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Posts tagged ‘Motorola’

26
May

Motorola slashes $100 off the price of the Moto 360


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Earlier today, Motorola lowered the cost of the Moto 360 by $100 on its website, so you can now pick one up for $149. This move strengthens rumors that the company is almost ready to launch its second-generation smartwatch.

The Moto 360 isn’t old hat by any means, though. It’s still one of the best and most reliable wearables currently on the market and is set to receive the Android 5.1.1 update in the coming weeks, which will transport a bunch of new features to the device.

If you’re in the market for a Moto 360 and want to bag yourself one for the reduced price of $149, hit the source link below.

Source: Motorola

Come comment on this article: Motorola slashes $100 off the price of the Moto 360

26
May

Best budget smartphones under $200 (summer 2015)


Just a few years ago it was near impossible to find a capable smartphone for a decent price. Most of the high-end offerings used to cost anywhere from $600 to $900, and most low-end devices were somewhataffordable, though they couldn’t keep up with simple day-to-day tasks. Luckily a few manufacturers have made great strides in the budget-friendly market, and now it’s easier than ever to find a perfectly capable device for under $200.

In a budget-friendly market that’s increasing rapidly in size, you might find it challenging to find a device that best suits your needs. With that said, let’s take a look at the best budget smartphones for under $200!

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#1 – Asus ZenFone 2

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 The recently-announced Asus ZenFone 2 offers flagship-level specifications, a premium build and a smooth software experience, which is why we name this device the best all-around smartphone you can buy right now for under $200. The device caught headlines when it launched at CES 2015, mainly for it being the first smartphone that came with 4GB of RAM. While that’s certainly an impressive feature, there’s a lot more to the story. In our full review, we took a look at the higher-end model, which features 4GB of RAM, a quad-core 2.3GHz Intel Atom Z3580 processor and 64GB of on-board storage. However, since that model is available for $299, today we’re taking a look at the lower-end option. The base model features a quad-core 1.8GHz Intel Atom Z3560 processor, 2GB of RAM and 16GB of on-board storage.

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It also comes with a vivid 5.5-inch 1080p LCD display, which we understand might be a bit too large for some users. Even so, the phone’s curved design makes one-handed use easier and the rear-mounted volume keys are an excellent departure from the norm. Placed on the very top, the power button can be difficult to reach much of the time, but thankfully the phone supports double tap to wake. And despite the phone’s chassis being made entirely of plastic, it still feels plenty premium. Even though the device only comes with 16GB of internal storage, Asus has provided a microSD card slot for expandable memory – a feature many users have come to appreciate over the past year or so, despite Samsung ditching the port with its latest Galaxy S6 flagship. The ZenFone 2 also has a 13MP rear-facing camera and a 5MP front-facing camera that will take sufficient pictures for most users out there.

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On the software front, the phone ships with Android 5.0 Lollipop running underneath Asus’ ZenUI software overlay, which some users may not like. That said, this most recent build of ZenUI is much-improved over past versions, and many of the UI elements are very similar to “vanilla” Android. Asus has been diligent about updating its devices’ software in a timely fashion over the past few years, so folks who buy this device will probably have a positive software experience for (hopefully) two full years.

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The ZenFone 2 is available for use on AT&T and T-Mobile in the U.S., among many other carriers and markets throughout the world. It also has dual SIM card support, which is a feature we’re always happy to see on low-cost smartphones.

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#2 – Motorola Moto G (2nd Gen.)

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 The followup to the original Moto G holds a lot in common with its predecessor, though in this case, that’s not a bad thing in the slightest. For just $180, Motorola’s Moto G (2nd Gen.) offers its users very impressive specifications, a high-end build and an incredible software experience. For those who think the ZenFone 2 is too big, the Moto G (2nd Gen.) is the next best device. It has a 5.0-inch LCD display with 1280 x 720 resolution, making the device very easy to hold in the hand. Although it doesn’t feel as premium as the ZenFone 2 in terms of build quality, a few features stand out that make this a very well-rounded device.

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Since the overall size of the chassis is much smaller, the power button on the Moto G is much easier to reach than the one on our first pick. Additionally, the front-facing speakers on this device are much louder and clearer than the ZenFone 2’s single rear-facing speaker. Unfortunately, the Moto G isn’t nearly as fast as the Zenfone 2, but it’s still more than capable of handling everyday tasks. The power-efficient quad-core Snapdragon 400 processor clocked at 1.2GHz is enough for basic tasks, but the 1GB of RAM makes the Moto G feel sluggish at times. Luckily, the near-vanilla build of Android helps manage RAM usage pretty well, but it still can be a problem when opening more than a few apps at once. The jump from 1 to 2 GB of RAM is a major one, at least right now, and that’s where I think the Zenfone 2 really has an edge over the Moto G.

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The Moto G also comes with just 8GB of internal storage, though you have the option to add an extra 64GB via the microSD card slot. Also present on this device is an 8MP rear-facing camera and a 2MP front camera, which is nothing to get excited about. The phone also has a non-removable 2070mAh battery, which should be able to get most light users through the day on a single charge.

When purchasing a Motorola device, one thing is for certain – you’ll likely receive timely updates for two full years. Motorola has been very good about updating its devices as of late, and the Moto G (2nd Gen.) is no exception. The phone comes with a near-vanilla build of Android with a few of Motorola’s software enhancements on top. Most Motorola phones feature a great software experience, so we think you’ll be pretty happy with this offering if you’re looking for a simple, functional software experience.

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There is a Moto G variant that supports 4G LTE connectivity, though it will run you more than $200. The model we’re looking at today only supports speeds up to HSPA+, so keep that in mind before you choose this device over the 4G-capable ZenFone 2.

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Buy now on Amazon


#3 – Xiaomi Redmi 2

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Announced January 2015, one of the latest products from Xiaomi continues to surprise us when it comes to specs, build quality and software experience. The Redmi 2 is a great option for folks who want to experience Xiaomi’s MIUI while still maintaining a tight budget. There are two models available, the first of which featuring 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage. While the attractive $150 price point may entice you, we’d wager to say that the higher-end Redmi 2 Pro is more worth your time. Featuring 2GB of RAM and 16GB of internal storage, the Redmi 2 Pro costs around $20 more than the Redmi 2 proper, which may be a good option for those who don’t mind spending a little closer to $200.

Today, though, we’re looking at the $150 Redmi 2, which is surprisingly solid and very comfortable in the hand. It has a 4.7-inch 720p LCD display, with quality coming really close to that of the Moto G and viewing angles being just as good or slightly better than those on the Zenfone 2. The rear-facing speaker on the Redmi 2 seems to be louder than the speakers on both the ZenFone 2 and Moto G, although the Moto G still has the least amount of audio distortion overall.

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On the performance front, the Redmi 2 is just about as fast as (if not faster than) the Moto G, though both devices are still a tad slower than the ZenFone 2. Both the base and pro models of the Redmi 2 have quad-core 1.2GHz Snapdragon 410 processors, which are still perfectly capable CPUs. The Pro model should be faster and much better with multitasking, however, since it has 2GB of RAM compared to the 1GB found on the base model.

You’ll get 8GB of internal storage with the Redmi 2 (16GB with the Pro model) with expandable memory up to 64GB, though MIUI doesn’t allow applications to be moved or installed on the microSD card. This is both a positive and a negative for the end user. On one hand, installing apps externally can free up a ton of space on your device. But much of the time, apps installed on the microSD card can act up, which is obviously something that should be avoided. The Redmi 2’s 8MP rear camera is overall pretty good. Featuring a higher dynamic range than on the ZenFone 2, the Xiaomi offering produces much more noise in low-light environments. It also has a removable 2200mAh battery that should get most users through a full day on a single charge with roughly three hours of screen-on time.The

The Redmi 2’s 8MP rear camera is overall pretty good. Featuring a higher dynamic range than on the ZenFone 2, the Xiaomi offering produces much more noise in low-light environments. It also has a removable 2200mAh battery that should get most users through a full day on a single charge with roughly three hours of screen-on time.

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The Redmi 2 runs Xiaomi’s MIUI V6 atop Android 4.4 KitKat, which will likely turn some users off from this device. MIUI is a pretty heavy Android skin, and it has been criticized for taking some inspiration from a certain fruity tech company, but the experience is truly unique and different compared to vanilla Android. Xiaomi releases occasional updates for the Redmi 2, and if you flash the developer ROM, you can even receive an update every Friday. The company is pretty optimistic with its release timelines, so hopefully we’ll get to see Android 5.0 Lollipop make its way to the device in the coming months. The ZenFone 2 and Moto G are likely to receive Android updates much faster than the Redmi 2, so keep that in mind if quick updates are important to you.

While the Redmi 2 is slightly better than the Moto G overall, availability is a major challenge with this device. You can’t officially buy the phone in the U.S., which means you’ll have to import it. Importing the device won’t get you the standard one-year warranty that many people expect, and the models available for import are not intended for the U.S. market either, meaning that carrier support isn’t always what you may expect.

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The Redmi 2 has dual SIM card support. But unlike the Moto G, which fully supports both AT&T and T-Mobile HSPA+, the Redmi 2 has limited support for U.S. carriers, depending on the specific variant. There is a variant that supports WCDMA 850 / 1900 / 2100MHz, which is fully compatible with AT&T and partially compatible with T-Mobile, depending on your specific coverage area. I wouldn’t recommend buying the Redmi 2 unless you’re on AT&T, and even then, please make sure to confirm that you’re getting the right variant.

I like to think of the Redmi 2 as being the option for users wanting something different – it’s a great phone, but it is difficult to get and carrier support can be complicated.

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Buy now on Amazon


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So, there you have it – our top three picks for the best budget smartphones under $200! We understand that there are dozens of other viable options that fit into this category, but we kept our list exclusive to the phones we thought gave the user the best bang for their buck. What are your thoughts? Do you feel another smartphone should take the top spot? Be sure to let us know in the comment section below!



24
May

[Deal] Grab a Moto 360 for $149.99 from BestBuy


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Earlier today, BestBuy kicked off a brand new deal on all three colorways of the Moto 360. However, unlike any of its other previous promotions, the company has decided to host this one via eBay.

Buying a Moto 360 with this promo saves customers a whopping $100; meaning you can pick one up for $149.99. However, stock is extremely limited — so if you want to get your hands on one, better act fast.

You’ll find the links for each of the colorways below:

Will you be taking advantage of this offer? Let us know below!

 

Come comment on this article: [Deal] Grab a Moto 360 for $149.99 from BestBuy

22
May

Smartphone philosophy: Has Motorola had it right all along?


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In 2013 Motorola began down a very different path from its rivals with the original Moto X, forgoing the spec race in favor of focusing on user experience first and foremost. That meant clean, non-bloated software that had a few meaningful additions but ultimately kept a near-stock look and feel. It also meant more customization options so people could have their phones better express their own style.

A few months later, Motorola switched things up again, this time aiming to reinvent the budget space with the debut of the Moto G. Up until that point, most handsets in the affordable (sub-$250) realm were cheap garbage that made major concessions on hardware, design, software, and more. The Moto G showed you could still provide an excellent Android experience with reasonably solid specs and yet offer a price tag that wouldn’t break the bank for most consumers.

Motorola’s current line-up

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While the Moto X’s sales were somewhat modest during these early days, the Moto G resonated with people and went on to be Motorola’s most successful smartphone to date. Motorola’s bold new vision of user experience over specs continued into 2014, with the Moto E, Moto G (2014), and Moto X (2014). All three of these handsets exemplified the company’s new philosophy, providing user experiences that went beyond just the spec sheet. All three phones were also aggressively priced for their prospective market segments, though more so for the former two devices than the latter.

And now it’s 2015. Motorola is no longer a Google company, and while the Moto E, G, and X lines have their fans, the brand still isn’t necessarily swimming in money, though Motorola continues to work on increasing its mindshare across the globe. Regardless, Motorola’s vision forward has served them well and we imagine they’ll continue down a similar path. One thing that will be different in 2015? More companies are seemingly adopting a”user experience first” approach, both in the flagship and mid-range sector.

2015’s flagships seem to show Motorola has had it right all along

The G4 and S6 feature better optimized software, more design choices (leather, edge, etc)

The G4 and S6 feature better-optimized software, more design choices (leather, edge, etc)

While 2013 saw Motorola as practically the lone force in the Android world when it came to the “user experience first” approach, things slowly started to shift in 2014.

In 2014 we saw devices like the original ZenFone series and several other devices that showed OEMs were starting to understand people expected excellent user experiences and reasonable specs even at the budget end of the market. In the flagship arena, however, Motorola still remained the main voice for those who wanted a solid flagship that favored user experience, a bloat-free easy software experience, and customization over added features, gimmicks, and impressive spec sheets. For what it’s worth, the OnePlus One also took a similar approach with its flagship last year, though limited availability and some customer service issues still held it back to some degree.

It is now 2015, and it seems that OEMs are finally starting to get it: user experience is king. The two biggest examples of how OEMs are starting to get it can be seen in LG and Samsung.

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For Samsung, the Galaxy S6 was an opportunity to re-invent themselves, giving users a more premium flagship and also providing the option of both curved and standard screen models, with aesthetics being the biggest differentiators between the two. Even more important than the design, Samsung worked hard to optimize its software, surprising much of the world by ditching many of its own apps and services to provide the cleanest version of TouchWiz to date. On the downside, it is worth mentioning that Samsung arguably took a step backward by ditching microSD and its removable battery slot — though solid sales show this isn’t a point of contention for everyone.

LG and Samsung 2015 flagships exude many of the same traits that Motorola first attempted popularize with the Moto X

Turning to the LG G4, you’ll find leather and plastic covers in multiple colors make it easier for customers to choose the LG G4 that best represents their style. You’ll also find that LG chose the more modest Snapdragon 808 over the 810, and worked with Qualcomm to optimize this experience so it actually performs smoother than the 810-powered LG G Flex 2. The LG G4 might still have much of the same bloat and added features as before, but user experience has evolved drastically, even if the spec sheet didn’t take a dramatic leap forward. It’s also worth mentioning that while Samsung ditched microSD and battery, LG offered both of these on its G4.

One last shared aspect where both manufacturers improved the user experience was the camera, with both improving the software and hardware to ensure an optimal photo and video taking experience. Curiously enough, that’s one area in user experience where Motorola has been less impressive.

Bottom-line, LG and Samsung 2015 flagships exude many of the same traits that Motorola first attempted popularize with the Moto X, and it is easy to see that they are starting to adopt a “user experience first” philosophy. The seeds of change are here and we suspect it means that Motorola will really have to up its game in this segment. Thankfully, one area where Motorola continues to have an edge is pricing.

It’s not just the flagships, though

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This change in philosophy doesn’t just apply to flagship devices, and can be seen in the mid-range market as well. While there are tons of growing Chinese manufacturers that have been nipping at the Moto E and Moto G’s price/value position for years, many of these devices have either had limited marketing or limited reach. For example, Xiaomi is doing wonderfully in Asia, but has no presence in North America at all (outside of a few accessories). That’s what makes the Asus ZenFone 2 and Alcatel OneTouch Idol 3 so very important; they aren’t just impressive, they are being pushed globally.

Right now you can pick up the base ZenFone 2 for just $200 on Amazon, or an even more exciting yet still aggressively priced model with 4GB RAM for just $300. The Idol 3, on the other hand, is just $250 and offers functionality that falls right in between the ZenFone 2 variants. Pricing on these phones are certainly one way that they stand out, but it’s not just that.

The Idol 3 has been praised by our own Josh Vegera in his full review for its attractive design, high-quality front facing speakers that practically rival the speakers found on flagship HTC phones, a gorgeous 1080p display, reliable performance, and a solid camera that is almost on the level you’d expect from a flagship.

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Lanh had equally nice things to say about the ZenFone 2 in his review, where he equates the mid-range device’s overall user experience to what you’d find on a flagship, particularly noting its bright and vivid screen, excellent build quality, and aggressive price tag.

The Moto E, on the other hand, is still a very nice sub-$150 price tag and specs that are decent for the money, but for just $50 more, the ZenFone 2 arguably offers a much more appealing experience. Of course, it’s the currently unannounced Moto G (2015) that will more directly compete with the ZenFone 2 and Idol 3 in terms of price tag, but it remains seen if Motorola can one up either of these devices when it comes to performance, value, or user experience or specs.

Best entry and mid-rangers

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So is everyone copying Motorola, or was this just a natural progression?

motorola logo mwc 2015 1

If you look hard at where the market is going, it’s easy to see that Motorola was the first to embrace the move towards”user experience first”, as well as the move towards aggressively priced budget devices that still provide a massive punch. But really, this was probably an inevitable shift, and not a case of OEMs following Motorola’s lead.

As the high-end market nearly reaches saturation, it’s only natural that more OEMs focus on the low-end. Additionally, as technology advances, we are finding that adding that extra two cores or extra gig of RAM is having less impact on day to day experience than it did in the days of single and dual-core devices. It also means that pricing for components is driving further down, allowing OEMs to pack quad-core (or even higher) processors into entry-level devices that would have been considered flagship performers only a year or two earlier. All of these combine factors have lead OEMs towards a new direction and ultimately it is the consumer that wins from all of this.

This was probably an inevitable shift, and not a case of OEMs following Motorola’s lead.

But the big question is where Motorola will go next. We speculated on this a bit earlier this month in an article asking what our readers would like to see from the Moto X 2015, but to recap, Motorola will likely continue down the path it has been for its flagship, while hopefully tackling current weaknesses like its camera. We also imagine Motorola could further increase the level of customization that the Moto Maker offers, and could even push price tags down further.

As for the Moto G and Moto E lines? With a big giant like Lenovo behind Motorola these days, we imagine the visions for these products will remain largely the same as well, though here’s hoping price will continue to drop, specs will continue to push the limits, and perhaps some more of the Moto X’s customizable nature will bleed over to these lines.

What do you think, will Motorola find 2015 to be a harder year now that more manufacturers are seemingly taking a similar approach to it when it comes to smartphone philosophy?

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What do you think of the “user experience first” philosophy, and do you agree that 2015 is the year that more OEMs seem to be getting on this train?

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22
May

Moto G (1st Gen) will start receiving Android 5.0.2 Lollipop


It has been a long time coming for Motorola’s Moto G (1st Gen). After Motorola has promised prompt updates and nearly a half a year after Android Lollipop was released to the masses, the original Moto G will start to receive the latest (sort of) version of Android. That means it will get all that comes along with Material Design.

The update has officially started hitting the airwaves, so it will hit devices in stages. If you haven’t received it yet, it will come, it just takes time. If you are curious as to what it will bring to your device, the main things are Material Design, updated notifications, re-designed recent apps, and many other features. If you would like to take a look at the full changelog, you can do so here.

It’s good to see they are completely skipping Android 5.0/5.0.1, but it would have been nice to see them jump to Android 5.1. If you have a Motorola Moto G (1st Gen), be sure to let us know if you have received the Lollipop goodness. Below are the instructions on how to install it on your Moto G if you have or haven’t received the OTA notification.

INSTRUCTIONS

For a successful installation, we recommend installing this update when the battery in your phone is at least 50% charged and you are connected to a Wi-Fi network.
If you have received a notification message for this update:

  1. Select “Yes, I’m in”.
  2. After the software is downloaded, select “Install now”.
  3. After the software is installed, your phone will re-start automatically.
  4. Your phone is now updated.

If you have not received a notification message for this update, follow the steps below to manually update your phone:

  1. Select the Settings icon in the apps menu.
  2. Select “About phone”.
  3. Select “System updates”.
  4. Select “Yes, I’m in”. After the software is downloaded, select “Install now”.
  5. After the software is installed, your phone will re-start automatically.
  6. Your phone is now updated.

Source

The post Moto G (1st Gen) will start receiving Android 5.0.2 Lollipop appeared first on AndroidGuys.

21
May

Lenovo sold 60 million PCs in a year, but probably won’t again


HONG KONG-CHINA-COMPANY-LENOVO

Lenovo’s basement full of accountants has released the company’s financial report for the last 12 months, and it’s all smiles and dollar signs. After all, it increased the cash coming in through the front door, spent big to buy buy Motorola and IBM’s server business and still made a $100 million quarterly profit. Even better, the outfit has now been the world’s largest PC maker for two straight years, selling 60 million computers in the last 12 months alone.

As TechCrunch reports, there are, however, some murky clouds that are gathering on the horizon. Lenovo itself attributes the diminished profits to merger costs and exchange-rate hiccups, but the company’s profits also dipped in 2014. Part of this is because the PC market is beginning to shrink as users switch to smartphones and tablets and businesses stop upgrading their machines beyond Windows XP.

Lenovo’s trying to make hay while the sun shines, using its cash reserves to boost its phone and server businesses and move beyond PCs. Instead, it’s aiming to become a “hardware and software services” firm, ironically mirroring a similar move that IBM made when it sold its PC businesses to Lenovo in the first place. Although, we imagine, that with the tighter margins and fiercer competition between phone makers, we could see those profit figures fall a little further yet.

[Image Credit: AFP/Getty]

Filed under: Cellphones, Desktops, Laptops, Tablets, Lenovo

Comments

Via: TechCrunch

Source: Lenovo (Businesswire)

21
May

Lenovo shipped 18.7 million smartphones in Q4 ’14, a new company best


lenovo motorola logo mwc 2015 4

Lenovo has just released its financial report for Q4 2014 and last year, and it’s a bit of a mixed bag for the Chinese technology company. Sales records were broken last quarter, but profit levels have been up and down.

The company acquired Motorola last year and the latest data includes combined sales of both brands. This has helped the company breach its previous sales figures, resulting in 18.7 million smartphones shipped in Q4. From the total, 7.8 million smartphones came from Motorola. For the entire year, Lenovo states that it has shipped 76 million smartphones, another record for the company, which brought in around $9.14 billion in revenue for the year and $2.8 billion for the quarter.

PC sales were also up despite the overall decline in global sales, reaching a record 60 million units for the financial year. It’s impressive that the company’s smartphone sales have now eclipsed its industry leading PC business.

Despite the positive sales, Lenovo saw its quarterly profit decline by a substantial 37 percent in Q4.

Despite the positive sales, Lenovo saw its quarterly profit decline by a substantial 37 percent in Q4. Annually, the company saw its net profit rise by a single percent to $829 million, which fell short of analyst expectations.

However, this can be accounted for by Lenovo’s expensive acquisitions of IBM’s low-end server unit and Motorola, which cost $2.1 billion and $2.9 billion respectively. Motorola, which Lenovo purchased in late 2014, has not turned a profit quite yet, but is expected to return to profit by mid-2016.

“In view of the opportunities and challenges of the new Internet+ era, we are ready to transform ourselves from making mostly hardware to a combination of hardware and software services,” – Lenovo CEO Yang Yuanqing

The company may also be showing signs of suffering from the slowdown in China’s mobile market. China, which is Lenovo’s largest single market, is showing signs of saturation, as shipments reportedly declined by 4.3 percent in the last quarter.

Lenovo appears to be hedging its position against the saturated PC market. The acquisition of Motorola and an IBM unit suggests that the company sees further potential in the smartphone and enterprise markets, and not necessarily just in terms of hardware.

More on Lenovo products:

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21
May

Motorola confirms mid-June for Droid Turbo Lollipop update, then pulls post


DROID_Turbo_Back_TAWe have good news and bad news for Droid Turbo owners. Earlier today, Motorola confirmed a mid-June release date for the Lollipop update on the device. However, not long after that post on Google+, it was deleted and is no longer accessible.

If the post was accurate, then we’re barely a month away from Lollipop rolling out to devices, but having it deleted so quickly could mean many things. Maybe Moto jumped the gun and made the announcement before they were sure that they could hit their target launch date, or maybe they found some crippling issues that are going to push it back even further.

As of right now, there’s no word from Motorola or Verizon on what the situation looks like, so we’ll just have to keep an ear out for any more news related to the Turbo. However it goes, we’ll know one way or the other in a month.

source: Google+

Come comment on this article: Motorola confirms mid-June for Droid Turbo Lollipop update, then pulls post

21
May

Deal: Moto G (1st Gen.) for Verizon on sale for just $19.99 at Best Buy


Motorola G Hands On AA  (1 of 17)

Offering users a smooth Android experience without breaking the bank, the Moto G (1st Gen.) quickly became one of Motorola’s best selling smartphones of all time. The 2013 model is still a completely capable smartphone, and right now, you can pick one up for an extremely cheap price point. Best Buy is currently selling the Verizon prepaid Motorola Moto G in Black for just $19.99.

It should be noted that since this is the Verizon version, the phone only comes with 3G connectivity, no LTE. Even so, this device is usually sold for the already low price of $40, making this quite the steal.

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For those who need a refresher, the original Moto G comes with a 4.5-inch 720p LCD display, a 1.2GHz quad-core Snapdragon 400 processor, 1GB of RAM, a 5MP rear-facing camera and a 1.3MP front-facing camera. It also has a non-removable 2070mAh battery and runs Android 5.0 Lollipop.

We’re not sure how long this deal will last, so be sure to head to the link below to pick one up before your time runs out!

Get this deal now



20
May

Motorola Camera receives manual exposure control in newest update


new moto x first look aa (9 of 21)

Motorola has just pushed out an update to its Motorola Camera application in the Google Play Store that brings manual exposure control. Changing exposure on the fly is easy and helps produce much clearer photos. To lighten or darken your photo, make sure that your camera app is in tap-to-focus mode, then simply drag the slider on the screen left or right to add or take away light. The Moto X’s camera certainly isn’t the greatest on the market, so perhaps the addition of manual exposure controls will help out a little.

Motorola Camera update

Motorola has also included a few bug fixes along with this update, which is always nice to see. The update is now live in the Play Store, so be sure to head to the link below to grab the latest version if you’re the owner of a Motorola device.

Get it on Google Play

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