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Posts tagged ‘Android’

1
Oct

The Pure Watch Face app gives you exactly what it’s moniker implies: A simple watch face ['Watch' This App]



If you’re someone who is currently looking for a plain smartwatch face, then it could just be time to take a look at the Pure Watch Face app. It provides you with a watch face that can be either analogue or digital, but only displays the time and date, and only comes in a grey color… Read more »

The post The Pure Watch Face app gives you exactly what it’s moniker implies: A simple watch face ['Watch' This App] appeared first on SmarterWatching.


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The post The Pure Watch Face app gives you exactly what it’s moniker implies: A simple watch face ['Watch' This App] appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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1
Oct
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Google Play Store now shows in-app purchase prices and developers address


play store in app purchases developers address

Recently there’s been quite a stir going on regarding Google’s new requirement for developers to provide an address for any paid apps to be displayed on the app page in the Play Store. Now it seems app pages have been updated to display the developer’s address, along with a price range for in-app purchases.

The issue with displaying developer’s addresses isn’t big until you get to the developers that are just a single person working out of their home. While you’ve always had access to these addresses in Google Wallet after purchasing said app, it was not out in the open for the whole world to see. So now, John Smith who created a new paid game in the Play Store has to provide his home address for it to be displayed on his app’s page.

However, the range of in-app purchase prices is a nice touch. Now you can be ready for whatever temptation may arise after downloading that free game, but with in-app purchases costing $15. No more excuses.

What do you think about the address debacle? And are you glad you can now see in-app purchases?

via Android Police


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The post Google Play Store now shows in-app purchase prices and developers address appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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1
Oct
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Microsoft’s Sway lets you share ideas on the web without any design skills


Microsoft Office Sway

Sharing ideas on the web is tricky. You probably want something more persuasive than a social network update, but it’s usually overkill to design a whole web page just to get your point across. Microsoft may have reached a happy balance between the two with Sway, a new part of the Office portfolio that lets you publish content in a slick, web-native format without knowing a thing about code or design. All you do is write and pull in content, whether it comes from your device or internet sources like Facebook, OneDrive and YouTube; Sway automatically organizes it all into polished web layouts that adapt to any screen size. You can switch layouts to fine-tune your work and update projects over time. Think of this as a Medium-like authoring tool that handles much more than just articles — it’s possible to publish daily photo diaries, non-linear presentations and other pieces that would typically require a dedicated web editor or a specialized app.

Sway is launching as an invitation-only preview on the web, but Microsoft tells us that it’s going to both expand the audience and the functionality very quickly. You should expect new features every couple of weeks, with feedback playing a big role in determining what comes next. The company plans to release an iOS app soon (Windows Phone and Android are coming as well), and you’ll eventually have the option to post interactive charts and other Office 365 content. This won’t necessarily replace an elaborate PowerPoint slide deck, but it could be good enough to get your classmates or coworkers to consider proposals that they’d otherwise dismiss out of hand.

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Source: Sway, Office Blogs

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1
Oct
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MSN’s simpler, mobile-savvy homepage is rolling out to everyone


MSN circa 2014

Well, that was quick — after just a few weeks in preview mode, the revamped MSN homepage is rolling out to everyone. You should see Microsoft’s simple, desktop-like web portal in your browser sometime within the next three days. If you’re using Windows devices, you’ll also see updated Bing and MSN apps that draw on the site’s many services; the Food & Drink app will keep track of your recipes, for instance. Windows Phone users get a few perks on their lock screens in the process. The Health and Fitness app will show pedometer stats if you’re using a Lumia 630, 635 or 1520, while Weather will show your local forecast. You’ll still have to wait for MSN apps on Android and iOS, but all the other pieces of Microsoft’s grand vision are otherwise in place.

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Source: Official Microsoft Blog

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30
Sep
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Rejoice! TiVo comes to Android


TiVo Logo

TiVo announced today that they are releasing an Android app with streaming video playback.  This has been a longtime coming to Android users.  The new TiVo app brings a huge amount of functionality to your Android device.  For starters, you can start watching a program at home, then continue to watch on your mobile device when you get to another location.  Like a late night infomercial, that’s not all:  You can also stream programing from your mobile device to a big screen; pull up background information on your favorite shows; and, use your mobile device as a next-gen remote control.  The TiVo app should be available today in the Google Play store.

Source TiVo 

 


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The post Rejoice! TiVo comes to Android appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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30
Sep
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Moto Nexus 6 leaks with slew of details


Moto Nexus 6

A few days ago we reported about some details of the upcoming Motorola Nexus 6 from 9to5Google. This morning we reported on a leaked picture of the Nexus 6 next to a LG G3. Now, we have details confirming some of the specs we had before, while also learning some new ones from Android Police.

Android Police says they can confirm that the next device from Google will be a 5.9″ screen device called the Nexus 6. It will have a 3,200 mAh battery, with a QHD screen bringing a whopping 496 ppi, a 13 MP camera with OIS and the dual-flash ring that’s on the new Moto X, and a 2 MP camera on the front, as we reported before.

What’s new, however, is confirmation of a few things. It will indeed be a larger Moto X (2014) confirming the leaked photo from this morning. It will have an aluminum frame as well, and will have the new Moto X’s fast charging capabilities (15 minutes of charging gives 8 hours battery life). Also, it will have front facing stereo speakers. The version of Android will be 5.0 (if there was still any doubt), and it seems there will be some refreshed icons, along with a different messaging app icon (different from hangouts?), and new Wi-Fi, battery, and signal icons at the top that are now solid rather than with breaks.

They give this rumor a 9/10, which is solid for a rumor from Android Police. Along with these details, they can’t necessarily confirm the existence of another, smaller Nexus device.

What do you think? Sound like some great specs, or still too large to even consider?

via Android Police


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30
Sep
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Spotify goes live in Canada


Spotify streaming some proper Canadian music

Canadians: you no longer have to jump through hoops (or hope for an early invitation) to check out Spotify. The streaming music service has finally launched in Canada, complete with an extensive collection of domestically-made tunes. As elsewhere, you can play songs for free if you’re willing to put up with ads, and shelling out $10 CAD per month for Premium lets you stream without commercials. The service is definitely late to the party — it’s years behind Rdio, and even Google Play Music arrived a few months ago. Still, it’s hard to object to having one more way to listen to Grimes or Leonard Cohen.

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Source: Spotify

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30
Sep
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Rear of Motorola’s Nexus phone leaked


Moto Shamu Nexus 6 X

The internet is hungry for new information and leaked photos of Google’s upcoming Motorola-made Nexus smartphone. Because of this, it’s very likely that someone would have the unfortunate dishonesty to put up fake photos of said phone. Be that as it may, it’s not like we haven’t seen leaked photo’s of smartphones before, even Google’s. So, take this new information with every bit of grain of salt you have.

The photo you see above is allegedly a photo of the upcoming Nexus 6 or Nexus X from Google, which has been given the code name “Shamu”, next to a LG G3. The LG G3 is arguably a big phone as it is… So “Shamu” is quite large as discussed before.

What do you think of the size of this phone? Would you get it?

via Android Community


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The post Rear of Motorola’s Nexus phone leaked appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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30
Sep
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Hands-on with Nokia’s Here Maps for Android


Nokia HERE Maps for Android

When Microsoft finally completed its €3.79 billion acquisition of Nokia earlier this year, the company took control of its smartphone business but left behind a number of Nokia’s other powerful and profitable properties. One such property was the company’s mapping division, now called Here, which has become the defacto maps app for Windows Phone users the world over. Nokia tried to replicate the experience on iOS, but after poor reviews and the admission things “went horribly wrong,” the company pulled its iPhone app and went back to the drawing board. As for Android, it looked like Nokia would never deliver a real Google Maps alternative.

Luckily, that’s all about to change. Thanks to some marketing muscle from Korea, Nokia will soon give Samsung Galaxy smartphone owners advanced access to its maps app. While Nokia readies Here Maps for Samsung’s Galaxy Apps store, which is expected to drop in the coming weeks, the company gave us an early preview of its new app, and it’s good.

When you first launch the app, you will be asked to sign up or log in. It’s important that you do, because you need an account to download maps and save collections for later. For ease of use, Nokia lets you use Facebook to sign in, but if you don’t like the idea of sharing data with Zuckerberg and co., you can simply use Nokia’s own signup form.

Once you’ve cleared that hurdle, you’ll immediately notice how basic the app is — there are no bells and whistles here. That’s no bad thing, because the app loads instantly and transitions are very smooth. Just like Google Maps, Here supplies the default mapping data (labelled Maps) and turn-by-turn navigation (labelled Drive).

Getting Around

Selecting Drive will immediately ask you select your destination. You can either enter a location directly or pull up a list of journeys you’ve recently made. Once you’ve plugged in that in, Here Maps will list the duration of the journey, the total number of miles, the main routes it expects to take and will also, as long as you’re not using offline mode (more on this later), list any potential traffic delays you might encounter on your journey. There are options to include or exclude major roads, toll roads, ferries or tunnels if your mode of transport requires you to.

Nokia's HERE Maps for Android

In the wider settings, you can choose to enable a feature that will gauge your speed and warn you if you exceed a speed limit in a certain area. The app offers two sliders: one that lets you choose how fast you need to be going to trigger an alert in an area where the limit is under 50mph, and another for when you’re beetling down a major road (over 50mph). There’s the usual option to switch navigation voices, but unlike Waze, which offers guidance from none other than Terry Crews, you’re stuck with regular male and female voices in at least nine European languages (which I’d still consider a huge plus).

During my short test, Drive performed well. It delivered early navigation prompts, meaning you can familiarize yourself with your surroundings before you make the turn. Although I was navigating roads I’m already familiar with, the app appeared to list the most effective route (i.e. the one I would’ve always taken), but did provide alternatives just in case.

If you don’t have a car, Nokia also includes train travel and walking options. Once a destination is entered, the app will detect your current location and provide walking distances to your local station and a number of upcoming trains. Like when you’re driving, it’ll list the total journey and estimated arrival times, how many changes it expects you’ll make and also give you a detailed summary of the journey ahead of you.

Offline Maps

Nokia's HERE Maps app for Android

One of Nokia’s mapping strengths is its ability to offer offline data not just for specific countries, but entire continents. Google offers a way to make selected areas available offline, but even then you’re only getting a tiny fraction of what Nokia can offer. To enable offline mode, Nokia has included a small tickbox in the menu. As soon as you enable it, you can search for specific locations and enable turn-by-turn navigation, but you won’t benefit from traffic warnings or Nokia’s updated place listings. Be warned, though, if you want to use offline maps, you need to make sure you have a chunk of free space on your device. For reference, North American and European maps take up 6.8GB and 9GB, respectively, and there are no options to dial it down to capture smaller areas.

Offline maps are likely to be a huge help if you want to see the sights while you’re abroad but don’t want to waste money on roaming fees. Before you go, though, you can add the places you’d like to visit to a “Collection,” which you can then pull up when you arrive in a distant land. The point-of-interest database might not be as comprehensive as Google’s, but it’s certainly not lacking. Nokia also lets you share these locations with other people using its Glympse integration, letting others see where you’re visiting and possibly join you (if you’re online, that is).

The app provides a decent mix of features without becoming bloated or troublesome to use. If you’re looking for a legitimate alternative to Google Maps, Here Maps matches its rival in many aspects and betters it in others. The new iOS and Android apps will be available later this year, after Samsung has enjoyed its period of Android exclusivity.

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30
Sep
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TiVo’s Android app now supports streaming


It was nearly a year ago that TiVo brought streaming to its iOS apps, enabling you to watch recorded shows anywhere with a WiFi signal. Eleven months later, and the company has finally added the same functionality for TiVo’s Android app. The feature will work on most devices running Android 4.1 or above, but there are a few caveats, like the fact that it won’t work on devices with Intel’s mobile chips, and you’re still at the mercy of whatever copy protection restrictions is placed upon the shows. On the upside, the app will also access content from Hulu Plus, Netflix and Amazon Instant Video – the latter being another service that’s belatedly gotten around to adding Android support for its users.

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Source: TiVo Blog, Google Play

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