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Posts tagged ‘News’

5
Sep

Google is set to mend ties with China, launch modified Google Play Store there



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It seems pretty obvious not to argue with your customers, especially relatively new customers, but that’s exactly what happened in 2010 when Google famously got into a dispute with China over its tough censorship of the Internet. Since then, China has grown into one of the largest consumers of the Internet in Asia, and Google has had to look on from the sidelines – while Android has a presence there, its Google Play apps don’t feature on any Chinese devices due to that 2010 decision to pull out. Thankfully, it looks like Google is set to mend ties with China, which will allow a modified Google Play Store to feature on Chinese devices as well as bring the Android Wear operating system to China for the first time too.

The obvious disclaimer over all of this is that the Chinese government must approve everything that goes through and reserves the right to shut down anything that they see as breaching their agreement. On the flip side, smartphones and smartwatches are still undergoing a big growth period in China so it’s absolutely essential for Google to re-enter China if it hopes to be there when the growth plateaus.


What do you think about Google making things over with China? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: The Information via TalkAndroid

The post Google is set to mend ties with China, launch modified Google Play Store there appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

4
Sep

A quick look at the new Sony Xperia Z5 camera


sony xperia z5 aa 6

Sony just recently unveiled a trio of high-end Android-powered smartphones, the Xperia Z5, Z5 Compact and Z5 Premium. Along with a great overall design, slightly toned down software experience and many other enhancements, all three of these new devices sport Sony’s new 23MP Exmor RS camera sensor.

Sony tells us that the new sensor is capable of producing the fastest auto-focus experience available on a smartphone to date, with the added benefit of focusing on a subject in just .03 seconds. The new sensor also has some improved Steady Shot features with Intelligent Active Mode for video and the ability to record video in 4K.


Sony Xperia Z5 camera AADon’t miss: Here’s what the Sony Xperia Z5 Premium camera can do5313149

That might be impressive on paper, but just how does this camera perform in real life situations? After spending a few hours with the Xperia Z5 and taking some photos, we have some early thoughts that we’d like to share with you. Note that many of these photos were snapped on the show floor in low lighting conditions, so these might not be the clearest photos in the world. With that said, many folks tend to take pictures in restaurants, bars and other dark areas, so we’re hoping this gives you a good idea as to what you can expect from the new camera sensor.

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Overall, pictures taken with the camera are actually pretty good. There looks to be plenty of detail in most of the photos, with some slight noise reduction in certain pictures. Low-light shots have a tad smudginess to them as the photo transitions from bright areas to darker areas.

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One thing many folks forget about is the dedicated hardware camera button on the side of all Xperia devices, which makes a big difference when snapping a quick photo. The camera app has gotten some improvements, too. It’s as fast as it’s ever been, from taking the photo to file creation. Also, this newer, faster auto-focus experience is no joke. Once you tap on the screen to focus, the camera wastes no time and focuses right away without too much spot metering. These new enhancements coupled with the dedicated camera button on the side actually made this feel more like a compact or quick mirrorless camera, not a smartphone camera.

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With that said, in terms of picture quality, photos could use a bit more saturation and sharpness. Overall, thought, we’re really excited to put this new camera through our full tests.

So now that you’ve seen some quick shots from the Xperia Z5, what are your thoughts? Are you impressed with the new camera tech, or do you think you’ll pass? Be sure to let us know in the comment section below.

4
Sep

LG G Pad 2 10.1 hands-on and first look


LG’s tablet offerings haven’t necessarily been all that exciting as of late, at least when it comes to the high-end market. That all seems to be changing now, as the company just recently announced a newer, larger addition to its G Pad line. Could this new device be a viable option for those looking for a high-end Android tablet, or will it fall short against other big devices from the competition? To help answer those questions, we go hands-on with the newly-announced LG G Pad 2 10.1.

lg g pad 2 10.1 aa 2 7

Once of the first things you’ll notice with this G Pad 2 is its big 10.1-inch display with a resolution of 1920 x 1200 and a pixel density of about 224. Despite its large screen, though, this is actually quite the nimble device, coming in at just 7.8mm thick. It features a soft metallic finish on the back that may look great, but can still be quite slippery at times. Much like other tablets of this size, the somewhat large side bezels and the side-mounted dual speakers suggest that LG primarily imagined this tablet for landscape usage.

lg g pad 2 10.1 aa 2 1

Underneath this large screen sits a 2.26GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processor and Adreno 330 GPU, with 2GB of RAM, only 16GB of on-board memory and a microSD card slot for expandable storage. There’s also a5MP rear-facing camera, a 2MP front-facing camera, as well as a non-removable 7400mAh battery powering the device that should be able to keep it running for some time. Given that LG decided to go with a Full HD panel instead of a more power hungry Quad HD screen, we’re sure battery life will be just fine with the G Pad 2 10.1.

lg g pad 2 10.1 aa 2 5

In terms of software, many folks think LG’s G UI software overlay can be a bit crowded and bloated at times. This isn’t really a problem here, as there seems to be ample room on the big 10.1-inch display for handling everything LG’s Android skin brings to the table. You’ll find all of the familiar software features on this tablet that we’re used to seeing on LG devices – QSlide applications, Dual Window functionality (perfect for larger displays), Quick Memo Plus, various LG widgets, and much more. It’s true, LG tends to oversaturate its G UI software when it comes to sheer number of additional features, but we’re sure Qualcomm’s capable Snapdragon 800 CPU will be able to handle most things that are thrown at it.

lg g pad 2 first look aa (22 of 23)

The G Pad 2 10.1 comes pre-loaded with Microsoft Office for Android tablets, which also comes with an additional 100GB of free OneDrive cloud storage for two full years. Obviously this doesn’t make up for the fact that LG only opted to throw in 16GB of on-board storage with the tablet, but for those who don’t own a microSD card, this will help out a bit.

lg g pad 2 first look aa (20 of 23)

LG also recently announced a fun little accessory called the LG Rolly, an ultra-portable wireless keyboard, which is perfectly suited for this device, but can be paired with other tablets as well. Typing on this particular keyboard is really easy, and all you have to do is fold it out, and place the tablet on the stands that help prop the device up. The keyboard is very impressive, with keys that offer a lot of tactile feedback, but there large gaps in between the lines of keys here that will take some getting used to. One AAA battery powers this foldable keyboard, and with it priced at around $100, it is a great option to have for use with any other tablets you may have in your possession as well.

So there you have it for this first look at the LG G Pad 2 10.1! Overall, the latest tablet from LG is another fantastic offering, and the complete package is quite impressive. We can’t wait to put this tablet through its paces when we give it the full review treatment.

4
Sep

Here’s what the Nextbit Robin looks like in closer detail (gallery)


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We first learned of Nexbit’s plans to enter into the smartphone game back in July, though the company wouldn’t formally unveil its handset until September 1st. Since then, the Nexbit Robin has managed to overtake its Kickstarter funding goal, offering a unique looking phone that brings a cloud-centric approach to storing apps, pics, and more.

Of course the Nextbit Robin isn’t actually expected to ship to its first backers until January or February of next year. Thankfully, we were able to get a little time with a non-working prototype here at IFA 2015. Although the non-working prototype doesn’t let us get a feel for the software or performance, we did get the chance to familiarize ourselves with the phone’s design language and we have to admit we liked what we saw.

Check out our pics for yourself:

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Though Nextbit borrows familiar concepts like dual-firing front facing speakers, it manages to do so with a brand new design language that certainly looks like nothing else on the market today. But what about the specs? Nextbit promises a mid-to-high range experience backed by a hexa-core Snapdragon 808 SoC with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage. Other specs include a 5.2-inch 1080p display, a 13 megapixel rear camera, 5 megapixel front camera, and a 2,670mAh battery.

The phone offers no microSD slot for expansion, but instead promises a unique cloud syncing experience with 100GB free storage for life. Unlike typical cloud back up, this system is smart and knows when to push off apps and pics haven’t used or looked at for a while. Need to access them again? Nextbit can redownload the information back from its servers and you’ll find regain use of the app (including game saves, etc), images, or other data.

For more details on the Nextbit Robin, be sure to visit their Kickstarter, where you can pick up the phone for as little as $350. Also be sure to check out our original announcement post. What do you think of the Nextbit Robin? Like the looks, impressed?

4
Sep

The Nokia C1 might by Espoo’s first “pure” Android smartphone: renders leak


2015 is shaping up to be a year of transformation if not one of “retro” resurgence. Two once-golden OEMs from days gone by are poised to come back in a major way, despite neither company’s potential products being public. While BlackBerry’s Venice has been exposed for all the world to see -unofficially of course- Nokia’s Android smartphone offerings have been somewhat of an obscurity. Today that looks to change, provided these renders out of China are the real deal:

nokia-c1_1 包子玩机

These renders are reportedly for a device that will be known as the Nokia C1. It will supposedly be running stock Android, however as GforGames has pointed out, there is not only potential for Espoo to add a skin to the stock, but it wouldn’t even be that outlandish given the company’s N1 Android tablet negated Vanilla AOSP for such.

nokia-c1_2 包子玩机

Nokia fans hoping for a positively premium product might want to tame their expectations as rumored specs for this product include a 5-inch 1280 X 720 display, an Intel CPU, 2GB of RAM, and an 8-megapixel rear/5-megapixel front camera setup.

The pictures actually give the sensation the phone is going to be made of aluminum however it could very well end up being a polycarbonate base. Given that the pictures don’t seem to indicate a SIM tray, it is possible the front unit will end up popping out of the base, not unlike some Lumia Windows Phone devices, or even HTC’s Sensation.

b4a56101gw1evqbd4jo7ij20fa02sq2r 包子玩机

At the very least, the phone looks like it will not only be quite thin, but also devoid of any “camera humps” that have characterized many recent anemic smartphones.

Notorious Nokia

Despite being worlds apart, both geographically and aesthetically, there is a fascinating similarity between the situations surrounding BlackBerry and Nokia. Both companies were once industry leaders and commanded gigantic smartphone market shares only to see their dominance erode due to the emergency of Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android platform.

nokia-x-range

X-rated: Nokia’s past Android smartphones were arguably a calculated move made by Microsoft.

While BlackBerry chose to remain true to its roots, many felt that Nokia’s decision to go with Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform was a recipe for disaster. Both companies, long term supporters felt, would have been saved of their current fates had they simply brought what they did best to Google’s camp.

Ironically Nokia actually did release a small smattering of Android phones, though they were of a very low-spec affair and so heavily skinned that they actually looked like Windows Phone 8, something that Microsoft calculatedly hoped would encourage buyers to switch to after they “graduated” from the X-series.

After Microsoft formally purchased Nokia’s mobile division, it seemed as if the company as it once existed was doomed to be little more than a fragment of fond memories. Assuming this C1 leak is legitimate, it could pave the path to resurgence and a resurrection for the Nokia that many the world over cherished with such fondness.

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4
Sep

Goat Simulator MMO Simulator is just about as bizarre as it sounds, and that’s good



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I’ll admit – I wasn’t an immediate believer in Goat Simulator when it was first released. After all, how could a satirical game that was buggy be so charming and popular? Well, after several hours of playing it, I get it, and now that Coffee Stain Studios has decided to up the ante by releasing Goat Simulator MMO Simulator, I’m excited. In essence, this game is basically a satire within a satire – the core goat simulator game is there, but now there have been MMO aspects thrown in as well. Let that sink in over this trailer:

Obviously, the most ironic part of this all is that Goat Simulator MMO Simulator is a simulated MMO i.e. it’s a single player game with no online interaction. Even so, you’ll be able to choose your character from five classes including Warrior, Rogue, Magician, Hunter and Microwave (because logic) and work your way up to the level cap of 101. No doubt this is one for the fans of the Goat Simulator series, and for that honour you’ll need to pay $4.99 USD – if that sounds like a journey you’re ready to embark on with your non-online MMO imaginary friends, then hit the Play Store link below:


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What do you think about Goat Simulator MMO Simulator? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Android Police

The post Goat Simulator MMO Simulator is just about as bizarre as it sounds, and that’s good appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

4
Sep

Epson Moverio BT-200 smart glasses review


Although it seems like it has been a long time coming, we are just on the cusp of a new era for Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). If you have read my article on what is virtual reality, you will know that the industry has gone through some good times and some bad times. Augmented Reality is a cousin of Virtual Reality. Both involve some form of viewing gear (headsets, visors, glasses, etc.) and both need lots of processing power to project images before your eyes. However, the big difference between VR and AR is that VR wants to completely create the world that you see, whereas AR wants to use the real world and add to it.

Probably the most famous (or should that be most infamous) AR product of recent times was Google Glass. But Google isn’t the only company researching and developing AR. Another well-known brand which has AR products is Epson. Maybe you know Epson more for its printers and projectors, however there is more to this imaging specialist than meets the eye!

I recently got hold of a set of Moverio smart glasses from Epson. Specifically, I have the BT-200 glasses, which consist of a set of glasses along with an Android-based control unit. I have been testing them out and this is what I discovered.

Moverio-BT-200-05

Design

The BT-200s are a full set of smart glasses with tiny projectors for both the left and the right eyes. However unlike a VR headset, the rest of the viewing area is transparent which means you can walk around and perform tasks aided by the glasses. Coming out of one side is a cable which connects to the control unit. This box, which is about the size of a smartphone, provides all the computing power, as well as a touch pad for controlling the glasses and connectivity like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Half way along the cable is a small clip and a headphone socket.

Moverio-BT-200-13

The control unit is similar to a smartphone (without the SIM card and telephone bits) but the display has been removed (but not the touch sensitive surface) and replaced by the glasses. Inside the box is a Texas Instruments OMAP 4460 dual-core Cortex-A9 based processor running at 1.2Ghz. There is also 1 GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage. If you need more space then you can use the microSD slot to add more, up to 32GB.

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The glasses weigh around 88g, which is much heavier than a normal pair of glasses, however the weight isn’t prohibitive. You can wear them comfortably for about two hours, only then do they start to feel like a burden. The optics are first class. The little projectors display an image which appears to be about 80 inches at 5 m or 320 inches at 20 m. The way the optics have been designed give the impression that you are looking at a large screen TV or monitor a few meters in front of you. Because of these perceived distance, and because of the quality of Epson’s projectors, my eyes never got tired from looking at the display. No headaches, no neck aches. It was a pleasure.

Android

The unit runs Android 4.0.4 which means you can run any API 15 Android app including games, productivity apps and multimedia apps. It is a fairly stock version of Android, this means that it will run unmodified Android apps directly, just as you would on a smartphone or tablet. The track pad on the surface of the control unit is used to control a cursor, almost like a mouse. You move it around with your finger on the pad and then tap for click. The “screen” that is projected by the glasses is in landscape mode but the track pad is used in portrait mode. This is OK and doesn’t really cause any problems except that the width of the track pad is narrow as you have to use the shortest side of the portrait area, rather than using the longest side.

Moverio-BT-200-31

The Moverio BT-200 smart glasses don’t come with Google play support, so any “normal” apps you want to download need to be either side-loaded or installed via a third party app store. For my testing I installed Amazon’s appstore and I was able to find and install many popular apps without any trouble.

For app developers there is also a Moverio SDK which provides a library that allows Android Apps to control the BT-200’s display, audio and sensors. For Moverio specific apps Epson has its own ecosystem and an appstore, the Moverio Apps Market.

bt-200-moverio-app-market

It would be nice if the Android version was higher, not because there is any functionality missing, but because it might give access to some more interesting content, like Google Cardboard or other VR/AR projects which are built on later versions of the OS.

Usage

The old adage goes that hardware is useless without software, and that also applies to the BT-200. Thankfully there is quite a bit of interesting app development going on for these smart glasses.

Having used the glasses for a while I can safely say that they work very well with just normal Android apps and games. I downloaded the Dolphin web browser and Angry Birds and both worked without any problems, with the minor exception that the intro for the Dolphin Browser is in portrait mode, however once you have dealt with that it switches to landscape. The only apps that don’t work are those that must be used in portrait. For example I downloaded Temple Run, and as a portrait only game it just isn’t playable.

Browsing the web is an interesting experience. If you are loading pages with lots of text then smart glasses really aren’t the best medium. However if you are looking at media rich pages, like photo galleries, then the smart glasses work well. Typing in URLs and search terms can be tedious as to use the on-screen keyboard you need to move the cursor to the desire key then tap, then move again and so on. Since there are no Google services there is no YouTube app. However YouTube worked as expected from within the Dolphin browser.

Watching a movie or browsing your photo collection is quite fun on BT-200s and the device supports apps like Netflix, however you can also do all that on VR headsets. The real power can be found in AR. Epson kindly pre-loaded my review unit with some example AR apps, which demonstrate what is possible.

bt-200-camera-sample-1

The glasses include a built-in VGA camera. You can take photos and record video using the standard Android open source camera app. As well as being able to take (low resolution) photos and video, the camera can also be used by apps to “see” what the wearer is seeing. With pattern recognition, and other fancy technologies, apps are able to add layers of new information on top of what the user is actually seeing. The “classic” use case is with trackers. Printed material (usually a unique pattern or code) is recognized by an app and used to display a 3D model or some other image.

bt-200-chest-drain

 

One of the more ambitious demo AR apps is “Visualizing the Future” by  CN2 Technology. It is meant to be used with the WellStar® Atrium Express™ Model 4000 single collection chest drainage system. It displays AR instructions directly over the physical device. The idea is that it provides help and training for users of these medical devices and shows the necessary steps for its successful operation. If you look at the screenshot above you can see that the glasses are projecting a 3D image (with a left eye image and a right eye image), but you will also notice all that black. That is because it is a screenshot taken via the control unit. But to the user all the surrounding area is filled with what you actually see. The screenshots below should help you get the idea.

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You can download the front facing target which is stuck to the front of these devices and experience the AR part without actually owning one of the drainage systems. Since I don’t know much about chest drainage systems I was kind of lost while using the app, but it certainly did show me where to connect the hoses, all in glorious AR.

bt-200-ar-man

One fun game I have for the BT-200 glasses is AR MAN. It is basically a PAC-MAN™ in 3D where you are the PAC-MAN. You are in a maze which you navigate by actually walking and by looking around. There are even ghosts! This is clever because the game uses the sensors in the glasses to detect movement and as a result you don’t need to control your position in the game via the touchpad, you just walk forward. Obviously you need a big open area to play this, but because you can see through the glasses you aren’t walking around blind like you would be with other VR headsets.

The same author (Sean McCracken) also wrote Maelstrom, a VR walking app that allows you to look around a virtual world, while also enabling you to move around in virtual space by actually walking around in real space.

If there is an app which is close to being a killer app for the Moverio glasses, it is the DJI VISION app for use with a DJI Phantom drone. Some of the DJI drones have a camera on them which allows for a live view from the drone. DJI call this First Person View Flying (FPV). The app allows full remote camera control and incorporates things like live telemetry readings. Since you can see through the Moverio glasses then you can watch your drone while flying it, but at the same time receiving telemetry and a live first person view from the drone!

Moverio BT-200 and the Phantom Drone 2 Vision

In terms of non-consumer apps, Epson is seeing lots of interest from businesses. For example, Lockheed is using the BT-200 smart glasses to instruct engineers about how to build and repair F-35 fighter jets! According to a very interesting article by Popular Mechanics, when a glasses-wearing engineer is installing a brake component on the landing gear, they look at the wheel and the Moverio glasses show renderings of every bolt and cable, with the part numbers and ordered instructions showing where each part fits.

lockheed-bt200-smart-glasses

Another interesting area is that of remote support, “you see what I see.” Imagine a situation where someone needs some remote technical support. Normal telephone support only goes so far. If you have used a service like TeamViewer to help someone do something on their PC, now imagine a system, where you can see what the other person is seeing through their BT-200 glasses. But more than that, you can interact with their display by adding arrows, circles, and text so that you can guide them in a repair. It is a quite an interesting concept and you can find out more from companies like Scope AR or APX Labs.

The list of potential usages is in fact very long. Another favorite of mine is the use of augmented reality by pilots flying planes. A company called Aero Glass has an app for the BT-200 smart glasses which help pilots to properly visualize terrain, navigation, traffic, instruments, weather, and airspace information.

bt-200-aero-glass2

 

Wrap-up

Overall I am impressed with the potential of these smart glasses. This is still very much a project in the “developer edition” phase. It isn’t ready for the consumer mainstream, however if you or your company are looking for AR solutions then the Moverio might just be the platform you are looking for.

As with some many areas of innovation, the key to success will be finding a killer application. At the moment the BT-200s are interesting, even inspiring, but not yet essential, unless you own a drone that is! However, as this tech develops we will certainly see lots of new ideas and interesting ways to use AR.

Epson’s original BT-100 smart glasses were released in early 2012 and weighed 220g. Two and a bit years later Epson released the BT-200 smart glasses, now weighing just 88g. If Epson maintains the same release cycle then we can expect the BT-300 smart glasses to appear in late 2016, maybe early 2017. If the company manages to cut down the weight even further, add a 2MP or 5MP camera, and use a newer version of Android, then what is currently a device for businesses, developers and drone enthusiasts, could become a must-have consumer product. But in the mean time, if you own a DJI drone then go get a pair of BT-200 smart glasses, similarly if you want to develop VR and AR apps then you need to seriously look at this platform. The BT-200 glasses are currently available for $699.99 from Amazon.

Buy from Amazon

4
Sep

Unannounced Motorola Moto X Force pops up in some leaked photos



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Motorola has released a number of great handsets in the last few weeks – the Moto X Style and Moto X Play to name a few. However, it doesn’t appear that Motorola is done announcing devices, even if they aren’t saying anything – a new leak has emerged today of another device in the pipeline, the Motorola Moto X Force. Obviously sharing the design language of the Moto X line of smartphones, there is one key difference of the Moto X Force shown in today’s photo and that is there doesn’t appear to be a bottom speaker grille, or at least, it appears to be split. The leading theory at the moment is that there is a fingerprint scanner hidden in that spot, which makes a lot of sense since Motorola’s other smartphones don’t have this feature.


http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsThat’s not all the information we have either – according to the rumours, the Moto X Force will be powered by a Snapdragon 810, with a 5.4-inch Quad HD display, 3GB RAM, 32GB or 64GB RAM, 21MP rear camera and 3,760mAh battery. That’s quite the device, though we have no idea when or if the device will be announced – for now, all we can do is take this news with a grain of salt.

What do you think about the Motorola Moto X Force? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Twitter via Phone Arena

The post Unannounced Motorola Moto X Force pops up in some leaked photos appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

4
Sep

Unannounced Motorola Moto X Force pops up in some leaked photos



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Motorola has released a number of great handsets in the last few weeks – the Moto X Style and Moto X Play to name a few. However, it doesn’t appear that Motorola is done announcing devices, even if they aren’t saying anything – a new leak has emerged today of another device in the pipeline, the Motorola Moto X Force. Obviously sharing the design language of the Moto X line of smartphones, there is one key difference of the Moto X Force shown in today’s photo and that is there doesn’t appear to be a bottom speaker grille, or at least, it appears to be split. The leading theory at the moment is that there is a fingerprint scanner hidden in that spot, which makes a lot of sense since Motorola’s other smartphones don’t have this feature.


http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsThat’s not all the information we have either – according to the rumours, the Moto X Force will be powered by a Snapdragon 810, with a 5.4-inch Quad HD display, 3GB RAM, 32GB or 64GB RAM, 21MP rear camera and 3,760mAh battery. That’s quite the device, though we have no idea when or if the device will be announced – for now, all we can do is take this news with a grain of salt.

What do you think about the Motorola Moto X Force? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Twitter via Phone Arena

The post Unannounced Motorola Moto X Force pops up in some leaked photos appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

4
Sep

Runtastic launches fitness-tracking Moment wrist watch


Runtastic Moment

Runtastic, an Austrian fitness company, has just launched a new fitness-tracker named the Runtasic Moment. However, unlike your common wearable, the Moment doesn’t have a display but an analog watch face, just like that Sony Wena watch.

As you would expect from a fitness oriented product, the Moment features a variety of sensors to help track various statistics. It doesn’t have a heart rate monitor, but the smartwatch can keep track of your steps taken, calories burned, minutes active and monitors your sleep patterns. The watch also features a vibrator motor to bring to attention to alerts. The Moment connects up to Runtastic’s fitness software via Bluetooth, which stores all of your fitness data over time.

As well as the analog watch face, the battery life is also quite a bit different to what we’re used to with a typical fitness tracker. Runstastic states that the watch should be able to last for around 6 months on a regular coin sized battery. The Moment is also waterproof up to 300 feet (100m), so makes a handy swimming companion.

Runtastic Moment models

The Runtastic Moment comes in four different models at two price points. The Moment Elite and Classic are the two more expensive options at $180/€199.00 each. The Classic comes with a black leather band and is available in your choice of silver, gold and rose. The Moment Basic and Fun are cheaper at $130/€129.00 apiece. The basic comes in a Stainless steel case, while the Fun is built from Aluminium but can be found in a range of colors.

The Moment is available to purchase directly from the Runtastic website, although demand currently means that shipping times may be delayed by 3 to 6 weeks.

Runtastic was recently acquired by Adidas at a cost of $239 million. Adidas is looking to grab a bigger share of the fitness tracker market in order to catch up with rivals such as Nike.

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