although it has ads, a $3 upgrade to professional is some of the best money you’ll ever spend on a mobile app.

The update hasn’t hit the Google Play Store quite yet, but if you’re anxious to get your hands on it, Textra tweeted a link to the apk:

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

With the added emoji, the number of little emoticons available at your fingertips has exploded to over 1600. Soon you’ll be able to walk like an Egyption through the mobile world, communicating exclusively in hieroglyphics to convey even the most complex thoughts to your friends and families.


best texting apps for AndroidSee also: 10 best texting apps for Android29

What are your thoughts of Textra? If you disagree with my hyperbolic praise in the first paragraph, let us know which texting app you prefer and why in the comments!

Get it in the Play Store

best twitter apps for androidNext up: 10 best Twitter apps for Android84

3
Feb

Virgin Mobile announces new unlimited plans


VM-15-25978_Virgin Mobile_ENGLISH_ BEST BUY 2-7 - VMU SWAS INLIN

It’s not everyday that we hear of big news from Virgin Mobile. The carrier just announced that it’s adding three new unlimited plans to its U.S. cellular network.

The first of Virgin Mobile’s new plans gives subscribers unlimited talk and text with 4GB of high-speed data, slowing down from there. The next plan includes unlimited talk and text with 6GB of data. The 4GB data plan costs $40 per month and the 6GB plan costs $10 more at $50 per month. You’ll also have the option to pay $30 for 500MB of data and unlimited talk and text if you’re not as data hungry. Users can also add 1GB to their plan for only $5 or $2GB for $10.

If you’re looking to sign up with a new cellular service, Virgin Mobile is worth considering. In addition to the data that comes with the plan you choose, you’ll also get free music-streaming that doesn’t count against your data. This only works with select services like Pandora, Slacker and a few others. T-Mobile also has a music-streaming deal of their own, but most U.S. carriers do not. For more details on Virgin Mobile’s new plans, click on the source link just below this article or check out the image above.

Source: Sprint

Come comment on this article: Virgin Mobile announces new unlimited plans

3
Feb

[TA Deals] This Lithium Card Wallet Battery is the perfect solution for your portable charging needs


lithium-card-wallet-battery

Keeping you smartphone charged can always be a pain, particularly if you’re a power user. Thankfully, the wonders of engineering has made it possible to keep your smartphone charged on the go. One of those marvels is the Lithium Card Wallet Battery. No thicker than five credit cards, this portable battery will keep your smartphone powered throughout the day.

Here’s what you get with this portable battery:

  • Keep your micro USB-compatible devices charged w/ the built-in connector
  • Enjoy the premium design crafted from durable aluminum
  • Charge your device quickly at up to 1% of battery life per minute
  • Add charging power capacity to your device
  • Simultaneously charge your device & LithiumCard w/ 2 flip-out charging cables
  • Carry it everywhere: fits into almost any wallet
  • Stick to your device w/ the NanoStik pad as an alternative to storing in your wallet

Portable batteries have historically been thick and difficult to truly call “portable.” This isn’t the case with the Lithium Card Wallet Battery, though. It’s literally no thicker than five credit cards, making it easy to fit into a pocket or another small space. It has a capacity of 1200mAh, which is just enough to keep the lights on until you can access a wall charger.

This portable battery normally retails for $60, but for a limited time only, our readers can head on over to Talk Android Deals to pick it up for $20. That’s a whopping 66% off, not to even mention the included free shipping!

Anyone plan on picking this bad boy up?

[Talk Android Deals]

Come comment on this article: [TA Deals] This Lithium Card Wallet Battery is the perfect solution for your portable charging needs

3
Feb

ZTE will launch its new Falcon 4G Mobile Hotspot through T-Mobile on Friday, February 12


Falcon-4G

ZTE announced earlier today that it will launch its brand new Falcon 4G Mobile Hotspot on T-Mobile starting Friday, February 12. While the market for dedicated Mobile Hotspot’s is declining as a result of every Android smartphone having the feature on board, there are some people who need to connect multiple devices when they’re on the road — so they plumb for a standalone LTE tethering unit.

The Falcon’s optimal attraction is by far its ability to pair with up to ten devices simultaneously, whilst providing equal Internet speeds to each of them. Its 2,000mAh rechargeable non-removable battery will also see you through a good 4-to-5 hours worth of constant use, while a standard mid-range smartphone would only provide around 3-hours worth of LTE tethering before dropping down to the 25% battery mark.

“We understand consumers are always on the go. From the comfort of their own home to the office to activities outside, the need for reliable, secure WiFi access never changes,” writes Lixin Cheng, chairman and CEO of ZTE USA.

As previously mentioned, the Falcon will be up for grabs on February 12th exclusively from T-Mobile. It will be listed on the carrier’s online portal, in addition to being stocked in a variety of its nationwide bricks-and-mortar stores. The little square box carries a price tag of $79.99 and requires a T-Mobile hotspot plan to function. 2GB of super-fast 4G data will set you back $20/mo, while 18GB will cost you $80/mo.

To see the device in all of its glory, be sure to take a look through the gallery below. If you’d like to find out a little more about the Falcon and all of its technical specifications, you can sift through the press release at the bottom of this page.

Falcon-4G-2
Falcon-4G-3
Falcon-4G

 

ZTE Falcon 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot Lands at T-Mobile at a Hot Price Beginning February 12

The new ZTE Falcon hotspot delivers worry free Wi-Fi at 4G LTE speeds while on-the-go

Richardson, Texas – February 3, 2016 — ZTE USA, the fourth largest smartphone supplier in the U.S. and second largest in the no-contract market*, today announced the availability of the ZTE Falcon 4G LTE mobile hotspot at T-Mobile. The compact and lightweight mobile hotspot provides fast, secure internet access for up to 10 WiFi devices wherever T-Mobile’s network can take you. The ZTE Falcon is available online at http://www.t-mobile.com and at select T-Mobile retail locations for just $79.99 MSRP beginning February 12.

“We understand consumers are always on the go.  From the comfort of their own home to the office to activities outside, the need for reliable, secure WiFi access never changes,” said Lixin Cheng, chairman and CEO of ZTE USA. “Users can depend on the ZTE Falcon’s solid performance and long-lasting battery to connect them to people, information, or services online easily, whenever they want.”

Worry-free, secure, and portable nationwide WiFi access

  • When you don’t want to rely on your smartphone or drain its battery, the ZTE Falcon can connect you to WiFi for hours thanks to its long-lasting 2000mAh battery
  • Optimized for T-Mobile’s network, the ZTE Falcon delivers expanded WiFi range and better signal quality for up to 10 devices
  • You won’t have to rely on slow or unsecure public WiFi thanks to T-Mobile’s fast 4G LTE nationwide network and WiFi Calling capabilities can now be taken almost anywhere you may go**
  • Measuring in at 105x60x16 millimeters in size and 110 grams in weight, the ZTE Falcon is ultra-portable for those on the go

The ZTE Falcon is durable and affordable. Matched with T-Mobile’s affordable data plans the hotspot offers flexible and budget-friendly pricing options.

*Strategy Analytics, Q3 2015

**Capable device required; coverage not available in some areas

Come comment on this article: ZTE will launch its new Falcon 4G Mobile Hotspot through T-Mobile on Friday, February 12

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