Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘iPhone’

5
Jul

Apple Pay reportedly reaches the UK on July 14th


Apple Pay UK's initial partners

Irked that Apple Pay is only officially slated to reach the UK sometime in July? Don’t worry — you might not have to wait all month to see it. Multiple retailer leaks at 9to5Mac point to Apple launching its iPhone tap-to-pay service in Old Blighty on July 14th, or soon enough that you can likely use it if you’re off to one of the country’s many summer music festivals. Just don’t expect to splurge on more than a quick bite to eat while you’re out. That £20 (soon to be £30) contactless payment cap seriously limits how much you can spend, so the British implementation won’t be quite as convenient as it is for Americans.

Filed under: , , ,

Comments

Source: 9to5Mac

2
Jul

Leak hints the next iPhone might record 4K video


An iPhone 6

Tired of recording ‘just’ 1080p video on your iPhone while your friends produce clips in glorious 4K? You won’t have to look on with envy for much longer, if the latest rumors are on the mark. A tipster on China’s Sina Weibo has posted what appear to be leaked details of the next iPhone’s rear camera, and it’ll reportedly jump to 12 megapixels with 4K video recording. There’s no guarantee that this is in the cards, but it jives with earlier claims that Apple’s future handset will focus on camera upgrades. You’re not likely to see design changes, if 9to5Mac‘s photos are accurate, so photographic improvements like this will likely be more important this time around.

Of course, the real question is whether or not 4K capture will matter much in practice. There are many more 4K TVs these days, as well as a 5K iMac, but they’re all pretty expensive — it’s still hard to find a place to play those Ultra HD videos in full detail. The gobs of storage necessary for 4K also limit how much you can record at a time. With that said, there are signs that Apple is working on a relatively cheap 4K iMac and otherwise pushing for higher-res content. If the iPhone is jumping to 4K movie-making, this year seems like a prime opportunity.

Photo by Will Lipman.

Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile, Apple

Comments

Via: SlashGear

Source: Sogi (translated)

2
Jul

CoolStream Duo Bluetooth receiver review


One of the hardest things about switching to an Android phone from an iPhone is that you’ve already invested so much into the apps and accessories, and switching to Android means having to start over. The Coolstream Duo alleviates a little of that pain, by allowing you to connect to iOS centric devices via Bluetooth.

Coolstream Duo overview

The device itself features a 30 pin iPod/iPhone connector, a 3.5mm headphone jack, an internal battery, and an on/off power switch. The internal battery and 3.5mm jack are nice features because they allow you to remove the Coolstream Duo from it’s appointed dock and take it on the go for wireless Bluetooth audio streaming in your car or to your favorite pair of wired headphones or even your computer speakers at work. Unfortunately, the one thing they don’t allow for is to use the device for hands-free calling. This is strictly designed to stream audio.

Coolstream Duo setup

The device is super easy to get up and running. First and foremost, you need an iPod/iPhone dock. I had to fish mine out of a box in the garage. I hadn’t used it in a couple of years because I have to mount it under a cabinet and I’m pretty sure my landlord doesn’t want me drilling holes in his cabinets. Once you have your dock ready, plug the device into the 30 pin connector and leave it on the dock for at least 3 hours to ensure that the battery gets a proper charge. When the device is fully charged, you can expect 5 continuous hours of battery life. Once the device is plugged in, search for Bluetooth devices from your phone and select the Coolstream Duo. The device will pair automatically without any need to enter a pin number. Now you’re ready to stream your music. Just open up your favorite music app and enjoy.

Coolstream Duo

Coolstream Duo use

The one downside to the Coolstream Duo is that you are unable to control the music through the dock. You’ll have to control the music from your phone. In my case, that’s ok. At home, I always have my phone handy and I have a very short commute to work. I rarely change the song that I’m listening to in the car. You may, however, take issue with it. The best part about the Coolstream Duo is that you can now use your Android device with your old iOS equipment.

What we liked

  • Bluetooth on iPod docks
  • 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Battery life

What could be better

  • Ability to change a song through dock
  • Needs a microphone for handsfree calling
  • A micro USB auxiliary charging port would open this up to more buyers

Coolstream Duo overview

If you have an old iPod 30 pin dock or even a 30 pin charger, then the Coolstream Duo is a great option to bring life to your non-Bluetooth equipped iPod docks and headphones. If not, then it’s probably best to look at your other options. You can purchase the Coolstream Duo for $29.99 from their website or on Amazon, where it has a rating of 4.4 out of 5 stars on over 830 reviews.

Do you have a Coolstream Duo? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

The post CoolStream Duo Bluetooth receiver review appeared first on AndroidGuys.

30
Jun

Apple will replace your battery once it hits 80 percent health


Apple iPhone Stock

Apple’s recently changed the terms of its AppleCare+ extended warranty program. Now, no matter what iOS or OSX device you own (yes, even the Watch), Apple will replace the battery as soon as it hits 80 percent health. That’s up 30 points from the previous 50 percent threshold for iOS devices. What’s more, Mac batteries used to only be covered for manufacturing defects, not normal performance degradation. So basically anything with an Apple logo will get a new battery once the old one loses 20 percent of its capacity. The policy kicks in immediately for devices purchased after April 10th of this year.

[Image Credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Archive]

Filed under: Tablets, Apple

Comments

Via: LifeHacker

Source: Apple

30
Jun

A closer look at Apple Music: feature packed, but a bit disjointed


Apple Music is here. Finally. Now that the company steered the streaming service to a successful launch, it now has to prove to the world that it’s actually something worth paying for – after all, there are like 80 other streaming music services (maybe not, but it feels like it) fighting for the subscription revenue in our wallets. Apple’s master plan: make Apple Music a one-stop shop by kitting out it with gobs of features. We’ll follow up with a longer writeup once we’ve had more than a few hours to play with it, but for now, let’s a take a quick peek at what Apple came up with.

Once everything is installed and you fire up Music for the first time, you’re asked to make a choice: Do you want to go with the three-month free trial, or just jump straight into your music? If you choose yes, then you’ll automatically start paying $9.99/month as soon as the three-month trial winds down (until you turn off the auto-renewal, anyway). Thing is, Apple manages your Apple Music subscription the same way it does recurring iTunes subscriptions — that is, it’s nestled away in your Apple account settings, and easy to miss unless you know exactly where to look.

After that, Apple tries to figure out your musical tastes the same way Beats did: By making you choose your preferred genres and artists from a stream of cutesy bubbles. So far, so good: I’ve locked my predilections for jazz, EDM and Third Eye Blind. Bring on the recommendations! Those all live in a section of the app called “For You”, and it’s almost surprising how densely they’re packed. Apple Music will quietly chew on your musical preferences and offers up albums and playlists you might like in a very busy grid. Everything’s mostly pretty perfectly intelligible, though; I’m just not used to Apple trying to do so much at once. Naturally, your recommendations will change over time, and not all of them will be up your alley — I had to kill a list of Madonna ballads by long-pressing the tile and asking Music to “recommend less like this”. (A brief aside: I bet you Apple swaps that long press for Force Touch in the next iPhone.)

The next section over is “New,” where — you guessed it — all the new/top tracks and albums live. You can sort drill down by different genres if today is more a blues day than an indie one, and the whole thing would be nice and straightforward… if Apple didn’t decide to stick their genre and activity-centered playlists in there too. Considering how proud Apple is of its human curators and tastemakers, I’m a little shocked these playlists live ignominiously under a bunch of new song charts and not in their own separate section.

I’ve always thought there was something a little magical about radio, about little voices talking and singing and floating out of a box, and Apple seems to have done a fine job recreating that experience with Beats 1. As I write this, DJ Zane Lowe and the rest of the crew are only two hours into their first broadcast day, which was largely problem-free despite streaming to users in 100 countries. I say “largely” because there were a good four or five minutes that I just could not connect to the station out of our New York office (perhaps because of all the new upgraders crushing Apple’s servers). Lowe and company like to drop little snippets of Beats audio branding into songs while they’re playing, too. Ugh.

If your ideal radio experience has nothing to do with DJs chattering about how exciting and rad their jobs are, you can always scroll down past the Beats marquee to pick from some tried-and-true genre stations. Hell, you can even ask Siri to play the “Top 20 songs from 1988,” if you feel oddly specific. I did just that, and to my infinite pleasure, George Michael’s Faith was immediately piped through my headphones. Well done, you beautiful machine.

Then there’s Connect, a sort-of-social-network for artists to interact with fans. Well, maybe “interact” is a strong word – artists, or their handlers, post things and we get to comment on them. By default, you’re set to follow the artists who already live in your music library, and in my case only four of them (Fallout Boy and Flying Lotus, RCHP and Ke$ha) had anything up on Connect to mark the occasion. Connect remains the single biggest question mark about this whole thing — I can see how some people would like to see occasional status updates from the musicians they love, but does it seem crucial to the rest of the Music experience? Is it necessary? Valuable? I’m really not sure. Right now, Connect isn’t much more than a music-enabled Instagram for celebrities; hopefully that changes soon.

Finally, there’s My Music, where all the music you own and have saved live. It’s still got the same super-flat look that debuted in iOS 7, but like the “For You” section, it feels a little constricted. Your three most recent additions now get a shout-out at the top of your library, for one, and the Now Playing controls section now lives in a slide-out tab at the bottom — a full-screen look at the song is no longer the default. It’s really no wonder thing seemed cramped; all of the bottom row tabs that used to be dedicated to Artist, Song and Playlist views have been given to Connect and Radio. If you’re anything like me, your muscle memory is going to need some serious retraining. Still, searching for tracks from the entirety of Apple’s music collection is quick and they sound pretty good even over cellular connections. Adding them to your own library is simple too, even though it means you’re giving local space on your phone to accommodate them.

A closer look at Apple Music: feature packed, but a bit disjointed

So, that’s Apple Music in a (pretty lengthy) nutshell. The thing is, even after all that, I’m not sure if I would give up my existing Spotify setup for it. Apple Music is “good” in the sense that there’s plenty (and I mean plenty) of music to stream and add to your local collection. That bar has been cleared with ease. And the rest of the stuff that’s here to help Apple Music compete with other services works pretty well too. It’s just that Music feels a little more disjointed and confusing than I’d expect from an Apple product; it’s as if the folks in Cupertino decided they could trade a little polish in exchange for more features. That’s the sort of design arithmetic that more-or-less makes sense on paper, but the reality is, well, less than elegant.

Filed under: Mobile, Apple

Comments

30
Jun

Apple Music in the UK: what you need to know


Apple Music

After months of waiting, Apple Music is finally upon us. The company is now ready to take the wraps off its new streaming service, which will deliver millions of tracks on demand, host a free 24-hour radio station with slots from some of the world’s biggest artists, and include a bevvy of social features. It’ll go live in over 100 countries today (June 30th), but as is often the case with new Apple services, there’s still some uncertainty around what you get and how much it’ll set you back. Fear not, for we’ve pieced together everything you need to know about Apple Music in the UK. Read on to find out.

What do I need and what time will it launch?

Thanks to Apple Music senior director Ian Rogers, we have a clear idea of when you can get streaming. The company will release the new iOS 8.4 update at 4pm UK time, which brings the Apple Music app with it. Once that necessary update has installed, you’ll be able to sign up for the three-month free trial and get to grips with all of the app’s features. As for Beats 1, Apple’s first foray into live radio: that will go on air one hour later.

Apple will also make its first ever Android app for Music. That won’t launch until the autumn, but you’ll be able to access the service on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Apple Watch (via a paired phone) and on your Mac or PC via iTunes from day one.

Apple Music Devices

How much will it cost?

When Apple unveiled Music, it only provided pricing for US customers. However, in the lead up to the launch, the company revealed the cost for Brits within iOS 9 beta updates. When you initially sign up, you’ll take advantage of a 90-day free trial, but after that you’ll have to pay £10 per month to continue streaming.

If you use Apple’s Family Sharing scheme for song, e-book and app purchases, there’s also a new option for Music that costs £15 each month and allows up to six family members to use individual Apple Music accounts. If you’ve had issues with Family Sharing in the past, this might not be the best option, but it definitely offers good value for money.

What will I get?

Apple already offers around 30 million tracks on iTunes and it’s very likely that the majority of them will be available to stream on day one. We don’t yet know what the bitrate will be, but reports suggest that Apple Music will mirror iTunes Match, which offers tracks at 256Kbps AAC quality.

While you’re free to stream your favourite artists, Apple Music will also offer curated playlists from “the most talented music experts around the world.” These will include mixtapes from Apple’s own curators, but there’ll also be playlists created by respected music publications like Rolling Stone, Q Magazine and Pitchfork. Apple says the more you listen to these playlists, the more relevant they’ll become. You’ll be able to find them in the “For You” section of the app, which will also suggest albums and new releases you might enjoy. If you want to create your own compilations, Apple will let you pull together (and share) playlists featuring tracks from the steaming service, and those you’ve purchased from iTunes or saved in Match.

Apple Music

If you’re one of those people who can never decide what to listen to and prefer the good old-fashioned radio experience, then Apple has you covered. With Beats 1, the company is launching a free, 24/7 global radio network with Zane Lowe fronting the show in Los Angeles, Ebro Darden in New York and Julie Adenuga in London. Lowe’s first slate of programming will feature an interview with Eminem and there’ll also be appearances from Dr. Dre and model-cum-actress Cara Delevigne. Apple has also said it will offer a daily schedule, so you’ll know who will be featured and when.

With Apple Music’s Connect feature, the company hopes it can do a better job at social than it did with Ping. Connect has a tab of its own inside the Apple Music app, and will allow verified artists to, you know, connect with fans. Pharrell, for example, could fill his Connect feed with tracks, photos and video. You can then heart posts, add a comment or share the updates to Facebook or Twitter, giving musicians and Apple Music a chance to enjoy more social exposure.

Apple will likely share more details when Apple Music launches — we’ll make sure to notify you as soon as any new information becomes available.

Filed under: Mobile, Apple

Comments

Source: Apple Music

29
Jun

Facebook wants to give your photo uploads a Snapchat-like flair


Facebook's in-testing photo uploader

Facebook may be not as in tune with the teen crowd as Snapchat, but that isn’t stopping it from trying to fit in. TechCrunch has discovered that Facebook is testing an iOS photo uploader that lets you overlay Snapchat-like filters, stickers and text on pictures as you post them. While it’s not exactly a subtle attempt at riding the coattails of a fast-rising rival, it does show that the social network has ditched writing me-too apps in favor of adding features you’re more likely to use. Whether or not you see this uploader any time soon is another matter. Facebook regularly experiments with features, and it wouldn’t be surprising if the revamped software sees a lot of tweaks (assuming it makes the cut) before you get to try it yourself.

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Source: TechCrunch

28
Jun

Apple reportedly starts making force-sensitive iPhones


A Force Touch example on the iPhone

Those rumors of a pressure-sensitive iPhone just gained a little more weight. Bloomberg sources claim that Apple has begun “early production” of iPhone models that incorporate Force Touch input. Full-scale manufacturing would start as soon as July, if all goes well. Don’t expect these devices to be conspicuously different, though. The tipsters say the devices will be similar on the outside to the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, right down to the 4.7- and 5.5-inch screens. In other words, this could well be the stereotypical iPhone “S” release — all the big improvements (such as Force Touch, a faster processor and upgraded cameras) may be found under the hood.

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Source: Bloomberg

28
Jun

Apple Music arrives June 30th at 11AM Eastern, Beats 1 an hour later


Apple Music

Determined to try Apple Music and its accompanying Beats 1 radio the very moment they’re available on June 30th? The streaming service’s senior director, Ian Rogers, is happy to help those early adopter impulses. He says that iOS 8.4 (and thus Apple Music) will be available at 11AM Eastern on that day, and Beats 1 will go on the air one hour later. It’s not clear what you’ll hear if you tune in to the station right away, but the first slate of programming will include an interview with Eminem as well as appearances from everyone from Cara Delevigne to (unsurprisingly) Beats brand co-founder Dr. Dre.

And no, Apple hasn’t forgotten about iTunes Match and streaming the songs you already have. Eddy Cue notes that Apple Music will not only share the feature, but expand on it — the company is aiming to match up to 100,000 songs in your library (versus today’s 25,000) by the time iOS 9 shows up this fall. Unless you have a mind-numbingly huge music collection, you can safely assume that it’ll be available in the cloud.

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Via: MacRumors

Source: Fistfulayen, Beats 1 (Twitter), Zane Lowe (Twitter)

27
Jun

Apple reportedly starts making force-sensitive iPhones


A Force Touch example on the iPhone

Those rumors of a pressure-sensitive iPhone just gained a little more weight. Bloomberg sources claim that Apple has begun “early production” of iPhone models that incorporate Force Touch input. Full-scale manufacturing would start as soon as July, if all goes well. Don’t expect these devices to be conspicuously different, though. The tipsters say the devices will be similar on the outside to the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, right down to the 4.7- and 5.5-inch screens. In other words, this could well be the stereotypical iPhone “S” release — all the big improvements (such as Force Touch, a faster processor and upgraded cameras) may be found under the hood.

Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile, Apple

Comments

Source: Bloomberg

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 326 other followers

%d bloggers like this: