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Posts tagged ‘Galaxy Note 3’

27
Nov

[Deal] Woot is selling unlocked Samsung handsets for under $300


samsung-phones-woot

Woot, as part of Black Friday, has started selling Unlocked variants of Samsung’s Galaxy S5, Galaxy Note 3, and Galaxy Note 4. While they might not be Samsung’s newest offerings, the Galaxy S5 and Galaxy Note 4 are still great performers today.

Woot is also selling some other smartphones, but they’re definitely much less impressive than the Samsung offerings.

Here’s what Woot is selling:

Keep in mind that these are refurbished models, though that might not necessarily be a downside, as they’ve been inspected in greater detail than when coming right off the presses. The big benefit of this deal is that you’ll be able to get a relatively good high-end smartphone for cheap. Not only that, but you’ll also be able to save a lot of money by going prepaid with one of these unlocked handsets.

Any takers?

source: Woot

Come comment on this article: [Deal] Woot is selling unlocked Samsung handsets for under $300

16
Sep

A History of the Galaxy Note Smartphone Series


samsung_unpacked_2015_galaxy_note_phones_TA

Samsung’s Galaxy Note series is still a mystery to some. “Who would want a device so massive?” is a common statement among onlookers. Many of us prefer the 5-inch form factor, which is why past Nexus devices, Moto X’s, and others have been so popular. Despite a market saturated with devices having a 5-inch form factor, the Galaxy Note series has managed to firmly corner a market wanting much larger options.

That isn’t a bad thing. After all, that’s what Android is all about–a variety of devices to fit different personalities, likes, and dislikes. However, the Galaxy Note series has an interesting history with the original Note launching in October of 2011.

Original Galaxy Note

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The original Galaxy Note was, at first, a strange device, not knowing what it really was. It featured specifications that are foreign to flagship devices today. It has a 5.3-inch 1280 x 800 Super AMOLED display, an Exynos chipset, a dual-core 1.4GHz ARM Cortex-A9 CPU, a Mali-400 GPU, 1GB of RAM, 16/32GB storage options, microSD support up to 64GB, an 8MP rear camera, a 2MP front camera, a, 2500mAh battery, and Android 2.3 Gingerbread.

The element that made this device unique was the inclusion of the S Pen, giving users more options and control with their smartphone.

Samsung created the Galaxy Note to be a user’s primary device for on-the-go activities. It would do whatever you needed it do–take notes by recreating the ease of traditional pencil and paper, take good photos for family vacations, be a great multimedia device, and so on. In essence, Samsung wanted to get rid of all the extra devices and accessories you take with you–pen, notepads, point-and-shoot cameras, and replace it with a single device: the Galaxy Note.

The most interesting aspect of the device is that the media wasn’t sure just how well the original Galaxy Note would fit in with its 5.3-inch display. At the time, that was a massive display and was considered extremely large for a phone, and almost unnecessary. However, it was still met with success, selling over 10 million units in a year.

This isn’t where the Note’s success stopped, though.

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Galaxy Note II

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Samsung’s Galaxy Note II was a big upgrade from the original Galaxy Note on the hardware and software side of things. It has a bigger, 5.5-inch 1280 x 720 Super AMOLED display, an Exynos 4412 chipset, a quad-core 1.6GHz Cortex-A9 CPU, a Mali-400MP4 GPU, 2GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB storage options, microSD support up to 64GB, 8MP rear camera, a 2MP front camera, a 3100mAh battery, and it’s running Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, upgradeable to KitKat.

Another modification was a revised S Pen, along with many added S Pen features. Added to the Galaxy Note II was pen gestures, split-screen multitasking, and Air View, a feature that lets users preview content by hovering the pen over the screen. There were some other new TouchWiz features included that was introduced with the Galaxy S III.

The original Galaxy Note’s success pales in comparison to what the Note II saw, selling well over 30 million units worldwide. Samsung certainly saw their was a market for large devices like this, and has seen a lot of success as result. However, after the Galaxy Note II, many other manufacturers began developing devices of a similar size to take advantage of this popularity.

Many still thought 5.5 inches was massive for a display at the time, but it would quickly become the norm in future editions.

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Galaxy Note 3

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The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 launched in September 2013, succeeding the Galaxy Note II. It was an extreme upgrade in hardware and offered more productivity options than the Galaxy Note series had seen in the past. The Galaxy Note 3 also ushered in a less blocky design, focusing on a much more premium offering.

It has a massive 5.7-inch 1920 x 1080 Super AMOLED display, a Snapdragon 800/Exynos 5 Octa 5420 chipset (varies by market), a quad-core 2.3GHz Krait 400/quad-core 1.9GHz Cortex-A15 and quad-core 1.3GHz Cortex-A7 CPU (varies by market), 3GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB storage options, microSD support up to 64GB, a 13MP rear camera, a 2MP front-facing camera, a 3200mAh battery, and the device is running Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, which is upgradeable to Android 5.0 Lollipop.

What was unique about the Galaxy Note 3 is that it introduced a plastic leather back as opposed to the silicone seen in the past. The faux leather gave the device a premium feel, though some didn’t like the new design at all. This new Galaxy Note 3 brought with it expanded S Pen functionality, such as Air Command, Action Memos, handwriting recognition, and much more.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The Galaxy Note 3 was met with yet more wild success, selling 10 million units in its first two months. Interestingly just a few months later, Samsung decided to offer a downgraded version of the device, the Galaxy Note 3 Neo.

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Galaxy Note 3 Neo

Galaxy Note 3 Neo White

The Galaxy Note 3, announced by Samsung Poland in January 2014, was intended to be a less pricier version of the Galaxy Note 3. The Galaxy Note 3 Neo’s specs were all downgraded, but nothing too bad. The only major change was that the display was reverted to a 5.5-inch 720p panel and the camera was reduced down from 13MP to 8MP.

Software and S Pen functionality remained the same. However, it turned out to be a big disappointment in that it was essentially a Galaxy Note 2 with an artificial leather back. Its biggest complaint was the extremely drop in screen resolution. After this, Samsung never made a “budget” Galaxy Note again.

Galaxy Note 4

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Samsung later in 2014 at IFA in Berlin announced the Galaxy Note 4, which was essentially a Galaxy Note 3 with a few minor changes, although there was a major improvement in resolution with the display.

It has a 5.7-inch 2560 x 1440 Super AMOLED display, a Snapdragon 805/Exynos 5433 chipset (varies by market), a quad-core 2.7GHz Krait 450/a quad-core 1.3GHz Cortex-A53 and quad-core 1.9GHz Cortex-A59 CPU (varies by market), 3GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB of internal storage, microSD support up to 128GB, a 16MP rear camera, a 3.7MP front camera, a 3220mAh battery, and it’s running Android 4.4 KitKat, which is upgradeable to Android 5.0 Lollipop.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The Galaxy Note 4 didn’t see as much success as previous entries in the Note series, only garnering 4.5 million units in its first month. This would also be the last Note device to see the faux leather back.

As with every release, more software features was brought to the device for added S Pen and TouchWiz UI functionality. While many of these aren’t necessary to the goals of the Note series, it reiterates Samsung’s effort to make the Galaxy Note an all-in-one device so that you won’t ever need to bring anything else with you, whether that be a notepad, camera, and so on.

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Galaxy Note Edge

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The Samsung Galaxy Note Edge can be pictured as Samsung’s “Frankenstein,” an experimental device. We’ve seen many devices with an edge-to-edge display, but nothing like the Galaxy Note Edge where it’s actually a curved display.

The device features a 5.6-inch 2560 x 1600 Super AMOLED display, it has Snapdragon 805 chipset, a quad-core 2.7GHz Krait 450 CPU, 3GB of RAM, 32/64GB of internal storage, microSD support up to 128GB, a 16MP rear camera, a 3.7MP front camera, a 3000mAh battery, and it’s running Android 4.4, which is upgradable to Android 5.1 Lollipop.

Aside from a small bump in resolution and a downgrade in battery, the Galaxy Note Edge’s specifications largely resemble that of the Galaxy Note 4. However, what makes it unique is that it has a curved display of 160px, running into the right side of the smartphone.

There was some additional functionality that worked with the curved display, but besides that, the device remains identical to the Galaxy Note 4. There’s been differing opinions regarding the Note Edge, but overall it seemed to do well, however, we haven’t heard news or rumors of another one in the works.

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Galaxy Note 5

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And here we arrive to this year’s refresh of the Galaxy Note. The device received a small bump in specifications, but nothing major. After all, Samsung’s focus this year wasn’t hardware, but offering a more premium device than it has in the past through a new design and better software features.

The phone totes a 5.7-inch 2560 x 1440 Super AMOLED display, a Exynos 7420 chipset, a quad-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A53 and a quad-core 2.1GHz Cortex-A57 CPU, 4GB of RAM, 32/64GB storage options, no microSD support, a 16MP rear camera, a 5MP front camera, and a 3000mAh battery, which isn’t field removable. It’s also on the latest version of Lollipop.

There’s been a lot of controversy regarding this device, largely because of closing off microSD access and sealing up the smartphone’s battery. There isn’t much reasoning behind getting rid of microSD support, however, we’re sure Samsung felt like they could seal up the battery by offering fast wireless charging features.

More controversy surrounds this device due to the S Pen. If you put it in its tray backwards, it gets stuck and generally cannot be removed without wrecking the device, though there have been some methods posted online to “unstick” the S Pen.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Overall, it’s a very nice looking device with a gorgeous glass back. There’s been a bevy of improved software features, and this is truly one of Samsung’s best, despite the controversy around it. Personally, the most upsetting aspect of this device is that European users won’t be able to get their hands on it, as Samsung, thus far, hasn’t revealed any plans to bring the device to European markets.

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Wrap Up

And that’s quick primer on Samsung’s Galaxy Note series. It truly is an interesting device, and its history is quite intriguing, especially considering that many thought anything above 5-inches was way too large for a smartphone. It still did very well, despite those thoughts, which were largely portrayed by the media.

Do you own a Galaxy Note device? Have you owned one in the past? If so, what do you like or even dislike about the Note series? Be sure to let us know in the comments below.

Come comment on this article: A History of the Galaxy Note Smartphone Series

4
Jul

Samsung and Oppo challenged in court over bloatware


The Shanghai Consumer Rights Protection Commission has announced that they are taking legal action against Samsung and Oppo over its practice of installing bloatware. In a study of over 20 different smartphones, they found that several were sold with non-essential apps preinstalled on the device. It was further discovered that these apps could not be uninstalled and many “stole” cellular data.

Two of the devices studied were the Samsung SM-N9008S (Galaxy Note 3), which had 44 such bloatware applications preinstalled and the Oppo X9007,  which had 71 such bloatware applications pre-installed.

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Oppo X9007

Some of the offending bloatware on the Samsung included an electronic dictionary and an online shopping program. The Oppo came with various programs and games.

The major problem that the commission found with these bloatware  apps is that they were not disclosed  to the purchasers of the phones before the purchase.

The litigation is our latest attempt to safeguard consumers’ rights after other methods failed… We hope it will force other companies in the sector to end the unreasonable, but common, practice of pre-installing apps without telling consumers. This is something that is very much necessary for the healthy development of the whole industry,

Tao Ailian – Secretary-General of the Shanghai Consumer Rights Protection Commission

In the legal challenge, the commission is hoping to bring to an end the practice of pre-installing applications without informing the consumer of said actions. If they win their case, manufacturers will be legally obligated to not only inform consumers of what apps come pre-installed but to also provide them a clear method of removing unwanted apps.

Samsung and Oppo have until July 17, 2015, to file their defense and then the court will announce a trial date.

Hopefully, this will lead to a legal precedent that will end the practice of installing unwanted and uninstallable programs. What do you think? Do you agree or disagree? Let us know in the comments below.

Source: Shanghai Daily

The post Samsung and Oppo challenged in court over bloatware appeared first on AndroidGuys.

3
Jun

Large smartphones rule the roost in latest consumer satisfaction survey


201506_acsi_smartphone_satisfaction_scores

When Samsung first came out with a large smartphone, the Galaxy Note, it was derided by many as being too big and spawned the term “phablet” as consumers tried to describe a device that seemed to land in between a phone and a tablet. A few years later though we see several companies producing smartphones in this category and even Apple is selling one, the iPhone 6 Plus, now. In a recent survey of 20 smartphones, consumers ranked these large smartphones high with the top three firmly coming from the “phablet” camp.

Leading the way in consumer satisfaction was the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 with a score of 86 out of 100 on the American Consumer Satisfaction Index survey of 70,000 participants. Half of the devices tied for second place with a score of 82 were large smartphones with both the Galaxy Note 3 and the iPhone 6 Plus reaching this position. Close behind in seventh place was the LG G3 with a score of 80. Overall, consumers were quite happy with their smartphones as the industry achieved some of its highest scores ever.

One factor that may have helped these larger smartphones find their way to the top of the rankings is their bigger batteries. Since the devices are larger, manufacturers can pack in heftier batteries that can last quite a bit longer than typical smartphone batteries. Poor battery life is a weak point for the industry according to the participants surveyed, so being able to outlast others helped keep consumers happy.

source: ACSI
via: Mashable

Come comment on this article: Large smartphones rule the roost in latest consumer satisfaction survey

16
May

Samsung distributing Lollipop OTA for the Galaxy Note 3 in South Korea


Samsung_Galaxy_Note_3_TA_Back_Bottom_Galaxy_Note_3_Logo

A month later than expected, Samsung is now finally distributing the long-awaited Android 5.0 Lollipop update to all unlocked variants of the Galaxy Note 3 with the model number SM-N900S in South Korea.

All the changes you’d expect to find are bundled into this upgrade, including support for multiple accounts, improved notifications, a smoother multitasking experience and the recently-announced Material Design guidelines.

The full changelog can be seen below.

  • Material Design: You will quickly notice a whole new colorful look and feel to your device – from fluid animations to new application and system themes, colors and widgets.
  • Notifications UI & Priorities: In order to alert you to the mosttimely and relevant information, the format and behavior of notifications have evolved:
    • notifications will appear on the lock screen and are intelligently ranked by type and who sent them.
    • you double-tap to open one, swipe left or right to clear one, or clear all notifications from the bottom of the list.
    • you can set the priority and privacy of notifications for each application.
    • very high priority notifications will pop up briefly over other applications so that you can take action.
    • when you dismiss a notification on one device it will be dismissed on your other Android devices, if they are connected to the Internet.
    • you can further tailor how notifications behave with the new Downtime and Ambient Display settings (see below).
  • New Interruptions & Downtime Settings: You can tailor how interruptions behave, choosing to allow all, none, or only priority interruptions.  You can personalize what counts as a priority interruption (reminders, events, calls, messages) and even tailor them to be from only contacts you specify.  The Downtime setting will allow only priority interruptions during the times and days that you specify.  e.g. allow only priority interruptions on the weekend.
  • Recent Apps (Multi-tasking): The redesigned Overview space (formerly called Recents) will include both applications and separate activities within those applications.  For instance, each open tab in Chrome will also appear here along with recent applications; both your Gmail Inbox and a draft email message will appear as separate cards.  This provides a consistent way to switch amongst tasks.
  • Flashlight: Lollipop includes a new flashlight option as part of Quick settings (swipe down with two fingers from the status bar to see it).
  • Pin a view/app: Screen pinning allows you to keep a specific app or screen in view. For example, you can ‘pin’ a game and your child will not be able to navigate anywhere else on your phone.
  • Battery: The Battery settings panel now shows an estimated projection for how much time you have left while discharging or charging.  You can also enable a new battery saver mode that will save power by reducing performance and most background data operations to extend your battery life.
  • Smarter Internet Connections: With Android Lollipop, your phone will not connect to a Wi-Fi access point unless there is a verified Internet connection. This feature improves hand-offs between Wi-Fi and cellular connections, helping to maintain your video chat or voice-over-IP (VoIP) call as you switch.
  • Performance: Your phone now uses the new Android Runtime to help optimize application performance.  After upgrading to Lollipop, your applications will undergo a one-time optimization process.  Note that the optimization for ART requires more space.
  • Security: Encryption can now use a stronger 256-bit key to help protect your data.  Note that the stronger key willonly be used after you perform a factory reset on Android Lollipop.  Otherwise encryption will continue to use 128-bit key.  You can turn on encryption in the Security settings menu.

As is customary with all manufacturer updates, the upgrade is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device, you could always search for the update manually. To do this head into Settings, followed by About Device, then System Update and hit Check for Update.

 

 

Come comment on this article: Samsung distributing Lollipop OTA for the Galaxy Note 3 in South Korea

1
May

Note 3 LTE’s in Poland now receiving Lollipop update


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Samsung is finally rolling out the long-awaited Android 5.0 update to all LTE variants of the Galaxy Note 3 located in Poland. As far as added functionality goes, this upgrade transports the latest build of Lollipop to the handset, in addition to a multitude of bug fixes and stability improvements.

Hit the break for the full changelog.

  • Material Design: You will quickly notice a whole new colorful look and feel to your device – from fluid animations to new application and system themes, colors and widgets.
  • Notifications UI & Priorities: In order to alert you to the mosttimely and relevant information, the format and behavior of notifications have evolved:
    • notifications will appear on the lock screen and are intelligently ranked by type and who sent them.
    • you double-tap to open one, swipe left or right to clear one, or clear all notifications from the bottom of the list.
    • you can set the priority and privacy of notifications for each application.
    • very high priority notifications will pop up briefly over other applications so that you can take action.
    • when you dismiss a notification on one device it will be dismissed on your other Android devices, if they are connected to the Internet.
    • you can further tailor how notifications behave with the new Downtime and Ambient Display settings (see below).
  • New Interruptions & Downtime Settings: You can tailor how interruptions behave, choosing to allow all, none, or only priority interruptions.  You can personalize what counts as a priority interruption (reminders, events, calls, messages) and even tailor them to be from only contacts you specify.  The Downtime setting will allow only priority interruptions during the times and days that you specify.  e.g. allow only priority interruptions on the weekend.
  • Recent Apps (Multi-tasking): The redesigned Overview space (formerly called Recents) will include both applications and separate activities within those applications.  For instance, each open tab in Chrome will also appear here along with recent applications; both your Gmail Inbox and a draft email message will appear as separate cards.  This provides a consistent way to switch amongst tasks.
  • Flashlight: Lollipop includes a new flashlight option as part of Quick settings (swipe down with two fingers from the status bar to see it).
  • Pin a view/app: Screen pinning allows you to keep a specific app or screen in view. For example, you can ‘pin’ a game and your child will not be able to navigate anywhere else on your phone.
  • Battery: The Battery settings panel now shows an estimated projection for how much time you have left while discharging or charging.  You can also enable a new battery saver mode that will save power by reducing performance and most background data operations to extend your battery life.
  • Smarter Internet Connections: With Android Lollipop, your phone will not connect to a Wi-Fi access point unless there is a verified Internet connection. This feature improves hand-offs between Wi-Fi and cellular connections, helping to maintain your video chat or voice-over-IP (VoIP) call as you switch.
  • Performance: Your phone now uses the new Android Runtime to help optimize application performance.  After upgrading to Lollipop, your applications will undergo a one-time optimization process.  Note that the optimization for ART requires more space.
  • Security: Encryption can now use a stronger 256-bit key to help protect your data.  Note that the stronger key willonly be used after you perform a factory reset on Android Lollipop.  Otherwise encryption will continue to use 128-bit key.  You can turn on encryption in the Security settings menu.

As is customary with all manufacturer updates, the upgrade is being rolled out in stages, but if you don’t feel like waiting for a notification confirming that it’s ready for your device, you can search for the update manually.

Come comment on this article: Note 3 LTE’s in Poland now receiving Lollipop update

16
Apr

Android Lollipop now rolling out to Samsung Galaxy Note 3 on Verizon


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Verizon has been busy recently with rollouts of the Android Lollipop operating system to many devices in their portfolio. The latest device to join the list is the Samsung Galaxy Note 3. The update for the Galaxy Note 3 brings all of the expected Lollipop improvements like Material Design for apps and some under the hood optimizations to help with battery life. Verizon indicates they have incorporated Samsung’s tweaks to the Touchwiz interface as well.

The update should be rolling out to users via an over-the-air process and users will be notified when the update is ready to be installed. Users can also check for the update and initiate the download by going into their settings and checking for an update.

Verizon notes that with the update to the operating system, users should expect to see battery life decline for 2-3 days before returning to normal. Likewise, the new system takes a couple days to optimize application memory which can cause some sluggishness.

source: Verizon

Come comment on this article: Android Lollipop now rolling out to Samsung Galaxy Note 3 on Verizon

10
Apr

Lollipop arrives on Sprint for Galaxy Note 3 and Galaxy Note Edge


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If you’re a Sprint customer and own a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and/or Galaxy Note Edge, your wait for Lollipop is over! This update will bring you to Android 5.0 and not 5.1, though.

This update is arriving over-the-air (OTA) starting immediately. Be advised, Sprint has already stated that this update will be coming in stages over the next few days, so if you don’t have it right this second, keep checking for it!

The update is also bringing WiFi calling enhancements and Factory Reset Protection to the Note Edge only.

Source: Sprint Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and Sprint Samsung Galaxy Note Edge

Come comment on this article: Lollipop arrives on Sprint for Galaxy Note 3 and Galaxy Note Edge

3
Apr

Rogers and TELUS start rolling out Lollipop update for the Note 3


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Canadian carriers Rogers and TELUS have now started pushing out the Lollipop update to all their carrier-branded variants of the Note 3. This upgrade brings the latest build of the Android operated system, in addition to a truckload of bug fixes and stability improvements.

In order to install the update, you will have to have 3GB of storage available. If you don’t have enough, we recommend transferring some your files to Google Drive or Dropbox. You’ll also need to be connected to an active Wi-Fi network and have 50% of juice.

If your handset meets all of the above criteria, simply head into Settings, followed by About Device and click Check for Software Update, to download and install the upgrade. Alternatively, you can wait until you receive a push notification prompting you to update.

Come comment on this article: Rogers and TELUS start rolling out Lollipop update for the Note 3

25
Mar

Samsung Galaxy Note 3 on AT&T getting Android Lollipop now


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Earlier today AT&T starting rolling out the Android Lollipop update to the Samsung Galaxy Note 4. Turns out that is not the only Note device on AT&T getting Lollipop today as the carrier started rolling out the update for the Galaxy Note 3 as well.

AT&T’s support site does not indicate whether the update includes some of the additional apps the Galaxy Note 4 is receiving, like Evernote or Amazon Shopping. There is also no indication as to whether Samsung modified the update from Samsung to ensure the mute mode works properly.

Users can wait for the OTA update notification to show up on their device to start the update process. They can also check to see if the update is available for them by going to Settings –> General –> About device –> Software updates –> Check for updates.

source: AT&T

Come comment on this article: Samsung Galaxy Note 3 on AT&T getting Android Lollipop now

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