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Posts tagged ‘Camera’

19
Sep
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Accessory of the Day: Motorola Wi-Fi home monitoring camera $99.99


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Whether you want to stay connected with your pets, keep an eye on your belongings, or be alerted of temperature/sound/motion variations in your home, the Motorola Focus S66 is the best bang for your buck. You’ll be able to enjoy two-way communication thanks to the built-in microphone. Stream and record in 720p straight to your device or to the cloud with Motorola’s free Hubble app. $99.99 (Prime eligible), with four-star customer feedback, is a true value considering the safety, security, and peace of mind this little unit comes with.

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The post Accessory of the Day: Motorola Wi-Fi home monitoring camera $99.99 appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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17
Sep
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Fujifilm packs a ton of power in the X30 point-and-shoot


The highlight for Fujifilm at this year’s Photokina is undoubtedly the X100T and its brilliant hybrid viewfinder, but the X30 point-and-shoot is also not to be missed. Internally, the $599 compact is nearly identical to its predecessor, the X20, with the same 12-megapixel, 2/3-inch CMOS sensor and f/2.0-2.8, 28-112mm lens, but it features a few improvements that might make an upgrade worthwhile for at least a few select Fuji fans. The most significant boost is a new 2.36M-dot electronic viewfinder, which provides a full 100-percent view, along with a new tilting 3-inch high-res LCD.

The X30 also includes dual control rings around the lens, letting you zoom with one and adjust settings, such as aperture or shutter speed, with the other. A new processor enables faster SD card write times while an improved battery gets you 470 shots on a full charge, compared to just 270 frames with the X20. You also get integrated WiFi, with full control of the camera via a smartphone app, including touch focusing, shutter speed, aperture, self timer, flash and white balance adjustments. The camera performed very well during our test, with speedy focus and a fast EVF response time. And it looks fantastic to boot. The Fujifilm X30 ships next month for $599.

Edgar Alvarez contributed to this report.

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17
Sep
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Leica continues tradition of re-branding Panasonic cams with V-Lux, D-Lux


We’ve seen plenty of interesting rebrands in past years. Leica’s perhaps the most prolific manufacturer to redesign housings and jack up a camera’s price, but Hasselblad is also guilty of trying to pass off a competitor’s cam as its own, with the $10,000 Solar. Leica’s own recreations are hardly as egregious — select photographers certainly don’t mind paying a few hundred dollars more for what’s arguably a better-looking camera from a more premium brand, making this year’s V-Lux and D-Lux a reasonable purchase for some. That first model is based on the Panasonic Lumix FZ1000, while the D-Lux is a deluxe version of the LX100, which squeezes a powerful Micro Four Thirds sensor into a surprisingly compact body.

The challenge, of course, comes down to pricing. If you opt for the generally identical Panasonic models, you’ll pay much less. Panasonic’s FZ1000 costs $899, for example, though Leica’s pricing its equivalent at €1,100 (about $1,425). The LX100, meanwhile, will also run you $899, compared to €995 (nearly $1,300) for the Leica D-Lux model. If you can afford to look past that discrepancy, you’ll end up with a great (perhaps better) looking alternative to two of the most powerful point-and-shoots on the market. The V-Lux hits shelves next month, while you’ll need to wait until November to pick up a D-Lux.

Photos by Edgar Alvarez.

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17
Sep
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Capture super-sharp shots with Leica’s X point-and-shoot


Leica cameras are not without their critics, especially when it comes to pricing (which admittedly can be absolutely absurd at times), but the company’s point-and-shoots are more affordable. Of course you’ll still pay a significant premium for the Leica name, but if you have the cash to spare, there are some very capable cameras to choose from, including the latest X model we met at Photokina today. Like its predecessor, the X sports a large 16.2-megapixel APS-C sensor (the same size you’ll find in most DSLRs), paired with a fixed 23mm f/1.7 lens, which provides a field of view equivalent to a 35mm lens on a full-frame camera.

The X is awfully sharp looking, and it’s very lightweight as well. You can shoot JPEG and RAW stills, along with 1080/30p video. There’s a crisp 3-inch LCD with a very wide viewing angle (helpful, considering it doesn’t pop out or tilt), and you can add on an EVF if you’d like. There’s a 5 frames-per-second consecutive shooting mode and a top sensitivity of ISO 12,500. The Leica X is shipping now for €1,850 in Europe or $2,295 in the US in brown with silver accents or with an all-black finish.

Photos by Edgar Alvarez.

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16
Sep
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Relonch camera case brings an APS-C sensor, f/2 lens to your iPhone


“It would be really hard to make a trashy photo.” That’s the actual tagline for a company called Relonch, which just launched (correct spelling) a camera case for iPhone 5 and iPhone 6 at Photokina today. Normally we’d dismiss such a product as vaporware, but this could end up being a pretty nifty gadget, if it ever makes it to market. Once you slide your iPhone into the $499 jacket, you’ll have access (via the Lightning port) to an APS-C sensor and a permanently affixed f/2 (or better) lens. The version above is just a mock-up — we did see a working prototype (it performed very well), which is simply a hodgepodge of “parts from different cameras.” The final version will also serve as an external battery for your smartphone, enabling more than four hours of use.

That all sounds great, but there are two major challenges here. First, the company is targeting “late 2015″ for orders to ship, which means your iPhone 6 will probably be a year old by the time you get this case. Given that each version is designed to fit only one phone, you’ll need to buy a new case whenever you upgrade your phone, unless the next iPhone has an identical footprint to the current model. Additionally, Relonch will charge your credit card for $499 as soon as you place an order, and given that you’re sending funds to a company with no track record of delivering products, handing over half a grand is risky at best.

Fortunately, there are other solutions on the market. Sony’s lens cameras, which, while not quite as seamless and elegant, work with just about any smartphone, and they’re available today. The QX1, which ships in November, even includes an APS-C sensor, which should get you comparable results depending on which lens you attach. You could also consider Panasonic’s CM1 smartphone, which includes an integrated one-inch sensor and an f/2.8 lens.

Photos by Edgar Alvarez.

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Source: Relonch

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16
Sep
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Leica’s medium-format S shoots 4K video, 37.5-megapixel stills


Leica’s ready to jump on the professional video bandwagon, releasing its 4K-capable S here at Photokina in Cologne, Germany. The 37.5-megapixel camera sports a medium-format sensor that’s just a hair larger than full-frame, giving you a crop factor of 0.8x. It can snap 3.5 frames per second in a continuous-shooting mode, 1080/30p video and 4K clips at 24 fps. You can capture 42MB RAW files or 37.5, 9.3 or 2.3-megapixel JPGs, but if you’re spending €20,230 ($25,400 in the US) on a camera (body only), you better be shooting RAW.

The bundled battery lets you snap up to 1,000 stills, so while many pros will be tethered to an external pack or an outlet, you can also use the cam away from another power source if you’d like. There’s clean HDMI output, of course, for pushing 4K video to an external recorder, which you’ll need to purchase separately. You’ll also need to add on a lens, such as the €6,450 ($7,995 in the US) 100mm f/2 Summicron-S we were shooting with in the hands-on photos above. While most of us don’t have nearly $35,000 to spend on a camera and one lens, there’s no doubt that the latest S will make its way onto at least a few magazine cover/billboard/motion picture shoots in the months and years to come.

Photos by Edgar Alvarez.

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16
Sep
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Meet the Leica X-E, an almost-affordable APS-C compact


Leica, Leica X-E, X-ELeica just released an update to its X2 point-and-shoot camera here at Photokina. The X-E has a look and feel that’s very similar to its predecessor, with comparable specs as well. There’s a 16.5-megapixel APS-C sensor that, like the X model also announced today, can capture images with a level of quality that rivals that of many DSLRs. What you can’t do, unfortunately, is swap in a different lens — there’s a 24mm f/2.8 optic permanently attached, which is what you’d expect given the light weight and compact size, but if you need to get closer to your subject, you’ll need to walk forward rather than zoom in.

As with all APS-C sensors, the X-E’s has a crop factor of 1.5x, making that 24mm lens equivalent to a 35mm optic on a full-frame camera. There’s a 230k-dot (low-res) 2.7-inch LCD, a 5 fps continuous shooting mode and a top sensitivity of ISO 12,500. The X-E does not, however, shoot video, which is quite disappointing given the price. At €1,490 in Europe or $1,795 in the US, you might be better off spending an extra grand for Sony’s full-frame RX1, but if a Leica’s what you’re after, this is a decent choice. The X-E is available now through select retailers.

Photos by Edgar Alvarez.

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16
Sep
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Hands-on with Leica’s super-rare $19,400 M Edition 60


As of this writing, 15,000 Euro is the equivalent of $19,400 — a very reasonable exchange rate indeed, and a fair price to pay for a mid-range car or a year of college. Only a select few can justify handing over that sum for a digital camera, however, regardless of the exclusivity that comes in tow. Leica’s counting on at least a few die-hard fans to fork over the cash, though, for the M Edition 60, a very special model created to celebrate the M system’s 60th anniversary. Only 600 have been made, and each is numbered between 001 and 600. Most peculiar is what this camera doesn’t include — a display, menu system, electronic viewfinder or any indicators at all, besides a tiny red light that flashes when the SD card is in use.

Instead, the only way to review your shoot is to pop the SD card into a computer. There’s no USB port to speak of, or an HDMI output. Not even a monochrome LCD readout. A large ISO dial (from 200-6400) occupies the area where you’d normally find a display. You set the aperture directly on the bundled Summilux-M 35 mm f/1.4 ASPH lens, and the shutter speed using a dedicated dial beside the shutter release. The M Edition 60, which is based on the 24-megapixel Leica M-P and includes a stainless steel build, shoots RAW image files (but not JPEGs). You can only adjust focus manually, using the rangefinder system. Expect to find it in very select stores beginning next month.

Photos by Edgar Alvarez.

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Source: Leica

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15
Sep
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Canon’s bringing back the square selfie cam with PowerShot N2


Early last year, a Canon rep pulled out a point-and-shoot with a very peculiar design. Instead of the rectangular form factor we’d grown used to, this camera was square. The PowerShot N was designed to be held any which way, making it a good fit for both righties and lefties, but without any pronounced grip, it didn’t feel quite as natural to hold. We were a bit relieved, then, when Canon debuted the N100 with a more familiar look and feel, but at Photokina, the company’s returning to the original shape and size with the PowerShot N2. The N2 replaces the original N — the N100 will remain on the market — bringing a slew of new features for social sharers and video bloggers alike.

There’s a new 16.1-megapixel sensor, a faster DIGIC 6 processor, a 28-224mm f/3.0-5.9 8x optical zoom lens (with improved IS) and a 461k-dot, 2.8-inch touchscreen that now flips 180 degrees for self-portraits (and videos). You still get WiFi (after all, this camera’s all about creating sharable content), but the N2 now includes NFC, making it easier to get up and running with a new device. The camera can capture 1080/30p video and thanks to a few added touchscreen controls, you can tweak exposure compensation, turn on the flash and adjust the smoothness of your skin (to decrease sharpness with certain facial features), all from the selfie mode. Canon’s expecting to ship the PowerShot N2 to customers this December; the camera is priced at $300.

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15
Sep
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The 7D Mark II is Canon’s best DSLR without a full-frame sensor


The wait is over. Canon’s long-anticipated EOS 7D Mark II is here, shipping in November for $1,799, without a lens. With a price tag that high, you’d think it’d be safe to assume that the company’s consumer flagship sports a full-frame sensor. It does not. It does, however, represent an enormous step up from the original model — the Mark II includes just about every feature a pro photographer (and video shooter) could hope for, excluding a 35mm sensor, of course, and integrated WiFi. Instead, there’s a 20.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, which, despite a similar spec, is an improvement over what you’ll get with the 70D. You can also take advantage of a new 51,200 top ISO and a 10 fps continuous shooting mode (at full resolution, of course), powered by the dual DIGIC 6 processors.

You can capture up to 4 frames per second in silent mode, which, although not completely silent, is certainly the best option for shooting performances and other events where a clanging shutter wouldn’t be appropriate. The 7D Mark II now includes 65 autofocus points, compared to just 19 on the original model. There’s a dedicated AF lever for jumping between modes, and when you’re shooting video, Canon reps liken the focusing performance to what you’d experience with a camcorder. You can also adjust the speed at which the camera will focus and track subjects while you’re capturing video, with five levels to choose from. You can capture MP4 or MOV clips at up to 1080/60p to a CF or SD card, or output uncompressed footage (with audio) through the HDMI port. Speaking of ports, there are plenty to choose from, including USB 3.0, a mic input and headphone output, a PC socket for strobes and a wired remote connector.

The camera has a magnesium alloy construction, so even though you’ll want to avoid it, the body should survive a tumble or two (though there may be a different outcome for the lens). The new 7D is even four times more dust and weather resistant than the original model — reps say you shouldn’t have any problem shooting in moderate rain, assuming you’re using a weather-resistant L lens. There’s a new, slightly higher capacity battery on board (the LP-E6N), though the camera will work with older packs too. You will need to buy a new BG-E16 grip, however. Finally, the shutter, previously rated for 150,000 shots, can now handle more than 200,000 without repair. The 7D Mark II is expected in stores this November for $1,799 body only, or $2,149 when bundled with an 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens.

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