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Posts tagged ‘Instagram’

28
Aug
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Instagram shows how Hyperlapse stabilizes your jittery videos


Image stabilization in Instagram's Hyperlapse

Instagram has already revealed a bit about how Hyperlapse turns your shaky handheld footage into smooth time-lapses, but what if you really want to know what makes it tick? Don’t worry — the company will happily satisfy your curiosity with a deep dive into the app’s inner workings. Ultimately, you’re looking at a significant extension of the Cinema tech used in Instagram itself. It’s still using your phone’s gyroscope to determine the orientation of the camera and crop frames to counteract any shakiness. The biggest change is in how Hyperlapse adjusts to different time-lapse speeds. It only checks the positioning for the video frames you’ll actually see, and that crop-based smoothing effect will change as you step up the pace.

Importantly, Instagram’s approach contrasts sharply with what we saw in Microsoft’s similarly-named technique. There, Microsoft is calculating a 3D path through the scene and stitching together frames to create a seamless whole. That approach is potentially nicer-looking, but it’s a lot more computationally intensive; Instagram is taking advantage of your phone’s built-in sensors to create a similar effect without as much hard work. You don’t need to know the nitty-gritty about Hyperlapse to appreciate the effect it has on your clips, but the post is definitely worth a read if you have unanswered questions.

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Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Instagram Engineering Blog

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27
Aug
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Engadget Daily: Instagram’s Hyperlapse, messaging’s mission impossible and more!


Today, we look at Instagram’s new video sharing app called Hyperlapse, imagine a world with a truly unified inbox, prepare for school with the 10 best tablets available, and more! Read on for Engadget’s news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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27
Aug
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A taste of the amazing videos made with Instagram’s new app, Hyperlapse


This morning, Facebook-owned Instagram released a new, free iOS app for making time-lapse videos. It’s called Hyperlapse. Though it sounds simple, the app is anything but: it adds beautiful image-stabilization to normally shaky-cam. We’ve compiled half a dozen of the best videos we’ve seen thus far, but we’d love to add more to our collection as the day goes on. Let us know about your favorites in the comments below, on Twitter/Facebook/G+/the Engadget forums, by carrier pigeon — really, whatever means you’d like. Preferably not smoke signals

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26
Aug
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Messaging’s mission impossible: One inbox to rule them all


My phone buzzes. I glance at it and see a text message from my husband, who wants to know if I can pick him up from work. Later that day, my phone buzzes again. This time, it’s a Facebook Messenger notification from my mother, who wants to chat about an upcoming trip. At the same time, a friend pings me using Twitter’s Direct Messages. Next, a colleague strikes up a conversation on Google Hangouts. Realizing it would be easier to handle all of these with a computer, I flip open my laptop so I can chat with everyone simultaneously. Within the span of a few hours, I’ve chatted with four different people on four completely different messaging platforms. And the juggling doesn’t stop there.

It used to be that sending an SMS was enough. Now there’s a seemingly endless number of ways to stay in touch with someone. And it’s not just dedicated messaging apps like WhatsApp or Line either. Instagram added direct messaging this past December; Vine followed suit earlier this April; and even Pinterest joined the bandwagon recently by letting pinners chat with other pinners. And, of course, Twitter has had direct messaging for almost eight years now. While variety and choice are generally good things, all of these messaging services introduce a perplexing problem: We have too many inboxes.

Being able to send messages within different applications isn’t all bad, of course. If I think of an interesting photo or video I want to share with just my friends on Instagram, I can do so within the app easily. The same with Pinterest — I can continue the collaboration process of pinning designs and planning a home remodel, for example, without having to use another messaging service. And, of course, messaging apps like WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger are a lot cheaper to use than traditional SMS — for US users at least, there’s no need to fork over exorbitant messaging fees every month or, if you’re on a limited plan, cough up pennies with every text.

But the problem is all of these messaging services and apps are siloed experiences. Messages can’t be shared outside of their respective ecosystems. Worse still, I have an obligation to use all of them because different people in my social circle use different apps. When I travelled to Malaysia earlier this year, WhatsApp was the app of choice amongst my friends. A couple of my other pals use Snapchat, so I have that installed on my phone too. A few other early adopter friends (most of whom are admittedly tech writers like myself) use Slingshot, Facebook’s Snapchat alternative, so I’ve got that as well. I also installed Path’s Talk app and Line to chat with a few people, though they were mostly to exchange fun stickers. I even downloaded that silly Yo app, even if I only ever use it in jest.

Forrester researcher Thomas Husson said in a report on messaging apps entitled “Messaging Apps: Mobile Becomes The New Face Of Social” that the “fragmented nature of the social media ecosystem is inherent to the fact that individuals have multiple identities.” Basically, people use different apps and networks for different reasons. For example, people tend to use LinkedIn to talk with potential business partners, while they might use Facebook Messenger only with friends or family. Further, some messaging apps tend to be more popular in certain parts of the world — Line, for example, has a stronger following in Asia — which, if you have friends all over the globe, would mean you’re constantly switching between services.

What’s the big deal, you might ask? Our smartphones and computers are certainly more than capable of handling these disparate systems, and besides, it’s not that difficult to switch between apps, right? Well, sure, but that doesn’t make it any less annoying. I shouldn’t have to have a dozen different messaging apps on my phone to talk with all the people in my life. Chris Heuer, a longtime social media user and CEO of Alynd, a social business startup, expresses the same frustration over too many apps: “I think what’s missing in this whole discussion on messaging now is that the messaging is now often done within the context, instead of messaging being the context.” It’s the reason why he dislikes the fragmentation of Facebook Messenger away from the core Facebook app. “Now I have another app I have to open and that will waste more time I don’t have … I’ve got enough apps. I want less, not more.”

Several years ago, there was a similar problem with too many instant-messaging protocols. I used all of them — AOL, Yahoo, MSN, GChat and, yes, even ICQ. I remember installing all of these apps on my computer and keeping them all logged in at the same time because, for some reason, my friends and coworkers just couldn’t agree on the same IM platform. Then, something wonderful happened. All-in-one apps like Trillian and Adium came along to unite most of the disparate IM services under one program. At last, I could launch just one app to chat with everyone.

What we need, then, is an equivalent universal inbox for messaging. No, not just for all your email and text messages. For everything. We need a smart inbox that’ll sort messages by service, label them appropriately and will let you continue conversations within just one app.

There are a few solutions out there that come close to solving the problem. The Hangouts app for Android, for example, is able to handle both Google’s IM system and text messages. If you’re a loyal BlackBerry fan, you already know that the OS from Waterloo has a unified inbox that can house emails, texts and messages from Facebook and Twitter in one place. Disa.im is an Android app currently in alpha that promises to combine SMS, WhatsApp, Hangouts and Facebook messaging in one place as well. There’s also an app called Messages+ that promises to do the same thing, though it seems to fall short — it doesn’t support incoming messages for WhatsApp and we weren’t able to use it to send a message on Facebook.

Still, none of these really live up to the dream of that one, true universal inbox for everything. Which is, sad to say, probably more fantasy than reality. Not only because most of these apps are walled gardens, but also because some, like Snapchat and Slingshot, are based around messages that are meant to disappear after you’ve read them. Further, new messaging features and apps crop up all the time, making it tough to keep something like a universal inbox up-to-date.

The alternate solution, of course, is to insist on just one communication method for people to contact you. You probably won’t be able to keep in touch with as many people in your life, and it might be harder for people to reach you. But, perhaps, that’s the price to pay for sanity.

Hold on, my phone’s buzzing again.

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26
Aug
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Instagram’s Hyperlapse app turns shaky video into smooth time-lapse beauties


The videos you see on Instagram right now are rarely worth writing home about — after all, most people just slap filters on them and cast them out into the social ether. As it turns out, the folks at Instagram have cooked up a new to create truly beautiful shareable videos with a new app they call Hyperlapse. In traditional Instagram fashion, it’s a breeze to use: all of the heavy lifting is done behind the scenes, so all you have to do is record what’s happening in front of you and choose how fast (between 1x and 12x) you want the resulting creation to play back. The end result? Some incredibly smooth, downright entrancing time-lapse videos that don’t require a desktop to make.

Curiously enough, Instagram’s new (and as-yet unreleased) app happens to share a name with another awfully neat bit of image processing tech. Microsoft showed off its own Hyperlapse at this year’s Siggraph conference and it too smooths out the shakiness from videos captured from devices like GoPros and Google Glass. It won’t surprise you to hear that Microsoft’s approach seems just a bit more complex – Redmond’s Hyperlapse calculates the camera’s path and chews on the geometry of the scene to create a new, smoother path to align images too, and it requires considerably more hardware to get the job done too. Alas, Hyperlapse won’t hit the App Store for a few more hours at least (don’t fret Android fans, you’ll get it soon too), but we’ll keep you posted once it does.

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Source: Wired

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30
Jul
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Motorola Nexus 6 is Huge! Galaxy S4 Catches Fire! – ManDroid Quickie



motorola-nexus-6-galaxy-s4-fire

It is Tuesday, so time to talk Android with you quick status. The Motorola Nexus 6 speculation has increased, but man is that phone going to be huge. Hopefully there will be a smaller version when they announce it. Another Galaxy S4 catches fire, but you can’t fully blame the phone for that. Enjoy the video!


Android News
Motorola Nexus 6
Amazon Kindle Fire HDX Snapdragon 805
Galaxy S4 catches fire
Instagram’s Bolt


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The post Motorola Nexus 6 is Huge! Galaxy S4 Catches Fire! – ManDroid Quickie appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

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30
Jul
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Instragrams Brings Us ‘Bolt’ that will Compete with Snapchat



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So many social media outlets…so little time to download and use them all. Instagram took the world by storm, because everyone loves to take pictures of themselves or what they are currently doing. I think most of us were satisfied by Instagram’s features of just posting filtered pictures, but of course that is never enough for the people who develop these apps. Instagram has introduced a new app called “Bolt”, that will compete with Snapchat, because it pretty much is Snapchat Instagramified.

  • One tap takes a photo or records a video. As soon as you lift your finger, it sends.
  • Photos and videos are always unedited so people can see the world as you do.
  • Easily caption photos and videos.
  • Go back and forth by replying to your friends with text, photos or videos.
  • Swipe photos away and they’re gone.
  • Organize your 20 Favorites in whatever order works for you.
  • Sign up with your phone number, no email address needed.


Those are just a few features you will find with Bolt, but don’t get too excited Americans. This app is not available for us quite yet, but you people living outside the States should be fine. This app should most likely do better than Facebook’s Slingshot app, that tried to bring the same kind of concept to Facebook Messenger. Facebook should just stop trying to be what it’s not. So click the link below to try out Bolt. Let us know how it is.

Play Store Link


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The post Instragrams Brings Us ‘Bolt’ that will Compete with Snapchat appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

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30
Jul
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Instagram quietly (and slowly) launches Snapchat rival, Bolt


We knew Instagram’s effort to nab a bit of Snapchat’s thunder was imminent thanks to leaked promo banners, and now, the app has officially arrived… for some. Bolt, the filter-driven photo app’s own ephemeral messenger has hit iTunes and Google Play for folks in Singapore, South Africa and New Zealand. The software’s claim to fame is speed: instead of having to fiddle through a series of options, tapping a contact’s picture both captures and sends a photo — no further swiping required (tap and hold records video). So long as they’re in your favorites list, of course. There’s also an undo feature that allows you to retrieve a message in the first few seconds by shaking your phone. While Bolt doesn’t require a Facebook or Instagram account, you will have to sign up with your phone number for sorting through your contacts. For now though, most of us have to find solace in just reading about it, since a select few locales are privy to the initial rollout. Instagram’s word on that particular strategy is situated after the break.

“Bolt is the fastest way to share an image or a video — just one tap to capture and send. We decided to start small with Bolt, in just a handful of countries, to make sure we can scale while maintaining a great experience. We expect to roll it out more widely soon.

Filed under: Internet, Software, Mobile, Facebook

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Source: TechCrunch

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25
Jul
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Engadget Daily: the Oppo Find 7, shoes that vibrate in the right direction and more!


Today, we review the Oppo Find 7, learn where not to fly drones, contemplate Apple’s rumored 12-inch Retina Display MacBook and take a look at smart shoes that vibrate in the right direction. Read on for Engadget’s news highlights from the last 24 hours.

Oppo Find 7 review: A solid phone that faces stiff competition

What you’re looking at is the Oppo Find 7. This Android-powered handset has a gorgeous Quad HD display and plenty of horsepower under the hood, but can it compete with the Galaxy S5 or LG G3? Read our review and find out.

Apple reportedly releasing OS X Yosemite in October alongside 4K desktop and 12-inch Retina MacBook

The OS X Yosemite public beta just went live today, and now… more rumors. According to 9to5Mac’s Mark Gurman, the final version of the OS will be released in October, accompanied by a 12-inch Retina MacBook and 4K monitor.

These smart shoes vibrate to point you in the right direction

Tired of being a distracted walker? Lechal’s interactive haptic footwear can help. These shoes pair with your smartphone and guide you around town with vibrations, no screen required.

Want to fly a drone? Don’t do it here

You’ve probably never tried to pilot your drone through a nuclear power plant, but that’s not the only sort of no-fly zone that should be avoided. Check out this map of locations where you should never fly your UAV.

Filed under: Misc, Internet

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24
Jul
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Instagram’s Snapchat competitor Bolt leaks


Snapchat’s meteoric rise made one thing abundantly clear — the market would soon be flooded with copy cats. The next major player to try and drink Snapchat’s milkshake might be Instagram. A banner introducing Bolt, a service for “one tap photo messaging,” appeared at the top of the company’s mobile app last night. The announcement was quickly pulled, but not before several people grabbed screenshots and started passing them around on Twitter. Unfortunately there’s not much more detail to share at the moment, but the move will definitely raise a few eyebrows. For one, it would seem like a trivial feature to simply integrate into the existing Instagram app. Secondly, with Facebook’s Slingshot already offering ephemeral photo and video messages, Bolt seems like a duplication of efforts. Of course, there’s always the chance that Bolt will offer some truly unique twist on the format and shove pretenders to the media messaging crown aside.

Filed under: Software, Mobile, Facebook

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Via: The Verge

Source: @yo_areli (Twitter)

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