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Posts tagged ‘Nexus 5’

15
Apr
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Engadget giveaway: win a Nexus 5 and wireless charger courtesy of iOttie!


The art of automotive zen begins with a clean and orderly interior (for most drivers) and this week’s giveaway is sure to help provide a more cable-free ride. The case, cradle and charger folks at iOttie have done us a solid by offering two Engadget readers the new Easy Flex Wireless car charger and a Nexus 5 smartphone. This Qi-enabled, dash-mountable charger will help drivers keep their hands at two and ten like they’re supposed to, while still providing visibility for turn-by-turn directions and a steady stream of juice. The charger’s sticky gel pad will keep Google’s latest handset from taking a dive to the floorboards and the device will even work with other Qi-compatible smartphones. All you need to do is head down to the Rafflecopter widget below for up to three chances at winning one of these prize packs. You never know, a little dose of automotive feng shui could turn that long nightmare of a commute into some peaceful “me” time.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

  • Entries are handled through the Rafflecopter widget above. Comments are no longer accepted as valid methods of entry. You may enter without any obligation to social media accounts, though we may offer them as opportunities for extra entries. Your email address is required so we can get in touch with you if you win, but it will not be given to third parties.
  • Contest is open to all residents of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Canada (excluding Quebec), 18 or older! Sorry, we don’t make this rule (we hate excluding anyone), so direct your anger at our lawyers and contest laws if you have to be mad.
  • Winners will be chosen randomly. Two (2) winners will each receive one (1) Nexus 5 smartphone (LG-D820, black 16GB) and (1) Easy Flex Wireless car charging mount (HLCRIO131).
  • If you are chosen, you will be notified by email. Winners must respond within three days of being contacted. If you do not respond within that period, another winner will be chosen. Make sure that the account you use to enter the contest includes your real name and a contact email or Facebook login. We do not track any of this information for marketing or third-party purposes.
  • This unit is purely for promotional giveaway. LG, Google, iOttie and Engadget / AOL are not held liable to honor warranties, exchanges or customer service.
  • The full list of rules, in all its legalese glory, can be found here.
  • Entries can be submitted until April 16th at 11:59PM ET. Good luck!

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15
Apr
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Android 4.4.3 for Sprint Nexus 5? Sense 6 Coming to Original HTC One! – Device Updates


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It is Monday, so let’s see what devices are getting updated. Seems that there is a nice little update rolling out to the Sprint Nexus 5, which just might be the first Android 4.4.3 rollout, but no one seems to no for sure. Let us know if you see a “3″ in your update settings.

Device Updates
Original HTC One getting Sense 6
Verizon HTC One Max gets Android 4.4.2

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15
Apr
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Sprint Rolling out KitKat 4.4.3 update to Nexus 5


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A new update is out today for the Nexus 5 on Sprint.  This update version (KTU84F) brings about various bug fixes, and also enables the device to work on Sprint’s Spark LTE bands 26 and 41.  Sprint’s update page states that the update will be released over-the-air in stages and may take several days for delivery.

This update is expected to fix several issues including the bug that causes massive battery drain while using the Nexus 5′s camera.

You can manually check to see if you have the update waiting by going to ‘Settings’, tapping ‘About Phone’, and then selecting ‘System Updates’, or you can just patiently wait for your update to arrive.

Sources: (Sprint), (GSMArena)

The post Sprint Rolling out KitKat 4.4.3 update to Nexus 5 appeared first on AndroidGuys.

8
Apr
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Most Suitable Device for Gaming


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There have been so many developments in technology in recent years that means it has become easier than ever for games developers to ensure that their games can be accessed across all portals and devices.  Of course it depends on the type of game, which device would be most compatible.

With the introduction of the likes of Google Play this has made things fairly standard for Android phones so game can be brought into the mobile market quicker.  This is also similar for the iOS platform with the app store.  There has even been the launch of the likes of GameKlip that now allows you to attach PS3 controllers to your Android device just like you would with a PS Vita.  It means you don’t have the added complication of using the touch screen and can simply use the controls.

We thought that we would give you the scoop on some of the best mobile devices that can be used for gaming.

Apple iPhone 5C

This little number is very compact which means it’s not a pain to transport around.  It’s also less expensive than the iPhone 5S making it attractive to consumers.  The resolution isn’t as good as what you could get with other mobile phones at 1136×640 a 325ppi. The best thing about this phone is the range of games that you can play on it.  With the Apple App store, you can do just a quick search and be presented with a flurry of gaming treats.

Google Nexus 5

The Google Nexus 5 is available in both black and white, so would appeal to those of you who want to look stylish.  It is powered by Android 4.4, so has a fantastic HD resolution.  This is perfect for those of you who enjoy good graphics and animations whether you are playing Angry Birds or having a game of some mobile bingo. Find out more details about mobile bingo sites.  The only downside about this device is that there is no section for an external card to be inserted, so it’s only available in 16 GB and 32 GB. This may be an issue if you are playing games that require a lot of data.

Samsung Galaxy Note 3

This game allows up to 64 GB in storage which is double that of Google Nexus and can offer up to a further 64 GB if required.  The quad core and GPU will allow you to have a go on any game you come across and with Google Play at your disposal there is more than enough to choose from.  It has a high resolution of 1080p and 386ppi making games even more enjoyable to play.

LG G2

The LG G2 is one of the best selling phones by LG.  It’s available in 16 different varieties with 32 GB.  What is most promising about this device is the visuals that it offers. It runs at 1080p and 424ppi and has the capacity to support HD graphics.  The downside with this device again is that it doesn’t have a memory card slot so there is minimal space for data.

Nokia Lumia 520

Nokia Lumia is of course a Windows phone.  This means that there are fewer games that are compatible with it. Although the selection is smaller, there are some games that are only exclusively available to that phone.  It has a 6 inch screen which is the largest on the list, prefect for games that require a little more detail than normal.  It runs at 1080p and 367ppi and has a fantastic touch screen.

There we have it folks a full list of phones that are great for gaming!  If you are looking for a phone that can support games with a large amount of data then you may like the Samsung Galaxy Note.  Or if the enjoyment of graphics and animations are more top on your list, then the Google Nexus 5 will be right up your street.  If it’s variety you are after then the iPhone 5C is the one for you!

6
Apr
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EasyAcc leather flip case for Nexus 5 review


Easyacc nexus 5

Flip cases serve a decent purpose in the smartphone world, offering more functionality than protection. They certainly aren’t for users that have a habit of dropping their devices often. But if you’re looking for a durable, well-built flip case for your Nexus 5, look no further.

We’ve used this case for two weeks, and we have a pretty good grip as to whether to buy this case or not.

Build Quality

Easyacc nexus 5

The case is made from a synthetic premium PU leather which feels good in the hand. It doesn’t necessarily feel cheap, especially in the world of fake leather. The interior of the case is made from a microfiber material that looks surprisingly similar to leather. Inside and out, the case is soft to the touch, and makes it feel like you’ve spent a good amount of money on it.

It locks the phone in by securing the four corners of the device. The phone seems pretty sturdy when inside the case, though the corners holding the device in feel a bit cheap. The front cover has a magnet that wakes and puts the device to sleep. This is definitely a feature we want to see in all flip cases.

The front cover locks in by a tab that wraps around the device. The tab has the same feeling as the corners securing the device – cheap feeling, but works really well. It also doubles as a kickstand and offers two different viewing angles. If you watch movies or YouTube videos, this case is great for you.

Look & Feel

This case feels really great when in use. It’s not slippery or easy to drop, making it an easy case for everyday use. If we could change one thing about the case, it would be the look and feel of the corners holding the phone in place. They look a bit cheap, and the leather doesn’t blend well with the look of the phone.

Easyacc nexus 5

Other than our one major gripe, for a leather folio case, it looks really good.

Durability

With any flip case out there, you’re really not going to get the best protection out of it. We have dropped the phone a few times while using the case, and we didn’t see any signs of damage. Since the screen is so fragile, it’s nice to know that the front cover is thick enough that it will absorb a large amount of shock.

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Other than dropping it, the top, bottom, and right side of the phone are bare, so it may not completely save the device from everything you throw at it. As far as folio cases go, this one offers enough durability to help you sleep at night.

Should I buy?

Good

This folio case has just the right amount of functionality and good looks for us to recommend it to you. We love that there are two different viewing angles when using it as a kickstand. But we wish they could have figured out another way to secure the device without sacrificing looks.

If you’d like to pick one up, you can do so on Amazon for $9.99.

EasyAcc isn’t usually a brand that comes to mind when you think of phone cases, but perhaps it should. They’ve put together a decent phone case with an inexpensive price tag. 

The post EasyAcc leather flip case for Nexus 5 review appeared first on AndroidGuys.

31
Mar
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Partial Android 4.4.3 changelog revealed, will bring in countless Fixes


Android 4.4.3 changelogOver the last few weeks, the evidence for Android 4.4.3′s inevitable release has been building, and the latest information to support these theories includes a screenshot of a Nexus 5‘s device details featuring the new software build and a partial Android 4.4.3 changelog.

Apart from the Nexus 5 camera bug fix that was suggested before,  the changelog appears to detail a whole number of fixes that will make some users very happy; see below for the partial changelog:

  • frequent data connection dropout fix
  • mm-qcamera-daemon crash and optimization fixes
  • camera focus in regular and HDR modes fixes
  • Power Manager display wakelock fix
  • multiple Bluetooth fixes
  • fix for a random reboot
  • app shortcuts sometimes got removed from launcher after update
  • USB debugging security fix
  • app shortcuts security fix
  • Wi-Fi auto-connect fix
  • other camera fixes
  • MMS, Email/Exchange, Calendar, People/Dialer/Contacts, DSP, IPv6, VPN fixes
  • stuck in activation screen fix
  • missed call LED fix
  • subtitle fixes
  • data usage graph fix
  • Internet telephony fix
  • FCC compliance fix
  • miscellaneous fixes

I’m surprised not to see any fixes for the dropped call issues that have been seen on the Moto G with Android 4.4.2, but this is only a partial list and the official changelog will no doubt have plenty more to offer. There’s still no word on when this software update will go live to the public, but with the suggestion that it will be releasing in Q1 2014, we should be seeing more news about it very soon.

When do you think Android 4.4.3 will be released? Are you suffering from some of the issues that have a fix incoming? Let us know your story in the comments.

Source: Android Police via TalkAndroid

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30
Mar
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Android 4.4.3 Spotted for Nexus! All New HTC One is One Piece of Sexy! – The ManDroid Show


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Hello precious Android friends. Time to talk a little Android with you. The show is up a little late, but it happens. Android 4.4.3 has been spotted, so hopefully an update will be rolling very soon. The New HTC One is looking pretty sexy, and hopefully I can get my hands on one soon. Enjoy the show!

News Topics
Android 4.4.3 spotted for Nexus
All New HTC One M8 is sexy
Upload Google Music through Chrome

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28
Mar
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Android 4.4.3 spotted running on Nexus 5 and Nexus 7


Android 4.4.3 spotted running on Nexus 5 and Nexus 7Over the last few weeks, the evidence that the next iteration of Android KitKat, Android 4.4.3, is on its way to being released is mounting. Last we heard, LlabTooFeR suggested that the software update would be addressing a well-known Nexus 5 camera bug, and today, myce.com is reporting that Android 4.4.3 has been spotted running on the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7.

Android 4.4.3 spotted running on Nexus 5 and Nexus 7According to the report, Android build KTU83 has been spotted running on the Nexus 5 and another build, KTU79, has been seen on the Nexus 7; this fits the naming convention that Google generally uses for its Android builds, and it also supports the existence of the KTU72B build that LlabTooFeR spotted last week. According to the report, the ‘U’ in the build name suggests that Android 4.4.3 is targeted for release in Q1 2014, so we should ideally be getting news about a release very soon.

How soon do you think Android 4.4.3 is going to be released? And what would you like to see in this software update? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Source: myce.com

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20
Mar
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Looking back: A brief history of Google’s Nexus devices


Sometimes when a smartphone is released, it is very easy to tell what the manufacturer was aiming for. Unlike some popular lines of smartphones like Samsung’s Galaxy S series or HTC’s One series, Google’s Nexus line has received some interesting feedback over the years. Does the term ‘Nexus’ mean what it did when Google started this line? Which one of these devices was truly iconic for it’s time? Let’s take a look back.

HTC Nexus One

Nexus_One

Introduced: January 2010

Android version: 2.1 Eclair – 2.3 Gingerbread

Notable hardware features: HTC used their familiar build for the time – matted plastic with brushed metal accents. Oh, and a trackball. It also sports a 3.7-inch 480×800 AMOLED (or Super LCD) display, 1 GHz Qualcomm Scorpion CPU with 512 MB RAM, 1400 mAh battery, and a 5 MP camera.

How it was sold: The One was sold mainly for developers and launched as $529 unlocked, and offered a “pure Android” experience with an unlockable bootloader. Also, this was Google’s first attempt to sway people to buy a device online without seeing in stores. Perhaps a bit ahead of its time, the Nexus buying experience would evolve over the years.

Despite the lawsuits and patent troubles, the reaction was very positive. These were some of the best specs anyone has ever seen on a smartphone. Everything was great about the phone except for the price, even by today’s standards.

Samsung Nexus S

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Introduced: Nexus S: December 2010, Nexus S 4G: March 2011

Android version: 2.3 Gingerbread – 4.1 Jelly Bean

Notable hardware features: Samsung opted for a slimy hyperglaze plastic for their first Nexus, with a slight curve to the screen. It also has a 4-inch 480×800 Super AMOLED display, 1 GHz Samsung Exynos 3 processor, 512 MB RAM, 1500 mAh battery, and a 5 MP camera.

How it was sold: The Nexus S was sold for $530, while the Nexus S 4G was sold for $550. The jump to Gingerbread didn’t change a whole lot, at least talking about the user interface.

At the time, it was one of the best smartphones to date. The first model didn’t support HSPA+, which was a big negative. However, Google seemed to remedy that by offering a 4G model in the coming months. This one wasn’t a huge step up from the One, at least originally, but it did keep users interested in the Nexus line.

Samsung Galaxy Nexus

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Introduced: November 2011

Android version: 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich – 4.3 Jelly Bean

Notable hardware features: Samsung’s second iteration of the Nexus came at us with a completely different design – still plastic, but more textured on the back plate, still keeping the slight curve of the screen and a (very) heavy bottom. This one sports a 4.65-inch 720×1280 Super AMOLED display, 1.2 GHz dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor, 1 GB RAM, 1750 mAh battery, a 5 MP rear-facing camera, and a 1.3 MP front-facing camera.

How it was sold: The G-Nex was sold for $399 at launch. Probably the biggest selling feature of this one is the software. The jump from Gingerbread to Ice Cream Sandwich is still the biggest UI overhaul to date, adding tons of new features/improvements.

Due to the software, the Galaxy Nexus became hugely popular. Now, every phone has it’s faults. But it seems to be more apparent than ever in this Nexus. The batter life, though a big jump from it’s predecessor, is terrible. There is no way a smartphone user could get through an entire day on a single charge. That’s to be expected, given the time this phone was relevant. But the phones being launched at roughly the same time had tremendously better battery life that this one. Also, when Android 4.4 Kit Kat was announced, Galaxy Nexus owners were distraught to hear that their phones wouldn’t be receiving the update.

ASUS Nexus 7 (2012)

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Introduced: June 2012

Android version: 4.1 Jelly Bean – 4.4 Kit Kat

Notable hardware features: Google decided to rope in popular tablet/laptop manufacturer, ASUS, for their first take at a Nexus tablet. The back was a soft-touch plastic with a golf-ball like texture. It has a 7-inch 1280×800 IPS LCD display, 1.2 GHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor, 1 GB RAM, 4325 mAh battery, and a 1.2 MP front-facing camera.

How it was sold: The Nexus 7 was announced at Google I/O for $199, bringing Android 4.1 to the table. With the addition of Google Now and other enhancements, the Nexus 7 was a very attractive tablet, especially for the price.

For years, Android tablets have had a big problem. The lack of tablet-friendly applications was a huge negative for Google’s first iteration at a Nexus tablet. Ultimately, the tablet did very well with the common consumer. It was a big change in the Nexus family – not only was it not a phone, but it was aimed at the average consumer. Also, the $199 price point was an invitation for developers to pick one up and start working on tablet-friendly apps.

Samsung Nexus 10

Nexus 10 1

Introduced: October 2012

Android version: 4.2 Jelly Bean – 4.4 Kit Kat

Notable hardware features: Google had Samsung make their 2nd Nexus tablet. This one has a rubbery-soft (very grippy) plastic and front-facing speakers. It has a 10.1-inch 2560×1600 True RGB Real Stripe PLS LCD display, 1.7 GHz dual-core Cortex-A15 processor, 2 GB RAM, a 9,000 mAh battery, a rear-facing 5 MP camera, and a front-facing 1.9 MP camera.

How it was sold: This one was supposed to be announced with the Nexus 4 in an event in New York, but it was cancelled because of Hurricane Sandy. It was still announced later that day for $399. It was running Android 4.2, a notable step up from Android 4.1.

The Nexus 10 was popular, but still carried the same unfortunate handicap that the Nexus 7 had. If the lack of tablet-friendly apps wasn’t apparent enough on the first Nexus 7, it was made very clear on this one. Suffice it to say, it is getting better, but at the time that this tablet was released, it was difficult to find apps that played nicely with a big screen.

LG Nexus 4

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Introduced: November 2012

Android version: 4.2 Jelly Bean – 4.4 Kit Kat

Notable hardware features: LG’s first Nexus was beautifully designed. It offered a glass back with a dotted, almost sparkly look to it. It also offered plastic bezels and a screen that curved slightly around the edges. LG”s Nexus has 4.7-inch 768×1280 IPS LCD display, a 1.5 GHz quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, 2 GB RAM, a 2,100 mAh battery, an 8 MP rear-facing camera, and a 1.3 MP front-facing camera.

How it was sold: Launched alongside the Nexus 10, the Nexus 4 was originally sold for $299. Still aiming at developers, this Nexus offered a very small price point – something the average consumer would be very fond of. It also offered Qi wireless charging – a Nexus family first.

For $299, you’d be hard pressed to find a better smartphone for the price. But for Google to reach that price point, they needed to make some sacrifices. One of those being the lack of 4G. Weird, right? Nexus phones that were released a couple years prior had 4G capabilities, but why not this one? Google seemed to think the HSPA+ support would suffice. There wasn’t much else that didn’t make it on the phone, though. It was a decent step up from the Galaxy Nexus, and showed people that they didn’t need to fork over an entire paycheck for a smartphone.

ASUS Nexus 7 (2013)

Nexus 7 1

Introduced: July 2013

Android version: 4.3 Jelly Bean – 4.4 Kit Kat

Notable hardware features: ASUS got a shot at making a second Nexus tablet. It has a soft-touch back, two long speakers on each end, as well as a big ol’ camera on the back. It has a 7-inch 1920×1200 IPS LCD display, 1.5 GHz quad-core Krait 300 processor, 2GB RAM, a 3950 mAh battery, a 5 MP rear-facing camera, and a 1.2 MP front-facing camera.

How it was sold: The 2013 Nexus 7 was announced at an event called “Breakfast with Sundar Pichai”, Google’s current Senior Vice President, overseeing Android, Chrome and Apps. It launched for $229 – a $30 price increase from the first generation tablet. This one brought Android 4.3 Jelly Bean to the table and a much-improved screen. 

The Nexus 7 (2013) has been Google’s most popular tablet to date, fixing just about every gripe that consumers had with the first generation. The speakers are loud and very difficult to cover up, the screen received a much-needed upgrade, and the bezels shrunk on the sides, making the tablet’s screen pop much more. With help from more and more tablet-compatible apps, this device marked Google’s entrance into the mainstream tablet world, offering an affordable, yet glorious competitor to others such as the iPad.

LG Nexus 5

nexus_5-threesome

Introduced: October 2013

Android version: 4.4 Kit Kat – 4.4.2 Kit Kat

Notable hardware features: This is LG’s second attempt at making a Nexus phone. The Nexus 5 offers a soft-touch back and a big camera on the back, much like the Nexus 7 (2013). It also offers a 4.95-inch 1920×1080 IPS LCD display, 2.26 GHz quad-core Krait 400 processor, 2 GB RAM, a 2,300 mAh battery, an 8 MP rear-facing camera with OIS, and a 1.3 MP front-facing camera.

How it was sold: The Nexus 5 was announced in a Google+ post for $349, and went on sale in the Google Play Store immediately. It launched with Android 4.4 Kit Kat, and drew people in with its exclusive “Google Now Launcher”.

The Nexus 5 became popular very quickly, mostly due to its price and hardware upgrades. Much like the 2013 Nexus 7, Google fixed most of the complaints users had from the Nexus 4. The addition of 4G bands, a slightly bigger screen, and more durable hardware were it’s best features, by far. The meaning of the term ‘Nexus’ began to change due to the Google Now Launcher. Though still aimed at developers, the consumer market took this one by storm. Google not only offered a cheap price point, but they added exclusivity with some of the services that came with it. Instead of offering a phone with a “pure Android experience”, they opted to give a “pure Google experience”.

Honorable Mention: Google Play Editions

Google Play Edition

Between the Nexus 4 & 5, Google announced the first ever Google Play Edition smartphones – the GPe Galaxy S4 and the GPe HTC One. Bringing a quality Android experience to top of the line hardware, the GPe phones are a force to be reckoned with… until you look at the price. The GPe Galaxy S4 was announced for $649. Suddenly, the term ‘Nexus’ doesn’t mean cheap anymore. Or, wait… is this a Nexus? 

With the promise from Google to receive timely Android updates, the GPe smartphones took an odd spot in the Nexus family, quickly dubbing themselves as the red-headed step children of the group. You love them because they offer a great hardware experience, but that price… oh man, that price. Google is still continuing to announce GPe devices left and right, so here’s the question – what’s their end goal?

Here’s my take, although I may be wrong; it’s the only answer my brain wants to accept as correct. Google has been releasing GPe devices for a while now. At first, it seemed normal for the S4 and HTC One to get the Google treatment. Premium hardware and software, where could you go wrong? Then they started announcing some really odd editions like the Moto G, for instance. The Moto G was already basically a Google-ified smartphone. It ran mostly a stock experience, give or take a few features. So why would they release it?

Manufacturers don’t receive code until the day it’s announced to the public. So with the odd addition of the Moto G to the family, swooping in before they’re whisked off to Lenovo, it gives all of the main hardware manufacturers early code that they wouldn’t have gotten already. Google didn’t have to add any of those phones to their lineup to make any money… they did it for the greater good – early updates for all.

What’s next?

So, does the term ‘Nexus’ mean what it did 4 years ago? Not really. But that’s not a bad thing. There will always be room for the Nexus line in the hearts of pure Android enthusiasts, developers, and consumers who aren’t fond of 2-year agreements. Sure, there are rumors that the GPe devices will take over the Nexus line sometime next year, but one thing is certain: we will always have access to the pure Android experience that we all love.

Sometimes it’s just nice to take a look back and reminisce about devices we love, no? Which of these devices is your favorite? Do you have anything to add about (what I consider to be) the best smartphone line ever? Leave a comment below and we’ll talk!

The post Looking back: A brief history of Google’s Nexus devices appeared first on AndroidGuys.

19
Mar
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Google expands Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 sales to more European countries


Google may have wowed the world yesterday with the introduction of Android Wear, but it turns out it also had some Nexus-related news tucked away too. Already available in 13 countries around the world, the search giant has quietly expanded sales of the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 across Europe, listing them on the Play Store in eight new markets. These include Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal and Sweden, giving customers the option to bypass operators and grab themselves an unlocked Nexus device direct from Google. With the Chromecast finally on sale outside of the US and an influx of Android-powered wearables on the way, Google’s finally making it easier for Europeans to start investing in its expanding product family.

Filed under: , , ,

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Via: Android Police

Source: Google Play Support

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