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Posts tagged ‘HTC’

29
Oct
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Sprint-branded HTC One now receiving Eye Experience update


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In addition to expanding its enhanced 4G LTE service today, Sprint has also started rolling out a rather hefty over-the-air update to all its carrier-branded variants of HTC’s flagship smartphone, the One (M8), currently located in the United States.

Weighing in at 250MB, the upgrade transports the Taiwanese company’s recently-announced Eye Experience camera software, together with a bunch of bug fixes, stability improvements and speed optimizations.

Hit the break to see the full changelog.

  • Android KitKat 4.4.4
  • EYE Experience
  • Face Tracking
  • Split Capture
  • Face Fusion
  • Voice Selfie
  • Live Makeup
  • Photo Booth

To initiate the upgrade manually, make sure you’re connected to a Wi-Fi network. Then, from the home screen, press the Menu key, followed by Settings. Scroll to the bottom and tap ‘About Device’, followed by ‘Software Update and ‘Update Now’.

Source: HTC

 

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27
Oct
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HTC Sense 7 screens show what it is shaping up to look like with Lillipop



Androids latest installment of Android treat, Lillipop, is all the rage right now. With Android 5.0 it is readily apparent that manufacturers are finally being forced to up their game a little bit and bring in more of the Google design elements to their own skins. This is a win for Google, the OEMs, and the consumers really. While we don’t get much of a look at everything that HTC has been working on, a couple of leaked screens do show some pretty fantastic Material Design elements at play.

HTC sense 7 Android 5 Lollipop


It might be a bit of an adjustment for many, while others coming into Android for the first time will more than likely be in awe of the bold coloring. It will be interesting to see the various manufacturers approaches to the new Android version. Google is expected to release the final Android 5.0 Lollipop code on November 3rd when the Nexus 9 officially becomes available. HTC has said that they will have the Lollipop update available 90 days from Google release, at least for the HTC One M8. The One M7 and others should be in the mix too. That would put it out just after the New Year. How long it takes to get certified and pushed through the various carries is a totally different story.

Source: HTCSource


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The post HTC Sense 7 screens show what it is shaping up to look like with Lillipop appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

27
Oct
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Alleged HTC Sense 7 screenshots highlight Material Design


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A few hours ago a couple of screenshots appeared online allegedly showcasing HTC’s upcoming Sense 7 user interface that’s expected to roll out alongside the Taiwanese company’s release of Android 5.0 next month.

According to the unnamed source, these two images were captured on a Developer version of the One (M8) running the latest build of Lollipop — which is still being tried and tested by the Happy Telephone Company to ensure that it runs smoothly on its smartphones.

HTC Sense 7 Leak
Sense 7 leak

As you can see in the pictures above, the design of Sense 7 is pretty similar to Google’s newly-established Material Design standard, but it looks as if HTC has implemented one minor, yet extremely effective alteration to the theme: the background of the software keys are now able to change color according to the palette of the application being used.

Obviously, it’s more than possible that these images are not genuine — they’re certainly not hard to fake. They could be concepts of what enthusiasts expect Sense 7 to look like. Or they could just be the real thing.

Nevertheless, we think they look great, and if these do, in fact, turn out to be the real deal, we’ll be seeing a lot more leaked screenshots within the coming weeks — so be sure to check back for more information.

Source: YouMobile

Come comment on this article: Alleged HTC Sense 7 screenshots highlight Material Design

26
Oct
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The truth comes out: the Nexus 9 wasn’t designed as an iPad killer



Nexus 9 wasn't designed as an iPad killerWith Google announcing its new Android Nexus devices and Android Lollipop on October 15th and Apple announcing its new iPad lineup on October 16th, you could have been forgiven for thinking Google intended to pit the Nexus 9 against the iPads and wanted to one-up their release by announcing the new Nexus tablet a day earlier. As it turns out, the Nexus 9 wasn’t designed as an iPad killer as Alberto Villarreal, the Nexus 9’s head industrial designer, elucidates:

“We wanted to accelerate the premium market for Android tablets… it has a lot of attributes and definitely will bring the quality for other companies to do better.”

Nexus 9 wasn't designed as an iPad killerIn a lot of ways, this makes sense for both the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9, and indeed, many of Google’s previous Nexus devices – Nexus devices have always pushed the boundaries of what is possible in Android devices, both on a software and hardware level, so that manufacturers have something to aim for and surpass, something which the Nexus 9, at the very least, does for Android tablets. Obviously, Google has more recently toyed with affordable options like the Nexus 4, Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (and to a lesser extent the Nexus 10) and it has proven to be effective, if not lucrative, but perhaps Google has seen the need to lead the Android market again, something which is epitomized by the HTC-manufactured Nexus 9. And as for why Google chose HTC to help manufacture and design the Nexus 9?


“We saw the One and really liked how their designs were very simple, focused on usability and removed things that didn’t need to be there… they have nice craft and precision details and materials.” says Villarreal.

And that’s something we can’t argue with. The Nexus 9 is now available to pre-order on the Google Play Store starting at $399 USD.

Source: engadget


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The post The truth comes out: the Nexus 9 wasn’t designed as an iPad killer appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

24
Oct
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The Nexus 9 wasn’t designed to be an iPad killer


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The Nexus 9 wasn’t designed to be an iPad killer; it was designed to inspire Google’s Android partners to create one instead. Though you’d be forgiven for thinking otherwise: It was announced one day before the iPad Air 2 and mini 3, comes with a powerful 64-bit NVIDIA chip and will be competitively priced with Apple’s tablets. But Alberto Villarreal, head of the Nexus 9’s industrial design, insists that this wasn’t the purpose.

“We wanted to accelerate the premium market for Android tablets,” Villarreal said. “[The Nexus 9] has a lot of attributes and definitely will bring the quality for other companies to do better.”

http://www.engadget.com/embed-5min/?sid=577&responsive=false&hasCompanion=false&playerActions=123071&relatedMode=1&autoStart=false&playList=518479435

The Nexus 9 had to be a shining example in much the same way that last year’s Nexus devices, the 5 and 7, showed manufacturers that it’s possible to create inexpensive phones and tablets that look good and perform well. The team needed a partner with experience in creating premium devices, so it turned to HTC.

The team needed a partner with experience in creating premium devices, so it turned to HTC.

“We saw the One and really liked how their designs were very simple, focused on usability and removed things that didn’t need to be there,” Villarreal said. “They have nice craft and precision details and materials.”

HTC handled the Nexus 9’s production and worked closely with Google on its design and materials, but it looks unlike anything the Taiwan-based manufacturer has made before. The well-hidden BoomSound stereo speakers on the front are distinctively HTC, but otherwise the tablet looks like a blown-up version of the Nexus 5: The straight sides, matte soft-grip (polycarbonate) back and even the camera placement offer a very striking resemblance. (Villarreal helped design the Nexus 5 as well.) But the 9 takes on more of a premium appearance than last year’s smartphone thanks to its use of aluminum.

If the design team entertained the idea of an all-metal device, the thought didn’t stick. It preferred a layered approach: The aluminum sides provide rigidity and protection, in addition to its premium appearance, while the polycarbonate is meant to offer a better grip and more color options. And while the Nexus 9’s three hues — black, white and sand — aren’t exactly vibrant or eye-catching, a lot more consideration went into selecting the right shades.

“We’re moving away from technology-driven black and silver, which is very common in the industry, and trying to bring more of a fashion look to the portfolio,” Villarreal said.

While the options don’t scream fashion, Villarreal explained that his team chose sand to be more expressive and make a statement. The black shade has a slight blue tint when viewed from certain angles, and the white option is actually closer to gray to combat dirt and grubby hands.

The size of the 9 places it firmly in the middle of the tablet spectrum, between larger tablets like the iPad Air and Nexus 10 and smaller ones like the iPad mini and Nexus 7. I much prefer the screen’s 4:3 aspect ratio over the 16:10 panel on the Nexus 7. It may not make a huge difference when watching movies in landscape mode, but it definitely will in portrait. A 9-inch screen using 16:10 would simply be too long for comfort.

The size of the 9 places it firmly in the middle of the tablet spectrum.

Early in the development process, Google experimented with a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Villarreal said the number of design prototypes was “countless.” It settled on this particular design because it’s still portable and light enough for travel, but large enough to use as a productivity tool and entertainment device.

Indeed, it’s smaller and lighter than the iPad Airs and feels more portable. It also rivals Apple’s tablet in performance — on paper, anyway. If Google wants to prove it can be a serious productivity tool, this is the company’s golden opportunity. The Nexus 9 is packing a dual-core 2.3GHz NVIDIA Tegra K1 chipset, but don’t let the number of cores fool you: We’ve already seen a glimpse of what the first-generation K1 can do, and it was a fantastic performer. The new Nexus comes with the next-gen Denver K1, which comes with 64-bit support and is supposed to be even more powerful.

[Image credit: Google]

Since it was built with productivity in mind, Google also constructed a mechanical keyboard that doubles as a protective cover. It’s 5mm thick, attaches to the Nexus magnetically, comes with NFC for easy pairing and is supposed to last several months on one charge. Since it’s not quite as spaced-out as desktop and laptop boards, it’ll still take some time to get used to, but the keys didn’t feel quite as cramped as I expected.

“We worked together with the software team from the onset — it was a super-close collaboration.”

One of Google’s primary advantages in building a Nexus tablet is its control of both the hardware and software. As a result, the Nexus 9 was designed with Android 5.0 Lollipop already in mind.

“We worked together with the software team from the onset — it was a super-close collaboration,” Villarreal said. The new version of Android feels incredibly fresh, primarily due to Material Design, which is cleaner, flatter and more intuitive.

At a baseline cost of $399, the Nexus 9 is priced competitively against Apple’s iPad mini 3 and older Air, and it has plenty of power behind it. It may seem odd that the $200 Nexus 7 is no longer available as a more affordable option, but this move falls right in line with Google’s new strategy: Create a premium benchmark for its partners to follow. Instead of going into battle alone, it’s recruiting an army.

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23
Oct
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HTC One (M8) for Verizon now receiving software update with Eye Experience, Android 4.4.4


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A software update has arrived for Verizon customers with the HTC One (M8). It brings the Eye Experience software introduced a few weeks ago as well as Android 4.4.4 in a file totaling just over 210MB. The carrier estimates that the update will take six minutes and that is about what I experienced. The device cycles through some restarts with installations once the download is complete and then the device is ready to go. Of course, Android 4.4.4 is primarily unnoticed changes; however, the Eye Experience gives new features to the Camera app.

Come comment on this article: HTC One (M8) for Verizon now receiving software update with Eye Experience, Android 4.4.4

22
Oct
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Choose Your Own Android Giveaway (Updated): Win a free, top of the line, phone of your choice [Deal of the Day]


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UPDATE: The Nexus 6 has been added to the choices of handsets available to the winner!

Ready for a new handset but aren’t prepared to shell out the clams for an upgrade? Today just might be your day. We’re giving away a top-tier handset of your choice to ONE lucky winner in the Choose Your Own Android Giveaway!

The winner will choose between a Samsung Galaxy Note 4, Nexus 6, Motorola Moto X, HTC One M8, LG G3, or Samsung Galaxy Note Edge. Brand new and ready to use! One of these may have your name written all over it.There’s no purchase necessary and no complicated forms to fill out. All you’ll have to do is visit our contest page, click ENTER NOW, and submit your email address. It’s as easy as that. Sharing via social media gains you more entries. Good luck!

Check this deal out, and many others at deals.androidguys.com!


 

The post Choose Your Own Android Giveaway (Updated): Win a free, top of the line, phone of your choice [Deal of the Day] appeared first on AndroidGuys.

22
Oct
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A Nexus 6 vs HTC Nexus One size comparison shows us exactly how far the Nexus line has come



Nexus 6 vs HTC Nexus One size comparisonI think it would be a pretty fair statement to say that the new Nexus 6 polarizes the Android community. Some love it for the performance beast it is, while others find it hard to overlook the gigantic 5.96-inch display. One thing is certain, however, and that is the Nexus 6 is a spectacular culmination of the Nexus devices that came before it, some of which it physically dwarfs. To picture by how much the Nexus 6 dwarfs its predecessors, Phone Arena has constructed some mockups, of which the Nexus 6 vs HTC Nexus One size comparison is the most pronounced. The front surface of the Nexus 6 appears to almost equally about double of the Nexus One’s front face, remarkable to think that 3.7-inches might have been enough for us at some point.

Nexus 6 vs HTC Nexus One size comparisonA more traditional size comparison of the Nexus 6 and Nexus 5 is perhaps less spectacular, but no less distinct – even the Nexus 5 looks tiny compared to its new big brother. I very much doubt that nigh on 5 years ago we would have imagined that the phones that we would eventually own could eventually measure 6-inches, but then again it’s hard to fathom just how far hardware and software developments have come in that identical period. Some days, you just have to love technology.


What to you think about how far the Nexus line of devices has come? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: Phone Arena


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The post A Nexus 6 vs HTC Nexus One size comparison shows us exactly how far the Nexus line has come appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

22
Oct
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Verizon pushing Eye Experience update to its HTC One (M8) on Wednesday


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Either the hardware manufacturers are getting things right or the carriers are easing up on the testing phase. Tomorrow, owners of the HTC One (M8) on Verizon will be getting a software update. The update includes the new Eye Experience that was announced alongside the Desire Eye and RE Camera. HTC expects the over-the-air (OTA) update to arrive around noon on Wednesday.

Mo Versi, HTC’s VP of Product Management, tweeted the news on Tuesday:

HTC One (M8) Verizon owners! We have technical approval on Eye SW! OTA target for tomorrow at noon! #HTCAdvantage

Source: @moversi (Twitter)

Come comment on this article: Verizon pushing Eye Experience update to its HTC One (M8) on Wednesday

22
Oct
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T-Mobile’s HTC One (M8) now receiving Eye Experience update


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If you own a T-Mobile-branded HTC One (M8) you may want to listen up as the operator is now rolling out the much-anticipated Eye Experience camera user interface update to all variants of the smartphone currently located in the United States.

Hit the break to see the full changelog.

System Improvements:

  • Radio stability improvement
  • Transition improvements

Eye Experience Implementation:

  • Split Capture
  • Crop-Me-In
  • Photo Booth
  • Auto Selfie
  • Voice Selfie
  • Swipe-To-Switch
  • Video Face Tracking
  • Live Makeup
  • Video Screen Sharing

Application Improvements:

  • Camera stability
  • Video highlight stability
  • Zoe 1.0

To initiate the upgrade manually, make sure you’re connected to a Wi-Fi network. Then, from the home screen, press the Menu key, followed by Settings. Scroll to the bottom and tap ‘About Device’, followed by ‘Software Update and ‘Update Now’.

Source: Twitter

Come comment on this article: T-Mobile’s HTC One (M8) now receiving Eye Experience update

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