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Posts tagged ‘HP’

16
Oct
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HP calls time, will shut down webOS support on January 15th, 2015


Still hauling that Palm Pre around without a care in the world? Sorry to say but there’s a nasty surprise coming your way just after the holidays. HP has quietly announced that it’ll pull the plug on the catalog and cloud services that support webOS devices from January 15th of next year. That doesn’t mean that your hardware will shut down, but living with the gear is going to get considerably harder. Firstly, you won’t be able to purchase, download and restore apps, and you won’t be able to restore your phone from a backup either. Setting up a new device has also gone the way of all things, and if you lose your password, you won’t be getting it back. This is probably the excuse you need to buy a new phone, but don’t worry, because as long as we remember webOS in our hearts, it’ll never truly die, okay?

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Via: webOS Internals (Twitter), PivotCE

Source: HP, (2)

9
Oct
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Apple is now the fifth-largest PC maker in the world, if you ask IDC


MacBook Air

Apple is historically a small player in the PC world compared to many of its peers, but it may have just entered the big leagues. IDC estimates that the company jumped to 6.3 percent market share in the third quarter of the year, making it the fifth-largest PC builder worldwide — a feat it hasn’t managed in decades. It’s still no major threat to heavy-hitters such as Lenovo (20 percent), HP (18.8 percent) and Dell (13.3 percent), but IDC believes that a combination of slight price cuts and improved demand in “mature” markets like North America have helped it grow in a computer market that’s still shrinking.

With that said, the crew in Cupertino probably isn’t breaking out the party streamers right away. Gartner contends that ASUS claimed the fifth-place spot with 7.3 percent, and that Apple only sits in the top five in its native US. So what gives? In short, it’s a difference in methodology; Gartner and IDC don’t have official shipping numbers from everyone, and there’s enough wiggle room in their estimates that it wouldn’t take much for the rankings to change. As precise as these figures may be, you’ll get a better sense of how Apple fared when it posts its fiscal results (and real shipping numbers) in a couple of weeks.

IDC worldwide PC market share, Q3 2014

Gartner's worldwide PC market share estimate, Q3 2014

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Source: IDC, Gartner

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8
Oct
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From beginning to breakup: a history of HP’s highs and lows


HP's Jon Rubinstein and Todd Bradley unveil the Pre 3, Veer and TouchPad

HP’s recent decision to split into two companies is undoubtedly a big deal. It’s a cornerstone of Silicon Valley, and it has been synonymous with PCs for much of its lifetime. However, this is really just the latest chapter for a technology legend that has witnessed plenty of triumphs and disasters throughout its 75-year history. We’ve rounded up some of its greatest and lowest moments in a gallery, ranging from its humble beginnings in a garage to the webOS era and a series of scandals — check them out if you want to know how HP reached yet another turning point.

[Image credit: Kimihiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images]

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7
Oct
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Engadget Daily: Galaxy Alpha and Xperia Z3 reviews, the new ‘Smash Bros.’ and more!


Interested in upgrading to the Galaxy Alpha or Xperia Z3? You’ve come to the right place. Today, we take both handsets for a spin, journey through the historical roots of Assassin’s Creed: Unity, play a whole bunch of the new Smash Bros. for 3DS, and more. Read on for all our news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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5
Oct
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HP is reportedly splitting into two companies


HP laptops

HP’s home-focused and business divisions have frequently seemed at odds with each other, and apparently the company agrees. The Wall Street Journal claims that the tech giant is about to split into two companies, one focused on PCs and the other dedicated solely to corporate hardware and services. If the report is accurate, the separation could be announced as early as Monday. The exact reasoning behind the move hasn’t been mentioned, but the PC-centric group would be headed by one of its existing executives, Dion Weisler; current CEO Meg Whitman would run the business group and keep an eye on the other company by serving as its chairman of the board. However true the rumor may be, such a move wouldn’t be all that surprising — much of the computing industry has been restructuring and rescaling to cope with a world where the PC’s role is rapidly evolving.

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Source: Wall Street Journal

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30
Sep
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Cortana makes sure you don’t miss nearby concerts


Microsoft’s virtual assistant comes in handy for lots of things — especially reminders. Now, thanks to a hand from SeatGeek’s ticket engine, Cortana will alert you when bands you listen to on the regular have a tour stop close by. As you might expect, in addition to date and venue info, the add-on will also provide you with ticket prices and a handy link to purchase. A Concert Watch option is rolling out to the Music section of Cortana’s Notebook, and toggling the option on will keep you informed about performances in your area. Google Now does something similar for the Android faithful, displaying concert dates based on artists from your search queries. If you’re unable to see the new feature, sit tight: it appears to be on its way to handsets.

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Source: WP Central

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30
Sep
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HP’s $199 Windows laptop arrives alongside a pair of tablets


Contrary to earlier rumors, HP’s Chromebook-like Stream 14 turned out to be more expensive than people had hoped for when it was announced a few weeks ago. Having said that, today HP is finally introducing its $199 laptop with Windows, staying in line with what a company representative had told us before in regards to the Stream line expanding beyond the 14-inch machine. But there’s more, since HP’s new, budget-friendly, 11.6-inch laptop isn’t the only fresh announcement. There’s a 13.3-inch model as well, priced at $230, which, along with the $199 Stream, features an Intel Celeron processor and 32GB of flash storage. In addition to this pair of notebooks, HP is also introducing two Windows 8.1 tablets: the HP Stream 7 and HP Stream 8. If the moniker for each didn’t give it away, they are 7- and 8-inch slates, respectively, with the former costing a mere $99 and the latter going for $149.

Unfortunately, HP isn’t sharing many more details (like other specs) at the moment. We do know, however, that the company hopes to lure in customers by including a bit of free mobile data every month and access to Microsoft’s Office 365 Personal productivity suite, which is definitely a nice bonus. All devices announced are expected to be available in the US by the beginning of November. In the meantime, stay tuned — we’ll be adding hands-on photos and additional info shortly.

Update: We are at a media event in NYC and managed to play with the new members of the Stream lineup, save for the 7-inch tablet, which HP wasn’t showing off. What’s more, HP let us in on a few extra details. The notebooks, for one, are also sporting 2GB of RAM (with the aforementioned Celeron N2840 CPU), Intel HD Graphics and can last up to 8.5 hours on a charge. Meanwhile, the Stream tablets are packing an Intel Atom Z3735G quad-core processor, 32GB of onboard storage (expandable via microSD), 1GB RAM and Bluetooth 4.0. Overall, the list of specs isn’t too shabby, especially when you consider the relatively low price points HP has attached to these devices.

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24
Sep
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Students allegedly being forced to work in Chinese tech factories


Despite the efforts of major technology corporations, such as Apple and Samsung, to improve labor conditions in China, major problems are still slipping through the cracks. Now, as The Wall Street Journal writes, some Chinese students in their teenage years are reportedly being forced by their schools to work about 12 hours per day, six days a week, on factory assembly lines in that country. It gets worse, though. According to a 16-year-old student who spoke to The Wall Street Journal, she was told to either “spend summer making computers” for an HP supplier or wave goodbye to the chance of graduating from her vocational school. She’s only one of thousands of teenagers going through this situation, per the report.

Of course, this only adds more fuel to the fire. Last year, a number of factories in China (and in other parts of the world) came under pressure after findings of child labor violations, unreasonable hours and extremely poor working conditions, so much so that companies like Apple went as far as dropping suppliers. Back then, tech firms promised to monitor the situation closely, along with the China Labor Watch, but it clearly hasn’t been close enough to keep these factories from violating the rules.

[Image credit: Flickr/Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights]

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Source: The Wall Street Journal

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18
Sep
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HP Slate 7 Beats Special Edition tablet now available for $250



HP has released a new slate recently with one of the longest device names I can recall, the HP Slate 7 Beats Special Edition. The name says it all. It is a 7-inch tablet by HP with Beats audio integrated, and prominently displayed on the front.

HP Slate 7 Beats

The special edition tablet is a clear refresh of their Slate 7 Extreme. The tablet is sporting a 1280 x 800 resolution 7-inch screen with a pair of front facing Beats audio tuned speakers. The tablet is running Android 4.4.2 with a NVIDIA Tegra 4 quad-core processor, 1GB of RAM, 16GB internal storage (with an SD card slot). For photos you have a 5MP rear camera and a 2MP front shooter. Powering the device is a 4,100 mAh battery that is rated at 9 hours. The Slate also offers an amplified headphone jack, HDMI out and a Stylus. Yes, there is a stylus too.

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1&isUI=1As for extra software and perks, HP worked out a deal for 25GB of Box storage for the rest of your life. There are also a number of HP specific apps like HP ePrint, Stylus Lab Write and HP Connected Photo powered by Snapfish. Don’t forget the pre-installed Tegra Zone for all those specially tuned Tegra optimized games and such.

The Slate 7 Beats edition comes in the vibrant red you see above as well as a traditional black. Cost wise you are looking at $250. Feel free to dig in a little deeper if you are interested over at HP’s site.

Source: HP Via Liliputing


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The post HP Slate 7 Beats Special Edition tablet now available for $250 appeared first on AndroidSPIN.

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8
Sep
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HP’s Chromebook-like ‘Stream’ laptop is real, but not as cheap as we thought


Don’t believe everything you read, kids. When we first saw leaks for the HP Stream, a $199 laptop primarily meant to be used online, like a Chromebook, we were pretty excited — here was something as affordable as a Chrome OS device, but running full Windows. It turns out, however, that although the Stream is indeed a real product, it’s not as cheap as we all thought. HP just formally unveiled it, and it’s actually going to start at $300, not $199, as previously reported.

That disappointment aside — a $199 Windows laptop would have been sweet — the specs match up perfectly with the rumors. This is a 14-inch machine, with a 1,366 x 768 display, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of local storage and a low-powered AMD A4 Micro processor that allows for a fanless design. On the outside, it looks similar to HP’s Android-powered SlateBook, with bright-colored accents, two USB ports (3.0 and 2.0), an HDMI socket and a microSD slot. Even the weight is basically the same, at 3.8 pounds. Similar to how Chromebooks come with 100GB of Google Drive storage, the Stream will include 100GB of OneDrive space, free for two years.

The Stream ships later this month, on September 24th. The higher-than-expected price aside, we still hope to check one out — ultimately, having more alternatives to Chromebooks is a good thing. Until then, what say you guys? Anyone out there buying? Sound off in the comments.

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