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Posts tagged ‘Nexus’

30
Jul

Is this the LG Nexus 2015 a.k.a. Bullhead? Is that a 3D camera?




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We’re pretty sure that there’s going to be a Nexus smartphone released this year by LG, however we’ve yet to see visual evidence that it even exists. Well, you can cross that item off your list as leaker @OnLeaks has posted the rough silhouette of what the LG Nexus 2015 is allegedly going to look like. Check it out below:


Clear as mud, right? Even @OnLeaks admits in subsequent tweets that this image has been provided by a case maker, which has made this drawing based on very early information of the LG Nexus meaning it could easily change. However, with what we have here, we’re intrigued to see that there are two identically sized circles as well as a separate square off to the left. While @OnLeaks suggests that they are the camera, flash and fingerprint sensor, I’d postulate that the two circles are actually the two cameras from a 3D camera and a flash – and that’s not completely unheard of given that there was a rumour about this in early June. Of course, we can’t be sure till we get some clearer pictures.

What do you think about the LG Nexus 2015? Do you think that’s really a 3D camera on the back? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Twitter via Droid-life

The post Is this the LG Nexus 2015 a.k.a. Bullhead? Is that a 3D camera? appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

21
Jul

Google Nexus 2015 rumor roundup


nexus 6 first impressions (13 of 21)

The second half of the year is going to bring us some amazing smartphones. Among the most anticipated announcements are those related to Google’s popular Nexus series. Rumors tend to start blazing through the internet very early on, and this year is not the exception.

It is no surprise to see the industry having such a high regard for the Nexus line-up. These are, after all, Google’s demonstration of where they want Android to go. Quality hardware, a pure Google experience and timely updates have always been the Nexus stamp, which has helped the brand gain a major follower base.

Where does Google want to take the most popular mobile operating system now? What will the upcoming Nexus device(s) be like? We have gathered plenty of (unofficial) details to share, so let’s dig right into the goods.

This article will continue to be updated as new information begins emerging. Bookmark this page and keep checking it if you want to stay in the loop! The article will also be pushed to the front of our home page whenever it’s edited. 

Nexus 5 (2015) from LG?

The Nexus 6 offered performance and specs without compromises, but the phone wasn’t exactly for everyone, due to one main reason. Its massive 5.96-inch screen and gargantuan body will definitely make it an uncomfortable phone to bear, especially for those who have smaller hands. This forced Nexus fans to stick with an older-generation handset if they wanted to have a traditionally sized phone.

Google Nexus 5 black vs white aa 2

Google may be onto something this year. Recent rumors suggest there will be a couple Nexus phones launched this year. One of them would be manufactured by LG and reportedly resemble the phone maker’s Nexus 5. In fact, some believe the new phone could be a direct successor, a Nexus 5 (2015) if you will.

LG’s Nexus device is reportedly codenamed Bullhead and is rumored to come with a Snapdragon 808 processor, a 5.2-inch display and a 2700 mAh battery. So far this is all we know about this product, though.

More rumors revolve around a Huawei Nexus phone, so we will focus on that one for now.

Huawei Nexus

huawei ascend mate 7 unboxing initial setup aa (5 of 20)

Reports of a Huawei Nexus have been making the rounds for a while, and the good news is these reports come from multiple sources, including some highly reliable ones. So while LG’s Nexus is shrouded in mystery, we can be almost totally confident that Huawei and Google will launch a Nexus phone this year, and we also have a pretty good idea of what to expect. Here’s the rundown.

Design

We have seen or heard very few details on what this Huawei-made Nexus phone could look like, but we can tell you one thing – it will be large. Rumors suggest the phone’s screen will measure 5.7-inches, which just so happens to be the same screen size as the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.

According to @evleaks, the Huawei Nexus will feature a metallic construction and a fingerprint sensor. In other words, it’s rough outline may be pretty similar to the Mate series. In fact, there’s a good chance the Mate 9 (due this fall) will contain hints at what to expect from the Google-branded device.

huawei ascend mate 7 first look aa (17 of 21)

If Huawei’s latest work is any testament, we should see a well-engineered phone with a solid build quality. The Chinese manufacturer is no rookie, and they can make some amazingly well-built gadgets. Let’s show you some examples.

Huawei devices in videos

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Display

As we mentioned above, the upcoming Huawei Nexus smartphone should come with a sizable 5.7-inch panel. What we didn’t tell you was that, like the Nexus 6, the new Nexus should also feature a QHD resolution display (2560x1440p). This entails the panel will have a pixel density of 515 pixels per inch.

Pixels should be packed in a little tighter than in the Nexus 6, due to the slight size difference, but it’s likely not a very noticeable upgrade.

nexus 6 review aa (14 of 14)

Specifications & hardware

The little evidence we have tells us this phone should be quite powerful. While the new LG Nexus is expected to go with the slightly sub-par (yet still capable) Snapdragon 808 chip, Huawei is not skimping out on performance one bit.

Most rumors state the new Huawei handset will come with a Snapdragon 810 chipset. Evan Blass (@evleaks) claims it will pack a Snapdragon 820 SoC. Regardless of the outcome, Huawei making a move to Qualcomm would represent a significant change, as they have stayed exclusive to their very own Kirin processors so far. Maybe this is one of the conditions for working with Google? After all, while Google is known to have worked with more exotic processors in the past (like Texas Instruments and Nvidia), the processor manufacturer has a huge role in ensuring support and timely updates through the lifetime of a device. Perhaps Huawei’s Kirin is just too risky for Google from this perspective?

Huawei-Ascend-Mate-7-Beautiful

Other hardware specifications continue to be a mystery, but Evan did say the phone should also come with a fingerprint reader, a first for Nexus devices. This would make total sense, as Google announced at Google IO that Android M is to integrate native support for fingerprint readers. This will enable users to make purchases on the Google Play Store, unlock devices, protect sensitive data and more.

There’s also a good chance the next Nexus will feature USB Type-C, which Google already adopted for the new Chromebook Pixel and hinted at for future Android smartphones. As for microSD, while Android M has gotten a bit friendlier to external storage, we would be very surprised if Google reversed its stance and included a microSD slot on a Nexus device.

Camera

The upcoming Nexus devices’ cameras may be the subject we have the least information on. We have heard some rumors say the LG Nexus successor will come with a dual-camera setup, similar to the in the HTC One series. In addition, some believe Huawei’s Nexus phone could be based on the Huawei Honor 6 Plus, which also happens to sport a couple cameras in the back.

Many would consider this a gimmick, as its most popular functions are to distinguish distance and allow for digitally applied bokeh effects (otherwise known as “blurry background”). While that may be a valid argument, I wouldn’t discard the possibility of Google adopting this dual-camera technique. The Mountain View-based company has been playing around with similar technology in Project Tango, and they do appear to be well-invested in the concept.

HTC One M9+-32

If the LG Nexus rumor winds up being true, we do hope the Korean manufacturer makes life good by implementing the LG G4’s camera. Nexus phones are not exactly known for having exceptional shooters (Nexus 6 was better), so it would definitely be a welcomed addition.

Getting back to the Huawei Nexus, camera info is completely absent. With the implementation of a superior Camera API in Lollipop, the conditions are set for a truly great camera experience, provided Google and Huawei won’t skimp on hardware. Unfortunately, that happened before, so it remains to be seen whether the Huawei Nexus will buck the trend.

Software

Nexus phones characterize themselves by staying true to the Pure Google experience; we have no doubt this will also be the case with the new Nexus phone(s). Furthermore, we also know the next-generation Nexus handsets should be the first to launch with Android M, Google’s new version of their mobile OS.

Improvements over Lollipop include granular permissions, custom Chrome tabs, battery improvements, USB-C compatibility, app state backup and native biometric support. You can see a detailed explanation of all Android M features in our announcement post, as well as our detailed “Diving into Android M” article series.

Android M Easter Egg-7

Pricing and release date

Most Nexus devices have been launched either in October or November. We expect 2015’s devices to follow suit, and previous rumors support these suspicions. Evan Blass’ sources previously stated they should ship in Q4, while The Information’s insiders suggest it will be in “the Fall”. Pricing-wise, some think the Huawei Nexus will be more upscale, due to the top specs and metal constructions, while LG’s Nexus could follow in the tracks of the popular Nexus 5. But there’s no guarantee that will be the case, at least for now.

Wrap up

2015 is looking to be a great year for Google. If most of this information proves to be true, the new Nexus products will be the phones to beat – especially Huawei’s. As we mentioned above: don’t forget to keep it tuned to Android Authority and this specific article, as it will continue to get updates as soon as new information emerges.

For now, let’s just hit the comments and share our thoughts on these rumors. What would you like to see in the new Nexus phones? Are you signing up for any of them? Many of you are probably happy a normal-sized Nexus phone is likely to hit the market again!

21
Jul

Latest Android Humble Bundle features NeoGeo’s best games


If you’re prone to throwing your controller when a game gets the best of you, perhaps the latest Humble Bundle isn’t quite for you. Maybe. That’s because the outfit’s offering up a slew of classic NeoGeo games for the very low price of paying however much you want. So, for that very flexible price range you get Garou: Mark of the Wolves, Blazing Star, The King of Fighters ’97, Metal Slug 2 (pictured above) and Metal Slug X on Android. Should you pay more than the (current) average price of $4.56 you’ll also get access to Fatal Fury Special, Samurai Showdown II, Metal Slug 3 and yet-to-be-announced surprises.

Android Central notes that if you grabbed ’em all separately it’d run you $23, so if you feel like throwing more money Humble’s way you can snag a Metal Slug t-shirt celebrating NeoGeo’s 25th anniversary. That isn’t expected to ship until October, but you could always use the next few months to brush up on your shooting skills and wear it with pride, right?

Filed under: Cellphones, Gaming, Home Entertainment, Software, HD, Mobile

Comments

Via: Android Central

Source: Humble Bundle

18
Jul

Huawei’s Nexus phone to be powered by Snadragon 810, not Snapdragon 820


huawei_go_hands_on_TA

Earlier this week, we passed along a rumor about the upcoming Huawei-made Nexus phone. The upcoming flagship, according to Evan Blass, is allegedly going to come with a 5.7-inch display with Quad HD resolution, a fingerprint scanner and be powered by Qualcomm’s upcoming quad-core Snapdragon 820.

Could the proven source of leaks be wrong? There is one analyst that disagrees with Blass’ note regarding the processor.

According to Pan Jiutang, the upcoming Huawei Nexus flagship will likely come with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 810. This is not the first time a claim was made about the Huawei-made Nexus phone adorning a Snapdragon 810. Jiutang believes it’s way to early for the Snapdragon 820, and we shouldn’t expect to see devices with the new chipset until early 2016.

We’ll see if the remaining rumored specs hold up. Unfortunately, there is no word on when Google and Huawei will take its wraps of the new device but it should be this fall alongside Android M’s launch.

Source: Mobipicker

Come comment on this article: Huawei’s Nexus phone to be powered by Snadragon 810, not Snapdragon 820

17
Jul

Unknown LG device visits Geekbench with flagship specs


An unknown LG device was spotted running through Geekbench. Dubbed the LGE LG-F600L, Geekbench tells us that it is running a Snapdragon 808 with 4 GB of RAM.

With two flagship devices expected to be released from LG in the coming months, it is uncertain as to what this device could be.

Could it be the revival of the Nexus 5 that is to expected to release along side a Huawei Nexus phablet? Or maybe it is the LG G4 Pro in accordance to LG’s promise of a new flagship in the second half of 2015.

I am leaning more towards the LG G4 Pro as Geekbench also identifies the device as running Android 5.1.1 where we all know that the new Nexus will be launching with Android M.

However, it is not impossible for the new Nexus to be tested using Android 5.1.1, and the LG G4 Pro is expected to come with a Snapdragon 820.

The naming, LG-F600L, also follows in line with the LG G4’s model number (LG-F500L) adding even more uncertainty.

Then again, why would the Nexus phone launch with a Snapdragon 808 while the Nexus phablet launches with a Snapdragon 820?

Which do you think this phone is? The Nexus 5 that everyone is dying to see, or the more powerful G4 Pro?

As always, this is all speculation. Take it with a grain of salt.

Source: Geekbench via: Phone Arena

The post Unknown LG device visits Geekbench with flagship specs appeared first on AndroidGuys.

17
Jul

Unknown LG device visits Geekbench with flagship specs


An unknown LG device was spotted running through Geekbench. Dubbed the LGE LG-F600L, Geekbench tells us that it is running a Snapdragon 808 with 4 GB of RAM.

With two flagship devices expected to be released from LG in the coming months, it is uncertain as to what this device could be.

Could it be the revival of the Nexus 5 that is to expected to release along side a Huawei Nexus phablet? Or maybe it is the LG G4 Pro in accordance to LG’s promise of a new flagship in the second half of 2015.

I am leaning more towards the LG G4 Pro as Geekbench also identifies the device as running Android 5.1.1 where we all know that the new Nexus will be launching with Android M.

However, it is not impossible for the new Nexus to be tested using Android 5.1.1, and the LG G4 Pro is expected to come with a Snapdragon 820.

The naming, LG-F600L, also follows in line with the LG G4’s model number (LG-F500L) adding even more uncertainty.

Then again, why would the Nexus phone launch with a Snapdragon 808 while the Nexus phablet launches with a Snapdragon 820?

Which do you think this phone is? The Nexus 5 that everyone is dying to see, or the more powerful G4 Pro?

As always, this is all speculation. Take it with a grain of salt.

Source: Geekbench via: Phone Arena

The post Unknown LG device visits Geekbench with flagship specs appeared first on AndroidGuys.

16
Jul

Unknown LG device with Snapdragon 808 and 4GB RAM surfaces online


LG_G3_Back_Slanted_LG_Logo_TA

Earlier today, an unknown handset visited Geekbench. The device is manufactured my LG and contains a Snapdragon 808 chipset with 4GB of RAM. The mysterious device is listed under the code LGE LG-F600L and has a single core performance of 1082, and a 3298 multi-core performance. These are good numbers and hint towards a flagship device.

LG has already confirmed they will be making the next iteration of Google’s Nexus line. The device is expected to feature around a 5-inch display and will be released alongside a Huawai-made Nexus device in the fourth quarter. These devices should debut alongside the new version of Google’s mobile operating system, Android M. Could this be the new Nexus handset? Maybe.

Rumors have also led us to believe this could be the new LG G Pro. The LG G Pro is supposed to be a follow up handset for the second half of 2015. The company mentioned this shortly after they released the high end LG G4. The LG G Pro is expected to come in the fourth quarter as well and recent leaks suggest an all-metal build with around a 6-inch display.

All we can do is wait for an official announcement. Either way this is shaping up to be a beast of a handset.

Source: Geekbench
Via: Phone Arena

Come comment on this article: Unknown LG device with Snapdragon 808 and 4GB RAM surfaces online

15
Jul

Huawei Nexus specs revealed via @evleaks


The anticipation around new Nexus phones is always high.  This year is no exception, especially following last year’s phablet-only release.  Throughout the year we’ve constantly heard about two Nexus phones coming our way, a Nexus 5 refresh made by LG and a phablet made by Huawei.

Today we have word that reinforces the existence of the Huawei Nexus, provided courtesy of the credible leaker @evleaks.  According to Evan Blass of @evleaks, the Huawei Nexus will be a smaller phablet than the Nexus 6, at 5.7″.  It will maintain the QHD resolution.

The chassis will allegedly be a metal body, which is not too surprising, as this has been a Huawei trend lately.  What I’m wondering is how will they make wireless charging work around the metal.  This has been a problem for manufacturers who prefer a metal build.  Wireless charging as been a Nexus staple since the Nexus 4.

Insuring that the Huawei Nexus is a beast is the power of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820 SoC.  This Nexus is also said to have a fingerprint reader, which would fall in line with Google’s outlook for Android following Google I/O.  Release of the Huawei Nexus is of course slated for Q4.

Are you excited for the Huawei Nexus or do you wish Motorola got another crack at it before Google switched manufacturers?  What about the phablet’s decrease in screen size?

The post Huawei Nexus specs revealed via @evleaks appeared first on AndroidGuys.

15
Jul

Specs for upcoming Huawei-manufactured Nexus leak


Huawei_Logo_01_TA_CES_2014

We’ve known for sometime that Google has afforded Huawei the task of developing its next generation Nexus smartphone, but we hadn’t, up until now, received any reliable leaks or rumors suggesting what the Chinese company had planned for the device.

Earlier today, renowned leaker @Evleaks took to his Twitter page to reveal some of the specifications for the upcoming Huawei Nexus. If they turn out to be correct, and we have no reason to doubt the credibility of the source, it looks like the handset is set to be pretty impressive.

According to the imparted information, the device will sport a 5.7-inch QHD display, feature a fingerprint scanner and be powered by Qualcomm’s upcoming quad-core Snapdragon 820 System-on-Chip (SoC).

Unfortunately, we don’t have a specific date for when Google is intending to launch its next Nexus, but the initiator of the leak has reason to believe that it will be in the fourth quarter of this year.

As with all leaks and rumors, we have to take the above alleged specifications with a pinch of salt, at least until Google or Huawei provide us with some evidence with regards to what’s in store for its next flagship, but hopefully we won’t have to wait too much longer to find out.

Source: @Evleaks (Twitter) 

Come comment on this article: Specs for upcoming Huawei-manufactured Nexus leak

15
Jul

I traded my Nexus 6 for a Galaxy S6 Edge…here’s how it went


Samsung…the ultimate tease

I recently dropped my Nexus 6 to give Samsung’s latest flagship a shot.  Not only that, the S6 Edge happens to be my first Galaxy device.  Hopefully that fact does not deter Samsung fans, I just have never been a fan of the Galaxy’s dated design.  To me, the S6 is the first device Samsung has delivered that’s worth the price they’re charging.  I value a hardware effort, and I now had no excuse to not jump in.  Well…and those rad edges.

Therefore, I thought this would serve as a good opportunity to help out those who are pondering Samsung’s current offering and curious about the refined TouchWiz.  Being that I’ve come from the latest stock Android build, I think I have a fresh perspective in touring the infamous UI, such as how it excels or falters in comparison.

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But before I dive into my experience with switching from the Nexus ginormica to a modest 5.1″ Galaxy S6, I’m compelled to go over Samsung’s hardware undertaking.

Design/Build

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When I observed the press details and first impressions of the S6 back in March, I wasn’t sure how to feel.  Everyone anticipated a major design overhaul, but we weren’t sure to what extent.  Samsung ended up keeping the design layout familiar, but changing the entire build.  Thus, my impression had to wait until I could get my hands on it.

But once I did, oh boy.  The metal frame has this soft elegance to it.  The glass back merges with the frame with a subtle 2.5D curvature, like the two materials are meant to be together.  I have the Sapphire color, which sometimes looks black, sometimes looks navy blue.  The base color works in unison with the glass to respond to bright light as gemstones do, shining mesmerizing bands of amplified color.  I applaud Samsung for nailing the build at their first premium go around and for producing something exciting.

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On the Edge model, the reflection of the glass stretches at the curvature.  To me, it’s so visual appealing.  You’re just not used to seeing this kind of thing.  Viewing the curved material from different angles begs me to call the appearance of the device futuristic.  The metal frame looks like a tub as the glass flows into it.  There’s never been a design like this, and although subtle, it’s darn cool.

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Not even accounting for attention-grabbing edges, the S6 filled the eye-candy void that my Nexus 6 left to be desired.

Usability

The buttons around the device are a mixed bag for me.  While I appreciate that the power and volume buttons are on separate sides, the volume buttons are too high on the device.  Not only are they an awkward reach to get to, the above-average force it takes to push them in often makes me need to resist the phone rotating out of my hand.

In contrast, the sensitivity of the Nexus 6 buttons caused frequent accidental presses, so I don’t know which I prefer.

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The click of the physical home button is too loud, and sometimes it gets pressed when the phone is in my pocket and I lean on something.  The bezel between the home button and the display is too small, causing me to accidentally touch something on the screen when I press the button.  And I find the area of the home button too small to practically house the fingerprint scanner.  While I can register many angles of my thumb, too many times do I manage to find a placement that it doesn’t like.  But at least it has a fingerprint scanner, unlike the Nexus 6.

Moving from on-screen buttons to capacitive was a benefit to me, as I’m pro-capacitive.  I won’t dwell on that, as we can debate it elsewhere.  But as I’ve expressed, I just don’t like the physical home button.

Not to forget that I’m covering the Edge variant of the S6, what I imagine the first and foremost question being is:  How is usability affected by those untraditional edges?  Unfortunately, what you gain in aesthetics, you lose in ergonomics.  Fashion over function, as it were.  The glass on the edges falls down to the frame, reducing your grip to roughly half the thickness of the phone.

So you may then ask:  How do you keep from making inputs on the screen when gripping the phone?  Samsung apparently brought up the same concerns and they have a couple design cues to address it.  First, the display does not extend the whole way down to the frame as the glass does, there actually is some bezel at the curve, between the display and frame.

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Second, the frame has some width to push your fingers away from the screen, as you grip the phone.  This creates a ledge that is not apparent with a picture/video overview of the device.

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Regarding the move from a Nexus 6, going from 6″ down to 5.1″ is quite drastic.  Predictably, my first reaction was “Wow, I can use it with one hand!”.  But the smaller content soon began to take a tole on my satisfaction with the S6.  Everyday I feel it getting worse.

Screen

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As of late, Samsung’s Super-AMOLED panels have been a sight to behold.  Seriously.  It’s natural to think that the display you’re using on another phone is all you would need, but once you witness Samsung’s panel, it strikes you.  The brightness, vibrancy, viewing angles…everything is so good about this display.  With the S6, past criticism about over-saturated colors has faded.  The colors are now tamed.  Yes, they do retain some of that color pop that makes you know you’re using an AMOLED panel, but it’s not exaggerated anymore.

One factor I just couldn’t wait to discuss is outdoor visibility.  Oh my goodness, I could praise this aspect of the S6’s display all day long.  For the first time I’ve ever experience, the screen can get bright enough to counter sunlight.  And I’m not just talking about good enough.  I can completely see everything, clearly.  This is truly a feat if you recall when OLED panels could not keep up with LCDs outdoors.  Kudos to Samsung.  If you’re out and about a lot, this screen is a must.

The Nexus 6 also uses an AMOLED panel, sans the ‘Super’ part.  It pales in comparison outdoors with brightness set to max, I often struggled to see what was on my screen.  And its lowest brightness setting, a pink tint would dominate the screen.

On the S6 Edge variant, observing content wrap around the curves is spectacular.  But although I love the feature, I must admit that the excitement wears off after sometime.  As we typically look at the screen straight-on, it’s easy to tune-out the effect.  You then remember the curves are there when you look at the device from an angle.

Camera

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Another well-deserved acknowledgement is the S6’s camera.  Especially in light of the Nexus 6’s camera, which was not accepted as part of the greats.  The upgrade from 13MP to 16MP on the rear camera doesn’t matter too much.  But it is important to know that the S6 is 16MP at 16:9, while the Nexus 6 is 13MP at 4:3.  The Nexus 6’s largest resolution at 16:9 is 9.7MP.

Samsung’s camera capability is leaps and bounds better than Motorola’s effort.  I won’t get into how many more manual controls and features you get with Samsung, but rather, the efficiency of pointing and shooting.  The S6 camera doesn’t require perfect lighting conditions for a good shot, HDR works automatically, low light performance is superb, and focus and capture speed can run circles around the Nexus 6’s camera.

Also, while the 5MP front camera of the S6 is nothing to write home about, selfies are much less noisy and grainy than with the Nexus 6.

Battery

It should be no surprise for me to say that the 3,220mAh battery in the Nexus 6 bests the 2,600mAh battery in the S6 Edge by a long-shot.  We’ve all heard of the S6’s battery being average, I can contend that it is so.  With the Nexus 6, I barely ever feared not getting through the day, but with the S6 I most certainly do.  I would recommend always keeping a charger close by.

Fortunately, I didn’t have to give up wireless charging or fast charging.  And from my experience, power saver on the S6 is more efficient, with the added option of an ultra power saving mode.

Software

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This is the touchy part of the discussion (no pun intended).  On the S6, TouchWiz is ever so present.  The reduction of bloat that Samsung sold us on was primarily optimization of the UI.  I can tell that it is quick and less laggy than previous TouchWiz iterations.  But unfortunately, not everything is rainbows and unicorns in TouchWiz land, like Samsung would lead us to believe.  My Nexus 6 also ran Android Lollipop 5.1.1, and after some quality time with Samsung’s implementation, it becomes apparent what should and what shouldn’t be.

First, app memory management on the S6 is…a mess.  Our beloved Android multitasking is handicapped.  Apps sometimes close mere seconds after switching out of them.  I found that this problem got worse the longer I went without rebooting the phone.  At my worst experience with it, the software would turn off Navigation on my road trip when I went to change the music.  I never had this happen on my Nexus 6, nor need to reboot for it to work as it should.

Lag and slowness join into this issue the longer you go without flushing the UI.  For instance, remember that quick camera shortcut that Samsung boasted about, by double clicking the home button?  While a fantastic feature, if you let TouchWiz use up most of its memory bucket, you’ll be sitting there counting the seconds for the viewfinder to come around.  I’ve also observed the camera app and Chrome browser freeze, leaving me with a paperweight until TouchWiz figured it out, closed, and restarted.

As a result, I’m rebooting the phone daily to avoid such annoyances.  The fact that TouchWiz’s stability decays over each day is a failure of the UI and an ugly misrepresentation of Android.

But surely there must be some worthy benefits that TouchWiz brings to Lollipop?  Yes, but not many such to justify a heavy UI.  The multi-screen functionality is something that stock Android should have by now.  Swiping down on one of the top corners will reduce an app into a floating window, so you can do other things while keeping that information in front of you.  TouchWiz now has a theme engine and store offering lots of appearance options.  Samsung has also developed some neat gestures and motions that are at your disposal, such as palm swiping the screen to capture a screenshot, automatically calling a contact on the screen when you bring the device to your ear, and face detection to keep the screen on while you’re looking at it.

To make the software their own, there are of course unnecessary tweaks to the lock screen, notification panel, icons, and even emoji’s.  Unfortunately, this results in repercussions to how Lollipop was made.  Double-clicking on lock screen notifications doesn’t do anything, the notification panel gets crowded too quickly, and sound prioritization options are not present on the volume slider.  I do however prefer the news panel on the most left.  I have always felt that the Google Now panel was redundant since it could be accessed just as quickly via the home button.  Samsung left the Recent Apps layout untouched, with the welcomed addition of a Close All button.

Conclusion

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So am I satisfied with my decision to leave my Nexus 6 for the new Galaxy?  I think I’ve shown that it’s a loaded question.  The chassis, screen, and camera quality are tremendous improvements from the Nexus 6.  But TouchWiz is so unnecessary and does more bad to Lollipop than it does good.  There is also that hit to battery life, but that’s expected from a smaller device.  The battery of the upcoming S6 Plus will be more appropriate to compare.

The S6 Edge variant brings something different in a dulling arena of flagships, but the glamour is short-lived.  Without impactful edge functionality (see the ZTE Nubia Z9), the feature becomes forgotten about and you start to question your decision to pay $100 more for it.

I’m left with the wish that Samsung would stop fiddling with being great and push through to being the best.

The post I traded my Nexus 6 for a Galaxy S6 Edge…here’s how it went appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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