Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Twitter’

23
Apr
image-199124.jpg

Twitter’s new profile pages are now available for everyone


After a few weeks of test drives, Twitter officially rolled out its new profile pages to the masses today. Besides the sexy new look, the update includes a few tweaks like a running tally of how many times you’ve favorited tweets and a new page where you can see every photo and video you’ve ever uploaded. The month and year you joined Twitter is also now displayed right under your username — a big plus for early adopters who want bragging rights, and a way for everyone to see how long an account has been around (and possibly determine how legit it is).

Your “best tweets” are featured automatically in a larger font that makes them stand out. Posts can also now be pinned to the top of the page when you want to draw attention to something, or just really want to show off that epic chicken burrito you had for lunch. If you don’t have the shiny new version yet, you can snag it now by going to this page from your desktop and selecting “get it now” from the bottom.

Comments

Via: TechCrunch

Source: Twitter

22
Apr
image-198949.jpg

HTC One (M8) Dot View case hacked to show more notifications


M8_dotview-hack

The HTC One (M8) was released with a very unique cover called Dot View which contains a bunch of tiny holes in the front allowing a user to view limited information from their device by simply double tapping on the front.

Traditionally, the information the user could view was limited to weather, missed calls, time, and any incoming messages.

However, Shen Ye has managed to open up the Dot View case to show more notifications when using the case. He posted a picture earlier today showing his HTC One (M8) protected by Dot View with a notification from Twitter.

Whilst he’s yet to share any information about how he managed to achieve this, and if it relies on root access or a hacked APK file, Shen Ye did say “Sense already hooks into social networking APIs, it shouldn’t be hard to get DotView to show those notifications.” It does therefore appear that it’s pretty easy to achieve, and consequently we’ll hopefully see something released into the wild pretty soon.

SOURCE: +Shen Ye

The post HTC One (M8) Dot View case hacked to show more notifications appeared first on AndroidGuys.

18
Apr
image-198416.jpg

Turkey to censor tweets with ‘malicious’ content


Twitter might not be banned in Turkey anymore, but the country’s government isn’t quite done putting it through the censorship wringer yet. In fact, Turkish Communications Minister Lütfi Elvan just released a written statement that says: “We [Twitter and Turkey] have reached a consensus to ‘neutralize’ malicious content that is the object of court decisions by pixelating.” He didn’t expound on what he means by “pixelating,” but it’s typically associated with the mosaic-like classic approach to censorship. If Turkish authorities can indeed blur out tweets, then this saga might have taken an even crazier turn. Since that’s bordering on the absurd, though, it’s possible that “pixelating” might have just been the term Lütfi used for Twitter’s Country Withheld Tool, which the website uses to hide tweets and accounts from a whole nation.

The minister says the decision was made during back-to-back meetings between Turkey’s telecommunication authority (called TIB) and Twitter’s execs who’ve reached a consensus to “neutralize malicious content.” Twitter also gave the TIB super-tagging powers (after deleting over 200 offending tweets, that is), allowing officials to flag posts and accounts that they want to be censored ASAP.

For those who haven’t been following this crazed roller-coaster ride closely, it all started when Turkish authorities blocked access to Twitter hours after Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan threatened to do so. Erdogan, who’d previously called social media “the worst menace to society,” claimed his detractors were using the social network as a platform to spread lies that he was corrupt. A few days later, the ban was overturned after the country’s court deemed it a violation of people’s right to free speech, and just recently, Erdoğan vowed to go after Twitter for tax evasion. It’s now unclear if he’ll follow through, as the two entities have promised to “keep in touch,” but let’s not forget that the prime minister called Twitter a “scourge” once in the past.

Filed under:

Comments

Source: Hurriyet Daily News

18
Apr
image-198386.jpg

Twitter’s new Windows Phone beta ties into your photo collection


Twitter beta on Windows Phone

A handful of those eager to install the Windows Phone 8.1 preview just got an additional perk for being early adopters. NokiaNewsIreland has discovered an unannounced (and now unavailable) open beta for Twitter’s Windows Phone 8.1 app that makes much better use of Microsoft’s mobile OS than the regular client. For a start, it now ties into the Photos Hub — it’s now easy to browse the pictures you’ve tweeted, even if they didn’t come from your phone.

The test build also ties into your Me tile by launching Twitter when you want to post an update, and app-based sharing is once again functional. It even addresses a longstanding annoyance by jumping to your latest mentions rather than making you wade through past replies. Twitter hasn’t said when the new features will reach the officially sanctioned release, but the apparently polished state of the beta suggests that Windows Phone owners may not have to wait much longer.

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Via: NokiaNewsIreland.com, WPCentral

Source: Windows Phone Store

17
Apr
image-198339.jpg

It’s not just you: Terms of Service agreements really are confusing, study finds


You know that page with a check box you haphazardly agree to on the way to signing up for various online services? The one with the hundreds (or thousands) of words of legal mumbo jumbo? Yeah, we do the same thing — it’s okay. It’s because those pages, the Terms of Service, are boring, lengthy, and probably meaningless. Right? Right?!

Not necessarily. And a new study from Georgia Tech of the “top 30 social and fan creation sites” (from Facebook to Daily Motion) backs that up. Well, first things first: yes, Terms of Service agreements really are difficult to read. Of the 30 sites surveyed, an average reading level of college sophomore was required for comprehension of the TOS. To put it another way, around 60 percent of working age adults in the US (25 – 64) don’t understand what they’re agreeing to. “It is likely that users may not know what rights they are granting,” the study says.

So, back to the question at hand: are these documents meaningless? Like so many answers in the realm of law, the answer really depends on how that law applies to you. What freedoms do you value in the content you create and/or host online?

Georgia Tech examined the freedoms we’re giving up when agreeing to these documents. Most of that involves giving away whatever content is added to the service (so-called “royalty-free use”), but also includes duplicating said content elsewhere (“non-exclusive use”). In plain terms, of course, those translate to “you won’t get paid for the content you add here” and “we can publish what you add here anywhere else we want” (respectively). A small fraction of the sites studied even granted the site advertising rights on user content.

A handful of more specific stats are in the chart below. To find out whether or not your favorite site’s TOS are agreeable, the latest version should be readily available from the home page. And remember: the best defense against restrictive TOS agreements is taking the time to read and understand the document.

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Source: Georgia Tech

16
Apr
image-198018.jpg

Sky now lets you watch or record TV directly from Twitter


SONY DSC

Twitter’s cosy with many broadcasters that wish to connect with their audiences better, and in the UK, Sky’s previously partnered with the social network for tweeting footy highlights in near real-time. Today, the two have teamed up again on Twitter embeds that allow Sky subscribers to watch or record content from within tweets by way of Twitter’s mobile apps. Two buttons in these style of tweets, that will feature on several of Sky’s accounts, send you either to the Sky Go app if you can’t wait another second to indulge, or set your Sky box to record the TV show, film or sporting event via the Sky+ app. It’s basically the same agreement Twitter has with Comcast in the States, as the microblogging platform moves to bridge the gap between the second screen and, well, screen.

Filed under:

Comments

Via: The Telegraph

Source: Sky

16
Apr
image-197978.jpg

Twitter’s latest acquisition turns tweets into a commodity


Twitter IPO Raises $1.82 Billion With Value Topping Facebook

Twitter announced today that it has bought Gnip, a social data company that has packaged and sold data from Twitter to other companies for the past four years. Gnip is one of a few firms that has access to Twitter’s “fire hose” of data — a history of tweets that date back to the company’s beginnings in 2006 — and is one of Twitter’s longest-lasting data partners. Such data is tremendously valuable, as Twitter mentioned in a blog post regarding the acquisition:

“These public tweets can reveal a wide variety of insights — so much so that academic institutions, journalists, marketers, brands, politicians and developers regularly use aggregated Twitter data to spot trends, analyze sentiment, find breaking news, connect with customers and much more.”

Bringing Gnip in-house therefore means that Twitter will now be selling its data directly to third-party outfits like advertisers and brand managers. This lets the microblogging firm provide “more sophisticated data sets” and “better data enrichments” to interested third-parties, which in turn could mean more targeted ads for you and I. It certainly falls in line with a recent report that Twitter is working on 15 new types of ads, most of which will likely be mobile, according to Twitter’s VP of engineering and revenue at a VentureBeat Mobile Summit.

Right now, Twitter’s relationships with other data resellers like Datasift and Topsy (which was purchased by Apple late last year) will continue, as will Gnip’s analytics deal with other social media companies like Tumblr, Disqus and Facebook. However, due to the conflict of interests at play here, we don’t expect many of these to last.

[Image credit: Getty Images]

Filed under:

Comments

Source: Twitter

14
Apr
image-197595.jpg

Turkey’s prime minister accuses Twitter of tax evasion


Turkish prime minister Erdogan's election campaign banner

Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan isn’t happy that free speech rights thwarted his desires to block Twitter and silence corruption allegations, so he’s switching to plan B: accuse Twitter of shady dealings. He’s now promising to “go after” the social network for tax evasion, and has implied that other internet-based peers like Facebook and YouTube might be breaking local laws. We’ve reached out to Twitter for its response, but we wouldn’t expect the company to take Erdogan’s charge lightly.

For now, it’s difficult to tell whether or not the claims will amount to more than just talk. There isn’t an official case against Twitter at this stage. Also, Erdogan’s views don’t always mesh with those of Turkey’s judges — he believes the Constitutional Court is conducting “interference in politics” by upholding freedom of expression. When the politician has had success in banning YouTube, though, we wouldn’t be quick to rule anything out.

[Image credit: Myrat, Wikipedia]

Filed under:

Comments

Source: AFP (Yahoo)

11
Apr
image-197274.jpg

Twitter introduces pop-up notifications on the web


It’s been a week full of announcements from Twitter: first the social network debuted a new (arguably Facebook-like) profile design, and today it’s officially introducing real-time notifications on the web. We first saw the pop-up alerts in late January, but it appeared to be an experiment visible to just a handful of users. Now — or, more accurately, “over the coming weeks” — any time you’re logged into Twitter.com, you’ll see a notification window alerting you to any replies, retweets or other activities. Conveniently, you’ll be able to favorite, retweet and reply to interactions directly from notification windows. Of course, if your Klout score is through the roof and you receive a new notification every second, you’ll be happy to know that notifications can be disabled.

Filed under:

Comments

Source: Twitter

9
Apr
image-196973.jpg

US denies that ‘Cuban Twitter’ was developed to create political unrest


Last week, we brought you the story of ZunZuneo, an oddly-named startup that sought to launch a social network like Twitter in Cuba. The twist in the tale, is that it was built and funded by the United States Agency of International Development, allegedly as a way to slowly turn the island’s youth away from rum and cigars and toward a local version of the Arab Spring. Naturally, the agency denies this, posting a rebuttal online that says the project was designed to circumvent the “information blockade” to connect people who have been cut off from the outside world. At a hearing on Capitol Hill, USAID head Rajiv Shah publicly denied the allegations, saying that “working to improve platforms of communication is a core part of what USAID works to do.” We’re sure that this story is going to run and run, at least until it forms the plot of the next Jason Bourne movie.

Filed under:

Comments

Via: Time

Source: USAID

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 124 other followers

%d bloggers like this: