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Posts tagged ‘Lenovo’

16
Apr
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Lenovo Yoga 10 Review


lenovo-tablet-yoga-10-front-side-modes-1

Lenovo‘s Yoga series has made a name for themselves in the industry pushing the boundaries of shape, form factor and all around physical features in mobile computing. The Lenovo Yoga tablet stays true to its name in pioneering something completely new in an Android tablet.

Hardware

Probably the most notable hardware of any Android powered tablet I’ve seen to date, when held in portrait mode one side on the device is slim as a razor, and the other side has a 3/4 inch thick round “handle” of sorts the length of the device. This serves the multiple purposes of giving you something substantial to grasp while using the tablet one-handed, and housing the tablet’s kick-stand.

At the top of the thick edge is a large, circular power button, balancing the 3.5 mm headphone jack on the bottom. The kickstand takes up almost the entire edge starting an inch from the top and bottom. To extend the kickstand you must grasp the edge tightly and begin to twist toward the screen. Beneath the kickstand on the back is the micro SD slot toward the bottom and the factory information sticker at the top.

The front of the device is a black slate aside from the rounded silver handle at the top and bottom of which the Dolby speakers are located. The MicroUSB charging port is at the top to the right of the power/sleep button opposite of the volume rocker which resides beside the headphone jack.

Software

The device’s launcher does not have an app-drawer, which can become an issue if you install upwards of 100 apps as it can start to look rather messy. But that’s what launcher replacements are for. Lenovo has implemented a “smart side bar” which offers quick access to apps like books, gallery and some of the recently used applications, however it is only accessible from the home-screen, so if you utilize the device’s stock launcher, all of those things would be immediately available anyway.

yoga 10 homescreen

yoga 10 side bar

The performance is sub-par, but if you’re interested in purchasing one to use as an ebook reader, I would encourage that. The screen has good brightness and visibility even in direct light, and the software offers several options to accommodate using the device in “tilt, stand, and hold” modes. However any usage much more taxing on the processor than that would be out of the question. Even playing Words With Friends at times proved to be too much for this little guy.

Probably the best feature of this tablet is the bragged 18 hour battery life. With somewhat light use, I pushed the battery over 2 weeks without charging it. If battery life is more important to you than hardcore performance or high-end specs, at an MSRP of $299, this tablet is definitely worth considering.

The post Lenovo Yoga 10 Review appeared first on AndroidGuys.

16
Apr
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Lenovo’s banking on motion control and Flex-able laptops with latest releases


Motion control hasn’t outmoded the mouse and keyboard yet, but it is finding its way into more and more consumer products. Take Lenovo’s upcoming A540 all-in-one desktop, for instance: its one of a handful of the company’s products to feature Lenovo Motion Control, a 12-gesture collection of hands-free (well, hand waving) media controls. The $1,279.99 machine is built specifically with families in mind, featuring a 23.8-inch 1,920 x 1,080 touchscreen, NVIDIA GeForce GT 840A graphics, an Intel Core i7 CPU and an aluminum frame that tapers down to 4 millimeters at its thinnest point.

Lenovo is refreshing its laptop line-up too, including two new models for its Flex family of convertible notebooks. The 14 and 15.6-inch Flex 2 laptops feature the same 300-degree hinge we saw in the Yoga, Yoga 2 and ThinkPad Yoga – allowing them to bend over backwards into a makeshift (and rather large) tablet. The machines are fairly customizable too, and are available in both Intel Core i7 / NVIDIA GeForce or AMD APU and Radeon GPU configurations. The 14 and 15.6-inch Flex 2 convertibles will be available this June for $429 and $799, respectively.

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16
Apr
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Lenovo’s banking on motion control and Flex-able laptops with latest releases


Motion control hasn’t outmoded the mouse and keyboard yet, but it is finding its way into more and more consumer products. Take Lenovo’s upcoming A540 all-in-one desktop, for instance: its one of a handful of the company’s products to feature Lenovo Motion Control, a 12-gesture collection of hands-free (well, hand waving) media controls. The $1,279.99 machine is built specifically with families in mind, featuring a 23.8-inch 1,920 x 1,080 touchscreen, NVIDIA GeForce GT 840A graphics, an Intel Core i7 CPU and an aluminum frame that tapers down to 4 millimeters at its thinnest point.

Lenovo is refreshing its laptop line-up too, including two new models for its Flex family of convertible notebooks. The 14 and 15.6-inch Flex 2 laptops feature the same 300-degree hinge we saw in the Yoga, Yoga 2 and ThinkPad Yoga – allowing them to bend over backwards into a makeshift (and rather large) tablet. The machines are fairly customizable too, and are available in both Intel Core i7 / NVIDIA GeForce or AMD APU and Radeon GPU configurations. The 14 and 15.6-inch Flex 2 convertibles will be available this June for $429 and $799, respectively.

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11
Apr
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Daily Roundup: Getting to know Xbox’s Phil Spencer, Nintendo’s rarest game and more!


You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours — all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

Google will protect your phone by looking for sketchy apps you’ve already installed

Google has been alerting users when downloading apps of questionable origin for some time. But now the company’s taking its security a step further by checking up on your apps after you’ve already installed them.

Getting to know Microsoft’s new Xbox lead, Phil Spencer

There’s a new sheriff in Xbox town, and his name is Phil Spencer. While most of us know him as the E3 guy who speaks about games during Microsoft’s keynote, Spencer is a longtime Redmond employee who worked his way up from the bottom.

Facebook is trying to save you from embarrassing posts

In an effort to keep you on top of your privacy settings, Facebook’s giving its existing controls more visibility. By rolling out a new “Privacy Checkup” box in the near future, the company hopes people will become more aware of their sharing habits.

Play Nintendo’s rarest game on your Wii U

Back in the 90s, Nintendo released 90 copies of a three-part, competitive play cartridge called Nintendo World Championships. In the spirit of nostalgia, the company’s adding said game into its next iteration of NES Remix for the Wii U.

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10
Apr
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Lenovo’s new kid’s laptop has a folding, Yoga-like screen (and there’s a Chrome OS version too)


SONY DSC

Here’s how you unveil a product and make sure no one hears about it: bury the news in a press release the same day you announce you’re buying an iconic tech company for $3 billion. That’s right: everyone was so busy pontificating on whether Lenovo would ruin Motorola, that barely anyone noticed the company had also announced a kid’s laptop. Well, we just had a chance to get hands-on with the new ThinkPad 11e ahead of its release, and while we might not normally care about kiddie PCs anyway, a few things stick out here. First off, although this is actually a collection of four different laptops, with two running Windows and two based on Chrome OS. Kind of a peculiar strategy when you think about it: how often do we get that kind of choice on the same machine? Secondly, Lenovo’s offering two form factors: a traditional non-touch notebook, and another with a touchscreen that folds back into a quasi-tablet mode. Yep, it’s basically a wee little Yoga, except it bends back 300 degrees, not 360. And, you know, it potentially runs Chrome OS. Now you see why we’re so intrigued, right? You grown-ups probably want one too.

But wait, there’s one other thing you should know, and unfortunately, this is probably where we’re going to lose some of you adults. As crazy as it sounds, this is actually the first ThinkPad that doesn’t have that classic red TrackPoint in the middle of the keyboard. “What kind of sorcery is this?” you ask. Chalk it up to kids having atrocious motor skills. According to a Lenovo rep, the company was getting complaints from schools about kids ripping out those little red dots on the last-gen X131e Chromebook. Which is silly because they apparently feel more comfortable using the touchpad anyway. So, to spare teachers the repair cost, Lenovo nixed the TrackPoint on the new 11e, and also retooled the keyboard so that there’s less space between the keys and their sockets (read: curious little children will now have a harder time wedging crap inside there).

Spec-wise, you’re looking at a quad-core, Celeron-based Bay Trail processor, with a 16GB solid-state drive on the Chromebooks, and a choice of HDDs and SSDs on the Windows model. Look for the Windows machines to arrive later this month, priced at $449 for the regular notebook, and $549 for the Yoga-like one. Meanwhile, the Chromebooks will ship in late May or early June, with the laptop retailing for $349 and the convertible priced at $429.

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10
Apr
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Death of Windows XP can’t quite reverse slowing PC sales


Microsoft Delays Next Version Of Windows Until 2007

The official end to Windows XP support may have sent many companies into a panic, but it was good news for PC manufacturers this winter… well, sort of. Both Gartner and IDC report a big increase in PC shipments during the first quarter thanks to companies scrambling to replace old XP computers at the last possible moment. However, the two analyst groups note that the sudden spike only managed to soften ongoing declines in PC shipments, rather than reverse them. Depending on which research firm you ask, the number of PCs on the market dropped between 1.7 percent to 4.4 percent year-over-year. That’s better than what system builders have seen over most of the past two years, but it’s not exactly a recovery.

As for the companies that came out on top, it’s a familiar story. Market share gains largely went to major players like Lenovo, Dell and HP, while the biggest blows came to a long-suffering Acer as well as small vendors. What happens next is less than certain, though. Gartner believes that the tablet boom isn’t hurting PCs as much as it used to, and expects upgrades from XP to help shipments over the course of 2014. IDC, meanwhile, isn’t so optimistic. Although the outfit sees the tablet market slowing down as it matures, it’s not anticipating a turnaround for computers any time soon.

[Image credit: AFP/Getty Images]

Gartner's worldwide PC market share estimates for Q1 2014

Gartner's estimates for PC market share in the US during Q1 2014

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Source: Gartner, IDC

10
Apr
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Lenovo Announces New A-Series Android Tablets with May Launch


Lenovo

With the budget-conscious in mind, Lenovo has announced a new trifecta of android tablets focused on work and play.  These A-Series tablets, as Lenovo VP Shao Tao puts it, “is designed to meet the demands of today’s young, active users who are always on the go, and have lifestyle requirements that are as diverse as their own personalities.”

Pricing starts out low, but there is a good reason for that.  Starting at $129, these tablets don’ t come off as top spec’ed powerhouses.  The specs are modest at best with MediaTek quad-core processors and 1GB of RAM under the hood.  The tablets’ will also sport 4.2 JellyBean at launch.  Rounding out the specifications is 16GB of onboard storage, front and rear cameras and 1280X800 displays.

The new Lenovo tablets will debut in May and come in the 7, 8, and 10 inch varieties with the 7 inch tablet focused on reading and web surfing, the 8 inch dedicated to media consumption, and the 10 inch designed for work and relaxation.

Lenovo, ZDNet

The post Lenovo Announces New A-Series Android Tablets with May Launch appeared first on AndroidGuys.

10
Apr
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Under Lenovo, Motorola picks a new but familiar leader


Motorola President Rick Osterloh

Motorola may have had to shuffle executives following Lenovo’s acquisition plans, but the phone maker isn’t straying far from its previous course. It just named company veteran Rick Osterloh as its President and COO, effective immediately. He’ll provide the “business continuity” that Motorola needs right now, according to outgoing leader Jonathan Rosenberg.

Recent history suggests as much. While many focused on ex-CEO Dennis Woodside as the face of the Google-era Motorola, Osterloh led product development during that period — he can take at least some credit for attention-getting projects like the Moto X and Moto 360. He’s also responsible for getting the ball rolling on Android at the company, having created the team that launched early efforts like the CLIQ and Droid.

There isn’t much in his background outside of Motorola to hint at a break from existing strategy. Beyond his most recent stint, Osterloh is best known for leading product management at Skype at a time when its mobile clients were becoming important. He also performed a similar role at Good Technology, a pioneer in enterprise smartphone use that Motorola bought in 2006 and sold three years later after getting little out of the deal. A brief position at Amazon in 1999 isn’t likely to have much influence given how much Amazon has changed since its storefront-only days.

Really, Osterloh has already been doing what you’d expect him to do in his new position: releasing products that revolve around strong mobile software. We wouldn’t rule out a change in strategy in the long term, especially since Motorola has been bleeding cash. For now, though, Osterloh’s appointment shows that the company is satisfied with how its recent devices have panned out — and it’s betting that you feel the same way.

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Source: Official Motorola Blog

2
Apr
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Intel aims at China with its speedy LTE Cat 6 solution, shipping in Q2 this year


Marking Intel’s 29th year in China, CEO Brian Krzanich took the stage at IDF Shenzhen with a little surprise: his company will be shipping its first Cat 6 multi-mode LTE solution, the XMM 7260, in Q2 this year. This follows the XMM 7160 that started shipping with Cat 4 LTE and half the number of basebands last October. The new solution has added support for China’s popular TD-SCDMA plus TD-LTE networks, along with the usual 2G GSM, WCDMA plus FDD-LTE around the world. With Cat 6 LTE’s carrier aggregation mode, the XMM 7260 can reach a top theoretical speed of 300Mbps, which is twice that of Cat 4 LTE.

There’s no word on who will be shipping the first mobile devices featuring Intel’s speedy modem, but Krzanich did use a development device to make a live Skype video call over LTE with Lenovo’s CEO Yang Yuanqing in Hong Kong, so we’ll take that as a hint. But of course, this doesn’t mean that Lenovo will be ditching its good friend MediaTek, who will be catching up with its own LTE solution very soon.

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2
Apr
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Lenovo’s latest budget Android tablets focus on high-quality audio


Lenovo Tab A8-50 tablet

If Samsung’s new Galaxy Tabs aren’t your cup of tea, Lenovo may have the budget tablets you’re looking for. It just unveiled four entry-level Android slates that expand on the sound quality focus we saw in last year’s models. The Tab A7-30, A7-50, A8 and A10 all have Dolby audio that should improve your small-screen movie experience. They also have “responsive” (if unnamed) quad-core processors, too. You’re mostly choosing devices based on screen sizes. The A7-30 has a basic 7-inch display and optional cellular support, while the A7-50 jumps to HD and throws in a 2-megapixel front camera; move to the A8 and you’ll get an 8-inch panel, while the A10 includes (you guessed it) a 10-inch display. Lenovo plans to ship the new Tab A-series worldwide in the second quarter of the year, with UK prices ranging from a frugal £100 ($166) for an A7-30 to a still quite affordable £170 ($283) for an A10. There’s no mention of a US launch for the new A-series so far, but we’ve reached out for more details. We’ll let you know if these starter tablets reach American shores.

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