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Posts tagged ‘Huawei’

4
Jul

The LG Nexus 5 (2015) will not be based on the G4


Nexus_Logo_Nexus_5_Red_Edition_TA_01

We’ve known for a while now that Google is set to launch not one, but two Nexus smartphones later this year. One will be manufactured by LG and the other by Huawei. However, if a new report out is anything to go by, it would appear that the LG-built Nexus will not be based on its flagship G4 as previously thought. Instead, the South Korean company has teamed up with Google to design the upcoming device from scratch.

It’s a pretty well-known fact that up until the Nexus 6, all former Nexus-branded devices were adapted versions of popular Android flagships. However, Google wanted a more unique smartphone to flagship its lineup, so when the collaboration began with Motorola for the Nexus 6, the search engine giant broke the mould and asked the company to start from the ground up — which is exactly what it’s rumored to have done with LG.

The report claims that the smartphone is currently being referred to as the Nexus 5 (2015) internally, although the name could change at a later date and also suggests that LG could be working on a more pocket-sized device, whilst Huawei may be developing a phablet for Google, possibly codenamed the Nexus 6 (2015).

Fortunately, we don’t have to wait too much longer before we find out more about these handsets, all Nexus smartphones are launched alongside new Android versions, and Android M is expected to appear on our handsets some point this fall. We do have to commend Google, though. It’s done an amazing job at keeping the leaks under wraps and preventing any potential hardware specifications from seeping out. Well, for now, anyway.

Source: AndroidPIT

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2
Jul

Road to 4K: Do we need it? And who will be first?


LG G3 display close up 710px

The question of whether we need 4K (Ultra HD) displays on a smartphone has been raised in many discussions and the answer is usually that we don’t, as 4K is beyond what the typical eye can see. Yet the smartphone market is progressing at such an advanced rate that the question should be a case of when – and not if – 4K (UHD) displays become truly portable.

I vividly recall a conversation I had with a few colleagues early last year, that turned into debate about whether Quad HD would ever become a reality. Yet now, less than 18 months later, the industry already looks to be moving past QHD.

Both Samsung and LG have introduced QHD screens in their smartphones, while other manufacturers don’t seem to be showing as much interest. With that said, there are still plenty of manufacturers that strive to be the first to reach 4K UHD. Let’s take a look at who is most likely to make the first 4K phone and the benefits and drawbacks that moving to such high resolution will bring.

Display panel manufacturers

Before we can consider who will be first, we need to consider which display manufacturer is capable of producing a 4K smartphone display. There are several major LCD manufacturers, who create displays for everything from smartphones and tablets to automobiles and navigational equipment, but here’s the few that are most likely to be involved with the production of a UHD smartphone display.

Samsung Display

samsung logo x x mwc 2015

The name really speaks for itself; the company is one of the world’s leading display manufacturers and supplies displays to many of the world’s leading electronics manufacturers, including Apple. Samsung Display has already produced Quad HD Super AMOLED displays – which are used in both the Galaxy Note 4 and the Galaxy S6 – and also has the world’s first dual-curved smartphone in the Galaxy S6 Edge (which also uses a QHD Super AMOLED screen).

LG Display

lg logo mwc 2015 c 2

Better known for its TV display heritage, LG Display provides most of the panels used in LG smartphones, including the stunning Quad HD Quantum Dot Display used on the LG G4. Its display technology is also used in other smartphones. It’s worth noting that LG Display has been the world’s leading large-sized LCD manufacturer for the past four years and, in 2014, the company accounted for 26.7 percent of the market for displays measuring 9.1 inches and above (closely followed by Samsung, who had 20.2 percent).

Sharp

Sharp Aquos-10

Sharp has a long and proud history in displays, beginning with its first television sets way back in 1953. The manufacturer produces screens of all sizes and owns the only 10th generation LCD manufacturing plant on the planet. In 2010, it struck an agreement to produce displays for Samsung and it can also count Apple and other OEMs amongst its customers. In 2014, the company recorded 2.8 percent of the large-sized LCD market and it has already shown off the world’s first 4K smartphone screen (more on that below).

Innolux

innolux

The Taiwanese company is relatively young, having only been founded in 2003 before being publicly floated in 2006. In March 2010, the company in its current state was founded through the biggest merger in the flat panel display industry, when Innolux, Chi Mei Optoelectronics and Toppoly Optoelectronics merged. In 2014, Innolux was the third largest producer of large screen displays with 17.8 percent of total shipments including supplying panels to Samsung, LG, Sony and providing most of the screens used in Toshiba, Sharp (where it is equal to Sharp itself), Panasonic and Phillips devices.

AU Optronics

AUO's 4K Curved Ultra HD TVs

AUO’s 4K Curved Ultra HD TVs

AU Optronics (AUO), the second Taiwanese manufacturer on our list supplies several manufacturers including Samsung, Sony, Toshiba and several Chinese manufacturers (including HiSense, Konka and Haier). With several smartphone players amongst its customers, AUO would have plenty of potential buyers if it developed a 4K smartphone screen. In 2014, the company controlled 16.8 percent of the large LCD market and provided a large amount of the displays used in Sony devices measuring 9.1 inches or more.

Japan Display

Japan Display's 4K Tablet Display

Japan Display’s 4K Tablet Display

Japan Display Inc (JDI) is the youngest company on the market, having launched only on April 1st 2012 through the government-backed merger of the loss-making display divisions of Sony, Toshiba and Hitachi. JDI was created specifically to manufacturer small and medium sized displays for mobile devices and has the largest production capacity of LTPS LCD displays in the industry.

Benefits of 4K

There are many benefits to using 4K on smartphones, both immediate and in the future. The key benefits and reasons to use 4K in smartphones are the knock-on effect and the benefits to virtual reality.

Virtual reality

Virtual reality may seem like something that belongs in the movies but over the past year, we’ve seen a new breed of virtual reality devices, which are powered by smartphones. Samsung’s Gear VR range uses the company’s next-generation handsets (the Note 4 and Galaxy S6) as the display in a virtual reality headset and this trend looks like one that might be followed by other manufacturers.

Using 4K on a smartphone would offer more pixels for virtual reality to work with; the current smartphone market plateaus at Quad HD and while the experience is certainly immersive, the higher resolution offered by 4K would mean an even better experience.

Packing millions of pixels into a smartphone display would also mean colours and vibrancy are improved, resulting in an overall better VR experience. Virtual reality might still seem like a concept at times, but with smartphones ever developing, it’s only a matter of time before it becomes an integral part of our daily lives.

The knock-on effect

The Idol 3 is only $250 and yet has a 1080p display.. an example of the knock on effect at work?

The Idol 3 is only $250 and yet has a 1080p display… an example of the knock-on effect at work?

Arguably the biggest reason for manufacturers to go to 4K on their smartphones is the knock-on effect; as 4K Ultra HD panels become affordable at a smaller size, the cost of panels with Full HD and even Quad HD would reduce dramatically. As a result, manufacturers would be able to use these panels in handsets where, previously, this wasn’t possible due to the cost.

Affordable for all…

The knock-on effect is not just with the display, as 4K on smartphones would mean advanced processors are being used in flagships. As a result, all components that are currently used in flagships would reduce in price and instead of being limited to just premium devices with a high price tag, they would be affordable enough to be used further down the smartphone chain. As a result, the knock-on effect of 4K would mean the entire smartphone industry advances ahead of where it currently is.

Those are some of the big benefits of 4K on smartphones, but what about the potential pitfalls? What do manufacturers need to watch out for and is 4K on smartphones even technically possible?

Pitfalls of 4K

There are three perceived major pitfalls to using 4K on smartphones – battery life, cost, and lack of available content – and I personally believe that the design factor will also be a concern when considering 4K smartphones. Let’s take a look at these in more detail:

Battery life

The biggest concern with using 4K on a smartphone is an issue that affects all smartphones and doesn’t just apply to Ultra HD: battery life. Although mobile technology has advanced considerably over the past few years, battery technology hasn’t followed suit and one reason that manufacturers are avoiding even Quad HD resolution is the additional strain on the battery from powering those extra pixels.

The current crop of Quad HD enabled smartphones feature battery capacities between 2,550mAh and 3,300mAh and these provide on average, between 10 and 40 hours battery life depending on usage. Something I’ve personally noticed is that using Quad HD displays at full brightness – which is really the only way to enjoy the next-generation display and resolution – can reduce battery life by half, and with Ultra HD displays, the temptation will likely be to use the display at full brightness wherever possible, to make the most out of the next-generation display.

Powering an Ultra HD display will require more than just the display itself as next-generation processors will be needed to power the display in the most effective manner. Alongside the cost factor (which we’ll look at below), these may also draw more power and the effect on battery life is likely to be impacted even further.

Cost

The smartphone industry has followed a predictable trend over the past decade; at first, smartphones were very expensive with a small feature set and then as technology advanced, the cost of components and handsets themselves reduced considerably.

Over the past eighteen months, we’ve seen a trend where smartphones are currently rising in cost and this looks set to continue as the feature set of premium flagship handsets becomes more advanced. Consider the cost of the Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 Edge, the Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus as outlined in the table below:

Storage iPhone 6 iPhone 6 Plus Galaxy S6 Galaxy S6 Edge  
16GB $649 / £539 $749 / £619 N/A N/A
32GB N/A N/A $699 / £599 $849 / £ N/A
64GB $749 / £619 $849 / £699 $799 / £660 $949 / £760
128GB $849 / £699 $949 / £789 $885 / £730 $990 / £899

Samsung’s flagship Galaxy S6 Edge has a starting price of $849 for the base 32GB model, which rises to $990 for the 128GB model and makes the Galaxy S6 Edge the highest-priced flagship on the market to-date. This handset comes with real innovation – the dual-edged curve makes the Galaxy S6 Edge the true flagship – but if the same handset were to sport Ultra HD resolution and next-generation internals, the price could conceivably increase by $200-$300, if not more.

Based on historical trends, it could take two years for Ultra HD to become truly affordable for smartphones and even then, it might take a year or two extra before it’s widely used on all smartphones. By way of comparison, the LG G4 also has a Quad HD display but can be had for approximately $699 and the varying price is down to the difference in materials and design.

As mentioned above, battery life would also need to be improved and innovation in battery technology may result in increasing the cost of a 4K smartphone further. As a result, it’s possible we could see 4K smartphones cost upwards of $1000 when they are first introduced to the market and this could make them inaccessible to most, if not all, consumers.

At present, 4K Ultra HD televisions can be purchased for as little as £400 (approx. $600) in the UK but no more than two years ago, these retailed for upwards of £2000 (approx. $3000). The drastic reduction in the cost of a 4K TV suggests that 4K smartphones would initially be higher priced but reduce in cost as more manufacturers explore the use of next-generation displays.

Lack of 4K video

4K televisions may have been around for a few years but the available 4K content doesn’t currently reflect the wide availability of 4K TVs. In the UK at least, broadcasters are yet to adopt the next generation standard and on more than one occasion, I’ve overheard discussions where consumers opt not to go for a 4K TV as the available content doesn’t reflect the cost of said TVs.

Producing content in 4K requires advanced equipment and an overhaul of existing infrastructure. Currently, broadcasters see very little reason to bare the cost of these upgrades as consumers themselves see very little appeal in 4K and this cycle could result in a stunt in growth and innovation.

The introduction ­– and adoption – of 4K on smartphones could provide the boost necessary to tempt media companies into making more 4K content. However, it’s also possible that manufacturers investing in 4K on mobile devices could find that consumers themselves have little interest in it.

The design factor

This is a pitfall to 4K that I personally believe should also be taken under consideration: the design factor. Smartphone design has followed the trend of handsets becoming smaller and thinner before displays became larger and larger; the current crop of handsets suggest that displays measuring between 4.7 and 5.2 inches are the plateau for a normal smartphone with displays between 5.5 and 6.5 inches indicating a phablet device.

OEMs currently follow one of two design strategies: go as thin as possible – like the flagship Huawei P8 which measures just 6.4mm thick – or go stylish with as many features as possible – like the curved HTC One M9 or the LG G4  which measures between 6.3mm and 9.8mm thick. The introduction of a 4K smartphone along with the extra battery capacity needed and the advanced internals could result in an impact on the possibilities of design. Could manufacturers like Samsung bring a handset that is as slim and feature-packed as the Galaxy S6 or dual-curved like the Galaxy S6 Edge and still incorporate an Ultra HD display, bigger battery and next-generation internals?

Do we need 4K on smartphones?

A couple of years ago, we may have asked the same question about Quad HD and before that, even about Full HD. 4K definitely has both major benefits and major pitfalls that OEMs will need to consider and evaluate before introducing a 4K smartphone, but the question of whether we need 4K is different to both Quad HD and Full HD.

The minimum density the human eye can see without being able to discern pixels is 350 pixels per inch density, which is slightly higher than Apple’s Retina Display on the iPhone 6, which offers 326ppi pixel density.

  Resolution Screen Size
HD Ready 1280×720 4.196 inches
Full HD 1920×1080 6.294 inches
Quad HD 2560×1440 8.394 inches
Ultra HD 3840×2160 12.588 inches

Reverse calculating the density leads us to the figures in the table above, which suggest that a Full HD screen measuring 6.294 inches is the point at which the average human eye stops discerning individual pixels. For Quad HD resolution, the display size increases to 8.394 inches – like the QHD display on the Galaxy Tab S 8.4 – and for Ultra HD, this increases further to 12.588 inches.

Considering the trends we highlighted earlier in the design factor, a 4K smartphone measuring 5.0 inches would result in a pixel density of 881ppi – almost three times as much as the human eye actually needs – while a phablet measuring 6 inches would result in a pixel density of 734 pixels per inch (which is far above anything on the market at the moment).

The average human eye doesn’t need anything above Full HD resolution in a 5-inch phone, but the market has already moved significantly past this threshold. Likewise, bar some major technological obstacles (battery consumption, insufficient processing power), it looks like the industry will adopt 4K. To answer the question, we probably don’t need 4K, but the electronics industry rarely settles for “good enough,” so it looks like we’re going to get it anyway.

4K – who will get there first?

Now we know everything there is to know about 4K, the question becomes who will be first to market. Based on past innovation in the market, there are just a handful of companies who would be able to successfully bring a commercially viable 4K smartphone to market.

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The most obvious of these are the two Korean manufacturers – LG and Samsung. Both companies have sibling divisions focusing on display technology and between them, they supply over 50 percent of the LCD panels used in consumer electronics today. LG was the first mainstream OEM to bring a Quad HD display to the market – the LG G3 – followed a few months later by Samsung with the Note 4.

Moving on from the big two and we come to two Chinese manufacturers: Huawei and Xiaomi. Speaking at the IFA 2015 GPC last month, Paul Gray – a Principal Analyst at IHS-DisplaySearch – quoted research that suggested 17 percent of all 4K televisions this year would be sold in China. The demand for technology in an ever-advancing market suggests that both of these manufacturers could be instrumental in bringing the first Ultra HD smartphone to market.

Huawei Tour of China 2015

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During our trip to China in January, Huawei confirmed that it had no current plans to adopt Ultra HD on smartphones due to the perceived cost to battery life but the company also revealed that it is looking into next-generation battery technology. Innovation in battery would solve the perceived cost of features over battery life and could mean that Huawei finally adopts displays above Full HD.

Rival Chinese manufacturer Xiaomi is also worth a mention as a potential candidate to launch an Ultra HD handset, but this seems less likely as the company focuses on bringing devices at an affordable price. While some of their handsets may be higher priced than the company’s ARPU (Average Revenue Per Unit), it’s unlikely Xiaomi could introduce the first 4K Ultra HD smartphone and still make it affordable enough.

Last on this list is Sharp and we’ve saved this until the end for good reason – the company appears to be working on the first 5.5 inch Ultra HD on the market, though the Japanese company never officially confirmed its existence. The screen boasts an eye-watering 806 pixels per inch density and is expected to go into mass production next year. Rather tellingly, Chinese manufacturers are being suggested as amongst the first customers for the advanced smartphone display.

This information suggests that the first commercially available 4K smartphones will launch towards the end of 2016 or in early 2017. Based on current smartphone launch cycles, if Samsung and LG were first, then we could see next year’s Galaxy Note or LG G flagship offer Ultra HD but it’s more likely that the Consumer Electronics Show in January 2017 will be our first glimpse of a 4K smartphone.

4K – the conclusion

Talking to the BBC about Sharp’s new 4K smartphone screen, analyst Tim Coulling from Calasys suggested that the perceived benefits of upgrading from 2K to 4K are minimal:

“At a certain point, the improvements get less visually stunning. Once you jump from 2K to 4K, you’re going to struggle to tell the two images apart even if you have perfect vision.”

However, while this will certainly apply to smartphones, I personally think the benefits of using Ultra HD on a tablet would be more apparent. My thoughts are that Quad HD will suffice on any device up to 7 inches in size and Ultra HD should be limited to tablets measuring 7.1 inches or more.

Using this as an example, a Quad HD device measuring 7 inches would offer approx. 420 pixels per inch density (which is considered great by smartphone standards), while an Ultra HD display on a tablet measuring 8 inches (like the Galaxy Tab S) would offer 550ppi, which is slightly higher than the 533ppi density offered by the Quad HD display on the LG G4.

Smartphone displays have evolved drastically over the past two years, but while we’re able to get pixel densities in excess of 500 on a smartphone, the same can’t be said for the tablet market. As an example, the Retina Display on the iPad Air 2 offers 264ppi density while the Quad HD display on the Galaxy Tab S 10.5 offers 288ppi density – both of these are below the human eye threshold and offer an experience that is visibly worse than their smartphone counterparts. Increasing to Ultra HD would result in pixel densities of 454 and 419 respectively, which would bring tablets beyond the point at which the human eye can notice pixels.

It’s just a question of who’s gonna be first…

As compelling an argument the numbers make, the fact that Sharp have a Ultra HD smartphone panel in the making suggests that 4K and beyond will become reality sooner rather than later. Whether we need them or not is a debate that will be contested for years to come, but 4K on smartphones is soon to be reality; it’s just a question of who will be first.

Who do you think will be first? Do you think we need 4K on smartphones? Let us know your views in the comments below.

1
Jul

Huawei’s Honor Band Zero is a circular smartwatch with a sleek design


huawei-honor-band-zero-smartwatch

Huawei took to Twitter, teasing a render of its upcoming wearable, the Honor Band Zero. There’s very little details on the watch, aside from what we can spot in the photo. The Chinese manufacturer has yet to launch the Huawei Watch, meaning the Honor Band Zero could be a long ways out. After all, this is merely a 3D render.

Based on the image, the Honor Band Zero will look similar to the Moto 360 and LG G Watch in some aspects, except without buttons. Considering that this is just a render of the wearable, it’s hardly worth speculating what the final product will look like. The one thing we do know and what was intended to get out of this render is that Huawei will be focusing on a sleek and minimalistic design, as mentioned on Twitter:

#Honor‘s smart wearable device that embodies a minamalistic design, that’s #HonorBandZero. #HuaweiFacts

Hopefully we’ll see more details soon. Anyone interested in the Honor Band Zero?

source: Huawei Device (Twitter)

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1
Jul

Huawei’s got another low-end smartwatch in the works


Huawei hasn’t even launched its first Android smartwatch yet and it’s already talking-up the following entry into the wearables business. As Engadget Chinese reports, the company revealed that it’s working on the Band Zero, a watch-style device for cheapie sub-brand Honor. We’ve only got rendered images to go on, but it’s believed that the device will tell the time, offer fitness tracking and some basic smartphone notifications. In addition, Leiphone is reporting that the hardware will have a battery life for four days and be both dust and water resistant to IP68 standards. That’s all that there is to say right now, but perhaps it might be wise if Huawei concentrated on getting its products out of the door instead of teasing us with what’s coming up in the future.

Filed under: Wearables

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Via: Engadget Chinese

Source: Huawei (Twitter), Leiphone

1
Jul

Huawei releases Android 5.1 Preview firmware for the Ascend Mate 2


Huawei_Ascend_Mate2_Main_03_TA

Those of you sporting the Huawei Ascend Mate 2 handset will be pleased to learn that an Android 5.1 Preview update has been made available. The bad news? It isn’t an Over-The-Air (OTA) update, instead you will have to get your hands dirty by performing a manual install. We have more details after the break.

This major update also includes Huawei’s new EMUI 3.1 software. Interested customers can download and install this first release version of the software now.

It isn’t the most fun thing to do, but flashing an update doesn’t need to be a complete chore. Everything depends on following the instructions to the letter. The first step is checking your handset’s firmware because the Android 5.1 Preview firmware (B309) can only be installed on handsets with the following software versions:

  • MT2-L03 V100R001C00B126
  • MT2-L03 V100R001C00B148

Once you’ve checked and verified that your Ascend Mate 2 is running the requisite firmware, the next thing to do is to download the Android 5.1 update that is roughly 1GB in size, which you can do by clicking here.

While the firmware is downloading, you should backup your phone. Here you have a couple of choices; you can either use Huawei’s HiSuite software (available here) that runs on Windows or a backup application of your own choice. It’s always best to backup to a MicroSD card, just in case your phone is inadvertently wiped when updating. If in any doubt, do the backup, and then copy the backup file to your computer just to be safe. When flashing firmware, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Before installing the update, make sure your MicroSD card has at least 4GB spare before moving on to the next steps.

  • Format the micro SD card (This is optional)
  • Download then extract the B309.zip file.
  • Copy the entire “dload” folder to the root directory of the micro SD card.
  • Make sure your handset is powered off. Insert the micro SD card into the handset.
  • Press and hold the VOLUME UP and VOLUME DOWN keys simultaneously, and then press the POWER button. Release power when you see the device turn on.
  • The phone should boot and begin flashing. When the progress bar stops, the phone will restart.
  • You may enter the Emergency Data dialog at the first boot. Choose the Factory data reset and click the Yes button. When the reset is done, reboot your phone.

It’s important to remember that this is just an Android 5.1 Preview for the Ascend Mate 2, it is not the finished article so there will be a few bugs present. If for any reason you’re unhappy with the Preview firmware, you can always downgrade your handset back to JellyBean (B148), which you can get from here.

If you choose to manually install the Android 5.1 Preview on your Huawei Ascend Mate 2, let us know how it goes and if you find any surprises or bugs in the firmware. Good luck!

 

Source: Huawei

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1
Jul

Huawei Honor Band Zero: a circular new smartwatch


Huawei is tenacious, to say the least. Despite the fact its existing wearable, the Huawei Watch hasn’t even been released yet, the company is already anxious to start spreading the news of yet another time-telling-trinket:

While absolutely nothing is yet known about this product, there are a couple of points which can be deduced from the pic:

1. The device will be thin and round. Round is sound, and it’s particularly interesting to see how many OEMs have opted for the form factor since the advent of the Moto 360 (which had a “flat tire” as many accuse it). Huawei seems to be going for a clean, disc-shaped structure here sans any form of physical buttons along the circumference. It’s possible there will be a flush, physical button along the side of the device facing down, but as the watch looks quite thin, it’s more likely there will be some form of button on the underside.

smartwatches

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2. The device will come with a textured, standard-type rubber(ized) band. Unlike the LG Watch Urbane LTE which has a very “rugged” band and adjustment mechanism, the Honor Band Zero looks to be much more of a traditional watch in every sense of the word. The texture on the band gives the device a certain sense of style that would otherwise be lacking like on say, the Apple Watch Sport.

honor_colorband_4

This device from 2014is known as the Color Band, but is it related to the Band Zero?

It will be interesting to see just how Huawei plans to position this device given that it already released the Color Band line which can be seen above. The Color Band series is much more in-tow with standard fitness bands. In theory, the Band Zero could actually use the large watch display as nothing more than a stat screen, with no actual Android Wear connectivity (more on that later).

huawei-watch-1

Huawei’s new watch is going for a distinctly different aesthetic and form factor than its previous one seen here.

The product is clearly taking on a very different aesthetic than the company’s last smartwatch, seen above. Whereas the Huawei Watch has a large, “manly” presence complete with physical buttons on the sides, the new one seems to be aimed at either a more casual user, or perhaps consumers who might not want such a rugged product. The Huawei Watch is also vaguely similar to the design of the LG Watch Urbane, however the Honor Band Zero looks to be of a much more unique shape.

One large question at hand is just what OS the product will run when it lands. While Huawei has been more than receptive of Google’s Android, and indeed opted for Android Wear in its upcoming Huawei Watch, that adherence to Mountain View has caused some problems in the OEM’s home territory. Indeed the product is rumored to be delayed into 2016 for the Chinese market due to its use of core Google services, the likes of which many are unavailable in China. While Android Wear is a safe bet, should Huawei be able to design a custom-OS for the product, chances are it would be keen to use it.

What are your thoughts on the Honor Band Zero? Does it look appealing to you?

1
Jul

Android Lollipop Preview available for Ascend Mate 2


Huawei-Ascend-Mate-2

If you’re waiting for Android Lollipop to land on your Huawei Ascend Mate 2, the wait is over.. sort of. Huawei has announced that the Android 5.1 Lollipop Preview for the Ascend Mate 2 is now available but you’ll need to download and flash it yourself.

Huawei say:

Starting today, Android 5.1 (Lollipop) is available to Huawei Ascend Mate 2 owners. This major update also includes Huawei’s new EMUI 3.1 software. Interested customers can download and install this first release version of the software now. Huawei will continue to enhance the software, even after this initial version is made available, to deliver the best experience to you, our customers. We look forward to your feedback.

Huawei also confirmed the Lollipop Preview can be installed on devices with the following firmware versions:

  • MT2-L03 V100R001C00B126
  • MT2-L03 V100R001C00B148

If your handset meets the requirements, you’ll need to backup your phone, either using the Backup application in EMUI, using Huawei’s HiSuite app for Windows or another backup application of your choice.

Once you’re backed up and ready to install, flashing the Lollipop Preview is rather straight forward. First, you’ll need a microSD card with 4GB space or more and then you’ll need to follow the steps below:

  1. Format the micro SD card (This is optional).
  2. Download then extract the B309.zip file.
  3. Copy the entire “dload” folder to the root directory of the micro SD card.
  4. Make sure your handset is powered off. Insert the micro SD card into the handset.
  5. Press and hold the VOLUME UP and VOLUME DOWN keys simultaneously, and then press the POWER button. Release power when you see the device turn on.
  6. The phone should boot and begin flashing. When the progress bar stops, the phone will restart.
  7. You may enter the Emergency Data dialog at the first boot. Choose the Factory data reset and click the Yes button. When the reset is done, reboot your phone.

 

The Android Lollipop update brings Google’s latest OS along with Huawei’s latest Emotion UI v3.1 interface, which initially launched on the Huawei P8. To download the firmware, visit the source link below where Huawei has also included instructions on downgrading your software if you’re not happy with the Lollipop update.

1
Jul

Huawei unveils its latest smartwatch, the Huawei Honor Band Zero






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Huawei‘s first Android Wear device, the Huawei Watch, was a breathtaking device, and although we’ve yet to see more of it, we’ve been interested to see if Huawei was going to use those design cues in its other devices. After Huawei unveiled its new smartwatch, the Huawei Honor Band Zero, today, it would appear the answer is no. Unlike the Watch which featured excesses in metal and a very traditional appearance for watches, the Honor Band Zero looks most similar to a Misfit wearable, except with a screen. That’s certainly not a bad thing, but it is a surprising direction for Huawei to take its latest wearable.


Because Huawei announced the device on its Twitter account, there’s not much we can say about the device right now, not even what operating system it’s going to run – Android Wear would be the logical answer, but it’s hard to tell at this point. We assume more details are going to trickle out in the near future, hopefully including its price and availability.

What do you think about the Huawei Honor Band Zero? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Twitter via Phone Arena

The post Huawei unveils its latest smartwatch, the Huawei Honor Band Zero appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

30
Jun

Huawei finally unveils its flagship Honor 7 smartphone


huawei-honor-7-063015

Huawei held an official press event today and finally announced its all new, much anticipated Honor 7 smartphone. The device will come in three different versions differing in connectivity and storage. There will be a basic version with 16gb of storage and LTE connectivity, a dual-SIM LTE version, and the third version with 64gb of storage.

All of the three versions have the exact same stylish and premium looking aluminum alloy body, a 5.2″ 1080p display that adds up to 423 pixels-per-inch. All versions will also sport Huawei’s own octa-core 64-bit Kirin 935 chipset. The chipset has 4 Cortex A53 cores clocked at 2.2GHz and 4 more clocked at 1.5GHz arranged in a big.LITTLE configuration which basically allows reduce power consumption by having the right cores work for the right tasks. For the graphics, the Honor 7 uses ARM’s Mali-T628 GPU. Other specs include 3GB RAM and a micro SD card slot for storage expansion up to 128gb. The Honor 7 will come with Android Lollipop 5.0 pre-installed on top of Huawei’s newest EMUI user interface (version 3.1).

Another point of focus for the Honor 7 is its 20-megapixel rear camera with Phase Detection Auto Focus for lighting-fast focus times (0.1sec). The camera features the latest Sony IMX230 sensor with F2.0 aperture a 6-lens module and for extra protection, a sapphire glass. The front facing camera has an 8-megapixel resolution with a wide-angle lens. The fingerprint sensor is placed beneath the camera and has the capability to unlock the phone with a single tap only, instead of the less convenient swipe type of previous mobile fingerprint sensor. The fingerprint sensor can also be used for added security when making payments through the Play Store for example. Finally the phone has a quick charging capability that can charge its 3100mAh battery from o% to 100% in just an hour and 25 minutes, or to 50% in just half an hour.

The Honor 7 base model with 16gb of storage will be priced at a very affordable $322. The dual-SIM LTE version will sell for $355, and the flagship version with 64gb of storage at $400. The different prices for the phone are very reasonable considering the device has high-end specs and a beautiful design with a premium aluminum look.

Source: PhoneArena

Come comment on this article: Huawei finally unveils its flagship Honor 7 smartphone

30
Jun

Huawei Honor 7 launched with in metal starting at $322


The much anticipated Honor 7 was just announced today during Huawei’s official press event. Actually, three Honor 7s were announced today. All of them were decked out in an all metal build.

Variants

The base model will ship with 16 GB of memory and LTE. A step up will lend you a dual SIM model and the top tier will ship with 64 GB of storage.

Each model will cost about $322, $355 and $400 respectively.

Display

The Honor 7 sports a 5.2-inch screen with a resolution of 1920 x 1080 yielding a PPI of 423.

honor7
honor7_2
honor7_1

Processor

Powering that 5.2-inch screen is a octacore Kirin 925 processor. The Kirin is clocked at 2.2 Ghz. The chipset is made up of eight A53 cores. Four are clocked at 2.2 Ghz, and four more are clocked at 1.5Ghz.

Backing the Kirin 925 is a Mali T628 GPU.

Camera

In the camera department, the Honor 7 shows off a 20 mega-pixel rear camera with “Phase Detection Auto Focus” that will supposedly give you a 0.1 second focus time. This shooter also has a F2.0 aperture and 6  lens made out of sapphire glass.

Over on the front is a more modest 8 MP camera that has a fixed focus and F2.4 aperture.

Memory

Following today’s standards, the Honor 7 will ship with 3 GB of RAM. As stated before, the base model will contain 16 GB of internal storage for about $322 with the option to grab a 64 GB model for around $400.

Don’t worry if you can’t afford a 64 GB model though. Huawei has included a SD card slot with support for up to 128 GB microSD cards.

Battery

What good is a phone if it is dead? Huawei asks the same question and answers it with a 3100 mAh battery powering the Honor 7.

This battery supposedly will reach a full charge in a mere 1 hour and 25 minutes. Don’t have time for that you say? Well don’t worry, you can get up the a 50% charge in just 30 minutes.

If you don’t have 30 minutes to charge your phone, then I would say you have bigger problems then trying to find a way to keep your phone alive.

Although not specifically mentioned by our source, it would appear that the battery is non-removable as a consequence of the beautiful all metal body.

Connectivity

The Honor 7 will sport NFC, WiFi (802.11 a/b/c/g/n/ac) with support for both 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands, Bluetooth 4.1, GPS, GSM, WCDMA and LTE.

Bands are, of course, dependent on your region.

Fingerprint Sensor

That’s right, fingerprint sensor. Huawei has equipped their latest device with a fingerprint sensor on the back of the device right under the camera.

This sensor will allow for one touch unlock. Huawei has also baked in various apps for banking and additional payment methods that will utilize the fingerprint sensor for security purposes.

Honor 7 comes with Fingerprint Cards AB (FPC)’s FPC1025 fingerprint sensor. A step up from the FPC1020 that can be found in Huawei’s Ascend Mate 7.

Gotta love those product names.

In a statement from FPC’s CEO, we learn that the FPC1025 is capable of 360 degree finger rotation.

Huawei is a leading global smartphone manufacturer and we are proud that Huawei selected FPC1025 for Honor 7, following up on the great success of Huawei Ascend Mate 7 with FPC1020 embedded that was launched in 2014. FPC1025 supports 360 degree finger rotation capability, fast response time and industry leading 3D image quality.

Wrap Up

The Huawei Honor 7 comes in at 143.2 x 71.9 x 8.5 mm and weighs 157 grams. Running EMUI 3.1 based off of Android 5.0, the Honor 7 packs quite a punch on paper.

For a base price of $322, the Huawei’s latest offering comes with near top of the line specs and a killer camera for half of what current flagships go for.

Hopefully the device will meet our expectations and deliver top grade performance for one of the cheapest prices out there.

Let us know in the comments down below what you think of Huawei’s newest device. Will you be getting it?

Source: GizChina via: PhoneArena

The post Huawei Honor 7 launched with in metal starting at $322 appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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