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Posts tagged ‘Nokia’

30
Aug

Microsoft prevails over an 8-year-old attempt to block its phone sales


2007 Consumer Electronics Show Showcases Latest Tech Products

Remember the heady days of August 2007, when the iPhone had barely reached store shelves and the Nokia N95 was all the rage? The US International Trade Commission sure does. After reviewing an 8-year-long case, the ITC has ruled that Nokia’s phones (now Microsoft’s) don’t infringe on InterDigital patents covering 3G cellular technology. The decision eliminates the possibility of an import ban that would have prevented Microsoft from selling many of its phones in the US, including modern day Lumias. Things very nearly didn’t go the company’s way — a judge had ruled in April that Microsoft was using InterDigital’s patents, which would have forced the folks in Redmond to pay up.

Microsoft is understandably “grateful” for the ruling, especially as it just recently sued InterDigital over “abusive licensing practices.” This fuels its argument that InterDigital is trying to extort cash from innocent companies. As for InterDigital’s response? It’s trying to put a brave face on the loss, arguing that the verdict has a “limited impact” on its future business given Nokia’s fall from grace. That’s true, but InterDigital had pushed for an import ban on the assumption that it would be collecting huge royalties from a mobile giant. There’s no disguising that this is a major failure for InterDigital, even if the damage is mostly symbolic.

[Image credit: Ethan Miller/Getty Images]

Filed under:
Cellphones, Mobile, Microsoft, Nokia

Comments

Via:
Bloomberg

Source:
ITC (PDF), InterDigital

Tags: 3g, cellphone, interdigital, internationaltradecommission, itc, microsoft, mobilepostcross, nokia, patents, smartphone

25
Aug

Microsoft keeps the candybar dream alive with the Nokia 222


There was a time when, if you’d told me I could buy a connected MP3 player with a camera, for $37, I’d have suggested a little less “jazz” in your cigarettes. Today, in 2015, that’s called the Nokia 222. Of course, this isn’t really a media player, it’s a feature phone aimed at developing markets. Despite the obvious limitations of a “2.5G” candybar running a bespoke OS (Nokia Series 30+), there are some features — like month-long battery life — that remind us that fancy-pants flagships can have their drawbacks.

While we’re joking about it being an MP3 player with a phone attached, it does support SD cards (up to 32GB) that you could stuff with media. Likewise, the 2-megapixel camera may be modest, but the handset is still good for Skype or Facebook, plus direct phone-to-phone sharing (via SLAM). There’s also a flashlight, that the PR kindly explains what you might use for.

Nokia fans may have spotted it’s very similar to the even more affordable ($29) Nokia 215, but with a much improved camera and a few aesthetic improvements. We suspect the “select markets” that the Nokia 222 (or its dual-SIM variant) are headed to don’t include the US, not least because of the 900/1800 MHz radios, still, we’re weirdly taken by its design. Enough that we hope the real Nokia (not the Microsoft-flavored version) breaks its own promise to make more phones once it’s contractually allowed to.

Filed under:
Cellphones, Mobile, Nokia

Comments

Source:
Microsoft

Tags: 222, featurephone, microsoft, mobilepostcross, nokia, nokia222

24
Aug

New talk shambles in suggesting Nokia to get back in smartphone market


nokia_headquarters_logo

Taking a cue from the zombie apocalypse landscape, the idea of Nokia getting back into the smartphone market has seemingly re-emerged from the dead thanks to new information from Bernstein Research senior analyst Pierre Ferragu. In a report to major clients, Ferragu thinks Nokia can ride the strength of their brand image to become a major Android smartphone manufacturer in the budget device segment of the market.

According to Ferragu, Samsung and Apple, while not fighting for the same consumers in the smartphone market, are competing for distribution channel customers. This battle resulted in no room being available for a third alternative to the Android and iOS platforms. Even now Ferragu thinks there is no room for a new entrant due to the level of maturity of the iOS and Android ecosystems.

Looking ahead though, Ferragu thinks the day is returning when “brand, distribution and scale were everything, innovation was mostly hardware-driven and easily replicable.” As evidence of Nokia’s return to a market where the dynamics are changing to a formula that existed when Nokia was thriving, Bernstein points to evidence the company is snapping up Android engineers for their development team. However, the analysts do anticipate Nokia will have to partner with others to manufacture low cost handsets and they point to a company like LG or Huawei as a possible source.

Finally, Ferragu believes Nokia’s brand image will help it succeed where others may have been struggling. Nokia recently placed 98th in brand value according to rankings by Interbrand. “From that perspective, the brand matters in smartphones as does distribution and scale,” according to the Bernstein analysis.

source: Korea Times
via: G for Games

Come comment on this article: New talk shambles in suggesting Nokia to get back in smartphone market

18
Aug

10 most iconic mobile phones of all time


iconic-mobile-phones

Ask people what their favourite phone of all time is and chances are you’ll get a wide variety of answers, with a select few being chosen by many people. Everyone has a particular device they remember, but what devices have defined mobile phones as we know them?

The word iconic has been branded to a lot of different devices and innovations but is there a particular device that has withstood the test of time to remain as iconic as the day it was first released? Here’s 10 phones (some of which you probably know of) that have defined the mobile industry as we know it.

Nokia 3310

1. Nokia 3310

When it comes to mobile phones, very few are as iconic as the Nokia 3310. Simply put – you either had one, or you know someone who had one. In fact, you probably had one – just about everyone had either the Nokia 3310 or its predecessor, the Nokia 3210. These were the phones that made Nokia the mobile phone king.

The handsets brought Nokia’s XpressOn Covers and the iconic game, Snake (as we know it, with the image of a snake) and permanently changed what we considered to be a mobile phone. Built like a brick with a battery life that people crave today, the Nokia 3310 was the first mobile phone to radicalise an entire industry.

motorola-razr-v3 WhatMobile

2. Motorola RAZR V3

Where the 3310 made Nokia, the RAZR V3 made Motorola. Before the V3, the concept of a slim phone was alien and even the 3210 and 3310 were bricks compared to this ultra-slim metal-clad mobile device.

The design proved so popular that Motorola continued using it for years and not only was it ultra-slim, but it proved that flip phones could be cool. It forced Motorola’s rivals to reconsider what could be possible with mobile design and brought about an era of manufacturers attempting to make sexy smartphones.

Nokia-N95

3. Nokia N95

There’s a pattern here and for good reason; Nokia, Motorola and RIM (now known as BlackBerry) were the undisputed kings of the mobile phone industry. The smartphone industry is an entirely different kettle of fish, as you’ll see below, but the Nokia N95 began defining what it meant to be a flagship smartphone.

Nokia’s N95 takes its place on this list for one reason and one reason alone; it heralded a fiercely contested battle (that still rages today) about mobile cameras and gave birth to an entire market devoted to cameras for mobile devices. Add in the cool design, powerful (for its time) OS and tons of neat tricks, the N95 was another device that sold in the tens of millions and is iconic for so many people.

iphone-3g

CyberNetNews

4. Apple iPhone 3G

Let’s be completely fair – it wouldn’t be an iconic phones list without the iPhone. However, unlike other lists, we’re not talking about the original Apple iPhone here. In my personal opinion, the iPhone 3G deserves the plaudits, as it fixed a few basic bits of functionality that were missing from the original iPhone and added a feature that defines smartphones: the App Store.

The rest… is history

Before the App Store, the concept of applications was a myth to most but within six months, it was legendary. When the App Store launched in July 2008, it offered 552 apps but this had swelled to 15,000 apps by January 2009 (when the App Store hit its 1 billionth app download). In September, there were 85,000 apps from 12,500 developers and the App Store had hit 2 billion downloads. The rest, as they say, is history.

The first iPhone also introduced the concept of a touch-friendly OS, unlike RIM and Nokia who had attempted to make non-touch platforms friendly for the new trend of touchscreens. Indeed, Google had been planning a BlackBerry-like platform for its devices but went back to the drawing board after it saw the iPhone; Android was born and it set off down the path towards world domination.

T-Mobile-G1-first-impressions-aa-8-of-13

5. T-Mobile G1

To combat the new incumbent iOS, the Open Handset Alliance (with Google as its leader) debuted the Android-powered T-Mobile G1, made by Taiwanese manufacturer HTC. The first real Android handset, the G1 was the first step in the rise of Android, with the platform now firmly dominating the smartphone market.

The G1 was iconic not just for being the first Android handset but because it aimed to also cater for those who may not be ready to give up the keyboard. The unique slide-out keyboard was a concept that faded with time – although some manufacturers are aiming to bring it back through unique accessories – but Android certainly hasn’t and shows no signs of abating for years to come.

samsung-galaxy-note

Mashable

6. Samsung Galaxy Note

We said there was a trend and there certainly is; the first iPhone saw incumbent heavyweights such as Nokia and Motorola replaced mainly by new challengers from Asia. We’ve already had HTC front the Android movement and while the G1 was iconic, the impact of the Samsung Galaxy Note is still felt today.


nexus-6-vs-galaxy-note-4-aa-9-of-30 The new Note is coming, but is it still special?14415442

The Galaxy Note is iconic for one main reason; it invented the phablet industry. The current trend in the market is for big screen devices but before the Galaxy Note, a 5.5-inch display would have been ridiculed. The Galaxy Note showed that it was possible, it was what customers wanted and out of nowhere, Samsung began on its own journey towards domination.

samsung-galaxy-s2-s-ii

7. Samsung Galaxy S II

From the big-screen Galaxy Note to the Galaxy S II, and the smartphone that many believe made Samsung the behemoth it is today. Before the Galaxy S II, we had the HTC Desire which was an excellent device but the Galaxy S II was slim, powerful and resembled the iPhone better than anything before it.

The Galaxy S II was soon followed by a spate of new devices from Samsung, with each attempting to be more powerful and with more features than the one before it. The Galaxy S III sold in the millions, the Galaxy S4 even more and after a flop with the Galaxy S5, this year’s Galaxy S6 attempts to continue the trend.

Motorola Moto G aa 8

8. Motorola Moto G

Where Samsung set about revolutionising the flagship market, Motorola looked at the low-end and the company’s next big innovation after the RAZR V3 took the market by storm. Simply put, the Moto G redefined what was possible from an entry-level smartphone.

The excellent design, the removable covers and the close to stock Android platform, which delivered a superfast platform, were all refreshing at a time when manufacturers were loading devices – both flagship and entry-level – with bloatware, resulting in poor performance. Since the Moto G, we’ve seen the lower mid-range market become as fiercely contested as the flagship market is and it shows no signs of abating with competition from everyone higher than ever before.

Chinese manufacturer Xiaomi has made it a mission to dominate this market and its new Redmi Note 2 does this, by offering flagship specs with a $140 price tag. No wonder Xiaomi sold 800,000 handsets in just 12 hours, setting a new Chinese record.

samsung galaxy note 4 air command aa 3

9. Samsung Galaxy Note 4

Putting this handset on this list was interesting as it is rather subjective but it made it on the list for one very big reason; as discussed in our podcast a couple of weeks ago, Josh and I both agreed that the Galaxy Note 4 camera rocks! There is a lot to like about Samsung’s phablet flagship last year and while the bloatware and performance left a lot to be desired, the camera was the first time that mainstream Android smartphone cameras were truly unflappable.


Qualcomm hybrid auto focus camera Who’s who in the smartphone camera business1515696

The Galaxy Note 4 camera is particularly impressive as Samsung finally adopted Optical Image Stabilisation in its smartphone cameras and in doing so, righted everything that was wrong with the Galaxy Note 3 camera. Even now – almost a year later when the Galaxy Note 5 has already been announced – the Galaxy Note 4 camera continues to perform brilliantly.

Samsung-Galaxy-S6-Edge-26

10. Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge

Samsung has dominated the later parts of this list for one main reason; it came from nowhere to become the world’s largest smartphone and mobile phone manufacturer. It emulated sunken behemoth Nokia to capture the two coveted crowns and it was largely thanks to the Android-powered Galaxy line.

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The last eighteen months however, has been extremely difficult for the Korean manufacturer and after the failures of the Galaxy S5, this year’s Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge bought about one of its most radical smartphone designs yet. In the space of a year, the plastic clad Galaxy S5 was replaced by a premium (in every sense of the word) smartphone that’s unlike any other. Not the Galaxy S6 but the Galaxy S6 Edge.

Last year saw Samsung release the Galaxy Note Edge and while that didn’t take off too well, the dual-curved Galaxy S6 Edge is, without doubt, an iconic device. Why, I hear you ask? Simple: it’s the first time a curved smartphone has become widely available and had Samsung made more, it would probably have sold tens of millions more.

samsung galaxy note 5 vs iphone 6 plus aa (1 of 13)

Notable Mentions

Given that hundreds of thousands of different devices have been released over the years, picking the iconic devices list was certainly a challenge. Many devices have come close to the list but the ones that stick in the mind range from early basic devices to some of the most powerful and recognisable modern day devices.

Top Phones of 2015:

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The first mention has to go to the Motorola DynaTAC, which was the first phone used to make the world’s first mobile phone call in April 1973. From there, we move to the Nokia 2110, which was released in 1994 and was the first time we heard the iconic Nokia Ringtone, which has gone on to become a cult classic.

Its well documented that Nokia was too slow to respond to the iPhone but when its first big response did come, it managed to sell over 130 million Nokia 5230 handsets. It wasn’t enough however, as the Apple iPhone 4 the following year redefined the iPhone again and reaffirmed Apple’s dominance of the flagship market. It was followed by the iPhone 4S, which introduced Siri, sold better than its predecessor and remains one of the most iconic iPhones of all time.

In response to this, Samsung introduced the Galaxy S II (above, which followed by the Galaxy S III a year later) and 40-50 million of each handset. Since then, we’ve seen the market become ever more saturated and the past twelve months has seen the introduction of devices like the OnePlus One, Huawei Ascend Mate 7, LG G4, HTC One M9 and Xperia Z3 Plus as manufacturers aim to dominate once again.

oneplus 2 vs oneplus one aa (27 of 27)

What was YOUR most iconic device of all time?

That’s our list of iconic devices and there were definitely at least 50 other devices that could have made it onto the list. Making a smartphone standout in the here and now is certainly something that many manage to do but very few remain iconic for years and generations to come.

Chances are you’ve had some of the phones on this list (I’ve still got a RAZR V3, N95, Moto G and S6 Edge which all still work); if so, which ones did/do you have and do they still work? What did/do you like most about them? Let us know your views in the comments below and don’t forget to vote for your most iconic device!

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13
Aug

Here’s indoor mapping will help you find that bathroom


shopping center decorated with...

It’s just as easy to get lost inside as out, but it’s much harder to find indoor maps. Nokia is trying to change that with its Here Mobile SDK that will let any developer add 3D venue maps to their iOS or Android applications. It has a collection of 13,000 such maps in its list, including airports, stadiums and malls around the world. Those are available on Here for Android and Windows Phone, but Nokia also does a brisk business selling maps to third parties like Yahoo.

Any app can include venues with 3D views and interior details like levels, floor layouts and tenant names. Other Here features like step-by-step navigation and zoom, rotate and tilting gestures are also included. While the feature is aimed at developers, consumers will benefit whenever they search for a food court or toilet in in an app that includes Nokia’s maps. We say “Nokia’s,” but of course the Finnish company just sold off Here to a group of German automakers for $3 billion. Hopefully, they’ll continue to develop the app and come up with catchier name than “German automaker consortium.”

Filed under:
Software, Mobile, Nokia

Comments

Source:
Nokia

Tags: Android, Here, HereMobileSDK, iOS, mappin, Maps, mobilepostcross, nokia, VenueMaps

11
Aug

Brace yourselves, Nokia is coming: Nokia is hiring Android engineers, readies itself for mobile entry




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Nokia was once the most dominant force in mobile phones, but has recently faded into all but obscurity. However, we know the company is down, but not out – its agreement with Microsoft allows it to re-enter the mobile market in 2016, and it has already started to gear up towards that goal. The latest news from Reuters is that Nokia is hiring Android engineers in California, which makes sense given Android is likely the operating system of choice for any Nokia devices going forward. If you’re not convinced, recall the Nokia tablet, the Nokia N1, that was released not long ago and running near stock Android. If you’re questioning Nokia’s resolve in trying to make it back to the big time, Reuters had this to offer:

“[Nokia] says it will not repeat the mistakes of the past of missing technology trends, being saddled with high costs, and reacting too slowly to changing consumer tastes.”

Despite making moves in the right places and changing its mindset, Nokia still has a long way to go to regain any semblance to its dominant presence in the mobile industry. Namely, it’s not likely that Nokia will be able to support manufacture of any devices, so we’ve previously heard plans for Nokia to licence its future devices – the Nokia N1 was after all made by Foxconn bearing Nokia’s branding on the front. This arrangement would likely be replicated to varying degrees with any future partners that Nokia works with. Pundits are carefully hopeful however – former Nokia executive, Anssi Vanjoki, said of Nokia’s unique position:


“A brand is quickly forgotten if it is absent from the consumer business. The brand will not help much if the product is similar to what is already being sold out there. But if there is something new and interesting to it, the old heritage may be helpful.”

We shall see.

What do you think about Nokia hiring Android engineers? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Reuters via Phone Arena

The post Brace yourselves, Nokia is coming: Nokia is hiring Android engineers, readies itself for mobile entry appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

11
Aug

Nokia hiring talent, preparing for its return to mobile


nokia logo mwc 2015 1

Nokia has been very clear about its aspirations to return to the mobile market as soon as their non-compete deal with Microsoft ends. They won’t exactly be making smartphones on their own, as they sold their mobile division to the Redmond-based giant.  Instead, they seek to license their brand, which still holds some power. Nokia was, after all, the #1 phone maker in the world once, and many of us still hold memories of our first cellular phone coming from this manufacturer.

Because Nokia is making a move to a brand licensing model, most of us assumed they wouldn’t be too involved in the making of handsets. Of course, they need to keep an eye on what gets out there, and it seems they are taking that task rather seriously. Nokia has been caught advertising plenty of new jobs in LinkedIn. Some of them are not as crucial, but there are some product development. The most interesting part is they are also looking for engineers focusing on Android, which is likely the mobile OS Nokia will work with more.

htc one vs nokia lumia 928 aa 928 back in hand

If we look further into the company’s future plans, we can also tell they are really trying to invest more in future products. The company was planning to lay off an average of 70 people in the technologies division, a number that has since been reduced by half (according to a Reuters source).

So far we have seen Nokia really trying to experiment and see where they can take their company in the future, while aiming to regain the level of success they once enjoyed. First we saw the Nokia N1, which was a Foxconn made tablet with good specs and a solid design. It was also among the first to sport a USB-C port, which is definitely a great addition. The tablet didn’t reach many markets, but it was a great way for Nokia to dip its toes into this new business model.

Nokia N1

In addition, Nokia’s new projects also involve the Z Launcher and even a professional-grade VR camera. They are getting pretty adventurous, but they should also understand the mobile industry is where it’s at right now. And though profits probably won’t soar by making licensing deals, they are also getting rid of the manufacturing woes and many other discrepancies that come with making a device. Their risk is much lower.

The new job listings help us understand where Nokia is trying to position itself, and proves that their commitment is as dedicated as always. Hopefully we get to see some great products come 2016, when they will finally be off the hook from their agreement with Microsoft.

ozo-press-photo-cloud

I used to hear it very often – “If Nokia made a good Android device, I would buy a phone from them!”. If the Finnish company and its partners managed to achieve the great build quality and design Lumia devices were known for, but the phones ran Android, would you get one?

Nokia videos!

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8
Aug

5 Android apps you shouldn’t miss this week! – Android Apps Weekly



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Welcome back to Android Apps Weekly! Here are your headlines from the past week.

  • With a little bit of tinkering, it’s been found that you can, in fact, control Windows 10 with your Android smartphone. It requires the use of Tasker and a couple of plugins so there is a learning curve, but it’s really cool to see this being done.
  • Earlier this week, the esteemed and unique browser Link Bubble received a huge update to version 1.5. On top of getting an update, the app also got a new owner as developer Chris Lacy announced the sale. It was for an undisclosed amount and to an undisclosed company. I’m sure we’ll know soon enough.
  • Speaking of things being sold, Nokia offloaded their acclaimed HERE Maps to various German auto manufacturers such as Audi and BMW for about $2.8 billion USD. This is a huge deal, but interestingly enough, Nokia took a loss because they originally paid $8.1 billion for it.
  • Square Enix announced a huge sale this week that includes a number of their biggest titles, including some Final Fantasy games, Secret of Mana, and Dragon Quest VIII. Square Enix is known for putting out some expensive games so this is a great chance to get them a little cheaper.
  • A new Humble Bundle is out now and it includes nine games from Games Workshop which means there are a ton of Warhammer games to be had. The whole package would cost $44 if you bought them separately but you can get them all for just about $4 and donate to charity in the process. That’s a win-win.

For even more Android apps and games headlines, updates, and new releases, don’t forget to check out this week’s newsletter. There we’ll have all the stuff that happened including the stuff we didn’t have time for here. If you want, you can also sign up with your email address and have this info beamed to your inbox every single Friday!


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chrome beta Android Apps WeeklyChrome Beta

[Price: Free]
The beta version of Google’s Chrome browser received a fairly significant update this last week. It will now have Chrome Custom Tabs enabled which, for those who may not know, is something that was announced for Android M back at Google I/O. Along with that came an update to the bookmark interface and media playback controls. If you want to see the future of the Chrome Browser, then give this app a try.
Get it now on Google Play!
Chrome Beta Android apps weekly


barmark Android Apps WeeklyBarmark

[Price: $2.99]
Barmark is an interesting and unique adventure game that has no point. By that I mean there is no score, no goals, and no 3-starring anything. You walk around in a fairly well designed world and alter the landscape based on what you think it should look like. It’s kinda weird because it doesn’t have a goal or a point which technically doesn’t qualify it as a game but it’s an interesting app nevertheless. It is $2.99 but do beware of those release day bugs.
Get it now on Google Play!


gunjack Android Apps WeeklyGunjack

[Price: Free]
Gunjack is a new game that was developed specifically for the Samsung Gear VR platform by the developers who bought us the EVE series of games. It’s a first person shooter where you sit in a turret, spin around, and shoot bad guys. This is an awesome premise and one of the few VR games that really takes advantage of the platform without feeling like it was intentionally built around it. It’s done but won’t be available to owners until this autumn.
Get it now on Google Play!


fishbrain Android Apps WeeklyFishBrain

[Price: Free with in-app purchases]
FishBrain is an app for fishing enthusiasts that kind of turns the actual act of fishing into a video game. It’s a crowd sourced application that allows you to see what fish are biting, where, and keep track of where you are when the fish start biting. There are also leaderboards per location so you can see who has caught the most and biggest fish. It’s a fun little app and one that all anglers should definitely try.
Get it now on Google Play!


shooting stars Android Apps WeeklyShooting Stars

[Price: $0.99]
Shooting Stars is the latest game out of Noodlecake Studios. This one has you suiting up and battling aliens that are mostly disguised as celebrities. It’s an arcade shooter with retro graphics and tons of rainbow lasers, explosions, and bright colors. The game also includes over 60 ridiculous weapons, plenty of celebrity cameos, and there’s even a hover board. It’s fast paced and utterly ridiculous. There are also no in-app purchases.
Get it now on Google Play!


Wrap up

If we missed any great Android apps or games news this week, tell us about it in the comments! Thanks for checking out the show and we’ll see you next week!

3
Aug

Nokia sells HERE mapping business to Audi, BMW, and Daimler for $3 billion


here_app_icon

The deal that would send Nokia’s HERE mapping business to three German automakers is now official. On Monday, the Finnish company announced that it would sell HERE to Audi, BMW, and Daimler for around $3 billion.

Audi, BMW, and Daimler will be able to implement HERE’s technology in their vehicles as soon as next year. Each automaker will be able to make a transition away from Google and Apple’s offerings, allowing more flexibility when it comes to tailoring the experience of a connected car. HERE’s real-time updates and parking data will also make it possible for the German automakers to increase the performance of self-driving cars.

Following the deal, Nokia will be split into two business entities. Nokia Networks and Nokia Technologies. Both will have completely separate goals and functions. Nokia Networks, which includes the Alcatel-Lucent acquisition, will focus on selling networking equipment. Nokia Technologies will be heavily invested in the research and development of future technologies.

The deal will officially close in the first half of 2016 and HERE’s mobile app is said to remain unaffected.

Source: Nokia

Come comment on this article: Nokia sells HERE mapping business to Audi, BMW, and Daimler for $3 billion

3
Aug

Nokia sells HERE maps to German car manufacturers for $2.8 billion


HERE Maps

Nokia has announced the sale of its HERE maps business to a group of leading German automotive businesses, which includes Audi, BMW and Daimler. HERE sold for a price of $2.8 billion, resulting in a heavy loss on the $8.1 billion that Nokia paid when it bought the mapping business from Navteq back in 2008.

HERE maps will likely be used by the German car companies to expand on map and navigation services and accelerate the development of self-driving cars. Although Google may be grabbing most of the headlines, German car manufacturers have all been working on self-driving technologies at various levels, and HERE is likely to form the basis of new assistance systems which are key to fully autonomous vehicles.

Nokia’s real time mapping technology is also clearly quite useful for companies looking to implement improved on-demand services, such as traffic monitoring, and travel commerce analytics, which might result in companies and customers reducing their dependency on Google’s services.

“All carmakers are working toward providing amazing, new connected services, and only by collaborating and sharing data can we reach the critical mass to make real-time map updates a reality,” – HERE’s Pino Bonetti

Importantly for HERE’s existing customers, the Android mobile app will continue to run as normal. The technology used on over 80 percent of sat-nav systems in Europe and America that depend on HERE will also continue to operate independently from the new owners and the group will not be interfering with its operations.

The deal is expected to be finalized in the first half of 2016.

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