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Posts tagged ‘Dell’

18
Nov
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Check out our laptop buyer’s guide for the best in portable PCs


Tablets are great, but if you’re really looking to get some work done, a laptop is still one of the best for the job, especially if you need flexibility and portability. With the variety of Chromebooks, Ultrabooks and slimmed-down gaming laptops on offer, you don’t even have to weigh yourself down anymore. So if you’re looking for an upgrade, it’s definitely worth checking out the laptop section in our buyer’s guide or the gallery below for a few suggestions. We’ll also be adding new items in the months to come, so let us know (in the comments below) if there’s something you’d like to see listed.

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6
Nov
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Engadget Daily: The Jawbone Up3, light bulbs that fool burglars and more!


As it turns out, smart light bulbs aren’t just good at saving you from high utility bills — they can prevent burglaries too. Read on for Engadget’s news highlights from the last 24 hours, including the Jawbone Up3, Dell Venue 11 Pro, and Google’s latest Maps update.

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6
Nov
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Dell selling Chromebox bundled with keyboard and mouse for only $199


ChromeboxIf you’re in the market for a new Chromebox you should start paying attention. Dell released a Chromebox bundle online for $199. That bundle includes a wireless mouse and keyboard (valued at $39). The Chromebox from Dell sports 2GB of RAM, a fourth-generation Intel processor, and an Intel 7260ac HMC network card. However the deal does not include a monitor so if you’re going to buy this make sure to have one on-hand.

Normally the Chromebox retails for just under $300. So if you’re in the market for a new Chromebox, hit the source link below. There’s no telling just how long this deal is going to last, so you better hurry.

source: Dell

Come comment on this article: Dell selling Chromebox bundled with keyboard and mouse for only $199

5
Nov
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Dell’s new Venue 11 Pro tablet is thin and light enough to take on the Surface Pro 3


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Nope, that’s not a Surface Pro up there. But it’s close. Dell just refreshed its 10.8-inch Venue 11 Pro tablet, and, much like Microsoft’s slate, it’s gone on a bit of a diet. Whereas the original Venue 11 Pro ran on a traditional, laptop-grade Core i5 processor, this one uses one of Intel’s new Core M chips, which allows it to be much thinner and lighter — and fanless, too. All told, it now comes in at 1.62 pounds and measures .42 inch thick — not bad for what’s essentially an 11-inch laptop replacement. (It’s even slightly lighter than the Surface Pro 3, though to be fair, Microsoft’s tablet also has a bigger screen.)

As before, it’ll be available with your choice of Core i3- and i5-series processors, a 1080p IPS screen and an optional Synaptics-made digitizer for pressure-sensitive pen input. Given that this is a lower-powered Core M processor, we wouldn’t be surprised if the performance were slightly below last year’s model but even so, battery life is supposed to be longer: up to 10 hours on the tablet, plus another 10 if you add the optional Mobile Keyboard, which has its own 10-hour battery built in. Speaking of the sort, both of last year’s keyboards, including the “Slim” folio, will work with this year’s model as well. Good news for IT departments that already sprang for the accessories, and only want to upgrade the actual tablet. The Venue Pro 11 starts at $699 with the Slim keyboard included. Storage starts at 64GB, but there will also be 128GB and 256GB models available. Look for it this month, and in the meantime, enjoy the hands-on photos.

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28
Oct
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Alienware puts its new gaming desktop and 13-inch laptop up for sale


If you liked the looks of Alienware’s new thin-and-light 13-inch laptop or its bigass, futuristic-looking Area-51 desktop, then listen up: Both are on sale beginning tomorrow, with shipments starting in November, and we finally know the full specs. Starting with the Alienware 13, it goes from $999 (£949 in the UK) with a dual-core Core i5-4210U processor, 8GB of RAM, a 2GB NVIDIA GeForce 860M GPU, 1TB 5,400RPM disk and a fairly low-res 1,366 x 768, non-touch matte display. If you like, you can step up to 16GB of RAM, either a hybrid hard drive or up to a 512GB SSD, and either a 1080p non-touch display or a 2,560 x 1,440 touchscreen. It would seem, though, that despite those various upgrade options, there’s only one choice for the CPU and graphics card. Regardless of the configuration you get, the whole thing comes wrapped in a slimmed-down package that weighs about four and a half pounds and measures an inch thick.

Meanwhile, the Area-51 starts at $1,699 (£1,299 in the UK) with a six-core Intel Core i7-5820K processor, a 2GB AMD RadeonTM R9 270 GPU, 8GB of RAM, a 2TB 7,200RPM hard drive and a slot-loading DVD burner. From there, you’ve got lots of upgrade options — way more than on the Alienware 13 laptop. On the CPU side, there’s a slightly faster six-core Intel Core i7-5930K processor (clocked at 3.5GHz instead of 3.3GHz), as well as an eight-core Intel Core i7-5960X chip. In total, there are four memory slots; Dell will ship the machine with eight, 16 or 32GB. When it comes to storage, you can step up to a 128GB SSD plus a 2TB 7,200RPM drive; a 256GB SSD with a 4TB HDD; or a 512GB solid-state drive, also with a 4TB disk.

As for graphics, well, this might take a few sentences: The Area-51 is available in single-, double- and triple-GPU configs. If all you can afford is one graphics card, your upgrade options include a 2GB NVIDIA GTX 770, a 3GB GTX 780, a 4GB GTX 980 or the GTX Titan Z with 12GB of GDDR5 VRAM. Ready to hear the dual-card options? You can get the GTX 770 with 4GB (2 x 2GB), the GTX 780 with 6GB (2 x 3GB), the GTX 980 with 8GB (2 x 4GB) or the Titan Z with 24GB (2 x 12GB). Across the board, NVIDIA’s SLI technology is enabled. Finally, the three-GPU options include a mix of both NVIDIA and AMD cards (but mostly NVIDIA). There’s the GTX 770 with 6GB (3 x 2GB), the GTX 780 with 9GB (3 x 3GB) and the GTX 980 with 12GB (3 x 4GB). If you’re an AMD fan, meanwhile, you an score the Radeon R9 290X with 12 gigs (again, 3 x 4GB). Depending on which brand of graphics card you choose, you’ll get either NVIDIA’s SLI technology or AMD Crossfire. Lastly, there’s a Blu-ray drive option, in case you haven’t quite ditched physical media.

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28
Oct
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Alienware’s got a massive $300 dock for your new graphics card


Alienware's got a massive, $300 dock for your new graphics card

We know what you’re thinking: What the hell is a “graphics amplifier”? (Some of you smartasses are probably also wondering if it goes to eleven.) In fact, it is what it sounds like: The Amplifier, a new accessory from Alienware, is a big ol’ shell that lives on your desk, with room for nearly any desktop-grade GPU (anything up to 375 watts). Once you get that set up, you plug the thing into your gaming laptop via a cable and boom, your notebook is suddenly running off a desktop-grade GPU, not the mobile one that came built inside the chassis. As a bonus, the Amplifier also has four powered USB ports, so you can also use this as a docking station for your keyboard, mouse, monitor, et cetera. And yes, that glowing Alienware head on the front has customizable lighting. Of course it does.

Sounds kinda rad, right? Right. Well, except for one teeny detail: This requires a proprietary, PCI-Express-based cable, one that only works on the new Alienware 13. According to a Dell spokesperson, future models will use the same connection port but for now, even if you have an older Alienware machine you’re outta luck. Of course, too, if you own a notebook from another brand, like Razer or ASUS, this will be of absolutely no use to you. Which makes sense: Dell wants to give people an incentive to buy Alienware laptops. This is, at the end of the day, just an Alienware add-on and little more. But come on, imagine how many of these Dell would sell if it could make the thing work using a common standard.

Assuming we haven’t taken the winds out of your sails, this is up for preorder today for $299 in the US and £199 in the UK (GPU not included), and is expected to ship sometime in November. As for the rest of you, well, we’ll always have Spinal Tap, right?

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9
Oct
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Apple is now the fifth-largest PC maker in the world, if you ask IDC


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Apple is historically a small player in the PC world compared to many of its peers, but it may have just entered the big leagues. IDC estimates that the company jumped to 6.3 percent market share in the third quarter of the year, making it the fifth-largest PC builder worldwide — a feat it hasn’t managed in decades. It’s still no major threat to heavy-hitters such as Lenovo (20 percent), HP (18.8 percent) and Dell (13.3 percent), but IDC believes that a combination of slight price cuts and improved demand in “mature” markets like North America have helped it grow in a computer market that’s still shrinking.

With that said, the crew in Cupertino probably isn’t breaking out the party streamers right away. Gartner contends that ASUS claimed the fifth-place spot with 7.3 percent, and that Apple only sits in the top five in its native US. So what gives? In short, it’s a difference in methodology; Gartner and IDC don’t have official shipping numbers from everyone, and there’s enough wiggle room in their estimates that it wouldn’t take much for the rankings to change. As precise as these figures may be, you’ll get a better sense of how Apple fared when it posts its fiscal results (and real shipping numbers) in a couple of weeks.

IDC worldwide PC market share, Q3 2014

Gartner's worldwide PC market share estimate, Q3 2014

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Source: IDC, Gartner

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20
Sep
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The 10 phones that fueled the big-screen revolution


Dell Streak

It’s safe to say that Steve Jobs was off the mark when he declared that no one would buy big smartphones — they’ve become popular enough that Apple itself is now making large iPhones. But how did these supersized devices escape their niche status to become the must-haves they are today? The transformation didn’t happen overnight. It took a succession of ever-bigger phones to spark the public imagination and prove that huge screens were here to stay. We’ve rounded up 10 of the most important examples — head on over to our gallery see how enormous became the new normal.

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10
Sep
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Dell’s new stick lets you share your tablet’s screen with bigger displays


Dell Cast in action

If you happen to own one of Dell’s Venue tablets, you now have an easy way to put its content on a bigger screen. Dell has just launched the Cast, a simple stick that lets you link your slate to any HDMI-equipped display. You can either mirror your screen directly (much like Chromecast) or use the larger panel as a makeshift desktop, including multiple web browser windows. Shades of Motorola’s Webtop, anyone? The add-on is available now for $80, although you may need to be patient depending on your choice of platform. Only Android-based Venue tablets can use the Cast right away. You’ll have to wait until later this year to pair it with Windows-based models like the Venue 8 Pro.

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Source: Dell

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10
Sep
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Engadget Daily: The best non-Apple news all in one place!


So, even aside from the bevy of news that came out of Apple’s iPhone 6 and Watch event today, there was still a ton of pretty interesting reads from the past 24 hours: Destiny developer Bungie spilled on what truly separates the game from its previous work, Stephen Hawking made a plea for a connected wheelchair and much, much more — it’s all in the gallery below!

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