Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘ZTE’

27
Jul

ZTE Axon review: a powerhouse that punches above its weight


ZTE Axon review: a powerhouse that punches above its weight

A few weeks ago, I got a look at a curious kind of mobile marketing head-fake: A new company called “Axon” no one had ever heard of promised the moon and stars in the form of a shiny, seemingly impressive $450 smartphone. As it turned out, Axon wasn’t an upstart smartphone maker taking on stodgy giants — it was a sub-brand of Chinese OEM ZTE trying to make something cooler than it’s normally known for. The ruse worked in that it got a bunch of jaded nerd journalists to an event in the middle of Manhattan in the rain, but is the phone itself actually worth that trouble? Did ZTE finally figure out how to make a phone that wary US consumers might flock to? The answer might surprise you.

Hardware

The model we’re working with has a full-on champagne finish, and despite the color, it feels a little less ostentatious than the blingy black-and-gold version I played with a few weeks back. It’s a dense, solid-feeling little handset since the body is crafted out of metal but isn’t hewn from a single slab. The main section of the Axon’s back is one plate, flanked on the top and bottom by metallic caps that form the phone’s edges. Turns out they’re a potential point of failure, too. I — ever the klutz — dropped the Axon from about two and a half feet up onto hard bathroom tile, and while it survived the drop, the corner of one of those edges popped out of place and had to be snapped back into position. I don’t think this thing will take a beating; just know that less than a week’s worth of jamming it in and out of my trusty blogger bag left the gold Axon with a lengthy vertical scuff I can’t rub away. Minor mishaps aside, the Axon’s thicker 9.3mm waistline is offset by a gently arching back that settles comfortably into the hand. I get the stylistic reasons why other companies (here’s looking at you, Sony) don’t make contoured phones, but man: curves make a world of difference.

As is often the case, that metal construction also means there’s no way to remove the 3,000mAh battery, and you’ll need a paperclip to pry the nano-SIM card out of the slot on the side. This might take a little more effort than you’d think since the tray has a nasty habit of sticking sometimes when I tried to pull it out. That’s really it as far as slots go, too, so you’d better know for sure you can squeeze the entirety — or at least all the really important bits — of your stuff into the 32GB of built-in storage, especially since only about 24GB of that space is available to you out of the gate. Speaking of what’s inside, the phone is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 clocked at up to 2GHz. Throw in a whopping 4GB of RAM and you’ve got a spec sheet that’s primed to take on the Axon’s pricier rivals.

Before you notice any of that stuff, though, your eyes will likely lock onto one of two things: the 5.5-inch Quad HD screen sitting front and center, or all the tiny little triangles festooning the phone. We’ll dig into the screen in greater detail shortly, but its spacious dimensions mean the Axon will be a little too big for everyone to comfortably use. Just south of the display lives a trio of capacitive buttons that’ll sit just fine with some of you and drive the rest up a wall. I’m not terribly miffed by the lack of on-screen buttons; my only gripe is that the “Back” and “Recent apps” keys are denoted by dots instead of more informative icons. At least you can swap those two options in the Settings menu. Meanwhile, it turns out the grid of triangles above and below the screen are a little misleading.

Given the Axon’s audio chops, you’d be forgiven for thinking they covered a pair of front-facing stereo speakers, but there’s only one, tiny speaker lodged in the phone’s bottom grille — the details are mostly just for show. The triangular motif got plenty of play around the rest of the phone too, as it adds a bit of texture to the shutter button and volume rocker. There’s a teensy patch of triangles separating the main 13-megapixel camera from the 2-megapixel secondary shooter above it, but it’s basically just a decal under some protective plastic. All told, it’s a neat little visual flourish that helps the Axon stand out from the crowd of conservative-looking flagships.

Display and sound

The jury’s still out on whether our phones really need super high-resolution screens (our eyes certainly can’t tell the difference past a certain point), but you won’t hear me complain about how tightly packed the Axon’s 5.5-inch screen is. ZTE chose an LCD panel that uses what it calls Continuous Grain Silicon (CGS) tech, which, in a nutshell, makes for a thinner high-density display… not that it made much of a difference for the Axon’s waistline.

Anyway, the whole thing is punchy and saturated, but not quite as overblown as what you’d experience with Samsung’s Galaxy S6 or S6 Edge. In fact, it’s not too far off from the screen packed into LG’s G4 (which strives for more accurate colors than impactful ones). The biggest difference is a slightly warmer, almost redder undertone. I’m the sort of guy who prefers some extra oomph in my screens and the Axon strikes a solid balance here. Brightness and viewing angles were mostly great too, the former being especially important under the pounding summer sun. Thankfully, the auto-brightness setting kept things nice and legible throughout my week of testing. Seeing as we all have our own persnickety screen preferences, I can’t guarantee everyone will be as fond of this as I was, but for what it’s worth, I haven’t spotted any outright dealbreakers.

ZTE apparently tapped the wisdom of the crowds to figure out what it had to nail with the Axon, and high-quality sound was near the top of the wishlist. As such, the company squeezed a digital-to-analog converter that lends the phone the ability to play 32-bit audio; rival smartphones like the Galaxy S6 only support up to 24-bit files. That might sound pretty impressive, but c’mon: Is your music collection filled with 32-bit audio files? Yeah, didn’t think so. Factor in where people tend to listen to music on their phones — traipsing down streets, on subways and so on — and it feels this 32-bit audio push is more an academic achievement than a practical one. However! There’s a bit of preloaded software that will actually change up how your audio sounds.

The Dolby Audio is installed and on by default, which computationally tweaks your tunes in the hope they’ll sound deeper and more powerful than they normally would. After throwing my usual slew of test tracks at the Axon, my natural urge to disable anything that wasn’t stock Android quickly evaporated. The meandering synth intro of Capital Cities’ “Kangaroo Court” sounded brighter and more expansive on the Axon and the included pair of JBL earbuds than it did on the G4 and the iPhone 6. As the album wore on, “Farrah Fawcett Hair” took on a more spacious feel and highlighted little bits of aural texture I never noticed before. The thing is, Dolby’s solution won’t be perfect for everyone from the get-go. The default equalizer settings try to punch up the mids a little too much, leaving those highs and lows a little wimpier than I’d like. It still makes songs meatier and more satisfying than they would be otherwise, though, and if you’re really picky, you can jump into the Dolby settings and tweak things exactly the way you’d like. What’s really depressing is the lack of stereo speakers à la the One M9 — it seems like an odd decision considering how important good audio is to the Axon, but we’ve got the laws of gadget economics to blame for that omission. At least that lone speaker is plenty loud.

Software

The Axon comes loaded with Android 5.1.1, and thankfully ZTE didn’t feel the need to paint over it too much. Aside from some different icons and a custom time/weather widget that greets you upon first boot, you might even mistake this for a stock Android phone. Not quite. First, the interface has some other personalities if the stock-ish default isn’t your thing. Long-pressing the screen brings up two alternate themes to load up, called Fancy and Sports. I honestly couldn’t tell you what’s so fancy about the Fancy look; it changes the default wallpaper to some red feather and axes the app launcher entirely; all your software lives on your home screens instead. And Sports? I don’t get why this needs to be here. It makes your icon set round and… that’s really it. If you’re anything like me, you’re better off just ignoring these other options. Unlike other flagships — the S6 twins and the One M9, for example — there’s no theme store here, which is fine with me. Thankfully, all of Android Lollipop’s most important features are just where you’d expect to find them, and there are a few comforting flashes of Material Design peppered throughout the mix.

Since the ZTE isn’t coming to you thanks to an arcane carrier agreement, there’s hardly any bloatware. In fact, I almost hesitate to call the apps here “bloatware” since most of it is genuinely useful. There’s Dolby Audio, for one, and a bunch of apps dedicated to sports and fitness. Yahoo Sports is the most inexplicable addition, but it’s handy if you want to keep tabs on certain pro teams. Beyond that, an app called RockMyRun offers curated playlists for those marathon-training sessions, along with an activity tracker called Argus that’s more solid than you might expect. It nags you to create an account to squeeze the most use out of it, but it’ll still track and display your day’s steps in what ZTE calls the Z-Tray. When the phone is locked, a little arrow icon will appear at the bottom of the screen — tapping on that brings up music controls and a quick rundown of your activity so far. Most of the time, the Z-Tray is a useful thing to have, but when the notification shade is full, it’s all too easy to open that when you mean to swipe to unlock. Oh, and speaking of the notifications on the lock screen, it hides all but the topmost one, so it requires an extra two taps to see what’s been going on. Sort of defeats the purpose, no?

Camera

I’ll be real with you: I wasn’t expecting much out of the Axon’s rear-facing camera duo. The novelty of using a second sensor for kooky post-production effects on phones like the One M8 never worked for me; it just seemed like a way to distract from the hit-or-miss quality of the primary shooter. My worries were mostly misplaced. The 13-megapixel camera lodged in the Axon’s back is a capable performer, and the Camera app doesn’t lean on that secondary sensor for very much at all. There’s a Bokeh mode available by swiping to the left of the main camera view (spoiler alert: The results are sometimes cool, but often screwy), and that’s really it.

So, that main camera. You don’t need me to remind you that most phone cameras live and die by the light they’re used in, so I’m not blowing any minds by saying the Axon’s daytime photos were sharp and nicely detailed. Color reproduction could’ve been better, though; sample shots were often washed out, undersaturated and lacked the punch you’d see in photos taken with the LG G4 or Samsung Galaxy S6 series. HDR mode mitigates the issue a bit, but man, I hate the idea of requiring HDR for nicely saturated photos (the fact that you’ve got to physically freeze for it to work well stinks too). The same saturation issues plague the Axon in video recordings, even when shooting in 4K; the camera picks up a respectable amount of detail, but colors often seemed a touch blander than in real life. Things naturally take a turn for the worse when it’s dark out; shots were flat and smudgy at best. While I’m griping, I wish holding down the shutter button while the phone is locked would automatically fire up the camera. I guess we can’t have everything for $450.

On the upside, ZTE’s Camera app strikes a fine balance between simplicity and feature bloat. Remember that Bokeh mode? It lets you fiddle with depth of field (down to faux-apertures of f/1.0) and play with the focus after you’ve already taken the photo. Once you’re done there, a quick tap brings up a slew of funky picture modes like multi-exposure to spice things up for an eventual upload to Instagram. My favorite bit? There’s an exposure-control slider that appears when you tap to focus on a subject, just in case the camera doesn’t adapt as fast as you’d like. Throw in a full manual mode that lets you control ISO, white balance and shutter speed and you’ve got a well-designed system that only provides as much control as you want it to. If you’re a straight-up camera buff, there are better phones out there for you, but most people won’t mind the Axon’s photo chops.

Performance and battery life

Right, it’s no surprise that the Axon has plenty of power to play with — we’ve got the Snapdragon 810 and the Adreno 430 GPU to thank for that. That combination (along with 4GB of RAM) catapults it into the upper echelons of mobile computing along with phones that cost considerably more, so let’s just turn to the tale of the synthetic benchmark tape:

ZTE Axon Samsung Galaxy S6 HTC One M9 LG G4
AndEBench Pro 7,961 10,552 7,404 8,352
Vellamo 3.0 3,086 3,677 2,874 4,065
3DMark IS Unlimited 24,802 21,632 21,409 18,572
SunSpider 1.0.2 (ms) 1,489 674 706 725
GFXBench 3.0 1080p Manhattan Offscreen (fps) 25 25 22 15
CF-Bench 62,117 62,257 53,579 71,260
SunSpider 1.0.2: Android devices tested in Chrome; lower scores are better.

Hardly any surprises here: The Axon’s Qualcomm silicon usually performed a little better than the 810 seen in HTC’s One M9, but still left room for Samsung’s custom chipset to pull ahead. The Axon’s SunSpider performance and Vellamo scores are the biggest question marks since they lag behind some of the others, but benchmarks only tell part of the story. Indeed, the Axon is more complex than the numbers might let on. When it came to graphical performance, it was right on par with other big-name flagships on the market. Games like Dead Trigger 2, Asphalt 8 and my new favorite, The Talos Principle, ran like a charm, even with graphical settings maxed out. The combination of a Snapdragon 810 and a metal body does mean that the Axon gets noticeably warm when you start pushing it.

More concerning than the warmth were some unnerving moments of flakiness I experienced during my week of testing. Opening a folder of apps took slightly longer than it ought to, even if the folder was relatively empty. Swiping through pages of apps was mostly fluid, except for moments of stuttering when I was in a rush to find something. Once, while shutting down all my running apps, the screen went dark for about five seconds and refused to heed my touch for a few seconds even after it came back to life. Bizarre. I eventually had to restart the phone to get everything running normally again. It’s these annoying little bits — in fairness, things that could probably be fixed through software updates — that ultimately dull some of the Axon’s shine. ZTE tried to keep things light with its custom approach to Android, but the experience of using it doesn’t always feel as fluid as it should.

Of course, pure power doesn’t mean much without the juice to make everything go. The Axon’s sealed, 3,000mAh battery performed worse than I thought it would in our standard Engadget rundown test. (We loop a 720p video with the screen at 50 percent brightness with the phone connected to WiFi). The official numbers: The Axon lasted for eight hours and 23 minutes before finally dying on me. That might not sound too bad (it’s better than the eight hours and 19 minutes I squeezed out of the One M9), but the G4 and its Quad HD screen stuck around for just over 11 hours. Good thing the Axon packs Qualcomm’s quick-charging tech. Thankfully, that battery fared fine with my daily grind, including email and Slack messages, the occasional YouTube video and an odd game or two. All told, it managed 13 hours before needing a top-up. If you’re the sort of person who isn’t glued to your phone, this thing will hang in there for nearly two days without much trouble.

The competition

The top of the smartphone heap is already a war zone, and if you’re in the market for high-end hardware, be sure to keep these other choices in mind. The HTC One M9 immediately leaps to mind because it too runs a Snapdragon 810 and manages to squeeze a memory card slot into its slim, handsome, all-metal chassis. It also has a nifty after-care angle in the form of Uh-Oh Protection, under which the company promises to swap your busted M9 for a replacement. ZTE’s own complimentary Passport program is a little different: It comes with a two-year warranty and a 30-day return policy. The icing on the M9’s cake is its impeccable build quality (the BoomSound speakers are a nice get, too), but it’ll set you back $649 unlocked — $200 more than the Axon.

Then there’s LG’s G4, which also features a 5.5-inch Quad HD display, albeit one that’s more restrained and color-balanced than the Axon’s. Performance can be pretty close between these things, but the G4 has some crucial benefits: a microSD card slot and one of the best cameras in its class. It’s available with a beautiful leather finish, too, and it won’t weigh down your pockets nearly as much as the Axon. I’d choose the G4 over the Axon if money weren’t an option, but it’ll still cost extra depending on where you look; eBay recently had a European version of the phone for $499, and prices online still hover around $550 for a new-in-box model.

And then we’ve got that other high-end smartphone that’s expected to go easy on our wallets: The OnePlus Two. The Two is expected to make its debut very soon, and it’s said to feature similar specs as the Axon, from the same Snapdragon 810 to the 4GB of RAM to what some rumors suggest is a 5.5-inch Quad HD screen. The kicker: OnePlus CEO Pete Lau already confirmed that it’ll cost less than the $450 the Axon sells for. Resist the temptation to be an alarmist: The OnePlus Two just might stop Axon sales cold, but we’ll see how quickly the Oppo spinoff can churn those things out.

Wrap-up

I’ve got to hand it to ZTE: The Axon is the sort of powerful, budget-friendly phone I never thought the company would, or could, make. It’s got gobs of power. It’s mostly well-built. The camera isn’t half-bad. And that tantalizing $450 price tag currently represents the floor — the least amount of money you could spend on a phone as well-specced as this. So why won’t I buy one? First, the software isn’t as polished as it should be. Secondly, I need memory. I need room for files and photos and tracks and videos, and the widespread availability of cloud storage just doesn’t cut it for me. The fact that ZTE made an actual contender of a phone, stuck it with only 32GB of storage and left out any expandable memory options is ridiculous. Samsung offers the Galaxy S6 line with more storage (for a pretty penny, but still). The Axon, then, isn’t a perfect handset. It is, however, a mostly great smartphone that makes me strangely excited for a sequel.

Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile

Comments

21
Jul

ZTE’s Axon smartphone, Axon Watch and Spro 2 Projector are making their way to China


ZTE Axon for China AA

ZTE’s flagship Axon smartphone just launched in the United States about a week ago, and earlier today we saw the device pay a visit to Chinese certification authority TENAA, signifying its imminent launch in China. Now the company has made the smartphone’s launch in China official, along with a few other notable devices.

Related Videos

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed';
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

For starters, let’s talk about the Chinese version of the Axon smartphone. This device features a very similar design to the U.S. model, though it comes with a few interesting features many users will welcome to the handset. It comes with a fingerprint scanner, dual-SIM card support, a massive 128GB of internal memory (expandable to 256GB) and Corning’s Antimicrobial Gorilla Glass display. The Axon smartphone for China is also the world’s first handset that can be unlocked using three different biometric security methods – fingerprint, voice control and eye-scan. The fingerprint scanner can also be used for NFC payments, making this feature even more functional.

The 128GB variant is now available for pre-order for 3,888 RMB, while the standard 32GB version can now be pre-ordered for 2,699 RMB.

ZTE_Axon_Watch_(1)

The Axon Watch is a new wearable from ZTE, featuring a 1.4-inch Gorilla Glass screen with sapphire coating and IP67 certification. It comes with a 300mAh battery, 512MB of RAM, 4GB of on-board storage and Bluetooth 4.1. Developed in partnership with Tencent, the watch runs Tencent OS that supports both voice and gesture control. As of right now, no pricing information has been given regarding the Axon Watch.

ZTE_Spro_2_Smart_Projector

Additionally, ZTE is bringing its Android-powered Spro 2 Smart Projector to China. Launched previously on AT&T and Verizon, this projector includes a built-in 5.0-inch touchscreen and some handy mobile hotspot features. The Spro 2 for China is now available for pre-order for 3699 RMB.

Show Press Release

ZTE Launches Flagship Axon phone, Axon Watch and Spro 2 Smart Projector in China

ZTE Axon phone for China is the world’s first smartphone to feature three different biometric authentication options

21 July 2015, Beijing – ZTE, a leading global mobile device maker, today launched its flagship Axon phone for the China market at the Water Cube in Beijing. Together with this announcement came the unveiling of a brand new wearable called the Axon Watch, as well as the China debut of the Spro 2 smart projector.

“Today’s launch marks a significant new chapter in product development for ZTE, and the three devices launched today are results of our ongoing commitment to becoming more consumer-centric in the global market,” said Adam Zeng, CEO, ZTE Mobile Device. “Following its U.S. debut last week, we are excited to bring our first ever global flagship to China – a market where our aim is to return to being a top-three smartphone vendor within the next three years.”

ZTE Axon phone

The Axon phone for China comes with the same premium design as the version recently launched in the U.S., but includes a number of additional features for the China market.

In terms of hardware, the Axon phone for China comes with a fingerprint scanner, dual-SIM support, 128GB of internal memory (expandable to 256GB), and Corning’s Antimicrobial Gorilla Glass.

On the software side, the device is loaded with the latest rendition of ZTE’s customizable user interface MiFavor 3.2, as well as ZTE’s innovative voice control solution. This latest iteration of ZTE’s Smart Voice supports voice translation for English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Thai and Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), as well as a host of other new voice control functions, including voice SMS and voice search.

The Axon phone for China is also the world’s first smartphone that can be unlocked with three different biometric authentication options: fingerprint, voice control and eye-scan, making it one of the most secure smartphones available on the market. In addition to unlocking the device, the Axon phone’s fingerprint scanner also offers support for NFC payments.

The Axon phone will be available for pre-order in China on July 21 via ZTE’s online store at http://m.myzte.com/act/axon and JD.com. Two Axon phone versions are available: 128GB for 3,888RMB and 32GB for 2,699RMB with two color options: Ion Gold and Chromium Silver. A ZTE Axon Mini version will also be made available in the near future.

ZTE Axon Watch

The Axon Watch features a 1.4-inch Gorilla Glass screen with sapphire coating and is IP67 certified. It comes with a 300 mAh battery, 512 MB of RAM, 4 GB storage and Bluetooth 4.1. Developed by ZTE and Tencent, the smart watch runs on Tencent OS and supports both voice and gesture control.

In terms of functions, the Axon Watch can be used for both fitness and health monitoring, and supports a range of other applications, from phone calls to messaging.

ZTE Spro 2 Smart Projector

Previously launched in the U.S. on AT&T and Verizon, the Spro 2 is a portable Smart Projector that also includes mobile hotspot features and a built-in 5-inch Android™ touchscreen.

For its China debut, ZTE has added its innovative voice control solution to the Spro 2, allowing users hands-free control over the smart projector. Users can simply say “projector on” in Mandarin to activate the device and can control the device using a number of other voice commands.

The Spro 2 Smart Projector will be priced at 3699 RMB in China and will also be available for pre-order from July 21 via ZTE’s online store athttp://www.myzte.com/6934933090095.html.

21
Jul

ZTE’s latest smartwatch packs style and gesture control


ZTE Axon Watch

ZTE isn’t just counting on a high-end smartphone to convince you that it means business. The company has taken the wraps off of the Axon Watch, a smartwatch that’s miles above last year’s clunky BlueWatch in both design and features. Besides looking like a conventional watch that you might actually enjoy putting on your wrist, it’s packing a wearable version of Tencent OS (nope, no Android Wear here) with both perks like gesture control as well as basics like phone calls, messaging and fitness tracking.

If only the hardware were more exciting. While the 1.4-inch sapphire-coated display and Bluetooth 4.1 are noteworthy, you’re otherwise looking at a very pedestrian 512MB of RAM, 4GB of built-in storage and a 300mAh battery. Don’t expect epic battery life or performance, then. As it stands, you may have to go out of your way to get one. The Axon Watch is launching in China, and there’s no indications that it’s heading elsewhere any time soon.

Filed under: Wearables

Comments

21
Jul

ZTE explains why it didn’t want to put its name on the Axon


ZTE AXON Phone Hands On-27

If you haven’t heard of Chinese smartphone manufacturer ZTE, you’re probably not alone. Although it’s currently the fourth-largest smartphone maker in the United States by shipments, the company is still struggling to increase its brand awareness because it’s solely focused on budget-friendly handsets for some time. But with the recent launch of the high-end Axon smartphone, ZTE set out to try to fix that problem.

ZTE Axon hands-on

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed';
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

The Axon, which was just recently unveiled at an event in New York City, ticks just about every box on the specification sheet that it possibly can. It has an aluminum chassis, a 5.5-inch Quad HD display, Snapdragon 810 processor, 4GB of RAM, a dual rear-facing camera, and some impressive Hi-Fi audio features. With the launch of the Axon, one of the most high-end smartphones the company has ever produced, one would think ZTE would want to display its name all over the device. However, we learned some time ago that this isn’t the case.

If customers know it is a Chinese brand, they might assume it’s a cheap phone.

Before the phone was announced, the Axon was a mysterious beast. The device’s website made some bold claims, though initially, we weren’t sure which manufacturer was behind the handset. Lo and behold the OEM behind this smartphone turned out to be ZTE, but why wouldn’t the company want to market it as a ZTE product? According to ZTE’s CEO of Mobile Devices Adam Zeng, it’s because ZTE was trying to change the United States’ perception of Chinese smartphone makers. “We didn’t connect it with ZTE at first,” Zeng said. “If customers know it is a Chinese brand, they might assume it’s a cheap phone.”

Mr. Zeng went on to say that ZTE will double its marketing spending each year for the next three years as it tries to reach the top-three handset vendor spot in the United States by 2018. The company’s marketing budget as a whole (not just for mobile) for 2015 is more than one billion yuan ($161 million). Zeng also says the company will still refrain from purchasing traditional advertising, but will continue to sponsor NBA teams like it has in the past.

Have you ever wanted to stay away from a smartphone because of its Chinese OEM origins? If so, do you think ZTE went about this product launch in the right way? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

21
Jul

Boost Mobile launches the ZTE Boost Max+ for $200 off-contract


Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 12.29.43

Earlier today, ZTE launched a brand new budget-friendly smartphone that’s up for grabs exclusively from Boost Mobile for $200 off-contract.

The handset’s called the Boost Max+ and features a 5.7-inch IPS display, a 1.2GHz quad-core processor, 2GB of RAM, an 8-megapixel rear-facing camera, 16GB of expandable storage and a 3,400mAh battery.

Straight out of its box, the handset will run the latest build of Lollipop skinned with ZTE’s custom user interface, which makes it extremely easy for users to switch between a rather large catalogue of themes.

If you’d like to find out more about the Boost Max+ — hit the source link below.

Source: ZTE

Come comment on this article: Boost Mobile launches the ZTE Boost Max+ for $200 off-contract

21
Jul

Axon Phone heads to China with fingerprint scanner in tow


ZTE AXON Phone vs LG G4 Quick Look-1

ZTE is one of a handful of Chinese manufacturers eyeing up growth in the USA and last week, the company announced its new Axon phone – which is part of the ZTE Axon brand – to offer competition to established brands in the US market. The Axon phone also looks set to land in ZTE’s home market with the handset paying a visit to Chinese certification authority TENAA with model number A2015.

The Axon A2015 features the same design and specs as the US handset but gains one important thing (at least for the Chinese market); a fingerprint scanner. Other than this change – which sees the fingerprint sensor put on the back of the Axon A2015 – the handset is pretty much identical to the US Axon phone and should offer one of the most affordable flagship experiences of the year.

To recap, the Axon phone features a 5.5-inch Quad HD IPS display offering 534 pixels per inch density and is powered by an octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor, 4GB RAM and 32GB internal storage that cannot be expanded. On the back, the handset has a 13MP and 2MP dual rear camera setup, which can shoot Ultra HD video while the front has an 8MP selfie camera. Other notable specs of the Axon phone include Hi-Fi Audiowhich we’ve gone into detail about here – Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, Wi-Fi n, LTE and a non-removable 3000 mAh battery.

Axon in video:

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed';
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

The Axon A2015 is likely to launch  in the very near future and so far, the handset is seemingly set for China only. Given some impressive handsets end up only releasing in China, it wouldn’t surprise us if the Axon with fingerprint scanner doesn’t make it to any other markets.

20
Jul

A closer look at the Axon phone’s “Hi-Fi Audio”


ZTE AXON Phone Hands On-4

Last week, ZTE launched its new Axon smartphone in the US, which boats some top of the line specifications at a price that substantially undercuts the competition. One of the big selling points is the Axon phone’s “Hi-Fi Audio”, but with lots of smartphones offering hi-resolution playback it’s worth looking at what separates the Axon from the rest.

The Axon phone boasts a “Premium 32-bit” AK4490 DAC which supports sample rates up to 192 kHz, features five digital filters, and AKM’s “Velvet Sound” technology. This is coupled with an AK 4961 codec used for recording functionality, which offers four differential channel 24-bit ADCs that operate up to 96 kHz.

So let’s take a look at this audio jargon in a little more detail.

32-bit playback, really?

Firstly, the Axon’s “Hi-Fi Audio” is capable of 32-bit 192 kHz audio file playback, which trumps the introduction of 24-bit 192 kHz capable flagship smartphones that have hit the market over the past year or so, at least on paper. I say on paper because bits and audio are a lot like megapixels and cameras, bigger numbers don’t always produce higher quality results.

You probably won’t be able to find a lot of 32-bit source material to playback, most high-quality audio downloads come at most as 24-bit 192 kHz files. Even then, you could fill up the Axon’s 32GB of memory pretty quickly with lossless files of that size, so it’s not an immediately useful addition. More importantly, the on paper capabilities of the codec don’t necessarily match up with real-world implementations.

“Customers told us what was missing from today’s smartphones, and low-quality audio was one of the biggest sticking points.” – ZTE

When we talk about audio bit-depth, from a consumer perspective, we mean the number of points available with which to record or playback the waveform’s amplitude. 16-bit CD quality audio offers 65,535 points (-32,768 through 32,767), 24-bit studio quality files offer 16,777,216 possible values (−8,388,608 to 8,388,607) and 32-bit files reach a huge 4,294,967,296 range.

People often confuse bit-depth with the resolution “accuracy” of something like a camera image or incorrectly think about smoothing out signal “stair-stepping”. But the real purpose of higher bit-depth at the recording and playback stage is to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR). 32-bit math processing is a different matter. This is done by increasing the number of points between the peak signal and the noise floor (dynamic range) and reducing distortion caused by rounding errors, something which dithering also addresses.

On paper, an ideal 16-bit signal has an SNR of 96dB, 24-bit has 144dB, while 32-bit theoretically jumps to 192dB.

Digital Audio Noise

Noise pre ADC or post DAC reduces the useful bit-depth of digital audio.

However, there are physical limitations to the actual SNR that can be achieved, which depends on hardware layout and the noise limits of integrated circuits. Real world high-end audio implementations are often limited to an SNR less than 132dB, which works out to 22-bits.

Jargon Buster:

(Signal to Noise Ratio) SNR – The difference between a nominal signal level and the average level of the noise floor. Dynamic Range is a similar measurement that looks at the maximum signal level and the noise floor. Larger values are better.

(Total Harmonic Distortion) THD – Additional signal content added as a single wave passes through a component. This is usually an odd or even harmonic of the original signal. This test is usually done with a 1 kHz sine wave and lower values are better.

(Intermodulation Distortion) IMD – Additional signal content added by a component when passing multiple signals of different frequencies. Content is not necessarily an integer harmonic, which can produce particularly ugly distortion.

So although an ADC or DAC may be theoretically capable of recording or playing back 24-bits of data or greater, you should actually look at the real world noise values to get a better idea of how close the hardware can actually get to the ideal.

With that understood, we can determine that the Axon phone’s 32-bit audio playback is actually a rather pointless marketing ploy. The chip itself promises a 120dB SNR, while the phone’s hardware layout seems to reduce this to 108dB, according to the launch presentation. So we’re actually only looking at noise floor equivalent to what we would get with an ideal 18-bit source.

The chart below shows a comparison of the dynamic range headphone outputs from a range of smartphones, and roughly what that equates to in terms of actual available bit-depth for playback.

smartphone dynamic range comparison

Data from the Axon phone press release vs other flagships (source).

The Axon’s result is still very good for a smartphone and shows a noticeable improvement over competing handsets on the market. However, it doesn’t provide as big of a gap between the competition as the 32-bit tag line would suggest, and won’t lend itself to the full dynamic range offered by a 24-bit source, let alone a 32-bit file.

All of that said, by the time we take the average listening environment, volume, and increased amounts of compression used in modern music, listeners will struggle to notice any difference between 16, 24 and 32-bit audio anyway.

Distortion Characteristics

The AK4490 DAC also offers up some improved Total Harmonic Distortion and Noise (THD+N) characteristics compared with other smartphones on the market. All audio hardware introduces some additional distortion and noise, including codecs, op-amps and speakers, most of all. A high-quality audio hardware chain should introduce less than 0.1% of additional content, or -60dB.

The Axon phone manages a THD factor of -97.7dB, which works out to 0.0013%. Typically, as output power increases THD rises as the speaker or driving chip works harder to increase the volume. The Axon phone retains its very stable -97.7dB all the way up to 10mW when driving quite typical 32 ohm headphones.

Axon phone THD

Compared with some of the leading flagship smartphones, the Galaxy S6’s THD measures around 0.0024%, the iPhone offers 0.0018%, the Xperia Z3 Plus measures 0.0049% and the One M9 comes in at 0.0082%. The Axon phone seems to offer the least distortion available in a smartphone and bests many of the current Android flagships by a notable margin.

smartfone harmonic distortion comparison

Perhaps a better distortion test for actual audio use is intermodulation distortion, which measures the additional harmonic content introduced by the system when two or more frequencies are sent through the system. Again, the Axon phone offers substantially less distortion than leading Android flagships, and also again bests Apple’s iPhone 6.smartphone intermodulation distortion comparisonAs a side note, these figures alter quite substantially with headphones attached, but we don’t have the exact test conditions for the Axon phone here, so we have picked the lowest value for the other handsets as a precaution.

Apart from the pointless addition of 32-bit audio playback, the Axon phone indeed offers some significant important improvements in audio playback quality when compared with other flagship smartphones, and looks to be the best Android phone for audio playback on the market right now. The iPhone 6 and the Galaxy S6 are the two smartphones that offer the closest playback quality.

Recording options

Turning to the handset’s recording options, the Axon boasts a 24-bit ADC with dual-microphone for omni-directional recordings, using a microphone at the top and bottom of the device.

The two microphones can help more accurately pinpoint a sound within 20 meters from the phone. As for how it works, just imagine a sound traveling to your ears. The slight difference in space between the two means that a sound arrives at ever so slightly different times, which allows your brain to pinpoint the rough location. A single (or mono) microphone setup does not capture this time difference, but a stereo microphone setup can help preserve this additional sense of space.

Omni directional mic phase

The phase and time differences between offset microphones helps to preserve a more realistic sense of distance. (source)

While this effect will probably work reasonably well when listening back through headphones, the decision to use a single speaker in the Axon phone means that this effect may not preserve quite the same sense of space when mixed down to a mono signal.

The ADC boasts 24-bit 96 kHz sound capture, but a quick check of the spec sheet SNR again suggests that the real-world usable bit-depth is actually closer to 17-bit, or 16-bit when the mic amp adds an additional 18dB of gain.

This is still more than good enough for high-quality, low noise audio capture, providing that the microphone is good enough, and the ability to capture stereo audio data through the use of two microphones should offer up a compelling sense of space. This could be a particularly nice feature to use in conjunction with the phone’s video capture.

Extra Features

ZTE has also picked an audio codec that comes with a built-in DSP core. The AK4961 can handle echo cancellation and microphone noise suppression for audio recording on the chip. It can also perform voice processing to enable voice commands and wake-up functions, as well as hands free functionality. Having these processes managed on the codec will save on the need for additional hardware or using up main CPU processing time.

Like all good codecs, the AK4961 and 4490 feature oversampling modes to reduce noise from out-of-band sources and make use of differential inputs and outputs to help prevent noise leaking into the signal path from additional sources.

ZTE AXON Phone Hands On-9

Wrap Up

Hopefully this breakdown has helped to give you an idea of the type of audio improvements that the Axon phone actually delivers and those that it can’t.

While a 32-bit “Hi-Fi Audio” DAC tag-line might be an easy sell, the reality is that the confined and noisy environments of a smartphone chassis are not going to allow hardware to operate anywhere close to that level of accuracy, if consumers could even notice the difference. However, the Axon phone’s choice of high quality ADC and DAC hardware does boast improvements to noise and distortion, which are sure to please audiophiles out there.

We’ll have some more time to spend listening to the phone when review time rolls around, so we won’t draw any final conclusions. But the Axon looks to be a step in the right direction for mobile audio lovers.

Axon Phone Hands on!

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed';
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

20
Jul

ZTE launches Boost Max+ with Boost Mobile


ZTE Boost Max+

ZTE and US carrier Boost Mobile have today launched the ZTE Boost Max+, a mid-range large-screen handset at an affordable off-contract price. The handset is the follow up to the ZTE Iconic phablet – which was rebranded to the Boost Max for Boost Mobile – but brings better specs at an impressive price tag.

ZTE Phones in video:

.rvs_wrapper
width: 350px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left
float: left;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none
width: 100%;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center
text-align: center;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: none;
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: top;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos:not(.align_none) ul li:nth-child(2n+1)
clear: both;

.rvs_title
font-weight: 600 !important;
margin: 0 !important;
font-size: 24px !important;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right .rvs_title
padding-left: 20px;

.rvs_title a
font-family: ‘Roboto Condensed';
color: #3a3a3a;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
padding-top: 10px;

.rvs_wrapper.align_left.cbc-latest-videos ul li,
.rvs_wrapper.align_none.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 15px 0 0;

.rvs_wrapper.align_right.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 0 0 15px;
float: right;

.rvs_wrapper.align_center.cbc-latest-videos ul li
padding: 0 7px;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a
font-weight: 400;

.rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li > a .yt-thumbnail
margin-bottom: 0;

@media only screen and (min-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
width: 100% !important;

@media only screen and (max-width : 480px)
body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos
width: 100%;
float: none !important;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: hidden;

body #page .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul
overflow: auto;
max-height: none;

body .rvs_wrapper.cbc-latest-videos ul li
float: left !important;
clear: none !important;

The Boost Max+ features a 5.7-inch 720p HD display (offering a modest 258 pixels per inch density) and is powered by a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 processor coupled with 2GB RAM and 16GB expandable storage. The handset is 9.3mm thick and has an 8MP autofocus rear camera that records in 1080p, a single LED flash, a 1MP front facing snapper and a large 3,400 mAh battery.

The handset runs on Android 5.1 Lollipop and connectivity options include Bluetooth 4.0, Wi-Fi n and integrated GPS. There’s no LTE onboard but given the original Boost Max was later followed up by the Boost Max LTE, it’s likely we’ll see an LTE variant of the Boost Max+ launched in the near future. At just $199.99 free of contract, the Boost Max+ definitely offers impressive specs for the money, especially when you consider that the one-off cost is the same as the upfront cost as many handsets on postpaid plans but doesn’t require a monthly subscription.

What do you think of the ZTE Boost Max+? Let us know your views in the comments below guys!

Show Press Release

ZTE Debuts Boost® Max+ Smartphone With Hot New Looks at One Hot Price

Popular Boost Max gets upgrades with Boost Max+ featuring Android 5.1 platform and stylish gold-color casing at just $199.99 with no contract commitment

Richardson, Texas (July 20, 2015) — ZTE USA, the fourth largest smartphone manufacturer in the U.S. and second largest in the no-contract market*, today announced the availability of the Boost MAX+ on Boost Mobile. Starting today, consumers can get the latest smartphone technology and design at just $199.99, with no contract commitment. The Boost Max+ can be added to any Boost Mobile plan and will be available online at Boost Mobile and in store beginning today.

“The Boost Max continues to be very popular and we are excited to see how that may further improve with the second generation Boost Max+,” says ZTE USA. “More consumers are looking for premium smartphone experiences as an affordable price and having a partner as great as Boost Mobile allows us to both deliver devices and services that consumers want, value and use.”

Larger screen smartphones such as the Boost Max+ helped ZTE secure 15.9 percent of the phablet market in the U.S. by the end of 2014 and also drove smartphone shipment growth to 41 percent year-over-year.*

Get more screen that does more for you

With a large 5.7-inch HD display you have the room to view two apps at the same time. With Smart Viewer, you can do things like watch YouTube and text simultaneously or view a website and write an email at the same time.

Second generation updates worth the wait

Coupled with a large 3400 mAh battery with wireless charging capabilities, increased memory and storage, and a Qualcomm Quad-Core chipset, the Boost Max+ provides the agility and power that can perform when life demands it.

Quality connection when you need it

When you’re ready to connect over the phone, you’ll enjoy the HD voice quality provided over Boost Mobile’s 3G and 4G LTE network. Or, if you want to connect over video, the phone features a quality 8MP rear camera and 1MP front camera.

*Strategy Analytics, North America Handset Vendor Market Share, Q1 2015

19
Jul

Android Authority this week – July 19, 2015


ZTE AXON Phone Hands On-22

Hello Android fans, this week brought us the release of the Galaxy A8 and the cool new Axon phone, and a bevy of hot rumors about the real stars of this summers: Galaxy Note 5, OnePlus 2, and the new Moto X. The Galaxy Note 5 and the S6 Edge Plus are now rumored to launch on August 12, and a series of renders gives us a good idea of what to expect. ZTE introduced the Axon in the United States, and we were actually impressed by the solid specs and cheap price. Motorola scheduled an event for July 28, where we expect to see the new Moto G and Moto X. More details about the Huawei Nexus leaked, we got a look at the Turing phone, and HTC introduced several new devices in the United States. Finally, Cortana for Android leaked ahead of launch.

Inside AA HQ

We had two product launches this week in New York (Axon and HTC Desire), that Darcy and Lanh attended, but all in all, our virtual HQ was pretty quiet this week. That’s not because we’re all in vacation… it’s just that we’re working on some long term projects, that are not quite ready to be announced.

Luckily, things are a bit livelier on the general Android front, thanks in large part to Samsung’s apparent decision to move up the launch of the Galaxy Note 5. Check our Galaxy Note 5 rumor roundup, and while you’re at it, have a look at the OnePlus 2 rumor roundup as well. And stay tuned for more rumors as we get them!

Cortana-Android-Thumb-

It’s been long since we’ve given away an Android tablet, but that changes today – head over to the Sunday Giveaway for a chance to win a Google Nexus 9!

The stuff you shouldn’t miss

Top news of the week

Galaxy A8 is official

Samsung Galaxy A8

Galaxy Note 5 and Edge Plus rumors

galaxy-note-5-3d-5

Check out the ZTE Axon

ZTE AXON Phone Hands On-14

Next Moto X and Moto G

motorola invite

Turing Phone: security in and out

turing phone first look aa (12 of 23)

OnePlus 2 rumors

oneplus-one-unboxing-8-of-29

Huawei Nexus

huawei ascend mate 7 unboxing initial setup aa (5 of 20)

New HTC Desires

HTC Desire 626 Hands On-18

Cortana for Android

cortana thumb copy

Sound off

We always want to hear your feedback. Whether it’s criticism or praise, feel free to tell us what you think about Android Authority’s content, design, and community. Comment here or get in touch with us on our social channels:

Happy Sunday!

19
Jul

ZTE and Boost bring the Boost MAX+ for under $200


If you’re in the market for a sub $200 phone with some flagship specs, be sure to check out the ZTE Boost MAX+ for Boost Mobile. This the successor to last years Boost MAX, and has some pretty good specs for a phone that’s only $200.

The Boost MAX+ brings a 5.7-inch Corning Gorilla 1080p IPS Display, 8 MP rear facing camera, a 1.2 GHz Quad-Core Processor with 2GB of RAM and 16GB of storage built in. The Boost MAX+ also is running Android 5.1 Lollipop, and has the ability to easily switch between Sprint’s 3G and 4G LTE networks, without any issues. Finally, the Boost MAX+ is sporting a 3400 mAh battery, that should keep your phone running all day with no issues.

While this isn’t a powerhouse, phone, it’s definitely a great deal considering what you get for only $200. Let us know in the comments below, whether you plan to check this phone out for your next option.

Source: Boost Mobile

The post ZTE and Boost bring the Boost MAX+ for under $200 appeared first on AndroidGuys.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 332 other followers

%d bloggers like this: