Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Camera’

30
Aug
image-228787.jpg

So what is it like to drive with Nissan’s Smart rearview mirror?


Despite all the changes going on in automobiles lately, one thing that’s remained pretty consistent in every car I’ve driven has been the rearview mirror. We can check that one off now though, now that I’ve taken a test drive in a Nissan Rogue equipped with the new Smart rearview mirror. Due to roll out on the company’s cars in North America next year, it’s a simple augmentation that combines a traditional mirror with a video screen. Flipping the dimmer switch usually meant for night driving drops you into video camera mode, with a feed streamed directly from a 1.3MP camera mounted in the trunk that drops out the usual blockages from the car’s interior for a clear view of what’s behind you. Back up cameras are already common — and highly necessary if you have my (lack of) parallel parking skills — but is it time to change out something that’s worked pretty well for the last century or so?

Based on my experience the answer is yes. Of course, I wasn’t driving a race car like the Zeod RC which doesn’t have a normal window for the driver to see behind in, but a common situation like transporting people or cargo can interfere with a normal mirror easily. According to Nissan’s Steven Diehlman, the normal FOV of a rearview mirror is about 17 degrees, while its camera not only frees the view of the normal C-pillar obstructions, but also expands that to cover 48 degrees. The difference was immediately apparent just backing out of my driveway — instead of having to turn my head to fill in the gaps between the mirrors, I could just see a fair amount of the street without shifting my viewpoint (there’s still a normal backup camera in place that feeds the display in the console, complete with the Around View birds-eye vision).

It does take some getting used to though — since the camera is right at the back of the car, everything is suddenly close up instead of 5-6~ feet in the distance. When you’re stopped in traffic it means suddenly getting very familiar with the car behind you, and depending on the height and zoom (which are adjustable) you might be able to see all of it in the 4:1 aspect ratio mirror.

Still, it easily became a part of the drive and not a distraction, and since switching back and forth between operation as a regular mirror is so easy, it could let others drive without even worrying about it (the focusing delay seen in the clip is from my camera, not the mirror). In Japan, the add-on costs around $600, but we don’t have a US price yet. Rolled into the price of a new car, it seems like a worthy feature, although I’m not sure if it would change my preference of which car to buy just to get it.

Filed under:

Comments

.CPlase_panel display:none;

28
Aug
image-226798.jpg

Olympus’ newest mirrorless camera is built for selfies


Olympus PEN E-PL7

Even Olympus can’t resist the allure of selfies, it seems. The company has just unveiled the PEN E-PL7, a retro-tinged mirrorless camera whose centerpiece is a 3-inch flip-out LCD that makes those trendy self-portraits a little easier. When you swing out the display, it kicks into a “Selfie Mode” which lets you tap the screen to capture a slightly time-delayed (and hopefully, better-prepared) shot. There’s a selfie interval option to snap successive photos in different poses, and powered zoom lenses will automatically kick into a wide-angle view to make sure your pretty face is in the frame.

It’s not just about stroking your ego. The E-PL7 still has a 16-megapixel sensor like the E-PL6, but it carries both the E-M10′s three-axis image stabilization and a fast 81-point autofocusing system that can shoot a moving subject at up to 3.5 frames per second (8FPS in regular bursts). And you’ll be glad to hear that WiFi has finally reached the mid-tier PEN line — you can both share pics through your phone or control the camera from a short distance away.

If you’re tempted, the E-PL7 won’t cost too much when it ships in late September. Spending $600 will get you the body alone, and $700 bundles a 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 standard zoom lens. The accessories don’t arrive until October, although there are two that will be worth waiting for if you’re going diving: a $700 underwater shell will keep your camera safe, while a matching $500 flash will illuminate darker waters.

Filed under:

Comments

Source: Olympus

.CPlase_panel display:none;

28
Aug
image-226572.jpg

Pentax’s latest DSLR has glowing LEDs to tell you what mode it’s in


If you’re intimidated by most DSLRs with all their knobs and buttons, you might want to take a look at Ricoh Imaging’s Pentax K-S1, a new mid-range camera that’s just one of many shooters the company’s releasing this year. It packs in plenty of performance — a 20-megapixel sensor and sky-high sensitivity of ISO 51200 — along with an interface that’s more reminiscent of a smartphone than a camera. According to Ricoh, the K-S1 “eliminates many of the complexities of a DSLR” with a friendlier “flat field” user interface that should be easy to navigate due to the luminous 3-inch 921,000-dot LCD, back-lit selection dial and four-way navigation. There are also various built-in LEDs that light up when certain features are in use. For example, the mode dial will glow green when it’s toggled to take still shots and it’ll glow red if it’s in video mode, as you can see in the video after the break.

If you’ve got Face Detection turned on, the number of lit-up LEDs on the grip gives a quick visual cue as to how many faces it’s detected and you could also use the grip LEDs as a countdown timer.

Aside from the simpler interface, the KS-1 also boasts a variety of features that would be of interest to camera enthusiasts: in-body shake reduction, an AA filter simulator, a 100-percent field of view glass pentaprism viewfinder and 5.4 frames per second shooting with a shutter speed of 1/6000. Optionally, the KS-1 also supports Pentax’s FLUcard, which lets you tack on extras like Wi-Fi transfer, wireless live and the ability to use your camera remotely with your smartphone, tablet or computer.

To make it even more obvious that the KS-1 is meant as a “fun” mid-range camera, it’ll come in a whole host of different colors. The standards are black, blue and white, but you can also choose one from either the Fabric Collection or the Night Sky Collection — the former calls on its fashion inspiration with cotton beige, tweed gray, linen brown and denim blue, while the latter flaunts hues such as Sunset Orange, Dusk Gold, Moon Silver, Midnight Black and Dawn Purple.

If all of that sounds intriguing to you, the KS-1 along with a 18-55mm kit lens will retail for $799.95, while the body-only version is just a touch cheaper at $749.95. Both will be available in September.

Filed under:

Comments

Source: Pentax K-S1, Ricoh

.CPlase_panel display:none;

26
Aug
image-224429.jpg

Casio’s new action cam detaches from its own touchscreen viewfinder


If you haven’t quite got on the action cam bandwagon, or you’re looking for a viewfinder bigger than a postage stamp, perhaps Casio’s EXILIM “freestyle” camera will do the job. Coming in orange, camo green and white options, it’s made of two different parts — the lens and a separate screen that can be used both attached and detached. In a sign of the times, there’s also a foldable docking option that makes it ideal for selfies. If you fold the lens back onto the display, then you have something closer to a typical camera — albeit one with a tiny screen. The camera will, naturally, arrive with a plethora of straps, clips and tripod accessories to ensure it attaches to everything adventurous in your life and both parts are water- and dustproof (IPX6).

The camera itself has an f2.8 lens and contrast-based auto-focus, with intelligent and multifocus modes which should help ensure it captures what you want it to. The Exilim EX-FR10 will snap photos at 14-megapixels and video at 1080p resolution, and Casio says the battery should last around 75 minutes for continuous movie recording. If you’re mostly shooting stills, then expect it to last much much longer – once detached, the two-inch LCD touchscreen controller will extend the camera’s view up to 5 meters. It will degrade after that, but Casio tells us that you’ll still be able to capture with the shutter button up to 10 meters away. Both devices can be charged through the micro-USB port, while storage is microSD card-based — like most action cams.

Once you’ve captured your adventures /water-fights, the images and video can be delivered through the aforementioned USB connection, as well as Bluetooth and WiFi. We got to play with one, and the device has a nice rough finish that ensured that it was easy to grip — you can also tell by the styling and color choices that it’s cut from the same cloth as Casio’s G-Shock. The hinge is also hardy — it maintains the angle you set it at when you bend it into place. The biggest concern here (despite the presence of waterproof smartphones), is the price: in Japan it’s set to land at 50,000 yen. It might well look hardier and cooler than a GoPro, and once you factor in a wireless viewer for the Hero3+, the price is close, but you’re going to have to pay a little more for Casio’s action cam — it translates to roughly $480.

Filed under: ,

Comments

.CPlase_panel display:none;

23
Aug
image-220731.jpg

Leica’s latest rangefinder camera is both speedier and stealthier


Leica M-P

Digital rangefinder cameras may look like retro fashion items, but they’re genuinely handy for pros — they’re good for moments when you need quality without carrying a big, conspicuous DSLR. To that end, Leica has just launched the M-P, a new addition to the M series that’s more about serious work than style. You’re still getting a 24-megapixel full-frame sensor in a relatively small body, but the buffer memory has doubled to a hefty 2GB; the camera should almost always keep up with your rapid-fire photography. There’s also a new selection lever that shows you framing for common focal lengths in the viewfinder, and an anti-reflective coating on the scratch-resistant sapphire LCD will help you review your snaps in bright sunlight.

The M-P may also be notable for what’s not there — Leica’s signature red dot branding. Much like the film-based MP from 2003, the M-P goes logo-free to avoid drawing attention and spoiling the moment. It won’t be the talk of the town as a result, but you also won’t disrupt a “natural” street scene. Just be ready to pay a premium for Leica’s faster, subtler shooter. You can pre-order the M-P today, but it will cost you a whopping $7,950 — around $1,000 more than the regular M’s current asking price, let alone full-size DSLRs like the Nikon D4S.

Filed under:

Comments

Via: DPReview

Source: Leica (1), (2)

.CPlase_panel display:none;

20
Aug
image-217413.jpg

Selfie cameras that look like perfume bottles are going to be a thing


It’s no secret that girls in China are obsessed with taking selfies, but there’s also a local trend of slapping a Chanel perfume bottle case onto their phones. No, we don’t understand, either. Nevertheless, Sony is seizing this opportunity by releasing a new Cyber-shot camera that not only looks like a perfume bottle, but its big lens — encased in a clear brick with a gold accent — can also be flipped around to suit your needs. While it seems that Sony’s seeded this bizarre device to several Chinese female influencers and models, they’re remaining tight-lipped about the specs, but all will be revealed in China on August 22nd.

Filed under: ,

Comments

Via: G 4 Games

Source: Sony, Digi-wo (Sina Weibo)

.CPlase_panel display:none;

19
Aug
image-216178.jpg

The 2015 Corvette has a video recording of everything the valet did in your car


The human body undergoes some weird physical changes when it hands the keys to a shiny new car to someone else; the pulse quickens, the throat dries out and the palms get unnaturally clammy. If that shiny new car happens to be a Corvette, though, the human body may be able to worry a little less – Chevy kitted the 2015 model out with a Valet Mode to help you lock down your ride when you’re not the one driving it. Once you key in your code and fire up Valet Mode (introduced in 2014), the system springs into action: the glovebox and the storage bin in the center console automatically lock themselves and the infotainment system gets disabled completely. There’s something new this year though: using the Performance Data Recorder tech, a built-in camera films where the car goes (complete with vehicle data like speed and engine RPM) while a microphone records what’s going on inside the cabin. Sure, using the feature may speak to an intense distrust of your fellow man (if you’ve seen Ferris Bueller’s Day Off), but really now — what have those randoms done to earn your trust in the first place?

Filed under:

Comments

Source: Chevrolet

.CPlase_panel display:none;

18
Aug
image-215733.jpg

Sony Alpha 5100 is the smallest APS-C camera with a built-in flash


If you’ve been holding out on purchasing an Alpha 6000 because you don’t need an electronic viewfinder, Sony’s got a mirrorless camera just for you. Internally, the Alpha 5100, which replaces the NEX-5T, is nearly identical to its pricier counterpart, with a 24.3-megapixel sensor and a BIONZ X processor. You also get a 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 power-zoom lens, bundled with the camera for $700 ($550 for the body only), and the same hybrid focusing system, letting you acquire a subject in as little as 0.07 seconds. It excludes an EVF, but the A5100 does have a 921k-dot display (with touch functionality this time) that flips forward 180 degrees for self-portraits. There’s also built-in WiFi, XAVC S video capture and a top sensitivity of ISO 25,600. It ships next month in black and white.

Filed under: Cameras, Sony

Comments

.CPlase_panel display:none;

11
Aug
image-214951.jpg

Microsoft teases new camera-focused Windows Phones on September 4th


Microsoft's

You won’t have to wait long if you’re hoping for a new round of Windows Phones with powerful cameras. Microsoft has just sent out a save-the-date notice that asks the media if it’s ready for “more face time” at a Berlin event on September 4th, just ahead of the IFA technology show. There’s a Lumia 1020-style camera module not-so-subtly woven into the text, too. While there are no dead giveaways in the teaser, it’s not hard to figure out the references. Our hunch is that “face time” is an allusion to “Superman” (aka the Lumia 730), the selfie-oriented Windows Phone that leaked just a few days ago. The module is slightly more cryptic, but it might be hinting at the aluminum-clad, 13-megapixel “Tesla” (Lumia 830) that reportedly surfaced last month. We’re headed to IFA, so you should expect to hear much, much more about any new Lumias within a few weeks.

Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile, Microsoft, Nokia

Comments

.CPlase_panel display:none;

11
Aug
image-214950.jpg

Lomography gives its DIY 35mm camera a flash upgrade


Last summer, Lomography debuted its offering that allows photogs to build their own 35mm SLR. Now, the retro-minded snapshooting outfit is lending the Konstruktor more film-shooting skills with flash kits. Thanks to a $20 accessory package, the latest version of the DIY camera can be paired with a Lomography flash should the need arise — if you’ve already splurged for proper lighting add-on. Those who’ve yet to take the leap can nab a bundle that includes the disassembled Konstruktor F, requisite accessory kit and a choice of flash for $103-$111 (depending on said selection). Not only can you put together the camera you’ll use for to capture that next road trip, but you can ensure those images will be well lit, too.

Filed under: Cameras

Comments

Source: Lomography

.CPlase_panel display:none;

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 200 other followers

%d bloggers like this: