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Posts tagged ‘Twitter’

19
Sep
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Twitter’s iOS 8 upgrade brings a new look for profiles


If (for some reason) you absolutely hate how profiles look on Twitter for the iPhone, you may want to fire up the App Store and download the latest update. It comes with a brand new design for profiles, which brings your bio front and center (no more swiping needed to see it) and adds separate timelines for your uploaded photos/inevitable GIFs) and favorite tweets. This new profile will show up for both iOS 7 and iOS 8 users, so you can already enjoy it even if you don’t want to delete apps and make room for Apple’s new mobile platform just yet. You do, however, get something extra if you’ve already upgraded: the power to retweet, follow and favorite posts right from the notification center.

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Source: Twitter, iTunes

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19
Sep
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Twitpic is being acquired, and apparently not shutting down next week


Good news? After a shocking announcement by Twitpic that it would close its doors as a result of action by Twitter, now the company has announced that’s not shutting down after all. There are no specific details, but in a tweet, it says “We’re happy to announce we’ve been acquired and Twitpic will live on! We will post more details as we can disclose them.” Your guess is as good as ours as to the buyer, but this may explain a recent dispute that saw Twitpic founder Noah Everett blocking efforts to back up the site’s pictures before they disappeared. All that matters now, is that your pre-Instagram photos are safe.

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Source: Twitpic (Twitter)

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10
Sep
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Twitter thinks it’s a good fit for the Apple Watch and other small screens


Moments after Apple announced its latest devices to the world, Twitter’s President of Global Revenue, Adam Bain, came on stage at CTIA to give his thoughts on the integration of Twitter with that much talked about Apple Watch. Twitter was one of the apps given early access to Apple’s WatchKit, and was prominently featured in today’s keynote in Cupertino. Not only can you read tweets on your wrist, but tweeted images fill up the entirety of the tiny screen.

In conversation with CNBC’s Julia Boorstin, Bain says he finds the whole wearables field very interesting, and says it’s good to be on platforms both large and small. “Promoted videos [for example] look better on a larger screen,” he said. Yet he also thinks the mobile nature of Twitter fits very nicely with a watch. In the physical world, you glance at your wrist multiple times a day, he says, and a lot of people do the same with Twitter. Marrying the two together makes sense and having Twitter available on wearable devices like the Apple Watch would make the service more accessible than ever. Further, he highlighted the personal nature of getting tweets on your watch, stating that connections and emotions could be “more dramatic” than before.

But wait, does that mean we’ll see Twitter ads on the Apple Watch? While Bain was hesitant to answer that question, he didn’t rule it out. “Every new device sets new rules,” he said, saying that it was far too early to talk about anything of the sort just yet.

Bain was also asked about Apple Pay and if that hinders or helps Twitter’s recent mobile commerce efforts. Essentially, no, it wouldn’t hurt them. “Anything that reduces friction of payment on mobile devices is a good thing,” he said, even hinting that an integration with Apple Pay was possible in the future.

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10
Sep
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Apple Watch will unlock your hotel room door, guide you home and more: the app roundup


You’re at the Westin Grand in Berlin having a luxurious vacation. After finishing a delicious bowl of mushroom consommé — chanterelles are in season, after all — you stroll up the lavish center staircase toward your room. Having left wallets in the past, you simply hover your Apple Watch over the door. “Click!” And that’s that. Magnetic plastic cards are so uncivilized.

This is the future Apple imagines for you with its new Watch, and it’s working with Starwood Hotels (the group that owns Westin, among others) to make that future a reality. And that’s just one of several scenarios for Apple Watch that were introduced by Apple VP Kevin Lynch during a third-party app demo on stage in Cupertino, California.

Beyond Starwood, American Airlines is also working on Apple Watch — both are using WatchKit, the software toolkit Apple built for third-party app development. The specific context wasn’t given for its use with American, but one can easily imagine using Apple Watch as your electronic boarding pass.

City Mapper, a popular transit app on mobile, is getting an Apple Watch version, as are home-automation apps from Lutron and Honeywell. BMW is apparently creating a tool for finding your car with the Watch. These are the “internet of things” applications for Apple Watch — home automation, location guidance, personal-object retrieval, etc.

And then, of course, there’s stuff like Twitter and Pinterest. Twitter is relatively fully featured from the looks of the brief demo shown: You can tweet from it, as well as browse your timeline and such. Pinterest acts more like a reminder list, letting you know when you’re physically close to something you’ve pinned.

We’ll assuredly hear more about Apple Watch apps as the trio of watches launch sometime in early 2015. And hey, maybe you’re making a really cool app? Or you know of one that’s in the works? Don’t hesitate to let us know!

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8
Sep
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Twitter’s ‘Buy’ button is finally ready for public testing


It’s no secret that Twitter’s been working on a way for you buy junk straight from tweets, and the company is finally ready to talk about it in public. You see, in the days and weeks to come, you might see “Buy” buttons embedded in tweets from Home Depot, Pharell and Burberry (no, really) as you poke around in Twitter’s mobile app. Tapping that button will take you straight to you a checkout page where you can either punch in your credit card info or call forth the payment data you’ve already stored with Twitter. If everything goes the Twitter probably wants it to, we may soon be looking at a service that’s just as much about commerce as it is about content. That’ll be great for Twitter’s bottom line, but the jury’s still out on how regular folks’ll take it — some of them are already a little miffed about some of the timeline changes may already be coming barreling down the pipeline.

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Source: Twitter

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5
Sep
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Twitter CFO hints at big changes to how your timeline works


Twitter has already started to look more like Facebook, and it might soon start acting more like it too. You see, company CFO Anthony Noto hinted yesterday that the reverse-chronological firehose of tweets that some users hold so dear may give way to a more curated collection of messages cast into the digital ether. To hear him tell it, the Twitter experience as we know it “isn’t the most relevant” to the people who actually use the service (a notion that some people would definitely disagree with). That tidbit was lodged inside a broader conversation (which the Wall Street Journal captured) about improving Twitter’s search functionality — Noto pointed out the need for “an algorithm that delivers the depth and breadth of the content we have on a specific topic and then eventually as it relates to people.” Those last few words seem crucial — it sounds like he wants the Twitter experience to become one where content is tailored and presented differently depending on how relevant it is to the user. In the end, it might wind up getting Twitter a bunch of new users (which is exactly what all those antsy shareholders want to see), but would it really be worth alienating the service’s hardcore fans?

What do you think about Twitter’s possible shift to a “filtered” feed?

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Via: Gigaom

Source: Wall Street Journal

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5
Sep
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Twitter helps you keep track of NFL action with curated timelines


While you’re sitting on the sofa watching your NFL team of choice take the field, you’re likely peeking at a mobile device for updates, too. If that’s the case, Twitter is looking to lend a hand this season with curated timelines for action around the league and game-specific options. In the #NFL timeline, you can see what the folks you follow are saying with “relevant tweets” from teams, players, coaches, media and celebrities peppered in to keep you in the know. For the game-focused feed (#SeahawksvsPackers or #SEAvsGB for example), everything is distilled down to what you need to watch that particular matchup. If that sounds a bit familiar it’s because the social network did the same thing during the World Cup, and now it’s looking to keep American football fans well-informed. For now, the timelines are only available on iOS and the web, so Android users will have to sit tight for the time being.

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Source: Twitter

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5
Sep
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Twitter trademark turmoil forces Twitpic to shut down


It’s the end of an era, folks: Twitpic, one of the first sites that let users upload and share photos to Twitter, will go dark on September 25. Unlike other shuttered startups though, Twitpic hasn’t run out of cash or been pushed out of the spotlight by fierce competitors. No, its demise is all thanks to some trademark turmoil initiated by the folks at Twitter who reached out to the Twitpic team a few weeks back. The social giant wanted the company (which at one point was valued at over $10 million) to give up its nearly 5 year old trademark application or face the prospect of being shut out of the Twitter ecosystem entirely. Rather than devote gobs of time and resources to proving his point, founder Noah Everett (sadly) decided to call it quits on the operation. Don’t feel too bad for him, though: he’s got another startup in the works called Pingly that basically aims to build a “better Gmail”. We don’t want to harp on a guy who’s already down on his luck but… join the club, pal. In any case, you’ve still got time to download all of your stored photos from Twitpic — just give those poor folks a little time to release the tool that’ll let you do it.

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Source: Twitpic

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4
Sep
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Digg brings its Twitter news fixation to its RSS reader and iOS app


Last month, Digg tried to very subtly reinvent itself with the launch of a feature called Digg Deeper. The concept was simple enough: Deeper would surface stories based on what your Twitter pals were all talking about, so you’d have a better sense of the news of the moment. There was just one caveat, though. You see, at the time, it was only open to members of News.me (the startup the new Digg team slaved away on first). We’re down with rewarding loyalty, but now Deeper is expanding in a big way — the feature has been baked into the Digg Reader proper, and now also lives in an updated version of the Digg iOS app you can download right now. Oh, and the team’s launching a new daily digest email that’ll encapsulate all your Twitter friends’ shared stories and blast them into your inbox (as if it wasn’t cluttered enough). Digg’s little social experiment seems to have paid off, but the thing to remember is that it’s still just a start. After all, there’s still no support for social channels beyond Twitter (like a less clickbait-y Facebook, for instance) and no word on when Google’s faithful will get a chance to sift through all that new news on their Android devices.

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Source: Digg Blog

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3
Sep
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Twitter says just when you’ll get others’ favorites in your timeline


Favorite in Twitter for Android

It’s no secret that Twitter is now putting others’ favorites into your timeline, but the actual trigger for those appearances has remained a mystery. Is it purely random? Keyword-based? As it turns out, it’s more like a slot machine. The company’s Dick Costolo has revealed that those favorites appear when you pull to refresh twice, and there aren’t any new tweets to show. Twitter is simply trying to respond to your insatiable demand for updates, Costolo says. In other words, the social network would rather give you some recycled tweets than leave you hanging.

The approach makes sense, especially given the company’s endless efforts to keep you active; it doesn’t want you quitting because you’ve run out of things to read. It also explains why those who follow a lot of people (such as yours truly) tend not to see these unexpected faves. Still, the explanation isn’t going to be very reassuring if you use favorites like bookmarks — a very bored Twitter user may end up discovering your tastes in content, whether or not you’re prepared to share them with the world.

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Via: The Verge

Source: Dick Costolo (Twitter 1), (2)

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